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35 Burst results for "Ninety Nine Percent"

How to Dream BIG

The Daily Boost

04:36 min | 6 d ago

How to Dream BIG

"So dreaming big I'm a big time. Dreamer I have a lot of friends who are big time dreamers. I'm realistic dreamer but I. Just believe that. If you shoot for the stars, you end up getting a lot right even if you don't get to the store you want to go to. You'RE GONNA get a lot more? If you shoot for the stars then if you don't then if you play small, you don't fly small. You're board place mall. You're born. Play big. Let me. Ask You a question. Do you still dream? About what you're going to be when you grow up. It's funny as I've gotten older I've never stopped that I never have. I get more excited, the older I get, and I find myself years ago when I was a younger guy when I was in my twenties and stuff I would. I would talk to people in their seventies and eighties, and they would say I still feel like I'm eighteen. And I never got it, but as I got older decade after decade after decade. I get it now. But one thing I've also noticed a lot of people don't have the dreams that they used to have. They're afraid to have them. They've forgotten how to dream. I still do that I still wonder what's GonNa be when Scott grows up and I'll let you figure it out, but I'm having a good time doing what I'm doing right now. Those visions. Those type officials keep hopping around in your head. Think about it for just a minute. Do they miss a reason? They're in there. As I've said many times before. If these ideas pop into your head, you got a couple of choices you can go. Do something about it sometimes scary. You cannot do something about it sometimes scary, or you can sit there on the fence getting spinners in your ass worrying about the whole time, drive yourself crazy for the next ten fifteen twenty thirty years. I highly suggest you don't do that. I want you to take those ideas on your head. Look at them and acknowledge him as a yeah. This is Kinda cool. So. They're popping around your head I. Want You to? Think about this. One is your big awesome motivating mission. What's your big awesome motivating i? Call Them Damn too big awesome motivating mission. I have goals like that as well. What's driving you? Where do you WanNa, go think about it inside and I will tell you this. In with ninety nine I really truly is ninety nine percent. I'll get people on the phone with coaching calls. I talked to people on the phone a lot all week long. I'm talking to people on the phone all over the world. And I will tell you. Uh Question. I'll say so. What's in your head? What's going on what really want to do? What are your dreams? Which your big awesome motivating mission and the global? No. I so I know you don't know, but if you did, what would it be? And then they go POW for the next ten minutes. They told me exactly what it is, and then if they forget it gone and I said, did you hear what you just said? Did you hear all that stuff? That just came out of your mouth. Yeah. We're there come from. the, smile on their face, peers I can hear it on the phone or seat on the call. So you have asked that question these visions in your hand. These things you want to do when you grow up what's driving you? What's at big awesome motivating mission? Mine is to do what I do. The Best I could possibly do knowing full well that if I do it really really well. Other people get all excited they Scott I wanNA I. Want what you've got going on there I won't come. Hang on to you a little bit. I wouldn't suggest it because I move fast is going to be unpredictable. I can be a radic. Sometimes I like to sleep in late on Saturday stuff like that. You probably wouldn't like all that stuff, but. What drives you Bam. What Dreams Excite you? Give you a feeling a happiness. I know that Scott. I can't do it I have this idea. Somebody really excites me I. Just be so happy doing that, but I can't do it. Why not? Why not because it scares me? Bam sure it does anything bigger than you. You never done before. It's going to scare you. What excites you though? Scares excites at the same time. Have you ever noticed how close to feelings are. Somebody screaming Oh my God. They're screaming. Let me say here. I come to see the day. Underdog is here. You go there, and you find out somebody's laughing hysterically himself. I thought you were dying. Laughing Fund Yukos cracking up. He cracks me up when he says that stuff. What's cares what excites you? It's kind of the same in that. Oh my God think about that for a second. Get excited your goal and yet it feels like you're fearful Bam. What makes you smile? When you think about doing it. It's that simple. Makes, you smile, you say. If I could get myself to Bam. I know it's in their. My question is. Do you have the nerve to? Admit, what's in there? Take a few minutes and figure out which Bam is and stand up. Take a SIP repeat Yvonne going to get what you want. Because I'M GONNA. Come over to your house and Meka. That's the case. Okay, I am.

Scott BAM Yvonne
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

08:32 min | Last week

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday June, twenty, four, th twenty twenty, and this is your host Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella. Cara Santa Maria Addy Jada Villa Hey. Guys and Evan Bernstein good evening, folks. How is everyone doing? Well Steve Good question. Yeah I've realized now that I really know how well I'm doing. I'm trying to figure out like. What twenty twenty like I don't know. Should I talked to you about how? I'm feeling today or ninety eight point six? Yeah, Vega question. It is a big question because it's. Everything is so weird. You know it is yeah, it's not natural. For data, let's go over. The covert numbers is so here's the. Interesting thing because if you look at the curve for the world, we're still on the upswing. This this pandemic is is accelerating still. Yep, we haven't even crested the first wave. You know if you're looking at new daily cases worldwide that slope is still increasingly going up if Daily new cases, the greatest single number of new cases on June, nineteenth, one, hundred, eighty, two, thousand, one, hundred and eighty two cases June nineteenth. So you know that we have to keep that in mind. I think if you're on a part of the world that's past the crest of the wave. It feels like it's over, but it really isn't and the United. States is a microcosm of that right because the wave is going through the United States and the the. The northeast were four of the five of us live were passed the peak and we're on the downslope, but other than the northeast rest of the country and most states are still increasing. There's still pre crest. You know of that I believe we have like a weird thing where we were extended in California now it's like getting worse again like we thought we were on the other side of it, but then when we opened of course well, that's the other thing. Nope the opening, so it's kind of a by humped wave because we did manage to flatten up, and now it's turning, but we didn't really turn it down, but it did start in those in some states it was flat, and then they opened up cautiously, and that's good, and then some states opened up not so cautiously, and they're surging. They are spending Arizona is the worst right now, but Farda Florida. Yes, or then a bunch of other states are really spiking. You know so. We're not out of the woods yet. You know he's this again. This is the the the. This is the home stretch, but this is that part of the marathon where like you really gotta dig down and keep going? And that's challenging because. Everyone wants to be outside. We all WanNa be at the beach. We all want to be at parties and social gatherings. It's a normal time of year otherwise to do those sorts of things. But. We still have to be cautious and take all the precautions necessary so total cases worldwide nine point, five million total deaths, four, hundred and eighty, three thousand are approaching half a million in the US for a Ching one hundred twenty thousand deaths. That's what are the projection Steve? So it's really hard. Yes, we're. We're at at least one hundred nineteen thousand. They're saying in the US alone two point three million cases. This is almost certainly an underestimate underestimate. The states that are that are spiking the most South Carolina Florida, Texas Oklahoma and Idaho. Rope I've read. One model, one analysis that says that this I wave is probably gonNA, and with about two hundred thousand. That's about where we're going to land and then second waves. Anyone's guess right? It depends on what happened at that point, but given that we're at one hundred nineteen now and most states are still on the increase that seems like a reasonable estimate. But then you the farther out you go. Obviously, the more variables there are so becomes harder to predict and like there's still the big unknown of. When a vaccine is going to become available here, conflicting things so I think the experts are just making their best gas based upon where we are right now, but nobody could really say for sure, but that could be a game changer will see. This is getting a lot of variables there and don't forget. Some people estimate that or estimate that our numbers now one hundred nineteen thousand could be off by thirty fifty percent could be low by thirty. Really did yeah the. Be. Fifty one specific thing I wrote my my science based medicine blog this morning on this mess event held in Phoenix Mega Church. Because heard about this. Yeah, I was actually interviewed for inside edition which they would last night and I wrote about it today as well, and they're holding a trump rally. They're actually they did yesterday, right? But the the the owners of the Church said. We're good. We're okay because we've installed this special air ventilation air filtration system that will remove ninety nine percent ninety nine point nine percent of the covert virus within ten minutes. So everyone is saw every leasing. Why don't we have? Every plane if that works, yeah, the church is a massive complex, but it has a main auditorium that can hold several thousand people at one time, so it's it's bad. 'cause like this big kind of some somewhat circular auditorium. So you know I wrote an article basically breaking down why that claim that is total nonsense the idea that if you have an effective air filtration system. That you can mask either in side so a couple. Quick points hit. The highlights the idea that it removes ninety nine point nine percent of the virus that. Isolation is plausible because filters can do that, the question is how much time would it take to do that now? They said ten minutes, but that's based upon study of a small closed, sealed off room,

United States Steve Good Twenty Twenty Cara Santa Maria Addy Steven Novella Evan Bernstein Church Bob Novella California Arizona Wanna Farda Florida Phoenix Mega Church South Carolina Idaho Oklahoma Texas Florida
Pandemic projections suggest requiring masks could save 33,000 lives in U.S.

The Lead with Jake Tapper

02:10 min | Last week

Pandemic projections suggest requiring masks could save 33,000 lives in U.S.

"There's a new projection from IHS. Emmy University of Washington which does a lot of the projections. They say that if people wear masks. Ninety five percent of the public, then thirty thousand lives in the United States could be saved just by October first. Does that suggest to you that every governor where there are? Outbreaks should be mandating masks in public. I do now that we have this guidance about how effective moss can be in the right conditions I think we need to be much clearer and telling people exactly what they need to do to protect themselves and their communities and this projection. Jake comes off the back of another projection. The estimate that seventy to ninety nine percent of Americans who died from covid nineteen that the Dow's were unethical. Unethical an unnecessary and could have been prevented if America had acted more aggressively early on and follow the steps of countries such as Germany and Singapore, so we missed the boat already. We've been late to the game. We have been getting poor communications Americans, and misguiding them I think now's the time to step that up and try to mitigate tens of thousands of Americans dying from covid nineteen. Only a little time but I want you to take a look at this video of a city councilman in Scottsdale Arizona Against Masks take a listen. I can't. I can't play. Obviously an incredibly insensitive reference to the death of George, Floyd, what we've also seen a judge in taxes assaulted after he issued a face covering order. What's your reaction? This is so such an awful exploitative co-opting of the icon brief statement, which is literally black Americans fighting for their right to live and not be killed by racist, and just speaks to what we've been talking about for the past few minutes that wearing a moth is a simple public health intervention. It protects other people. It need not be a political

Covid America IHS Emmy University Of Washington United States Arizona Jake Germany Singapore George Floyd
Delivering Biologics Orally

The Bio Report

05:12 min | Last week

Delivering Biologics Orally

"Thanks for joining us. Daniel, thank you so much for inviting them. At least to be here, we're going to talk about Ronnie. Therapeutics effort to develop biologics orally the potential for this technology and the technology underlying this. What's the range therapeutics were talking about? How big a market opportunity are we talking about? That is a great first question to start with so. The the range of biologics there is no constraint on rich biologic. We can deliver for instance we can deliver peptides, insulin, or bt, age, human growth, hormone, or or Therapeutic antibodies like humira percent. Dick's in others. And other Larger molecules that are like factor aid. For instance for there is no constrained on kind of one accuser. We can deliver so therefore. The market that we address is merely. In? Hundred fifty billion dollars overall march that we we can. you know and can get a small piece of that. That great outcome. What's the case for doing this? What problems would be addressed and what benefits would there be? So you know when I started looking at this problem of the. Daily injections and Found that the people have tried turning. Insulin into oral formats or Even inhaled. Insulin end there. Other drugs people have tried. D- owning them in rural in fact over the last fifty years. There have been more than one hundred attempts main Trying to convert a few of these peptides into oil, and the vast majority of those efforts failed on the handful that have had some success in Rene. Say some success what I mean is. bio, absorption, or bioavailability, as it's called or amount of drug that is absorbed is Less than one percent so. compared to Subcu- injection. You're you're throwing a ninety nine percent of the drug. Because the enzymes in the gastric gi track really digestion breakdown in so the the chemistry approaches approaches that are employed cannot protect the drug long enough and well enough do get better than one percent absorption. have. There been other challenges to doing this. You know the the the significant amount of effort that has gone has gone into this chemistry based approaches Tried to block the enzymes with the enzyme blockers and. IMFORMATION enhancers that essentially the new the mucosal lining so. that. those those. Attempts have worked in very small biologic molecules to my knowledge. No one has tried delivering therapeutic antibodies with this approach and right after that will work well. Ronnie has taken. A mind-bending approach to the problem it's it's really fascinating to me as an approach to to problem solving it in the TAC. You've taken in developing the Ronnie Pill. What is the Ronnie Pill? Could. Let me start with the premise that. Led to this the asked a very simple question I. Ask. Why can't we have a pill? That goes into the intestine. and delivers a pain-free injection. and that was a that was the question I started with. And that question it has taken several years to answer that question. And we have. Great data so the a premise was. Created capsule. That is a like a tiny robot. Very low cost. And arrived the stomach acid. Goes into the casten and then. Transformed seven when injection delivers an injection in intestinal war. And The intentional water doesn't have the sharp pain receptors that we have in our skin, so the injection is pain pre.

Ronnie Pill Daniel Humira BT Dick Subcu
Supreme Court rules Trump administration improperly ended program for "Dreamers"

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

04:52 min | Last week

Supreme Court rules Trump administration improperly ended program for "Dreamers"

"That's the sound of people celebrating in front of the Supreme Court last Thursday after the supreme. Court ruled that the trump administration had acted unlawfully when it tried to rescind DACA, the deferred action for childhood arrivals program designed to protect people known as dreamers. From a moral standpoint, this is a tremendously gratifying decision. Dreamers about the most sympathetic people you could imagine, and the fact that the trump administration sought their deportation was again from a moral standpoint horrendous. That, said the supreme. Court's decision was itself surprising on the law. The decision was written by chief. Justice John Roberts who is ordinarily a staunch conservative. And as the fact that it was a five to four decision shows, there were grounds that a conservative justice like Roberts could have used. Had He wanted to decide that? What Barack Obama put in place namely the DACA program Donald Trump could remove indeed. Roberts typically has a rather expensive conception of executive power, and although we can know with one hundred percents certainty I would say ninety nine percent probability that several years ago Roberts was one of the justices who voted to strike down an Obama program that was similar to Dhaka aimed at parents. So what was going on here? Why did chief justice? John Roberts choose to leave his conservative. And join the Liberals to keep Daca in place. Sometimes when Roberts issues, apparently liberal decision, it's clear that what he's doing is trying to preserve the appearance of legitimacy of the Supreme Court. Voiding scenario where the public would think of the justices as basically partisan. Roberts understands that the public knows that the Supreme Court justices have different ideologies. What he doesn't want is for the public to think that the justices vote based on the party of the person who appointed that. That may explain Roberts's vote not to entirely strike down obamacare. The affordable care act some years ago. In the case. However Roberts's motivation seems to have been somewhat different. What seems to be motivating, Roberts is a kind of disrespect for the Donald Trump administration's unwillingness to cross. It's t's dots is and follow the rule of law when it comes to issuing important governmental decisions. We saw this a year ago when Roberts also provided the decisive fifth vote to reverse the trump administration's plan to put a citizenship question on the twenty twenty census. Census in that case, as in the DACA case Roberts relied on a law called the administrative precede. ACT, which is the law that gives a federal courts, the authority to oversee and review decisions of administrative bodies in order to determine whether they complied with the procedures that the law demands in particular. The Administrative Procedure Act requires that the government give clear honest and. Justify and reasons for why it's doing what it's doing. And both the census case and the DACA case. Roberts ruled that the government had failed to provide those justifications in essence. Roberts was saying taking the action in question was within the General Authority of the executive branch, but the executive branch didn't do a good enough job of explaining why it did what it did. This kind of judicial supervision of governmental action is crucial to preserving the rule of law, and it's pretty clear that John Roberts no longer trusts the trump administration to do that to be sure at the beginning of the trump administration roberts was willing to give trump the benefit of the doubt. He after all wrote the opinion in the trump against Hawaii case, the one involving the Muslim travel ban in which he upheld the presence authority to issue the version of the travel ban that was in play the time. What seems to have happened subsequently is that has Roberts has gotten a closer and closer look at trump's disrespect for the courts and his disrespect for the rule of law. He's decided to take on the role of defending judiciary defending the rule of law, and if making trump comply. And it may not be a relevant. That Roberts, also had to spend a good chunk of his January sitting in the Senate, listening to the impeachment managers condemnation of Donald, trump, precisely for his disrespect for the rule of law, so if you're wondering whether John Roberts has suddenly become a liberal. Take it from me. He has not I expect more conservative decisions from him possibly even this week or next but John. Roberts has taken up the responsibility of the judiciary to keep an eye on this president. And for that I think everybody liberal or Conservative should be profoundly grateful.

John Roberts Donald Trump Daca Supreme Court Barack Obama Executive Senate Dhaka General Authority President Trump Hawaii
Greece sees 99% drop in travel revenue during April lockdown

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:06 sec | Last week

Greece sees 99% drop in travel revenue during April lockdown

"And the a travel industry worldwide it being impacted by all this another bulletin says grace has seen its travel revenue plummet by ninety nine percent during the April economic

Grace
From The City To The Megalopolis

Travel with Rick Steves

05:48 min | 2 weeks ago

From The City To The Megalopolis

"It's amazing to think that. In the nineteenth century about three percent of humanity lived in cities and today. That number is fifty percent, and it's growing rapidly. We live in the age of the Megalopolis. We're going to talk about that now with Dr, Salvatori satis Dr set. This is an emeritus professor of the history of classical art and archaeology at the school normality superiore in Pisa in Italy. He's an archaeologist and art historian. He's the chairman of the Louvre Museum. Scientific Council his the author of several books on art. Art History and he's known as the conscience of Italy for his role in spot, leading the neglect of it all national cultural heritage. His book is if Venice dies, and it's a look, not only at in the struggles, Venison the twenty first century, but at the increasing urbanisation of civilization general doctor says thanks for joining us. Thank you for inviting me. Can you talk about if finished is? How much of it is about Venice? And how much of it is it about the changing urban landscape across the planet? Well my intention in writing. This book was to focus on Venice. In order to make people meditate about what's going on on on a global scale about what I would call the shape the form of the city Savannah's. Sample account that example, contrasting some of the most disturbing. Of Urbanization in our current world end, it is quite dramatic. What's going on in your book? You explain there are fifteen megalopolis. That have over twenty million people is the advent of these massive cities twenty million people cities people have to live somewhere is is that a good thing or a bad thing? Why does it concern you well? I'm concerned about the quality of life. Those people because although this organization may look something that happens naturally, it is also prompted by economic forces. It is a concentration of workforce. which is not necessarily living in good conditions in order to create profit for a very low number of people, so it's the usual formula ninety nine percent, the best one percent, the megalopolis is a consequence of a complication of the world, the general commodification of the world that includes to an increasing extent human beings. This is just a very efficient thing for the elites to have a concentration of workforce where people who will be able to work cheaper and produce more by being right there at the center of production. Is that what? What you're saying, produce more and also by more become consumers, because workers are simultaneously consumer, so there is a a bishop's or two, if you so wish seal between being workers and consumers and I, think that there are two your which are combined, and normally one is made. Opera is the big over-centralisation to the other one is the verticalisation of AF- architecture. May Boca Use a? It's an example Chung Ching in China which had the six hundred thousand people in the nineteen thirty s and now thirty four million people living in it. I talked to contrast this with a different. Format Orbis or shape of the city. A form of the city in which that is some sort of harmony of balance between the body of the citizen and the body of the city where the citizen doesn't feel The one thing I'm saying is that it is good that we presser diversity in urban form and preserving diversity means among other things saving and saving the other historical see also because there is in even more. More disturbing feature of urban farming cities taking shape in in our time, and that is the fact that wide ancient cities. Historical CDs had a boundary around the city in the case of Venice Lagoon, case of other cities, the walls around the city now the boundaries around the boundaries of the city are being gradually substituted by boundaries within the city which has boundaries between the gentrified areas. For. The Hey and the have nots. You can see that in Paris very well. This can impact is. Also in Rome or in Milan dimension, Italian cities, the gated communities are increasingly frequent all around the world, but the gated communities are for those who are wealthy or relatively wealthy, while the other people are condemned to live in favelas. Zeal or in in be don't be like this aim French. I'm just thinking of Paris. I was just in Paris with a group. And I was explaining how they protect the center of Paris where everything is the months heart, scale you know six or eight story tall monster building, so you can see the domes, and you can see the spires, and you can see the Eiffel Tower and then right when you get to the periphery. Periphery this big boulevard that circles the city outside of that. It's just no-holds-barred, and it's like keeping the Cadillac Bay outside of that periphery. It's forced of skyscrapers within that you've got the elegance of the classic people friendly city that is in a sense, a gated community, because it's unaffordable for lot of people, and they end up outside a town in the rougher downtrodden neighborhoods. This is what's going on. Your description is absolutely perfect I think. But this involves a separation with inside, which is socially potentially very dangerous for the future. which is not precisely what I would call democracy.

Paris Venice Venice Lagoon Italy Louvre Museum Savannah Professor Scientific Council Eiffel Tower Chairman Pisa Cadillac Bay Venison Chung Ching China Milan Rome
Food Fight: Is it more ethical to eat meat if you kill the animal?

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Food Fight: Is it more ethical to eat meat if you kill the animal?

"Hunting may seem like an unexpected pastime for Iowa resident Rachel Vander F-. I did not grow up. Hunting I was not at all involved in hunting world. An environmental consultant. She was Vegan for a while because of animal welfare and sustainability concerns, but vandor were missed eating meat so obtained in a way she feels as ethical. She decided to try hunting and after her first deer hunt, she was hooked. Really. That was the first time that I felt like I was part of nature and part of the food system. How she's gotten more involved, she's realized that hunting can inspire people to protect wildlife habitat. She says hunters often lead land conservation efforts interstate. Iowa has lust ninety nine percent of its native prairie and wetlands, and it's really important to conserve what we have left so today. A group called at a below doors. It offers classes on hunting, fishing and foraging. She hopes these practices helped. People feel more connected to nature. The more people are out enjoying our land the more likely that they're going to be invested in wanting it to be conserved.

Iowa Vandor Rachel Vander Consultant
Warner Music Group prices IPO at $25 a share to raise $1.925 billion

Balance of Power

02:34 min | Last month

Warner Music Group prices IPO at $25 a share to raise $1.925 billion

"That time now for our stock of the hour it is Warner Music Group which went public earlier today it's been held off for a day or so it's gone public and then the price is actually gone up since it started trading we are joined now by kill whites to take us through the Warner story yeah David started trading just over half an hour ago right now the stock up the better part of six percent trading around twenty eight sixty one a share that's after it priced at twenty five dollars this morning the midpoint of the marketing range raised about it one billion one point nine three billion excuse me in the listing which which I should point out I was actually up size seventy seven million shares up from just seventy million makes it one of the biggest offerings we've seen so far in twenty twenty and values the company at nearly thirteen billion dollars of course even as you alluded to this was delayed from yesterday to observe the music industry's blackout Tuesday to support the protest against police brutality in fact it was really delayed about three months because of the pandemic so the fact that the company now has come public we're seeing it being taken pretty well by the public markets sends a pretty positive signal about potentially renewed strength of the U. S. offerings after we saw those really put on pause for a while because of this pandemic David yeah exactly I wonder whether it says more about the history of the equity market which is really on its way back with that says more about the state of the music market is the music market sort of stay at home kind of business well it's a little bit of both isn't right we've seen obviously increased demand for risk on the part of investors and it's not just a big week for Warner music we're about to see six point four billion dollars in IPOs total this week some definitely revival of companies coming to the public markets but on your point about the music industry of course is really is a lot about streaming Warner music especially is very catered towards streaming about seventy percent of its revenue comes from digital sales Spotify apple for example account for about twenty seven percent of revenue be looking at the last fiscal year in fact that is everybody is home bound we can't go out to concerts etcetera to get entertainment lately is giving an added boost to Warner music here yeah let's be honest Kaylee I've downloaded more music club and stuck at home that you have to do so maybe it's Happy Days are here again for the music business which let's be honest has really gone up and down down initially string was not too good for it yeah absolutely there's been a lot of back and forth for certain and not only is this good for the music business I would point out to you that the man who really is making all the money from this IPO land blah blah Finnick excuse me I'm totally butchering that name you do a far better job job but he actually is getting eighty five percent of economic interest in this ninety nine percent of the voting right is basically all of the proceeds from this IPO are not going to Warner music they're going to

Warner Music Group
The Seven Roles of Photography

LensWork

05:55 min | Last month

The Seven Roles of Photography

"Let's start today with an obvious given. We all have cameras. We all take pictures but the question I WANNA ask today is why and there's one simple answer that probably accounts for ninety nine percent of what we do photographic -ly we make pictures because it's fun and it's entertaining and we enjoy it and we don't need any more excuses than that and so the rest of this podcast can be forgotten except for the fact that some of us. WanNa do something more with our photography. The just have fun. Some of US WANNA do something more with our photography than just capture memories. That is to say we're interested in using photography something beyond the snapshot and when that happens now. I think it may be more interesting to ask why. What is the purpose of making our artwork? We'll part of the reason to be an artist. Is that things. Like photography gives us a way to approach the world almost an excuse to approach the world as I've said for years. A camera is a fantastic. Excuse for going out and exploring and people will give permission to go places and see things that you wouldn't have if he just said. I'm curious and I WANNA go see it but if you say I want to take picture of it. Sometimes that opens doors and so a camera can be a handy tool for us to use in life as an excuse to go out exploring okay fine but that still doesn't give us a reason why we wanNA create artwork from the photographs that we capture with our cameras. Why do we WANNA make prints in math and frame them and put them on the wall or publish them or make folios chat or whatever? What is it that motivates us? What is our purpose for creating artwork for reasons? I can't explain it other than the fact photography's my life. I find this a fascinating question and so I spent considerable time in the last no sixty days or so thinking about this more critically trying to figure out. What is the purpose for being an art photographer other than fun? And an excuse to explore the world essentially what I came up with. This is just my own little brainstorm so I'm not pretending like this inclusive or exhaustive of all possibilities. But here's what my brain thought that. There are basically seven roles of photography and by that I mean things that we do with photography not rules Phil The seven roles of photography that is to say there are seven purposes of fine art photography that I find help clarify my thinking about what it is that I'm doing once. I had sort of concluded this brainstorm I applied retrospectively and I discovered that it was pretty useful. Sometimes I could use these seven ideas to clarify a project that I wasn't quite sure what I was doing. And where it was going and what the next step was etc how to conclude it or even how to make final decisions about editing and sequencing but once I had these seven roles of photography in mind I found I could go back and use this to clarify my thinking so that was a reason to explore why we make our work. The other thing is it tells me what the limits of my thinking our because I have no doubt there are more than seven ideas. That should be on this list but for some reason. I can only think of seven roles of photography. I'll get into them in here. Just a second but I can only think of seven which tells me the limits of my thinking and as a matter of fact when I went back and looked at the well at this point I have a hundred thirty seven small projects that have been published in cocoa and all hundred and thirty seven of them fit with one of these seven definitions of the roles of photography and not a single one was outside of this. So that tells me I need to push the envelope a little bit. Because they're probably some things that I missing that I've become so entrenched in my thinking that I need to expand so with that in mind. Let me share with you. What I am characterizing. As the seven roles of photography these are things. We want our fine art photography to do the purpose for making what we make and why we make it. The first is to take me there that is to say camera as transporter through space and time the classic examples of this are probably ansel. Adams in contemporary photographer Art Wolf. I'll use him as an example and there are lots and lots of others but the essence of this kind of photography is for us as viewers to go someplace through space and time to a place that we have not been or cannot go and see the world through the eyes of the photographer no question. That's probably the dominant use of photography in terms of fine art photography or as far as that goes with snapshots snapshots take us back in time to an event that happened so that we can remember it more clearly the snapshots that we make vacation pictures can take us to a place that we're not currently at but maybe we visited on vacation and we want to remember it and reminisce about it and so take me. There is the first and most dominant role of photography and lots and lots of projects fit that

Art Wolf Adams Phil The
Ecosystem Engineering

Front End Happy Hour

06:56 min | Last month

Ecosystem Engineering

"Gave a little bit of descriptions early in your intros. But I'm really curious. How do you describe? What IS ECOSYSTEM? Engineering NF flakes. So I've my previous role. I was a manager also and interest netflix's have to do a lot of recruiting and I'd have to answer this question a lot. Like what do you do? And what is this an unusually posted by saying you ever go into a store costco someplace and you see the. Tv's for sale and on the box they have netflix on them. Netflix's already pre install on it or if you could buy a Roku already got netflix on their more comcast box you may or may not get it but if it does get loaded somehow. Netflix's getting on all these devices. How does that happen? What happens is there's a team at net flicks that makes the Netflix's player code and we package it up once a year and we call it the de k a software developers kit for the player and we might give it a name but every year we give it out to these partners in these partners are like Samsung L. G. Roku comcast of the world and they have to take it and make it work on their system. And so if you look at all the TV's out there and all the set top boxes you can see that you know they're different chipsets. There's different hardware. They probably have different compilers and compilers settings. They've God's maybe their own libraries that they have to do they have a different os on their TV. Every device out there. Basically a custom made device. And so how do you get those Netflix's player which looks pretty much the same once you start the APP whether it's on a Roku or a Samsung Smart TV or a cable set top box? How is it ended up at experiences? Pretty much universal. I would say in how that happens is there are other teams that work with these partners to make sure that AAA compiles and be that. It's good that doesn't crash We have a suite of tasks and Trevan helps with that that area. The part and my previous manager job was in area too. We don't let net Netflix. Go out or be sold or pre installed on and device unless we know that device is going to have good quality with it. I said it cheers. Cheers cheers cheers and how that happens. Is these partners. Have to run a whole bunch of tests and pass these tests and there's a a Cloud-based tests service that Netflix's made where they can take their device whether they're working in China or whether they're working in Japan or Korea or the US or anywhere in the world they plug it into Internet. They log into this cloud service and they can run tests and we can see these tests if they pass fail and so on so forth and was passed all these tests then it goes out into the field and people can buy them what people have them in their homes or they sign up for cable service and they get this box and they start net flakes. And if it's working great we can see the metrics remotely from here 'cause all these boxes and TV's are sending this logs all the time and if there's a problem we should be able to detect that and try to get it fixed so long story. Short Netflix's works with a whole bunch of other companies to get these apps working and what's out there are jobs not done. We have to make sure that it keeps working. And so that's where he may be a deluded to like. Qe which maybe you could explain. What the Kiwi Patrick. Is that your your teams looking at sure. So Kua we. Quality of experience cheers. Cheers kind of set. You up for that one. They are metrics that deal with how the APP appears to the user. So this would be. Things like is video smooth. Does it look like high. Bit Rate. So it looks like very high quality not just st but also hd for K. buffering a lot. Which hopefully it's not a re buffer is when you're watching in the middle of playback and there's this kind of spinner that appears on the screen where it's trying to load and it's ten percent twenty percent. Seventy five percent. Ninety nine percent starts playing again. It's probably because there's some interference on the network or there's a bug in the buffering on the device we want to keep all that buffering to a minimum so that when you start watching it smooth. There's no interruptions but it's not just limited to that if you have trouble starting the APP or if you're in the middle of the APP crashes or there's like network fluctuations where it goes high quality low quality too much on. These are all things that could be addressed usually on the device side and try to minimize those as much as possible wherever possible. Even things outside of the network that users network or the service provider's network lately. Yeah that's another one. I forgot about that one. The time it takes for you to press the button versus how long it takes to start the actual playback. Hopefully it's around four or five seconds but on some devices we see. It's as long as twenty seconds thirty seconds. That's something that could be fixed on a device. Hopefully I think that's always been something that I've actually been amazed at is just Michael. You paint the picture of the ecosystem of all the different TV devices. But when I think about it too is the Netflix. App is being built for something like a roku stick. It's a lower powered device. And then you have something lake the playstation four or Xbox at you can also play on. It has a lot bigger assessor. I think is really interesting. How you there's large ecosystem of devices that we are supporting and so I can imagine that becomes a lot more challenging in your world to to support all those different variables are those devices and especially when you think that every one of those devices basically a custom made device very few devices. Look or act exactly the same from the code perspective and so it's it's a challenge to make sure that when you start Netflix's whether on a fifteen dollars stick if you bought it on sale the way up to four hundred dollars playstation or even a three thousand dollar four K. SMART TV that the Netflix's experience is pretty universal. On all of them. You still log in the same. You still have your same catalog. He still are able to see and navigate through the you. I pretty much the same. It's pretty familiar despite that range and I think that's pretty

Netflix Samsung Costco Kiwi Patrick Comcast Trevan Michael United States China Korea Japan
Coronavirus Lockdown Takes a Toll on Mental Health

Larry Elder

01:05 min | Last month

Coronavirus Lockdown Takes a Toll on Mental Health

"The research literature is clear on the effects of quarantine and stay at home practices on mental health we know that the longer the duration of these orders the greater the intensity of the mental health problems experienced and then there's the financial health restaurant owner Frank Mendoza give up my business that I worked twenty five years sacrifice my life for okay the corona virus uptake coronavirus all that losing my business okay and I guarantee you ninety nine percent of people why can't we do the same thing the very same media demanding shut everything down it's too dangerous what do you want to do about all the people are unemployed Mr trump Mr president I have anyone else a plan to get thirty six million unemployed Americans back to work you're overseeing historic economic despair what I think we've announced a plan we're opening up our country just a rude person you are we're opening up our country and we're opening it up very fast the plan is that each state is opening and it's opening

Frank Mendoza President Trump Mr Trump
Here Is How Washington DC Ranks For Park Systems In 2020

Chad Hartman

00:45 sec | Last month

Here Is How Washington DC Ranks For Park Systems In 2020

"Well Minneapolis parks on the receiving end of some great recognition the annual park score index ranks the Minneapolis park system first in the nation beating out second place Washington DC and Saint Paul in third index cited new park acquisitions strategic expansions and the fact that ninety eight percent of Minneapolis residents live within a ten minute walk of a park up from ninety six percent a year ago that number is now at ninety nine percent in Saint Paul the trust for public land warns that U. S. public parks are facing inequities and budget cuts despite increased use during the corona virus pandemic in the west metro Susie Jones news talk eight three

Minneapolis Saint Paul Minneapolis Park Washington U. S. Susie Jones
Guy Fieri raises over $20 million for struggling restaurant workers

WGN Nightside

02:21 min | Last month

Guy Fieri raises over $20 million for struggling restaurant workers

"You know how many people are how many people are are are are struggling right now it's not so the guy fieri man did something really good twenty million Bucks for struggling restaurant workers that's a great story it's a great store your watch guy fieri I'm not not particularly but I've always found him to be an amusing the muezzin character yeah he something I I'll tell I'll I'll give you that I'm not you know he annoys the hell out of me but this is a really amazing thing he's done I mean good for him and good on him he did introduce me to one of my favorite spots around the loyal area or local area bobbin girl oh sure which there's a couple of locations it's a great restaurant really taste it really really tasty but I never had they they do like Korean styles of the two kimchi no idea what that was until until I tried it simply like spiced pickled yeah Cabot Dr yeah king changed my palate yeah I know I've never really into spicy stuff and then all of a sudden I tried that and so I guess I can give props to guy fieri for that well you know the thing is also I mean obviously raising twenty million dollars for struggling restaurant workers is fantastic at this time and you know I mean his businesses are taking it to but also it's it's a it's amazing the testimonials that you hear from the restaurants or places that he showcases on diners drive ins and dives because I don't I would I would say ninety nine percent of the of the businesses that appear on that show the the the the business goes through the roof I'm you get you people just say it as soon as the this is the episode airs you know within days they're packed like the restaurants are packed so he does a lot of good for the restaurant businesses you know he really does say what you will about his you know his his personality or his persona or whatever the guy's heart's in the right spot I mean it really is you know thank you to every every business that they've ever done a follow up with said that that the you know like as soon as the eyes to the episode aired like their business doubled or tripled which is

Guy Fieri
HOW THIS CEO INCREASED SALES AND REDUCED CHURN

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

06:35 min | 2 months ago

HOW THIS CEO INCREASED SALES AND REDUCED CHURN

"Hey everybody welcome to the PD. Revenue Leadership podcast. Hey what we do in this. Podcast is talk about what B. Two B. Sales and marketing Leaders operators experts are doing today to really break through and grow their businesses at exponential levels. Let's get it in the interview at the end. Give you an update on my courses and you can check out my website at B. Two B. Revenue Dot Com. And it's Brian G Burns. Aw on linked in they Chris. Welcome to the show was waken started. Tell us about yourself. Chris Smith on say of Happy Height shot in Melbourne Australia. We are a high CIA software that supplies league replied contract To businesses. We integrate with lots of fun software as well paying five use and emerging market later in High Chelsea S. And how do come up with this idea why he had a manufacturing business back in the day and Actually v Ceremony export market was the US back in the night and hightower's will be part of that sold that company you know you have a restraint of trade pretty tight I had the guy for manufacturing and food to something else so I started consulting and helping. Businesses grow in the export market. Very quickly are realized that they didn't have a grip on. Hi John and hi was very expensive. Lois holes contracts Blah Blah Blah. So I looked at the IMMERSION OF COMPANIES. Like zero dollars tops. Accompany site fifty dollars a month. You could get accounting softwares pretty decent somewhat. Let's do these for the CIA spice and lighter we are here we are today but it's a pretty competitive space isn't it we? It's quite a strange way. Will Wing Non added tingles guy for I think the reality of happy high CIA people talk about features features features right all the time but we are very useful feature reach grading the Gracious? That actually were sorry to take the credit but does come with human element that you get a qualified consultant Service and Services Service of its own fashion service. Sorry it's really for me. It's like competition out Bay. But you when you dealing directors or managers of Orange Prison. Whoever people just want that element all by getting get support integration of SASS product into is essentially change management and. It's hard and it takes time where we've got a very easy process sites in for lodging bars or small it can integrated very quickly and without any disruption into a company's. Y I have been doing previously so it's busy accession that regards instead of having to try to put a square peg in around how we have around. Paul Hall Ricotta Mike. It Nice and council as guess you're dealing with non technical people and sometimes the last thing they wanna do they have to learn a new system right and no matter. How Arcane their system is they probably know it is. There's right and the idea of switch into something else without that service is scary and I'm happy it was one of those ones where high chows not very happy people fear performance management. So I thought what the the catchphrase how behind charge Hijab now. It might be an we endeavour to do that and through working with out customers. Whether they're very technical or nontechnical we might that experience spies. Best spoke to them. That means that they can get on board into the subway. There's stress rings already with that. Change Management from on Pie device person with falling cabins of all these Hijaz stuff. Now maybe to the cloud all that must be really hot. It's actually not but we helped them understand that. So it's we've got ninety nine percent retention right clients so that's kind of unheard of in such sorry again it goes back to your top of China and when we say we're going to actually help you really do. Who Do you sell to certain size? Companies OR UH. Sweet spot's probably zero to two fifty employees. We have some logic companies or two thousand employees on and the saw it's built so whether it's ten employees will two thousand the largest science. It's really great. Take a sweet spot. Zero to two fifty wanted to fifty. I should say and And that seems to be where we really dominate the market here in Charlotte. Okay and what resources do you put towards marketing versus sales? It's been really interesting. I'll listen to your pod council time so to say generally without Machi solids we. It sounds you got in marketing. Really secretly putting at least ten to fifteen percent of Revenue Tamaki and you look at Sioe stuff. He'd said we'd like thirty percent of the revenue regime sales staff in the business side. Probably a fifty versus one hundred splitting you. Look at that part of the revenue but what we are doing a lot. Why very well is investing very heavily in partnership programs on main genuine partnerships? We accountant that. It's declined I pay your taxes. Do you J. Through these concerts. Okay no problem bye. Say you're using Zero Mile K. PIE or whatever? You should integrate with happy. Because they're going to be right like our. Yes but the difference is we hold the hands. Enjoy that relationship in a lot of equity with the Ken Cheese at that company. Put me onto right the captain's love us. I we pickup pickup spicy. They he will realizing now more than ever having a trusted pot and provide is it silently. GonNa do is very important is marketplace.

CIA Chris Smith Consultant Service And Service Revenue Tamaki Brian G Burns United States Orange Prison Restraint Of Trade Melbourne Australia China Ken Cheese John Paul Hall Hightower Charlotte Accountant
Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

08:54 min | 2 months ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
Why Do Pistachios' Color Depend on the Iran Hostage Crisis?

BrainStuff

03:35 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Pistachios' Color Depend on the Iran Hostage Crisis?

"Are tasty seed the grow on trees and have cream colored shells and green colored flesh a Estacio. Green is a specific queue. A soft yellowish green. That was super popular in the fall of two thousand. Nineteen in Pentagon's catalog. It's thirteen dash zero two to one but there was a time when the stash IOS that Americans eight were almost all died red cedar and Shell so vibrant read that it would stain your fingers so why were stashes died in the first place. And why aren't read pistachios around anymore? It all starts at the Syrian stash importer by the name of Sullom who supposedly died his stashes read to differentiate his product from that of his competitors and to hide any minor imperfections from harvesting. The pistachio is believed to be indigenous to the Middle East specifically Iran and has been widely cultivated from Afghanistan to the Mediterranean region and more recently in California where it was introduced in eighteen fifty four as a garden. Trie we spoke with Persian chef and writer Nashashibi up among leauge. She explained four Iranians and Turks Stash. Here's play an important role in their culture in cuisine for them stash. Here's our everyday snacks roasted salted and sometimes lime juice. There are Stachel cookies flavored with rosewater in cardamom. Mustaches lamb braised with rose water and Saffron Stachel meatballs cooked in pomegranate juice etc up until the nineteen seventies. The majority of America's mustaches came from abroad. Most hailing from Iran looms method of using his red dye to make his not standout eventually became the identifying mark of Middle Eastern Stash IOS. Then in nineteen seventy nine can the Iranian hostage crisis in which fifty two American diplomats and citizens were held hostage in Iran for four hundred and forty four days. Tensions between the two nations were extremely high during this time at deeply affecting how the United States viewed Iran and also undermining Jimmy Carter's conduct a foreign policy. Carter did what any president in a tight spot would do and imposed a number of sanctions on Iran. Just after the crisis began Carter began by cutting off sales of Iranian oil and freeing all Iranian assets on April seventh nineteen eighty frustrated by the ineffectual outcome of the sanctions. Carter announced he would be taking drastic measures by cutting off diplomatic ties with Iran and embargoing all imports from the Middle Eastern country. His embargo against Iranian imports resulted in what was essentially an embargo on the area's vibrant red pistachios. Leaving the fingers of Stachel loving Americans everywhere. Their normal hugh. So where do America's stashes come from? Now California grows about ninety eight percent of statue sold in the US using an automated process that ensures little to no colorful imperfections on the Shell California produced around four point. Five million pounds of pistachios in nineteen seventy seven. A number that grew by twenty times only twenty years later now. California is home to ninety nine percent of the nation's pistachio orchards. Making it three point. Six billion dollar industry coming in second and third are Arizona and New Mexico with an economic impact thirteen million and three point one million respectively. These nuts are all their natural green but relics of red pistachios do still exist for example in a scene in the film the naked gun in which the characters mouths are dyed red by eating nuts and in some people's nostalgic memories.

Iran Jimmy Carter California Saffron Stachel Middle East America United States Pentagon Arizona Nashashibi Sullom Shell California Leauge Trie Afghanistan Mediterranean Writer New Mexico
Comfort Food Uncomfortable?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Comfort Food Uncomfortable?

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Health show. I'm Janet Lewis and Dr Louis and we are hoping this show find you guys doing well staying out of the viruses way and being healthy and with that we've noticed a few of your post with some pictures on it of things we thought we might should address Called is comfort food making you uncomfortable. Because as good as this all his tasting there may be some consequences coming down the pike for eating incorrectly. So Dr Lewis is going to help educate us today and tell us about maybe some ways that we can try to stay healthier during this time because they are very much correlating people. That are getting this to being unhealthy. So if you're new to the show we're going to tell you ways that you can start getting healthy your listeners of our show We appreciate you very much and GonNa make a special offer for you at the end of the show and Have a couple of questions to answer. So Dr Lewis. Now that you're all doing good over there and stay in peppy and healthy. Can you tell us how to stay out of the Sugar Bowl? I'm sorry go ahead. Yeah I got the look on that one You know week so ago. Jonathan said you know we were talking about stress on the shooting straight with Dr Louis facebook group which I wish more people would join because we have fun here He said a little blue bunny would help. I said Bluebell had blue bell last night but I changed the microbiome in my gut Enough that it didn't really taste the same and then Brian Down in Florida Kinda got in it and said Bluebells Stress Reliever Law Dead Blue Bell again last night. I've done some stress eating because Well there's much more good things coming out of people under stress and there's a few people that are spending a little more Benham and I sugar. You know I'd. I'd much rather have sugar than alcohol when I'm stressed but and I've gained two pounds. Yep Two pounds and it makes me uncomfortable and its people at have Tennessee toward diabetes and heart disease and door high blood pressure which I think is the same thing as heart disease. They're the ones that Are much much much more susceptible to this cove? Nineteen and many other things so you but you've got understand just because the media says it long enough in loud enough doesn't necessarily make it true because I just talked to lady that Works in both of the big hospitals here and she says now. We're not busy at all. She says Kobe. Nineteen is a thing. But it's about ninety percent smoke mirrors and not real You know here's that. Thank though as the media pushing all this fear and death. I don't know but I'm GonNa tell you. Fear doesn't Stop Death. It stops laugh in life as we know it now. Worrying doesn't take away tomorrow's troubles it only takes away today's peace and I hope that you will remember that and you know that being said something that would be applicable anytime. Are you a viewer or a doer? They're so many people as gathering information and not doing anything with it. The Bible says faith without works is dead. So if you're not doing you know because the Internet. There's a lot of viewers a lot of people that are gathering information. Not Do anything with it so I would invite you to take action because the only thing that determines your health or destiny is whether you choose to live big. Imagine big and do it. Go big or go. Home is my advice to you. You know I'm not really bold and and rob up in Lake Orion Michigan Lubbock Guy. He said he's talking about my mask. Don't shoot straight with my crown. Royal made out of a crown royal bag and he says I think you're the kind of person that doesn't like the word can't said your psychic because I know I I'm in charge my destiny. I think we'll let you know at my age. I looked back at all the things I've worried about. Ninety nine percent didn't come true and the one percent that did country wasn't half as bad as I thought is going to be anyway so folks life's too short not to be having fun and our job here. Our Goal Janet and my goal is to help you be healthy enough to feel good to have life have life more abundantly and feel good. Why you get there. They lend good. It's a lot easier to have fun and isn't lap supposed to be fun.

Janet Lewis Benham Dr Louis Dr Lewis Green Wisdom Health Jonathan Lake Orion Michigan Lubbock Brian Down Tennessee Florida Kobe
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99 Percent Invisible

99 Percent Invisible

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99 Percent Invisible

"This is ninety nine percent invisible i'm roman mars log is a radio producer you might recognize his name in the credits of the npr quiz show wait wait don't tell me or as the co host of the now defunct podcast how to do everything which i just loved it such a good show he has a new podcast out right now launching this week and it's delightfully weird well the show is called everything is alive and it's an interview show in which all the subjects are inanimate objects so i talked to things so what made you want to do a show like this well a couple of things like one i think it's just like a would just sort of think this way like i you know i get up from a chair and think about what a terrible job that chair had and and like how the chair must feel about being sat on all the time and then also like i think producing for so long you're always trying to get to like the primary source you know and like you're always looking for experts i thought it would be really fun if like you know you're putting the other piece about rainbows or whatever and like rather than talk to the physicist who understands rainbows if you could actually talk to the rainbow so that that's kind of the idea i know that listeners to ninety percent of his bowl of fully capable of accepting that even the most mundane objects are infused with great meaning and can say something about us as humans but you may not be prepared for that object to actually talk so i asked ian for a primer on how to listen to everything is alive you know if i was talking to a candle say like a bedroom candle like it's not every candle it's not speaking for every candle it is one candle that has sat on one night stand forever and like been blown out by one person forever and has a relationship with that person but they're kind of aware of their object communities like it knows more about candles than we do it also has very distinct lifetime of experiences but the things that it says are all factual i think i was surprised by that when i first heard the episodes that i've the samples that i've heard yeah they know things they know real things about their world for the most part they're the inanimate object version of the person at the party who like always has an anecdote for everything they're very aware air of history and of stories of what they are so even though the situation is quite absurd on the face when you hear fact it's a true fact yeah there is so much about the kind of personal life of the object that you know you know isn't exactly real but when i'm telling a story about something real i don't cite it you know i don't tell you where i heard it and so we're just letting the objects behave in the same way and so there's probably you know there's going to be some mystery and hopefully people will google pick out if things a real or not this is everything is alive hosted by ian to log let's let's just start settle in have you introduce your self fourth my name is louis and i am ken of goto cola that's storebrand goto keough to go so it's similar to coca cola similar people call it a knockoff i've been called.

producer npr ninety nine percent ninety percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Yeah yep guys i'm actually got a pretty good idea on the horizon i want to get your take on it and see if maybe you want to be a interested in this and stop you there zac i'm gonna start off a saying i'm a i'm a like a ninety nine percents no really for job ninety nine percent yeah okay well then ford i have the offer for you evacuate still be decades could jake you have that one percents right now i want to open up a breakfast place called i hop because move because there is no i hop anymore now it's i hob and i was thinking wow i'm totally going to jump on that name i'll take all their stuff for l trade market they've already got the signs up i'll take him oh you're in you're in also the name i hop well whatever you want and we can make it now that's up for discussion i thought you know international house of anything to the p i guess instead of pancakes baby paninis panini shop international house of people uhhuh yeah pie possibly imagine how's the pebbles like fruity pebbles.

jake ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"What are you tougher to laser there are three components in fertilizer have you ever gone to buy fertilizer and you look on the fertilizer bag and there are three numbers now the first is up this is new what's the first phosphorus phosphorus potassium up down and nitrogen so how how do those relate i have to i have to go back to our story on that nitrogen is for fast growth first down down is phosphorus and all around is potassium i believed what are i'm i'm so what are you guys talking about right fertilizer if you if your lawn if you take the three names that compose fertilizer the three elements that make up ninety nine percent of the fertilizer on the market there are the three components potassium nitrogen and phosphorus okay okay one the first component is the up component up down all around so the first component makes the plant grow upward in greens it up going to the store to buy food for your plants better know what those numbers mean we live in a world and number numbers license number addresses and bar codes most we understand the we don't like those three numbers on plant fertilizer box i'll tell you everything you need.

ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

"Ninety nine percent of our our specialty is working with hr directors has they put together programs as they're transitioning people out downsizing rightsizing whatever you wanna call it as well outplacement firms in that being a firm that helps people find their next job so during that twenty five year period when nine out of every ten new individuals that i need just lost their job that that's really become a focus a lot of these individuals as well as the outplacement firms and even a few hr directors that want to help individuals is they're transitioning now they would ask me if i had something that i could give them so that they could kind of read up on what to do what not to do during this time and i research trying to find things that i could provide people as a resource i discovered that it did not exist so that's what really prosecutor write the book i want people to have a tool that they can turn to during the period of transition so that they do not make financial errors that destroy their short term in in greatly reduced the possibility of them accomplishing their longterm objectives as well so let's get into the little what can a reader expect well i i i let me tell you what they should expect and that's a boring block with a bunch of financial terms and ratios and boring grass i wrote this book because i wanted it to be an easy and engaging read so i used to road trip with road signs as metaphor because i think we can all relate to a road trip in using gps to navigate our way and i hear i said you know navigating the financial bumps in the in the unemployment road in a very wanted to guides the reader through every stage odd financial planning registry during a stressful period especially what that what do i do immediately for the short short term and that's what we're talking about really wet to immediately do and then you can worry about the longterm once you you've taken care of what matters.

prosecutor Ninety nine percent twenty five year
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"It's still early to start looking at how market's gonna develop but when i saw that i thought okay there's a possible landing spot for hamels and it sucks that we're at that point right now not even twenty two games into this season we're thinking about destinations for some of our our key veterans are let's go to sean in fort worth after a sixteen loss to seattle sean actually belonged to play a big role to that i thought there was a couple of blows on for each teams on ninety nine percent of the games i go by our home run especially that to lead author i done same thing and other also i'm still calling me debase our hockey football it rough season and start but can you scream into why gallo wise players in india shifts away for a shift i guess why is it hard for gala why can't you just put it down third base line because yellow is a max effort power hitter so you're asking somebody to go outside of their normal skill set to try to hit the ball the other way take possibly take that hit or out of their own head space yeah try to thinking about it right and make them think about doing something else that they're not accustomed to doing and yeah you know every once in a while i do like that he will show bont and in the ninth inning we down four there i have no problem with joey gallo if he it's a solo shot to start that inning it really doesn't matter you need you need runners so if he wants to hit a bunt down the third base line in that that.

hamels joey gallo seattle sean hockey india ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"This is ninety nine percent invisible i'm roman mars the late 1920s the ford motor company bought up millions of acres of land in brazil they loaded boats with machinery and supplies in ship them deep into the embassy on rainforest workers cut down trees and cleared the land and then they built a rubber plantation in the middle of one of the wildest places on earth forge robert developing on the top assurance river is an enterprise of historic proportion air airtel mention acres of jungle are being converted into a highly modernized plantation capable of producing rubber on a large scale the plan was to harvest the rubber and it back to detroit where it would be turned into tires and other parts for ford cars but henry four wanted this community which he called ford land yet to be more than just a huge plantation he wanted it to be a kind of industrial utopia he paid his brazilian workers good wages at least for the region and he tried to build them the kind of place he would've loved to live which is to say a small midwestern town but in the middle of the jungle in the wilderness motto community is self at everyday payoff got its own powerhouse electric lighting up telephone system it's all machine shop complete the equipped with modern tools as a laboratory for processing rubber and ice brand and the fire department you had a church you had hospital you had a power plants you had a big sawmill that's roger weber he's the host of a podcast called mismatch in this story is now detetion of one that recently aired on his.

ford motor company brazil henry roger weber detroit ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"In a gun and twice the only in in these these are things that a lot of people want to do but most dunk i mean the vast majority don't like ninety nine percent or better and i got to do both of them twice in the third one is to win the powerball i figured i it think you're gonna say find love or i don't know what win win powerball and then as out of mine that's out of my well how much powerball do you play non tobacco you gotta be talent randy l l way forward to get the three hundred billion and then by a dollar but now you the best good question i i i need a goal and maybe you know maybe that goal should be get my cheat teaching degree because i can count on survivor to call me can count on winning you know winning the power law mmm i don't wanna july are manned again i've done it twice um mmm uh so yeah you're right i need a goal and now i think i might take a goal on you but i was just thinking about you as we were getting ready to do the pond gives that i said you know randy you know he of course he watches all of these shows and i know he loves to talk about these shows but i wonder for randy i mean what what is he thinking about right now does he want to go back on survivor i need likes to get is emails or tweets into the shows and others he likes that stuff but i won't with like where's it all going for randy era and i think about that.

randy ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The World Transformed

"In other sometimes sometimes the height of of a movie that uh anything can beal no matter how good it is the doesn't heal the planet and save your marriage partnered up to the high wife tipper vets promise keeping siliconsomething ninety nine percent on rotten tomatoes i'm i react badly to that i'm like well it can be accurate right you want to be the you want to be the one guy them on i don't wanna viewers at just who i am okay that's you know i don't want to be checked off while ninety nine percent will love it we will uh will uplink you factor should we will we will pick it up i i guess we shouldn't spend too much time talking about a movie we haven't seen in don't know anything about the so a although hayuth our show we can do what we want and we will once again next week when we come back and do three more brand new shows it's been great having you all with us this week look forward to being with you again and until next time lived to see it inspiration to help you do insurance of okay turned out you're going to let your budget be the boss of you take control with progressive name your price tool tell us what you want to pay for car insurance and we'll help you find options to fit your budget here's the music to get you pooped down don't don't don't i i hear your budget laughing at you oh wait that's just those kids laughing at me.

beal ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"This is ninety nine percent invisible i'm roman moss you've seen a logo that tom guys more has dissolved you probably psalm one today xerox mobile quote in why you pbs univision the boston public transit systems mark is a t in a circle tom guys marta that but his work and that of his longtime business partner i venture maya who passed away in the 2017 his truly fused into the dna of most modern logos uc today whether they design them or not in 1960 one the logo for chase bank that he designed the blue octagon with the square in the middle was introduced it still used everywhere and it's considered one of the first of its kind in the us and abstract dynamic shape representing a giant company the logo was a real seachange per chase we'll chase at that time it was really chase manhattan bank because who was the merger of two giant banks chase national bank and the bank of the manhattan company and they had a logo which featured a map of the united states globe of the world the wording chase manhattan bank and a few other things it was quieter quite a mix and they were in the process of building the first modern skyscraper in the wall street area because lovey financial firms were moving up to midtown at that point david rockefeller was in charge of that process though he was only third in command at the time at the bank and he felt that it would be appropriate to have him also a modern contemporary looking mark four this new lee formed a judge basically a merger of these of these two banks and we discussed with him the idea of navy we could just do something abstract because no nsaid of a symbol of banking in a on.

univision partner chase bank us lee tom boston manhattan david rockefeller ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Meditation practices but as we talk about in the book we've done a case study of a very very long term 'practitioner in our lab pu his consented to be identified in his name is media rinpoche a in he's a tibetan lama who has done many years of intensive retreat practice in his brain ages in the ninety nine percent tile of a large group of individuals against which we compared it uh using these objective parameters when you say ninety nine percent of all you made he he's if if you had a hundred people in the room of his age his would be correct on just brain thus convene a reverse mortgage slows it i think it's important to make that point yes than we have cereal mri scans over a 14year period with him and his brain is definitely changing an aging just like your brain or my brain is but the what is showing is that his brain is ageing more slowly so what we just said is that there is it in the vendee diagram of you know what meditation is good for and purpose for and all the other things about the mind and human life that concern us there is imperfect overlap between those two circles but we should say that there is significant overlap so what meditation is good for and what meditation was designed for an we've used words like awakening and deconstructing the self and they're they're other terms like enlightenment and insight these are at least as conceived advertised antidotes to human suffering at its most basic or lease as as it was conceived to be its most basic in the traditional buddhism and it's also i'll add one more piece here is also an antidote to or at least connected to.

ninety nine percent 14year
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on James MacDonald Podcast

James MacDonald Podcast

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on James MacDonald Podcast

"And whether you call or go online be sure to request the new will of god book along with the question and answer session with james who james our time is nearly gone for today but next time we'll continue this message on answering the question does god have a will for me this is something that people wrestle in rests with all the time well sure because think of the person who's listening to that traditional view on god's woman like i think i married their own version i missed it on all these kids they should have existence another going to up in a can of anybody to mary i mean the whole thing's pretty outlandish and pretty out of control and not like god ninety nine percent of god's will is god's word get that done and you'll be making good choices and god we'll be pleased with you if you need this if this is helping you we're not done with again we're gonna come right back to it on the next broadcasting we'll look forward to open up with you here again on walk in the word we shepherded butter you to join us again thursday as we continue to look at the question does god have a will for me right here on walk in the work until then stay in the scriptures this daily program is listener supported and sponsored by walk in the work.

james ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"They're just shuffling the numbers around our going to reduce taxes over here were to raise taxes over here to pay for it at the end of the day whatever change happens to your tax is going to be so inconsequential for ninety nine percent of you as to not even be worth discussing the ideas of radical tax changes were we clean up the tax code where we eliminate the mountains of pages and gray area that exists in our task owing to go to something like a flat tax or a consumption tax or one of the other really simple and straightforward tax programs that have been proposed time and time again he's not even on the table aside the being discussed what we get our a bunch of people in washington acting like they're fighting for you acting like they're doing the right thing for your benefit and working for the people when in reality behind the scenes nothing changes it makes me want to pull my hair out and you want to know what makes the change because governments not gonna just implode on itself in venezuela is collapsing in on itself right now in the government those in power are still in power and when venezuela ultimately implodes and they have their whatever their coup is in their rebirth and whatever the next thing is that comes along they'll be a government there too this idea that we're going to live in a government list society is is a grandiose dream.

venezuela washington ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"In ninety nine percent is the way find may be able to discuss carry super easy to make unlike coffee technically aegis led the kaskai sit in a hot water and let's finally try it so exciting to be reading it has picked up some nice color so it's quite complex and complete drink by itself and very easy to make but he can make fun after you have made some drinks vivid paul you make infusion from it you can make some of the fun things with it on to my favorite thing as a winter warmer is a instead of wouldbe surf every winter outside on the farmer's market it's called hardcore cuss kara what does that which is the very strong confusion casse carter use little bit as we have now than at little bit of honey and local spirit made from a precursor so like schnaps from apricots the apricot liquor and the heat from because skyora is making this beautiful aroma and uh and it's not only alcoholic this just touch of it but this his coming together works really well i think it would work really well for some christmas holidays smells amazing ancillary now so we going to make one more alcoholic cocktail out to face plus cairo drain so what are we do now so at the moment too because casse caroline's hits well for mixing not just with alcohol but with other things but alcohol will seems to be fun for many people it works and the wondering that we make has good is sort of like car specific flavors remedied whiny uh sort of spicy in a vain of nigger donate my favorite cocktail classic cocktail which is a combination of come party gene and very move but instead of very moved if gonna use koska so we gonna start adding one part of putting one part of gene mixes a lot and took it up the has.

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"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KELO

KELO

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KELO

"And these are some of the incidents that took place but the ninety nine percent of people they protested peacefully and they were there to protest what they said as racism and bigotry and white supremacy and for that i applaud them now oddest thing about the whole weekend is in i i never saw the crowd from what i saw the people that were the free speech rally i only saw highlights of one speaker who was talking about the need to all be united and and again i didn't see a lot of it was only tiny blurb but i don't know what happened is that tv stations didn't air it and then you've got an anti for purse and cursing out a trump supporter and ntv protesters telling a black female police officer you're supposed to be on our side and then we got some of the sounds of van tifa and what i'm saying is you'll live early have in these events you do have agitators but the good part is that was not the representative group of people protested peacefully for all the right reasons and you've got to give an awful lot of kudos to the mayor of boston and to the police department they did their job and they had people getting in their grill in their face coming up to a push in them shoving them and it's amazing how prepared they were and how professional they were and how nobody as far as i know got hurt in this thing but that but those agitators were the with the small amount that was not the overwhelming ninety nine percent and for that that that's that makes america stronger stand up against racism and bigotry and hatred and a people want to want to do that i support them and some of you got mad at me this week and 'cause i said yeah it's it makes america strong when people speak out against white supremacy racism and bigotry four you know whatever the protest was amount anyway let's let's play some of these sounds and bringing up to speed everything you yes um i want us and we should have be afraid throat right right hearts now trump's what one ooh.

officer van tifa boston representative america trump ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on WLOB

"They behaved the right way ninety nine percent of the time but all we see is misbehaving cops in the videos and i don't even think it's misbehaving most of the time most of these outrages videos i look at it and i say oh yeah what happened before the the the film was running i know what they were dealing with somebody resisting arrest remember that pool party they busted up i remember look into that video and we showed it on tv we showed it on fox news i showed the video and i thought this is a pool party a party out of control it's not just a bunch of victim kids they would practically rioting and the cops came in and arrested them i'm pro cop basically so when i see these videos i of up giving the cops the benefit of a doubt but as the society we're not given them the benefit of the doubt so we have idiots like this the guys i'm sure he's sincere he's a sincere idiot who runs a jim full of it thaddeus and they're not going to learn because they don't want they don't even want to be in the same space as a cop white supremacy how ridiculous eight three three i don't wanna put ideas in your head i to get your opinions eight three three eight five two four eight six six should this be allowed and you know the wedding cake issue if one why not the other we'll take your calls after the break the challenge lucio psalms book mean dads.

fox thaddeus ninety nine percent
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"The head of cereal girl welcome to mike al to show i drew jio tyga he gave rally oh man like be hitting a man like aloma's ninety nine ninety nine percent is that true my algae show every day 62 and although bone 102 five jio beach drew gherardo live great all right old school here and if you say it elect a song come on your full of yourself come up scrape paraguay absolutely love never did dance again as the does of the party none is in the decide what you'd have the dead dan event me i gotta tell you you throw one heck laporte thank you brother the fact we have more common nobody of redo some things going on right now that are now percolating you know could work so um right now in the studio we have uh we have some ribs and second she's just some evil evil back and cheese it's like the double from smoke is we all been through we've got our soul the eu buckle show a couple of sled city spoken aces on park of what across from singlea subway they also have one in lake clinton mujtaba highway and this is their bacon as forget it's the dignitary rigs which are the bacon a brown sugar crust did and it's this is the best read about me ever he can ever especially if either ever gob idiom now and will forget about it a workout the morning and later automobile inc some home i'll be thinking guys what i'm just picking metes out of my teeth yet and that is the wonderful thing now it's a great segway this the.

aloma paraguay laporte mike al singlea lake clinton mujtaba ninety nine ninety nine percen
"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"ninety nine percent" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Ninety nine percent of the time there's inspiration and guidance i didn't have that i said there was no element or individual in my life that provided guidance at all in regard to what my next step in life was going to be i do not discern for myself at the age of sixteen seventeen that i that this was something that i should pursue in the small town of which i grew up in i didn't i didn't really have that kind of an impact on me now that's not an excuse it's just an explanation years go by life happens and you couple that with i have numerous folks in my family much younger than i who did sir my cousin kile was just in town about a month ago and kyle is a uh activeduty air force reservist having served continuing in the reserve and now he's a firefighter in charleston south carolina but he dispatched on missions and one of them was to accompany part of the air transportation four vice president pence remember when he came to town well kile was part of that contingency plan jets get together it.

kile kyle reservist charleston south carolina vice president Ninety nine percent