35 Burst results for "Nineteenth Century"

Darwin notebooks missing for 20 years returned to Cambridge

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Darwin notebooks missing for 20 years returned to Cambridge

"Two two two two of of of of naturalist naturalist naturalist naturalist Charles Charles Charles Charles Darwin's Darwin's Darwin's Darwin's notebooks notebooks notebooks notebooks that that that that were were were were reported reported reported reported stolen stolen stolen stolen from from from from Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge university's university's university's university's library library library library had had had had been been been been returned returned returned returned two two two two decades decades decades decades after after after after they they they they disappeared disappeared disappeared disappeared from from from from the the the the books books books books which which which which include include include include the the the the nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth century century century century scientist scientist scientist scientist famous famous famous famous tree tree tree tree of of of of life life life life sketch sketch sketch sketch went went went went missing missing missing missing in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty oh oh oh oh one one one one after after after after being being being being removed removed removed removed for for for for photocopying photocopying photocopying photocopying the the the the the the the the time time time time stuff stuff stuff stuff believe believe believe believe they they they they just just just just might might might might to to to to be be be be misplaced misplaced misplaced misplaced of of of of the the the the searches searches searches searches of of of of the the the the library's library's library's library's collection collection collection collection of of of of ten ten ten ten million million million million books books books books they they they they were were were were reported reported reported reported stolen stolen stolen stolen to to to to police police police police in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty the the the the university university university university now now now now says says says says the the the the treasured treasured treasured treasured notebooks notebooks notebooks notebooks have have have have been been been been left left left left in in in in the the the the library library library library inside inside inside inside a a a a pink pink pink pink gift gift gift gift bag bag bag bag along along along along with with with with a a a a note note note note wishing wishing wishing wishing the the the the librarian librarian librarian librarian a a a a happy happy happy happy Easter Easter Easter Easter Charles Charles Charles Charles the the the the last last last last month month month month on on on on the the the the

Charles Charles Charles Charle Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge Darwin Police Police Police Police University University Universi Library Library Library Librar Charles Charles Charles Charle
Pope begs forgiveness of Indigenous for Canada school abuses

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Pope begs forgiveness of Indigenous for Canada school abuses

"Pope pope Francis Francis begs begs forgiveness forgiveness from from indigenous indigenous peoples peoples of of Canada Canada the the school school abuses abuses Francis Francis has has apologized apologized and and begged begged forgiveness forgiveness for for the the deplorable deplorable abuses abuses suffered suffered by by indigenous indigenous peoples peoples in in kind kind of of this this church church run run residential residential schools schools and and said said he he hopes hopes to to visit visit Canada Canada in in late late July July to to deliver deliver the the apology apology in in person person more more than than one one hundred hundred fifty fifty thousand thousand native native children children in in Canada Canada will will force force to to attend attend the the state state funded funded Christian Christian schools schools from from the the nineteenth nineteenth century century until until the the nineteen nineteen seventies seventies in in an an effort effort to to isolate isolate them them from from the the influence influence of of the the homes homes and and culture culture the the aim aim was was to to Christianize Christianize and and assimilate assimilate them them into into mainstream mainstream society society which which previous previous Canadian Canadian governments governments had had considered considered superior superior I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Canada Pope Pope Francis Francis Francis Francis Charles Charles De De Ledesma
John Zmirak on the FBI's Plan to Investigate Parents Over School Board Meetings

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:13 min | 8 months ago

John Zmirak on the FBI's Plan to Investigate Parents Over School Board Meetings

"Well. It's always a happy part of my week when i get to talk to our friend. John muir john's miracle. Welcome to the program. Hey are going to talk to you. No matter how grim the subjects were yes. Exactly a what. What is on your mind. What are some of the things that You know today is wednesday We're in the middle of another strange week. What what are you. what are you thinking. Well we just learned that the fbi is going to investigate parents who go to school board meetings to question what the teachers are instilling joke. Yes that's mind-bending is it not mind-bending i mean this is. This is one of these things that i guess. I took for granted that everybody in america knows that the government has no business getting between parents. Their kids never unless there is violence. Horrible violence how dare. How dare they imply that parents shouldn't no. i mean. look in loco parentis. We have schools public schools because we can't teach kids in many cases so we say we're going to hire people to teach kids. How did the government take this over and try to shove the parents out of the way. This is completely. Un-american is completely wrong. And i want every american to know. This is utterly unacceptable. Don't ever let school boards or governments pushed around when it comes to your kids as it is right now. The the is the enemy. Okay the fact that the fbi and the department of justice can be used to exert pressure on individual citizens trying to get involved in local politics. That's what school boards are the most local organic natural form of politics. The healthiest thing in the world is for people being involved in the decisions of what happens on their local government including including local schools with that said public schools. Were always a terrible idea. That public schools were created in the late nineteenth century by progresses like horace mann. Who explicitly said. They wanted to teach children to be less conservative less religious than their

John Muir John FBI America UN Department Of Justice Government Horace Mann
Why Do We See Anti-Intellectualism in the Church?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | 8 months ago

Why Do We See Anti-Intellectualism in the Church?

"I often talk my nor my bugbear is People who claim to be intellectual who have a philosophical bias against faith. It's wrong it's a philosophical bias. It is illogical but on the other side there are people in in the world of faith who have somehow in a knee jerk way adopted a bias against the things of the mind against the intellect. There are people christians. There almost nas ticks Who don't want to hear about reason they just wanna be kind of floating in the ether. as though faith and reason are opposed to each other. So tell us elijah stevens. You've made the film send prove. Why do you see that in the church. Anti-intellectualism i think that happened. During the great awakenings. It was not a part of the church until like people like finney came along and said look to reach the frontiers. We need to make this stuff. Simple emotional end. God use that but it stripped out the mind and so in the american wait wait wait so finney in the nineteenth century during the second great awakening right. He kind of emphasized. Let's keep it simple. Let's not go into the intellect because we're trying to reach the people on the frontier. I mean he actually made a strategic choice to do that. Yes and that kind of split. The church part where you have high intellectualism on one side and low focus on the power of spirit and then high focus on the power of the spirit and high emotionalism. And it's like there's this divide but that hasn't always been the

Elijah Stevens Finney
How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

Classics for Kids

02:03 min | 8 months ago

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

"After christopher columbus made his first trip across the atlantic ocean spain and other european countries began to colonize the americas. Spanish music had a big influence on latin american music. And so did the music of the enslaved people who were brought over from africa one of the first places columbus landed in fourteen. Ninety two was cuba. Nineteenth century violinist. Jose white lafitte had a spanish father and an afro-cuban mother whites composition that they yaqoob ana the beautiful. Cuban uses dance rhythms from haiti and the dominican republic on the island of hispaniola twentieth century. Cuban composer and missile. The owner was a pianist. That's lik wound up performing his most famous piece. My leg ania which is a spanish dance. Kunas family was full of musicians including his great nephew. Leo brouwer leo. Brouwer was guitarist until he hurt his right hand even after he had to stop playing. He kept on composing in fourteen. Ninety three columbus landed on the island. We call puerto rico spanish for rich port. The taino people who originally lived there called it. Land of the great lords in their language voted ken. Which is the title of this piece by. Puerto rican composer. Roberto ever

Jose White Lafitte Yaqoob Ana Christopher Columbus Atlantic Ocean Americas Kunas Columbus Spain Leo Brouwer Hispaniola Cuba Dominican Republic Africa Haiti Brouwer Puerto Rico KEN Puerto Rican Roberto
U.S. Spat With France Shows Challenge of Keeping Allies Unified

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:24 min | 8 months ago

U.S. Spat With France Shows Challenge of Keeping Allies Unified

"I want you to put on the secretary of state hat. That many believe people believed you're going to wear. Should hillary clinton have won the two thousand sixteen election. And tell me what you would do if you were sitting on the seventh floor of the state department and this submarine controversy arose. And you might want to recap it for people who didn't listen to talk about it last week. You're on the air with me when the story broke. Yeah in in very short strokes. Australia signed up for france to build diesel electric submarines which are pretty good but over the last week or so they have done a one eighty and signed up with the united states in the united kingdom to build vastly better nuclear powered submarines. The french have lost a multi billion dollar contract. Their outrage what i would have done in retrospect was spend more time speaking with our allies. The french our oldest allies the first nation who came and fought alongside us in the revolutionary war. There are very fond of pointing that out as we subsequently fought a small war with them but such was the nineteenth century at the moment there still very strong allies within nato and so this came across to them as a very bad industrial policy. But also a real stab in the back to an ally. If i were sitting in tony blinken shoes right now and tony by the way. Interestingly is a franco phonic. He speaks beautiful. French lived in france for many years. I think he is and ought to be the point. Man on trying to rebuild this at the moment quite shaky set of relationships. And it's not just france hewitt's it's also with europe. Broadly we see particularly in the wake of brexit as the united kingdom pulls out. We now see france taking a lead in germany in working toward a much more independent eu policy. That'll bleed into our efforts to stand up to china. That's why this is important. I think secretary blinken that ought to be pretty much at the top of his chat list. Right now is working with his counterparts in paris.

France Hillary Clinton Tony Blinken United Kingdom Australia United States Nato Tony Hewitt Europe Secretary Blinken Germany EU China Paris
John Zmirak Loves Eric's New Book

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:50 min | 8 months ago

John Zmirak Loves Eric's New Book

"Some talking to john's mirror and it's really really really depressing. John do we talk about something positive for for change. Sure how about the best book. I've read this year. And you just have a new eric. I'm the author get get outta here avalon. All you know. I do not flatter. Because i don't care what they think and your mum that list of people i just i don't care enough to flatter europe or the book is just actually good. If it sucks. I would not i tell you in an email but i wouldn't tell you on the air but this book is atheism dead is fantastic and i wanted to describe it to people. I purposely took this book with me. E book version to a greek restaurant in in dallas. That i take you to. When you're in town cost is cafe. Wonderful cafe on greenville. Very authentic When i was once reading your book stared the waiter comes up and says the author is greek. And i said yes. And he's a friend of mine and he eats here sometimes he said go tell telling to say hello next time. He is in restaurants. And i'm reading his atheism de kostas cafe and i realized that your book is like the athenian combo on the on the menu. Where it's not just lamb chops. It's also shrimp scampi. And it's also an order souvlaki. It has a huge filed. Three different wonderful thing. You get all of that for the low low low low low price of fourteen ninety seven if you go to eric. Metaxas dot com. It's supposed to be a thirty dollar book. Four hundred plus pages. And you're telling me and i know this is true. It's basically three books in one. I mean i'm not joking like it is. It's weird right. It is three short books in one. It really you should have sold them separately and now seldom together in a special authors anyway. Three books in one the first one is a fantastic book on intelligent design and how physics and biology and cosmetology and chemistry and chemistry are all pointing towards the fact that life could not exist. An orderly universe couldn't exist certainly advanced life and then human conscious life. None of these things can be explained by the quaint victorian nineteenth century superstition of random chance. Darwinism and survival. Of the i mean and that's putting it very mildly and i oftentimes when i'm writing my books. I established myself because i discovered things. I think. It can't possibly be this dramatically true. So i think when people read the book they will be

De Kostas Cafe Greenville John Dallas Europe Eric
The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:40 min | 9 months ago

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

"So margaret louise night. She was a prolific american inventor of machines and mechanisms for a variety of industrial everyday purposes. Margaret was nicknamed maddie mit. She lived with her widowed mother and older brothers. Charlie and jim in a little house in york maine. she was born in eighteen. Thirty eight by the way so after her father passed away mattie had inherited his toolbox and she liked to think of things that could be made with these tools and she drew them in a little notebook that she labeled my inventions. Mattie demonstrated knack for tools and mentioned from an early age making toys kites sleds and household items in as little girl. She preferred to play with woodworking tools. Instead of dolls saying that quote the only thing she wanted whereas a jack knife gimblett and pieces of wood. She knew she wanted good for her so when she was eleven. Maddie's finley moved to manchester new hampshire to work in the textile mills there and so matty was going to continue going to school only going so far as a complete her elementary school education and she got to know the head engineer there while wandering around the grounds after school waiting for her family to be done with their like fourteen to eighteen hour shifts. Sure textile mills. Yeah including like her twelve year old brother and fourteen so at age twelve. She started working the mill herself and aloom ow function and injured a worker So it turns out that one of the leading causes of serious injuries at the mill that she had observed was the propensity of the steel-tipped flying shuttles so those were manipulated by workers to unite the left in the warp threads in their weaves. I'm so these shuttles would come free of their looms and they would like shoot off the machines high-velocity even at like the slightest employee error. So like there were people dying from this. There are people like you know basically like you're getting almost shot. Yeah basically tipped metal thing like flying off a machine you know so it was really dangerous and so matty what she did. She created a guard. That would stop the shuttle from coming off of the machine if it malfunctioned. So like the exact details of this device have kind of been lost to history but mentions of it came out throughout published stories of her work and her Mentions articles that will get into so again because this was the mid nineteenth century. And why would anybody document what they actually did anyway. So workman who installed these types of guards all the looms and all the males in manchester. So this sounds like a big deal. She clearly didn't make any money for sure. You know maybe save some lives so after she turned eighteen. Mattie left manchester for better opportunities She worked in several different factories on new england along with other short-term technical jobs too so that she could keep

Margaret Louise Maddie Mit York Maine Gimblett Matty Mattie Margaret Finley Maddie Charlie Manchester JIM New Hampshire Workman New England
What All Americans Should Understand About Black Lives Matter

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 9 months ago

What All Americans Should Understand About Black Lives Matter

"Couple of questions black lives matter. What should all americans understand about black lives matter. And where does it fit into america. Organically is it some big plots of the democrat party. Is it just another race hustle. Ethno business also from a new generation of of al sharpton 's or is it truly something organic that is headless like an amoeba way. Does it fit in. What should all americans irrespective of their mellon levels. Think of this thing. I consider The movement behind b. l. m. not a real estate investment vehicle to ensure that the founders can get up home about the house multi worth multiple millions but instead the analog to the militant wing of the d. n. c. for the latter part of the nineteenth century and for the early parts of the twentieth century. The klu klux klan operated to make sure that all americans remembered the messaging the importance of separation the importance of weaken get you. Wherever you are. We can stop that job. We can prevent that opportunity. Black lives matter is working with corporations. It is working with the media. It is working with the academy. It works with government. The sad thing about the bill in movement is it was is able to do out in the open with the klan had to do secretly that danger is something that i hope that we start seeing a pushback. I want to start seeing. And i hope that we start. Seeing companies have to apologize for being willing to associate with racial separatist like the black lives matter

Democrat Party KLU Al Sharpton America
Creating the Oxford English Dictionary

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:04 min | 9 months ago

Creating the Oxford English Dictionary

"London physiological logical. Society is the oldest organisation in great britain dedicated to the study of language formed in eighteen. Forty two one of their first objectives was to create a list of the deficiencies of the english language by eighteen. Eighty four they had hatched the idea of creating a new dictionary. That would solve the problems. They saw in current dictionaries. The process of whoever was incredibly slow. It took until eighteen fifty seven to establish a committee to create a list of unregistered words. These are words that weren't in current dictionaries or were poorly defined. If this had been the extent of what the illogical society had done. I wouldn't be doing an episode about this. The man who headed up. The committee was richard chenevix-trench. Trench was an interested in just coming up with a list of unregistered words. His ambition was much greater the report he produced with something else entirely. His report was titled on some deficiencies in our english dictionaries. It detailed all of the problems with current english language dictionaries in the nineteenth century. He noted problems. With the lack of coverage of obsolete words histories of words synonyms of words in poor examples and illustrations of words. What trench propose wasn't just a dictionary like the society had considered in the past. Trench was proposing writing the dictionary the most comprehensive dictionary of the english language. It wouldn't just be a list of words but of all of the words no longer in use and the history of all the words and where they came from. This would be a massive massive undertaking in eighteen fifty-eight the illogical society formerly called for the creation of a new dictionary which they called a new english dictionary on historical principles. First order of business was hiring someone to be the editor. Trench wasn't able to take on the assignment. As he was appointed the dean of westminster abbey. The job fell to herbert coleridge. Coleridge was only twenty nine. When he was appointed in eighteen sixty he created the outline in strategy for the entire project. He began the system to categorize the hundreds of thousands of quotes which would be required.

Richard Chenevix Great Britain London Herbert Coleridge Trench Westminster Abbey Coleridge
The Origin of the Elgin Marbles

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:41 min | 9 months ago

The Origin of the Elgin Marbles

"Greece in the early part of the nineteenth century wasn't yet an independent country. It had been under the rule of the ottoman empire since the mid fifteenth century and this was the geopolitical situation in athens in eighteen. O one thomas. Bruce seventh earl of elegant was appointed as the ambassador extraordinary and minister. Plenipotentiary of his britannic majesty to the sublime port of selma third sultan of turkey prior to arriving in the ottoman empire. He asked the british government if they were interested in. Hiring artists can make drawings and take plaster casts of the sculptures at the parthenon. The british government was in no way interested. However even if the government wasn't interested. Thomas bruce still was so using his own funds. He hired a team of artists to document. The artwork found at the parthenon so far all of his plans for documenting. What was at the parthenon. We're perfectly fine. If he had just stuck to this. I probably be doing an episode today about something else. however he didn't didn't just stick to documenting the artwork. He soon began removing whatever sculptures that he could in total he took twenty one full statues fifteen meta panels which are carver. Tabular architectural pieces and a full seventy five meters of the parthenon frieze which decorated the upper interior of the parthenon. All of this marble sculpture was sent them all. To and then to england they became known as the elgin marbles named after the earl of elegant and because they were all made out of marble they are also known as the parthenon marbles. This was all done at the personal expense of the earl. At a cost of seventy four thousand two hundred and forty pounds or what today would be worth five million pounds or about six point eight million dollars.

Bruce Seventh Earl British Government Thomas Bruce Selma Greece Athens Sultan Thomas Turkey Carver England
Childbirth in the 19th Century

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:39 min | 9 months ago

Childbirth in the 19th Century

"Mid nineteenth century didn't have anything close to what we would consider modern medicine. The germ theory of infection still didn't exist and many medical professionals still believed in things like my asthma's and humor's and would prescribe things like bloodletting patients also at this time. The mortality rate for women in childbirth was significantly higher than what it is today. The primary cause of death was something called peripheral fever also known as child bed fever. It was a disease that would strike women within days of giving birth and it often lead to raging. Fevers putrid pus. Admitting from the birth canal open sores in the abdomen and finally sepsis and death. The maternity wards at hospitals at this time in europe were primarily for lower class women and often prostitutes the deal. Was that women who came to the hospital. Could receive free care but their care would usually be overseen by students as it was a training hospital. When someone weiss arrived at vienna general it had to separate maternity wards. That were run quite differently. One ward was run by male doctors and the other ward was run by female midwives however the outcome in the two wards were radically different. The word with the doctors had a mortality rate. That was five times. That of the ward the midwives. The reputation of the doctors ward was so bad that women would often cry and plead not to go there and there were some that would hold off on their arrival so they could give birth in the street as if they gave birth in route to the hospital. They could get the same benefits as if they gave birth in the hospital. Shockingly women who gave birth in the street had a lower mortality rate than those who gave birth in the doctor's ward

Asthma's Peripheral Fever Child Bed Fever Fevers Sepsis Weiss Vienna Europe
The Lost History of the Electric Car

Kottke Ride Home

01:59 min | 9 months ago

The Lost History of the Electric Car

"Electric car revolution is finally hopefully beginning to go mainstream but it turns out. It's taken even longer than i realized. The debate over electric versus gas cars goes back pretty much to the beginning of cars themselves and the reason gas cars one ounce. Here's a hint. It was misogyny well at least in part is asleep recently ran in excerpt from. Tom standards his new book a brief history of motion from the wheel to the car to what comes next and he dives into the development of electric cars all the way back in the nineteenth century so way back in eighteen ninety seven the best selling car in the us he says was the columbia from pope manufacturing company in electric model. Now it's lead wouldn't last long. As steam vehicles became pretty popular for a hot minute there and then by nineteen o three. The oldsmobile curved dash came out a gas powered automobile and it took the lead in popularity and even though many in europe had already become gasoline converts in the us. The debate was still ongoing through the first decade of the nineteen hundreds. And what exactly were the main points of the debate. Well as stanage points out cars. Were supposed to fix a lot of the problems that people had with horse drawn vehicles in issues like noise traffic accidents and the pollution and stench caused by horse manure now standard is well aware of the irony that the gas powered cars. That one out failed on exactly all of those points. Well except the manure in less. You were biff in back to the future. Your car isn't leaving any horse manure in its wake. But it is producing way more and way worse. Pollution in the form of carbon monoxide and dioxide nitrogen oxides sulfur dioxide and various greenhouse gases not to mention quoting standards reliance on fossil fuels such as gasoline and diesel has also had far reaching geopolitical ramifications. As much of the world became dependent on oil from the middle east during the twentieth century and quotes

Stanage TOM Columbia United States Europe Middle East
Nicola Tesla: Let There Be Light

History That Doesn't Suck

02:15 min | 9 months ago

Nicola Tesla: Let There Be Light

"Is no subject more captivating more worthy of study than nature to understand this great mechanism to discover which forces on active and the laws which govern them is the highest aim of the intellect of man nature has stored up the universe infinite energy com infinite energy in the universe. Indeed nicholas stand by the statement and goes on to explain his desire to tap into this infinite energy but the immigrant continues he will not wax philosophical tonight rather you'll contend himself with explaining and demonstrating one of the most important issues facing the world at present namely the production of a practical and efficient source of light going into professor mode the ingenious serb scratches out formulas on the chalkboard that high frequency alternating current the way forward. That's a claim that his former employer. Thomas alva- edison would certainly reject yet. Nikola argues alternating. Current could cindy electricity hundreds of miles but as intellectual as the audience in this packed lecture hall might be why just tell them about the virtues of alternating current when you can show them nikola flips a switch on his wooden desk. He's just engaged. A motor high frequency alternator and as he does so an arc in sparks. Jump between two poles incredible. But that's nothing. The lincoln venter's just getting started with the lecture halls lights dimmed nikolai now. Picks up to gasfield tubes that is geissler tubes holding one in each hand as he stands between the two large hanging zinc sheets. They start to glow americans essentially from now. Might look at these think lightsabres. Well these nineteenth century americans aren't far off from that one reporter here. Tonight will later. Describe the scene quote like aluminum held in the hands of an archangel. Those quote others are just lost as to how nikolai's doing it. The electrical review will write quote. Here mr tesla seem to act the part of a veritable magician close quote

Thomas Alva Nicholas Lincoln Venter Nikola Cindy Nikolai Mr Tesla
WW1: The Schlieffen Plan

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:12 min | 9 months ago

WW1: The Schlieffen Plan

"One of the most remarkable things about the first world war. Is that everyone sought coming. Well no one knew when it would start or what would be the trigger. All the parties involved knew that such a war was eventually going to happen. The germans saw the writing on the wall. Almost a decade before the war started most of the alliance's which were put into play for the first world war. We're developed in the aftermath of the franco prussian war of eighteen. Seventy and eighteen. Seventy one during this war which was really the last major war of the nineteenth century. Prussia defeated france taking the border territory. Known as alsace lorraine it also indirectly led to the creation of a new country called germany which was a union of prussia. Bavaria in a few smaller german speaking states france seeing this new unified germany posing an even greater threat than just prussia signed a treaty with russia in eighteen ninety four which stipulated that an attack on one country would be an attack on both. Both countries saw germany as a threat and their alliance was used to put germany in the position of having to fight a two front war. Should they choose to be belligerent. It was this strategic reality. That the chief of staff of the german army field marshal elfriede vansh lifan had to plan for lunch. Lifan was the head of the german army from eighteen ninety one to nineteen o six in late nineteen o five vansh leaf and realized that the world had changed dramatically. Russia had been soundly defeated in the russia. Japanese war railroads have made the movement of troops easier and the telegraph and the telephone had made communications faster. Weapons had improved and had become more lethal bunch leaf than felt it was necessary to totally rethink. How germany would fight a war against both france and russia. There were several big pitcher assumptions that virtually in made which went into the development of his plan. The first was that if a war with france and russia turned into a war of attrition. Germany would lose. They simply didn't have the manpower or resources of a combined france and russia to take them both on simultaneously second was at russia's military had been vastly over estimated their defeat at the hands of the japanese showed their weakness and they would soon recover from that defeat. Vansh lifan estimated that russia would take at least six weeks to mobilize before they could seriously begin to challenge germany.

Prussia Germany France Russia German Army Marshal Elfriede Vansh Lifan Lifan Bavaria Vansh Lifan
The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:06 min | 9 months ago

The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

"Psychology has been an important topic of study for centuries the ancient greeks and egyptians had their schools of thought on it as did the people in ancient india and china. it wasn't until the nineteenth century. Though when psychological research turned from the philosophical to the experimental german psychologist gustave thickener started testing human brains response to various stimuli around the eighteen thirties from their experts. Such as herman ebbing house went on to study other functions of the mind from memory to introspection to classical conditioning psychology became a bustling industry of experimentation. Eventually scientists didn't just want to learn the limits of the brain. They wanted to understand what made people tick. Why were some individuals able to say no while others were more closers. Stanley milgram of yale university tested this in his famous milgram experiment in nineteen sixty one. He invited participants to administer electric shocks to someone in another room. As the shocks increased in power the screams of the unknown party got louder and more intense until they stopped completely. But don't worry nobody died. The electric shocks weren't even real but the effects on the subjects pushing the buttons certainly were milgram wanted to test how far a person would go in following orders from an authority figure even if those orders involved hurting or even killing someone else. He based his experiment. On the actions of the nazis during world war two the stanford prison experiment of nineteen seventy-one took things further by placing college students in a simulated prison environment. The purpose was to study. How power affected one psychological states one group of students was given the title of guard while another subset was placed in the prisoner role. Three guards were pulled out of the experiment early after demonstrating what were described as genuine sadistic tendencies. The prisoners also suffered they were referred to by numbers rather than their names. They were stripped naked and sprayed with a hose in shorts. They were humiliated the two week experiment was terminated. After just six

Gustave Thickener Herman Ebbing Stanley Milgram Yale University India China Milgram Stanford
Phill Kline on How to Stop Them Stealing the Next Election

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 9 months ago

Phill Kline on How to Stop Them Stealing the Next Election

"Do we make sure this does not happen again. fell i. You have to hold state legislatures accountable and under current law. They are not accountable. They need to have a standing committee they need to pass legislation. that has a standing committee. That's bipartisan that. Has subpoena power that compel people to testify and produce documents. Whose charges that. They must issue a report one whether the election was lawful and followed regulations to it did not wear. Did it not three. What was the impact in four. Should the election be certified. All of that should be open and understandable and provided to the american people. You have to ban private money. Many of our states are doing that wrong but we have to ban private money in the elections and we have to eliminate these dropbox. When you say doing it wrong. What are they doing well. Georgia passed a law. That said private monies allowed if it's appropriated by local government. Well that's exactly what's convert. Did he bypassed. The state legislature directly to local government gave them grants and they use the money as an example in wisconsin. That money was used to give Democrats cities forty seven dollars of voter turnout the vote and republican areas. That was four dollars. Voter you go to pennsylvania. There was a zucker box every four square miles in strong democrat county delaware county. They also had ballot harvesters paid for and unlawfully by zuckerberg money flowing through a nonprofit in the fifty nine counties in the trump won in two thousand sixteen. The which one sucker box for every eleven hundred and fifty nine square miles. You have to keep the private money out and that state has to as have the courage to treat every voter the same. What we saw twenty twenty was the same democrat strategy of the deep south of the turn of the nineteenth century where they tried to turn out one type of vote. That was the white vote. They tried to suppress one type of vote. That was the black vote this time it was. They tried to use government to turn out the democrat. Vote and they tried to suppress the republican vote. It shouldn't be allowed. It can't happen

Dropbox Legislature Georgia Delaware County Wisconsin Zuckerberg Pennsylvania
Author Melanie Kirkpatrick Describes Sarah Josepha Hale, the Original 'Lady Editor'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:21 min | 10 months ago

Author Melanie Kirkpatrick Describes Sarah Josepha Hale, the Original 'Lady Editor'

"Woman as you said she was a major figure in the nineteenth century gigantic. Name but virtually forgotten really. I mean whoever talks about. Sarah jesse hail so just tell us about her generally speaking more about her life because she is a hugely influential figure. I imagine how influential she watched. I think she's one of the most influential women if not the most intellectual in our history on she was. She grew up in a little town in new hampshire. She was born in seventeen eighty eight. She was really a a woman of the eighteenth century and when her husband died she was in her thirties with four children by the oldest for seven and a fifth on the way she had to figure out a way to support herself. She liked to write her husband had told her she was good at it. So she got the masons the freemasons her husband had been a freemason and she started to write and the freemasons published her first book. A book of poetry then wrote a novel an anti slavery novel decades before uncle. Toms cabin and that caught the attention to detail and it caught the attention of an episcopal priest in a boston. Who was starting a a magazine for women and he invited her to come. There called the lady's magazine and be the first editor she did and she turned it into a big success. So much. so that louis goaty a publishing magnets in philadelphia decided he wanted her is editor of this book. Called his magazine called the ladies book and she wanted to stay in boston where her oldest son was in college and harvard. But so what domestic odi do. He bought her magazine so that he could get her and a. That was the beginning of uniform partnership that lasted until the I think it was eighteen. Seventy seven so for fifty years. She until she was almost ninety hale. Was this a towering figure in american

Sarah Jesse Toms Cabin New Hampshire Louis Goaty Boston Philadelphia Harvard Hale
"nineteenth century" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Encourage these women to bake items that have cream in them on them or whatever whipped cream all right and then you also say let's go over goblin cutoff and see what the ladies are given up and you played bump and grind music. You don't find that suggestive at all. I think it's fun. I think it'd be speaks the old minor town the old minor times you know about monitor times the nineteenth century. That's exactly right but the lake is not that old but let me say because you think. I know a little bit about this. But they're lake is not that old but indies in this area. There reminders for many many year many decades and they went into town and they built saloons. Now i don't know what was here before Old man butler got here but there were saloons here. They did logging here. You know they had logged okay. All right see talk about. Suggestive are making that connection. You know all right fine anyway so there was the old and the old ladies would come out and show you what they had. Are you talking about pies and candies. we're talking about you know you wanna give it up. Listen the old women give it up. Sex about sex yes. of course i am. And that was one of the oh wives tales one of the legends of the area that the old women would come out and told her skirts up and go. Ooh you know and then run back inside. It's still somebody needs to get over there and help them with that.

one nineteenth century
"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Appalachian folk song of the nineteenth century the time the date is right there in the opening line eighteen forty five and that version by Matthew all well and his cyber trad project so we use a company by an electronic drone but also a double bass and cello really effective use of of the electro acoustic instrumentation there at the beginning of the set we heard Shirley Collins version of pretty sorrow which is set in the year eighteen forty nine but either way the song seems to be the the tale of an Irish immigrants fleeing the potato famine arriving on the shores alone destitute and then converted by death a tale that is probably too frequently told even that one hundred seventy years after the song in between those two versions of pretty sorrow we again heard Charlie Collins it remarkable to think it's the same woman singing in in the the the pretty Sarah recording she's almost high enough to shatter glass and then this unexpected late season comeback from the British folk singer released a couple of albums in her eighties after nearly forty years of not recording at all and we heard her version of another nineteenth century American song a hymn called wondrous love and that's where we are on this episode of new sounds listening to contemporary versions of of these old American songs from the nineteenth century Stephen foster is remains a kind of foundational figure in American popular song I mean everybody knows at least some of his songs my old Kentucky home Swanee river oh Susanna my Darling Clementine hard times come the more the the list goes on and on the one will hear is beautiful dreamer in an unusual arrangement by the late nori York New York based singer composer teacher and she had a real knack for doing unexpected arrangements of thrice familiar songs like this and the recording you're going to hear is from a new sounds live concert that we did with Nora onstage Merkin hall back in two thousand two of beautiful dreamer then we'll hear a song by the next great American songwriter of the nineteenth century Henry Clay work who's probably best known for the song grandfather's clock but the song that will here is one of his civil war tunes it's called wake Nicodemus and it is about a slave a man who as you listen to the lyrics was bought for a bag full of gold and I I mentioned you know what the song is about because listening to it you may not get the the full a fact because this version by Tim curry of Rocky Horror Picture Show fame is sung in a kind of a broad Scottish accent with wailing bagpipes behind him which actually is a pretty inventive way of calling back to one of the the the the main musical threads that went into American popular song in the nineteenth century the the music of the British Isles so it's very rock N. but also a very thoughtful version of wake Nicodemus that Tim curry does right after this version of Stephen foster's songs my beautiful dream from the late nor your cool to this well the highland pipes and.

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WTVN

"Concerned with taking in carbs and fats into their systems and of course that is a no no for a lot of fad diets they say the first fad diet program in the U. S. during the nineteenth century and to this day people are trying all sorts of crazy things to lose the pounds if you just needed any sort of justification today is national eat what you want them to live large just talking about how impulse buying was going up according to this study there is a decline in sales for the first time in a decade this is from Costco and they say this could signal the end of panic buying the retail giant released its monthly sales reports said that net sales were down one point eight percent for April as compared to last year Costco attributed the loss to the effects of code nineteen including social distancing measures and stay at home orders which they said led to decrease to decrease the traffic and sales but then they say it is people got the supplies they needed foot traffic started to slow down toward the beginning April and some people say that this is a sign that retail trends are going back to normal so we'll see if we're through with panic buying the the XFL is up for sale it I can't imagine I thought Vince McMahon was insane for trying this a second time you know covert nineteen is certainly decimated a lot of stuff but the XFL was was a victim and I guess the way it sounds to get a potential buyer for this some investors are saying it might not be as far fetched as you think Mr there's lots of people who are very rich but not rich enough to own an NFL team so maybe someone will see this as the next big thing at a bargain price so it's kind of amazing to think that you could own an entire football league and that is that still cost less than one NFL franchise wow they say the XFL was on track for forty six million in revenue last year I would double check those stats before I signed on the dotted line but that's that's kind of interesting Lori Laughlin we'll see if she's laughing Laughlin come in October she was pretty sure the judge was going to dismiss her case against her and her husband you know for the the college admissions scandal U. S. district judge Nathaniel Gorton decided against it and I guess she's freaking out now and it looks like the the trial is coming up in October so it'll be interesting to see how she gets her house in order she's been a little bit it almost seems kind of a she seems a little arrogant like al I'm not going to go down on this it turns out you just might miss Laughlin where is the lovely parting music Josh.

Costco Vince McMahon Lori Laughlin Nathaniel Gorton NFL
"nineteenth century" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"In the nineteenth century he failed died his wife then launch series of rescue operations defining thinking was stuck out there somewhere and she had to bring him back and on one of those expeditions was a young midshipman his name was Sir his name was mark and he became Sir Clements Robert Robert mark and why is Markham so critical to the story of Antarctica how does he contribute to this drama Markham is a true Victorian character larger than life Victorian character who becomes who is have have ample wealth to indulge his interest and he is a geographer extraordinaire of and we had yes the young man he had as is very common with the upper crust in England he joined the navy for awhile and on that while in the navy he found basically meaning first wife in exploration and he had participated in the search for Sir John Franklin the Franklin search the search went on for twenty years and in the process the well maybe and private expeditions literally map that archipelago of islands above Canada which is where Franklin was lost and he comes back he doesn't really like being in the navy doesn't like maybe discipline is a very independent minded man and he he musters out of the navy and he there is a life of a mixture of exploration and geography and science the sort of a gentleman he T. D. takes expeditions he's the one who who get quinine out of Peru and takes it to India and other places where it can be grown he he travels in India he travels different in Ethiopia Abyssinia and he eventually and he'll come back to England he eventually worked his way up he becomes involved in the royal geographic society serving for for two decades as a secretary and Dennis is president and he he he he he hasn't strong attachment to the British navy he is impact his cousin is a is a is a leading captain in the navy very prominent he has a strong attachment to empire he's been very involved in Africa in building empire in South America and in India he has a very strong ego and he's a very driven character well connected and he thinks it all fits together with him going back to either succeed in getting through the Northwest Passage or even better get to the North Pole I know we're a long way from the South Pole as far as we can get but he he he fixes on this and he pushes have the navy the British navy oil maybe engage in in explorations to reach the North Pole any pushes the government any anything the colonial office and he pushes the Royal Society to back this and so the British re engage they had after the failure of a Franklin and the Franklin search they they pull out of the north of of this sort of exploring but he thinks it's the best possible training during peace time for the navy it builds com prop come moderate among the month and then it happens the officers it happens the man he has this romantic notions almost like Arthur I'm trying to find the holy grail because he thinks it's great for the men great for morale in in in in in peacetime it gives the navy something to do and also it it extends the British domain remember more than Canada which still British back then it was under the under the the house and take a company and so he gets some expeditions to go north and they are utter failures utter failures and windows fail and and people die on them his cousin is on it and lead to disastrous March to the North Pole with an utter failure mark and then re calibrate that and because he knows the North Pole is out of the question and it's just water up there and he tries for thirty years to get that up get the British involved with going to the South Pole because there there's land there there's potential new territory there might be minerals or something but most of all this is a chance during peace time to build the navy and to build British prestige and when he becomes president the Royal Society in the eighteen nineties he is absolutely fixed on that goal of getting an expedition to the south he's already met Robert Fulton Scott who is a is a cadet in the navy and he chooses it in his own mind that would be the perfect leader of the expedition now that he's too old to do it and in that sense he is central to to getting the British engaged he's a natural writer he writes articles for all the popular journals all the journals for the upper crust to try to excite them to make when you really think about it getting the South Pole you have to choose it it's an arbitrary goal it's like getting to the head of the Nile which of course speaks in Livingston and and Burton were all focused on you have to or getting later getting to the Himalayas or later for us getting to the moon you have to if you had to romanticize this objective and make the British people getting to the South Pole as an objective worthy of of what Britain should be all about in other words he needed to make it a dream and there's a side bar here before we plunge into the race to the South Pole which is a free Hoff Nansen a an explorer Norwegian explorer who will and became the not mentor but inspiration for rolled Ammons Manson was successful in reaching through the arctic ice is in the north and was successful in of the Northwest Passage and so this side bar that Markham had to watch the Norwegians leap ahead of British explores while he was frustrated with the reluctance of the Victorians to get back to explore Manson was an extraordinary character he out of the blue he he crossed Greenland that's how he got his name he skied with a party of four others across Greenland and this is when Norwegian nationalism was just starting and they wanted to claim their independence their part of Sweden and he came back this resounding national hero and it really was not that he skied across Greenland which no one else had done that before and it was certainly amazing but he becomes he he is he he becomes the focal point of of Norwegian pride much like George Washington would be for America and the focal point of independence and then he becomes a scientist in his own right he becomes he's appointed ambassador to England he eventually wins the Nobel Peace Prize for his work later in life in the nineteen thirties yes a spectacular live spectacular light now Ahmanson was never at that level but Ahmanson idealized image as a boy with when he was a boy that that Manson sailed across Skeeter crossed green later on he would take the arctic drift expedition up toward the North Pole and in his boat the fram and Ahmanson wanted the same and the glory that Manson got he became hooked on this celebrity because man Manson was literally a larger than life celebrity this is very much like a romantic drama and the professor mentions Arthur in the round table in the minds of these men it was played out.

"nineteenth century" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The Pacific Ocean and was picked up by United States Navy warships all has actually happened a hundred and four years later yeah but the difference was he used heavy artillery for propulsion yes you're right and so you look at that you say how nineteenth century can you get well he was a nineteenth century mind grappling with the twenty century problem you got part of it right but part of it just have to be off if the only had the Vinci's mind god knows what he could to come up with with that book comma yeah right but I am a twentieth century mind grappling with the twenty second century problem so you know they'll look back at my stuff people say well that was that was cute but he couldn't possibly know we would do it was self with producing that'll low box you know or something like that in terms of breathable oxygen Robert how what what level do you have to be at so you don't have to wear you tank in a mask or anything because I've noticed just myself when I'm in St Louis or Los Angeles the breathing is much easier than when I go to Denver when were right way up high I mean what's the deal like that what's the difference between Denver's oxygen level and Saint Louis is there a big difference there are some difference in in you know I'm speaking to you from ten perfect that's right okay well when we did our beyond belief show that that's right so for me this is normal and and plenty of people course live here in a similar altitude state we get used to it where about eighty five percent the oxygen level you have he level now there are people that with higher than that there are people that live you know improvement in the call and they have about half the oxygen that you get at sea level and you can still function and they still function you can get used to that still function okay now when you start going even higher like if you climb Mount Everest they're the oxygen level is only about a third of sea level that is a harsh that's that's too low there is to most people needed oxygen mask for that and and I meet somebody actually did climb Mount Everest without oxygen mask but you may find himself doing and so on Mars that would be easy to gauge where somebody would say you can't take your mask off your friends you can't do it right right but for instance if you know high altitude pilot since World War two and of course our mac address climbers have done just fine at twenty seven thousand feet wearing an oxygen mask so the air pressure can be that low provided you have a higher oxygen percentage in what you're breathing okay so that's how they solve the problems of pilots blacking out flying at high altitude beach put on the oxygen they have in our hotel in boulder little apparatuses for breathing if you need it you know where they put the the cookies on the din the drinks and stuff like that they there's a there's a little tiny canister with a cop that fits over your face and your nose and they have it for you if you need to brief and I've never seen that before ever now I actually have my money with him in a hotel room right but anyway if we can create an atmosphere on Mars that is say one thirty second Mister then you'll be able to go outside without a space suit you would need an oxygen mask on you never ask one okay but you wouldn't need a space anymore to stand and you could have shown to cities that are at that very thing pressure but with a higher oxygen percentage in the air and so and it doesn't have to be pure oxygen because you know he at sea level you're breathing one fifth of the gas your previous oxygen so it's if you were up on Everest in your briefing where the air is one thirty second you will greeting stuff that was three fifths oxygen you would be greeting the pharaoh oxygen you are now do you think Mars at one time had a pretty significant oxygen awful atmosphere well I think March at one time had a pretty significant atmosphere that we know for sure because three rivers on March the dry up reverse that water erosion features could not exist.

Pacific Ocean United States Navy
"nineteenth century" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"He used heavy artillery for propulsion yes you're right and so you look at that you say how nineteenth century can you get well he was a nineteenth century mind grappling with the twenty century problem we got part of it right but part of it just have to be off is the only had the Vinci's mind god knows what he could to come up with with that book comma yeah right but I am a twentieth century mind grappling with the twenty second century problem so you know they'll look back at my stuff will say well that was that was cute but he couldn't possibly know we would do it was self we produce the national low box you know or something like that in terms of breathable oxygen Robert how what what level do you have to be at so you don't have to wear Etain kit a mask or anything because I've noticed just myself when I'm in St Louis or Los Angeles the breathing is much easier than when I go to Denver when were right way up high I mean what's the deal like that what's the difference between Denver's oxygen level and Saint Louis is there a big difference there are some difference in in you know I'm speaking to you from ten perfect that's right okay well when we did our beyond belief show back that's right so for me this is normal and and plenty of people course live here in a similar altitude state we get used to it we're about eighty five percent the oxygen level you have he level now there are people that with higher than that there are people that live you know improvement in the pow and they have about half the oxygen that you get at sea level and you can still function and they still function you can get used to that still function okay now when you start going even higher like if you climb Mount Everest they're the oxygen level is only about a third of sea level that is marsh that's that's too low there is to most people needed oxygen mask for that and and I meet somebody actually did climb Mount Everest without oxygen mask but you may find himself doing and so on Mars that would be easy to gauge where somebody would say you can't take your mask off yet friends you can't do it right right but for instance if you know how the two pilots since World War two and of course our mac address climbers have done just fine at twenty seven thousand feet wearing an oxygen mask so the air pressure can be that low provided you have a higher oxygen percentage in what you're breathing okay so that's how they solve the problems of pilots blacking out flying at high altitude the to put on the oxygen they have in our hotel in boulder little apparatuses for breathing if you need it you know where they put the the cookies on the din the drinks and stuff like that they there's a there's a little tiny canister with a cop that fits over your face and your nose and they have it for you if you need to brief and I've never seen that before ever now I actually agree with him in a hotel room right but anyway if we can create an atmosphere on Mars that is say one thirty second Hey then you'll be able to go outside without a spacesuit you would need an oxygen mask on you never ask one okay but you wouldn't need a space anymore to stand and you could have shown to cities that are at that very thing pressure but with a higher oxygen percentage in.

"nineteenth century" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"The Pacific Ocean and was picked up by United States Navy warships all as actually happened a hundred and four years later yeah but the difference was he used heavy artillery for propulsion yes you're right and so you look at that you see how nineteenth century can you get well he was a nineteenth century mind grappling with the twenty century problem you got part of it right but part of it just have to be off is the only had the Vinci's mind god knows what he could to come up with with that book comma yeah right but I am a twentieth century mind grappling with the twenty second century problem so you know they'll look back at my stuff will say well that was that was cute but he couldn't possibly know we would do it was self we producing Natalie robot you know or something like that in terms of breathable oxygen Robert how what what level do you have to be at so you don't have to wear you tank in a mask or anything because I've noticed just myself when I'm in St Louis or Los Angeles the breathing is much easier than when I go to Denver one were right way up high I mean what's the date like that what's the difference between Denver's oxygen level and Saint Louis is there a big difference there are some difference in in you know I'm speaking to you from ten perfect that's right okay well when we did our beyond belief show that that's right so for me this is normal and and plenty of people course live here in a similar altitude state we get used to it where about eighty five percent the oxygen Michael you happen he level now there are people that live higher than this there are people that live you don't ruin in the call and they have about half the oxygen that you get at sea level and you can still function and they still function you can get used to that and still function okay now when you start going even higher like if you climb Mount Everest they're the oxygen level is only about a third of sea level that is a harsh that's that's too low that is too low most people needed oxygen mask for that and and I meet somebody actually did climb Mount Everest without oxygen mask but evening upon himself doing and so on Mars that would be easy to gauge where somebody would say you can't take your mask off yet friends you can't do it right right but for instance if you know high altitude pilot since World War two and of course our mac address climbers have done just fine at twenty seven thousand feet wearing an oxygen mask so the air pressure can be brought low provided you have a higher oxygen percentage in what you're breathing okay so that's how they solve the problems of pilots blacking out flying at high altitude beach put on the oxygen they have in our hotel in boulder little apparatuses for breathing if you need it you know where they put the the cookies on the din the drinks and stuff like that they there's a there's a little tiny canister with a cop that fits over your face and your nose and they have it for you if you need to brief and I've never seen that before ever now I actually agree with him in a hotel room right but anyway if we can create an atmosphere on Mars that is say one thirties thickest earth science fair then you'll be able to go outside without a space suit you would need an oxygen mask like an Everest climb okay but you wouldn't need a space anymore to stand and you could have shown to cities that are at that very same pressure but with a higher oxygen percentage in the air and so and it doesn't have to be pure oxygen because you know each at sea level you're breathing one fifth of the gas your previous oxygen so if if you were up on Everest in your briefing where the air is one thirty second you were breeding stuff that was three fifths oxygen you would be grievously around oxygen you are now do you think Mars at one time had a pretty significant oxygen awful atmosphere well I think March at one time had a pretty significant atmosphere that we know for sure because three rivers on March the dry up reverse that water erosion features could.

Pacific Ocean United States Navy
"nineteenth century" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"He used heavy artillery for propulsion yes you're right and so you look at that you see how nineteenth century can you get well he was a nineteenth century mind grappling with the twentieth century problem you got part of it right but part of it just have to be off is the only had the Vinci's mind god knows what he could to come up with with that book comma yeah right but I am a twentieth century mind grappling with the twenty second century problem so you know they'll look back at my stuff will say well that was that was cute but he couldn't possibly know we would do it was self reproducing that'll robot you know or something like that in terms of breathable oxygen Robert how what what level do you have to be at so you don't have to wear you tank in the bass grainy thing because I've noticed just myself when I'm in St Louis or Los Angeles the breathing is much easier than when I go to Denver when were right way up high I mean what's that like that what's the difference between Denver's oxygen level and Saint Louis is there a big difference there are some difference in in you know I'm speaking to you from ten perfect that's right okay well when we did our beyond belief show that that's right so for me this is normal and and plenty of people course live here in similar altitude state we get used to it where about eighty five percent the oxygen Michael you have he level now there are people that with higher than that there are people that live you know improvement in Nepal and they have about half the oxygen that you get at sea level and you can still function and they still function you can get used to that still function okay now when you start going even higher right if you climb Mount Everest they're the oxygen level is only about a third of sea level that is a harsh that's that's too low that is too low most people needed oxygen mask the fact and and I meet somebody actually did climb Mount Everest without oxygen mask but you may find himself doing and so on Mars that would be easy to gauge where somebody would say you can't take your mask off your friends you can't do it right right but for instance if you know high altitude pilot since World War two and of course our mac address climbers have done just fine at twenty seven thousand feet wearing an oxygen mask so the air pressure can be that low provided you have a higher oxygen percentage in what you're breathing I think that's how they solve the problems of pilots blacking out flying at high altitude the to put on the oxygen they have in our hotel in boulder little apparatuses for breathing if you need it you know where they put the the cookies on the din the drinks and stuff like that they there's a there's a little tiny canister with a cop that fits over your face and your nose and they have it for you if you need to brief and I've never seen that before ever now I actually agree with him in a hotel room right but anyway if we can create an atmosphere on Mars that is say one thirty second Mister Hey then you'll be able to go outside without a spacesuit you would need an oxygen mask like an Everest climb okay but you wouldn't need a space anymore to stand and you could have shown to cities that'll affect very thing pressure but with a higher oxygen percentage in.

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Nineteenth century these caster of blame shifting and smearing and anti semitism seems very far from the twenty first century however there is a line that can be followed directly from the Dreyfus affair eighteen ninety four until his eventual vindication nineteen oh six by the a high courts in France right through to to now to today because Alfred Dreyfus an honorable French officer from a part of France and we will discuss that with the author Robert Harris from a part of France that had both French and German antecedents Alfred Dreyfus was a Jewish officer in the French army and therein lies the link to to this anti semitism and the persecution of Judaism here in the twenty first century and everything that's happened in between certainly the two world wars I welcome and congratulate Robert Harris the author of the new book an officer and a spy I emphasize this is a work of literature a work of fiction but Mister Harris has done us the good work of taking the fax and go plunging inside the mind of one major character who was at the center of telling the story in the first person Robert a very good evening to you congratulations I begin with the Dreyfus frame because it's a lack of education in the United States that delivers this very far away name to something to do with the black and white movie made a long time ago about some man named sela who wrote novels it's all very far away from the American audience to do them the favor you are in Great Britain you see this as a European what is the Dreyfus case for your up today and what do we know what we think about that period good evening to you good evening John thank you for having me on well look great because of that was in its day at the end of the nineteenth I'm sure the beginning of the twentieth century the biggest story in the world it concerned issue said Jewish office captain who is accused of spying for the Germans passing secrets to Berlin he was given a rapid in secret trial found guilty publicly humiliated in Paris one winter morning in nineteen ninety five and shipped off to imprisonment for life on devil's island off the coast of South America many gradually did they begin to emerge that Mister been a miscarriage of justice and that's the story that I tell and it seems to me immensely relevant to the modern world both as you say because we see in the traces case the pre figuring all the anti semitism the then erupted in Germany and dislike of the twentieth century and they're also elements of the track this case we speak very directly to us now the twenty first century just in terms of the way in which national security considerations can trump justice lead to miscarriages of justice and a cover up and conspiracy and in that way it's a very modern stories I testify the lack of attention to the Dreyfus affair in late twentieth century education America is it the same in your power in London can you generalize too young English and British students learn of the Dreyfus affair no I don't think they do to be honest with you I think it's one of those stories the tool is very long F. as you said twelve years is very complicated and really it's called loss of blood to rated by the first four wheel and the second World War when we think of anti semitism now obviously we think of a house with only think of an office and the drivers of that seem to sort of footnote to us I think I didn't seem most people know about things I didn't know much about it myself to be honest until I started work on this book and it was a revelation to me just how interesting it was and how how very relevant to these problems it is the spell of your riding Mister Harris as a novelist that I I I I found my paranoia growing and I've got an advanced case here in the twenty first century on mon Air America you understand I'm talking to a to a tense situation always but again I was reminded how we've been that we've got nothing new now we're repeating the errors of the past when public figures are smeared and when the apparatus of a state turns on a man or a group of them to destroy them in the interest of the state it happens again and again I think you see it in Great Britain we saw it during the we've seen it these last ten fifteen years of the war on terror and I believe it will continue its not a French story itself it's a power is the power of the sovereign state exactly the really it's not just about a government or an army I think it's about how any large organization Ole church or corporation will close ranks and will testify to itself lying and smearing someone who is innocent in the name of the greater good I you mentioned soda he he wrote the famous article shot crews about the track with the fat and the and the he said these men go home and sleep at night and see their wives and children and that's really what makes the story time this is the way in which really quite decent people in other respects can pull themselves into engineering a cover up the miscarriage of justice and I think that really makes the story time and your involvement in because I'm always aware that the novelist is at work you begin with a library of publications beginning with the complete story told in nineteen oh eight and then continuing through this last century you say that you work with the chronological history by George white at your side are there still mysteries in there we're going to plunge into your story but did you feel while you're reading this that there seems within scenes and we can never know everything yeah we called know everything I mean there were mysterious death in in the course of the fat and we don't know whether they were suicide film does I suspect said only one was in the we don't know precisely how much the very senior high command new at the beginning that the whether they knew even before traces went to devil's island that he might well be innocent we don't know absolutely everything but I don't thing though and the revelation spattered that it would fundamentally change understanding this was a miscarriage of justice brought about partly by anti semitism which was then covered up at enormous cost to the French state and I I think that that basically is the story and it's rather like the Kennedy assassination all the death of princess Diana one could come up with fancy conspiracy theories but they don't really hold will try it connects directly I've recently been reading again of president Wilson and the Versailles treaty connects directly to America through one of the major actors in the eventual vindication of Dreyfus and all the others George Clemenceau the tagger who is twice prime minister of France and we could say his celebrity hinges on him taking the right side in the Dreyfus affair so and his power adverse side is still felt in the United States and worldwide because of the first I treaty I'm also is one of the really astonishing figures that was thrown out by the tracks of that he was out of office a look completely out of it in the mid eighty nine to than the dregs of fact came along he was editing a newspaper called the law or a little on and he saw in the drivers of that I think an opportunity to bring down the government to tank the government which he proceeded to do with great said brilliance and we might well not a sink them also as prime minister of France if it hadn't been for the day people the most prudent campaign why would we begin now with the story told by the novelist the literary novelist also with thriller but this is a literary thriller there's a delight in the construction of this as you read Robert Harris is the author of the book is an officer in a spy this is.

"nineteenth century" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Charles Dickens novel Jim Bohannon is off. PT Barnum was the quintessential American show but eight billion showing how bugs as we call them the nineteenth century audiences he did so well the rotors first autobiography of age forty four it seems like sort of audacious time to write your memoirs his father had died young and life expectancy in the middle of the nineteenth century was not what it is today he has no real way of knowing that you know he lived to be eighty in fact his greatest success came long after his first autobiography was until the eighteen seventies he was born in eighteen ten and so he was in the sixties before he became involved with what we would think of today areas of circuses Robert Wilson author of the book Barnum and American life notes that the path to immortality was a bumpy road at times he had so much money that he didn't really pay attention to what was happening to it and eventually he went bankrupt but then came a legendary pairing he had a partner and he noticed that all competing circus was doing very well and one of the people behind that one was a man named James Bailey and Barnum realize that Bailey had all the talent food he lacked for a for organization and so he told his partner look we've got to connect with James Bailey and we can't be them so we have to join them as for what Barnum is rumored to have uttered the famous phrase there's a sucker born every minute which is associated with him which I've never been able to find any evidence the actually said it above all bar that was master of self promotion one of the things he really understood very well was the power of the press and power of newspapers when buying a lots of advertising he really really believe deeply in advertising and also in writing squibs himself for the newspaper which were often. verbatim an unsigned so people didn't know that pardon was writing about himself PT Barnum were alive today he'd buy time on this radio station the off beat hi Jim Bohannon America.

PT Barnum James Bailey Jim Bohannon Jim Bohannon America Charles Dickens partner Robert Wilson
"nineteenth century" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Nineteenth century is we've tended to codify things a great deal I like this one school of thought that says we reincarnate every so many you know almost like clockwork a hundred forty four years I mean I've read that ninety I understand what they mean the numbers more symbolic the people then take it literally or some people say well these folks reincarnate you know every you know like it says in the Bardo or if using this number the dead they reincarnate after forty nine days well even with the bands of say that's more of a symbolic number and then you'll see some some people say why don't believe incarnation how do you explain these people who don't reincarnate well maybe not everyone does it very quickly you know there you have a fantastic example the book is called in search of home seti and I I really encourage your listeners to read it if they haven't I don't remember when it was written and I can tell you I think is maybe in the eighties it was written possibly and there was a woman who was who went by the name home sexy who lived in Egypt at temple of set and she went there as a child even and if she is there when she was very young girl she had an interest in Egyptology in hieroglyphs and her parents were horrified by city center this private school of course continues in England at I'm so schools what we think of as private schools and on the way home she would stop the British Museum and home hold you know polished budge took an interest in hieroglyphs of learning Egyptology from you know you know at that he angles of the the devoted Ross call of of of the the father might reach apology yes you so yeah I think she gets about eighteen or twenty and off she goes to Egypt but the important part is that egyptologists would come to her for answers that they couldn't get through regular meetings because she claimed I'm not only in knowledge of egyptologists being living in Egypt at that time when they said her knowledge was fairly impressive in this is that the book in search of said he is an attempt to give a more objective biographical accounted for but she also claims that the pharaoh of the period and I think it was said he the first news after read the book to be certain okay to check on that would actually visit her and so here you have this notion that the the Egyptians of course view the afterlife is a mirror of this life okay and some not so more right if you were a feral in this world how do you not want to be a fair on the other world so they have this notion set up where okay and maybe the possibility is is that when they died where we swim Affero died you know he went to some kind of one also called astral realm heavenly realm of their own creation and think there for a few thousand years because remember time is different yeah right different thought the same time frames were thinking of what makes this most interesting for the listeners is adamant account that he would physically materialize and visit her in in love that yeah yeah that ties in show one of the questions that we see about materializing phenomena in in spiritualism okay and how and in what goes on with that because the material I think phenomena is something that we really haven't seen in a long time of course a lot of that was wonderfully fake but there's also a lot of things that occur that defied explanation and I do believe the what is the name escapes me at the moment but there was there are some folks in England and leave in the nineties who's who had a extensive array of materializing phenomena that was well documented and of course a former justice to give give a plug for one of your former guest Shannon Thagard who has documented spiritual phenomena extensively photographically next talk to about this too that's it is a new book coming out not just when I mention it because it's the photographs are quite impressive in their own doctor and just what appeared at the time which she took them that's good to hear because always when I think of these types of things I always think it's past and people are just talking about it again but it's good to hear that these things are still happening in fact you talk about in your latest book about how things are happening now that we don't even see that we don't even notice this is where I you know what I have trouble you know when we use when using certain language we talk about you know physical material spiritual in the search Chris this is incredibly clunky and cumbersome language because we're talking about is a continuum we're talking with spectrum of sensory experience and we have to keep that in mind so what appears to be material to one thing may be very spiritual to another and what appears to be very spiritual to us may be incredibly tactile and intense phenomenon to another and this is where we get in certain aspects of Comala you know it where you have different magical and magical meaning visualization and other practices you know to essentially create a kind of body if you will make homebody light that allows you to stabilize and retain consciousness after death post mortem you see that same practice and visually on into that Buddhism is quite well established in the notion of visualization Sir or someone can stabilize from consciousness for calling in love listening to this is wonderful stuff mark I'm like just this is great this this is awesome so tell me it because it because I get confused I hear you know talk to a lot of people they tell me their perspective of things and it's not always it can have the same noun but it's very different from each person so describe to me what alchemy is and also describe to me what a Bala is a simple alchemy is the study of the interrelationship between energy matter and consciousness now the difference if there is the consciousness that that makes it all chemical in the fence science is constantly sending the relationship between energy and matter all what alchemy does it throws in that I think consciousness where does that occur what is the feedback loop that is when I am performing an experiment for specific outcome does my consciousness allow me to accelerate the process and that's the process accelerate my consciousness what is a feedback loop so really alchemy is a massive experiment in you know psychokinesis if you want to put it in those terms well okay but with it okay because it works in in three U. number all these things always working and thrust for they were aware of it or not yeah I'm trying to expand in stabilizer get it expand in fable if the consciousness if you just expanded beyond stabilize it.

hundred forty four years forty nine days thousand years
"nineteenth century" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Politicians responding to the palace of mocks the fact that both friends and foes alike mon his then he lies in state the public grief was understandable **** to Leo Vargas had ruled his country for longer than any other president before or since he seized power in nineteen thirty ending the sway of a landowning elites that's a rule Brazil since the overthrow of the emperor forty years earlier zero before the nineteen thirty revolution had an economy only **** cultural commodities the workers were treated as slaves the no labor or civil rights and the politics were the politics of changing different order keys once in power Vargas set about addressing the needs of those who've been marginalized when he took charge he started making the big changes one of his first measures was to create the minister of labor because people were treated as slaves and they had not rights ought hours north of salary to work but opposition to his program proved obstinate seven nineteen thirty seven he mounted a second coup a constitutional one he dissolved parliament bands political parties and introduced what he called the Estado novo within you state modeled on Roosevelt's new deal his granddaughter Selena argues that the innovations this provides changed Brazil forever I think he was the father of the industrial revolution and research the country's jumped from the nineteenth century to the twenty first century in a period of only nineteen years of government he started with an enterprise of steel iron petroleum electricity and and the bank until today this companies the other biggest and most powerful enterprises of Brazil but in nineteen forty five Vargas was forced by the ministry to resign he retreated into exile and braced the family life Selena remembers those years we affection I was the smallest of the he's four and sons and daughters we are very close because my mother was very close to him and several vacations we went to stand in his farm during the late forties everything was quiet for him most of it was silent but when general elections will cold in nineteen fifty fungus return to politics and ran for president.

Leo Vargas president Brazil Roosevelt Selena nineteen years forty years
"nineteenth century" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:35 min | 3 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the. Nineteenth century widely investors rewrote the rule. So they could buy up farm, south of San Francisco, and it was all about water. A lot of times, they would enlist the aid of the courts and might have the lands condemned a ten cents on a dollar. I'm Brian watt. My colleague, Rachel, myrow tells us this not so crystal clean story today on morning edition. Hear that story at six twenty two and eight twenty two on morning edition on K. Q E D. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm no Wilkin. Good morning. The White House is losing another high profile staffer this time, it's press secretary, Sarah Sanders. She talked for a short time at an event with President Trump yesterday. It's one of the greatest jobs, I could ever have. I've loved every minute even the hard minutes. NPR White House. Correspondent Tom Keith is on the line. Good morning, Tom. Good morning. So Sarah Sanders is one of the original members of President Trump's team, and this is the White House. That's really struggled with high staff turnover. How did she manage to last so long, but fee came from the campaign, in fact, and she was both super loyal, and came to accept that President Trump was the real press secretary of this administration, she publicly avoided contradicting him, even if that meant contradicting the truth? And there's one glaring example of that. From shortly after then FBI director James Comey was fired. Well, I can speak my own personal experience. I've heard from countless numbers of the FBI that are grateful and thankful for the president's decision. And even in that moment, reporters pushed back, that she insisted really real. On between like Email. Text message is absolutely, yes. Sixty seven anyway, look, we're not gonna get into a numbers game. I, I mean, I've heard from a large number of individuals that work at the FBI that said that they're very happy with the president's decision. So what we know now from the Muller report is that simply wasn't true. She made up the countless numbers. She says it was a slip of the tongue and another comment was just in the heat of the moment as a result of all that, she lost a lot of credibility with the press. How would you describe how she did the job of press secretary? We'll see completely changed the job of press secretary the press secretary to come out into the White House press briefing room on a nearly daily basis and speak for the president of the United States, and by extension for the US government to the world, essentially, not just to the White House press corps. Now that's President Trump. Whether by tweet or by standing on the south lawn with a helicopter behind him. Sarah Sanders has killed. The daily White House press briefing. It went from being daily to being monthly and it's been ninety five days since there was a press briefing, ninety five days. Wow. Yes. So she's taken into the driveway, I, she goes, she does FOX hits. She walks away from those cameras, and she is greeted by a throng of members of the White House press corps, hungry for information that they just aren't getting Tim is worth running through a list here. You've got an acting chief of staff a vacant communications director position. You've got no press secretary, and the top economic adviser is leaving so who is running White House, fewer and fewer people. And there are fewer people that are close to the president or are sort of originals that he trusts names that you have left are as Stephen Miller, and Kellyanne Conway and Dansk. You know, the social media director who helps the president with his tweets and his family, Jared Kushner, the son-in-law and his daughter, Ivanka Trump NS for Sarah Sanders. Any idea who might replace her? No, no idea. I asked yesterday and did not get an answer on that. But one thing that we can be certain of the daily press briefing as it was known through multiple administrations is over at least for now. NPR's White House correspondent Tim, or tempting so much. You're welcome. Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation from very wet. Winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change how the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at the historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires are the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right of accusations to get the support and help to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable. Forests setting themselves up for potentially worse fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I wanna say it's a game changer. I wanna say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative and how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on upfront mitigation. But the agency's budget is still mostly status quo, this year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two. Point five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred and thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in a whole before you even start to talk about mitigation rich Fairbanks is a retired federal Firebaugh. See now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental findings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold, what that budget is allocating experts who studied disaster response also, say more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behave. You're in other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe. Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through a wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a.

press secretary president President Trump White House Sarah Sanders White House press corps NPR FBI NPR White House Tom Keith United States Rachel Martin director California Vicki christianson Brian watt San Francisco White House correspondent Tim
"nineteenth century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:55 min | 3 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In the late nineteenth century. President Obama has prosecuted and jailed more journalists and journalistic sources than every other president combined. Can we just talk about facts? We like facts, why? Because that's what the real world is about. A man who deals in facts is next guest, Bill guts, built goods is the senior editor for the Washington free beacon and national security correspondent for the Washington Times, all of the fabulous book called, I war and peace in the information age. He is working on a his next book about China. We'll talk about China and second. But I Bill any comments about what you've seen in the last two days the day celebrations and, and how the president is doing the UK, and they'll sweat Trump had a great trip overseas. He just rocked it. I mean, it was a very good trip to Britain with the Queen, also is, is d Dave remarks were great seventy fifth anniversary of this historic liberation beginning point of the liberation of Europe, from the Nazis was very well done. This is about celebrating. Those who risked everything to fight an evil dictatorship. Francis Fukuyama in nineteen Ninety-one Ninety-two wrote an article, which became a book called the end of history and the last man in, and it was too much hullaballoo, and he sold a lot of copies in which he said, democracy has one it's all over the future of mankind is it's like those old graphic equalizers on the stereos is just tinkering on the fine shooting of market democracies. How wrong was he? If you look at the threats we face today, especially coming from Asia, Bill. Well, clearly, my view, communist China represents the greatest threat to democracy and freedom that we faced and let me say that it's going to take a massive American effort, and a global effort to organize the world to counteract this, this is not going to be an easy fight where we're in it for the long haul. The Chinese are on the March. They've put out their wages. Information warfare. They're waging unrestricted warfare against us. Trump is fighting back. That's the good news. We've seen a tremendous shift in the US policy towards China. And interestingly enough, it's one of the very few areas where there is a growing bipartisan consensus that finally, this is the real super of twenty-first-century war that we're going to be engaged in for, for many years to come. Now this week's or another very important anniversary, and that was the thirtieth anniversary of the massacre CNN square in China. The secretary of state Mike Pompeo, made a RAV or unusual speech with regards that anniversary Bill does a little bit about my guess, the secretary of state issued a commemorative notice, and check with the State Department there, historians this was the first time that a senior US official has demanded that China provide a full accounting of this massacre that took place on June of nineteen eighty nine which they've tried to blood out of the his folks, it's amazing CVS recently did a report where they sent a film crew correspondent into tenement square showed pictures of the iconic tank man shopper standing in front of a line of tanks and a large number of the Chinese people had no idea who he was, or what, what that took place and image is in the western world. As powerful as well known as the east Germans chiseling away with pickaxes at the Berlin Wall in the van, but the ninth nineteen Eighty-nine exact but buddy, China, the Chinese don't know the this shows the power of the totalitarian info- information desert, that is communist China, too, which is being a facilitated by American companies like Google right, Bill. Many of them. Yes. Well, we're pushing back against that again, Trump has done amazing things and shifting the policy. It's like a super tanker though, there are still pockets of resistance within the foreign policy bureaucracy intelligence bureaucracy. And the defense bureaucracy is well, even though that we're, we're on a new course. We're changing things dramatically, and I think this Pompeo statement was very significant. Because he, he identified the people who died, and as many as ten thousand Chinese were bayoneted shot run over with tanks and pump AO called them, the heroes of Tiananmen. And their Chinese response was to say that might Pompeo in making a statement about what really happened in gentlemen. Square was breaking international law. That's what the Chinese said crazy. Yeah. Also, we saw the Chinese defense minister in Singapore last weekend way Fung, he. Came out and said denied that there was ever a massacre at tenement square and he threatened the United States. After our defense acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan give very strong speech, denouncing Chinese coercion attempting to take over the South China Sea. This is never been done in human history where a nation has claimed an international waterway even the Romans didn't claim to own the Mediterranean back in the day. And you hear the Chinese are now militarizing islands in the South China Sea. And so we're pushing back against that in the last minute, we have with you, in this segment, Bill goods, what is the most important thing that Americans who don't follow politics, or international affairs should know about China today? China is a nuclear armed communist dictatorship and people need to understand that. That's the beginning point of understanding what I called the China threat, and this is a multifaceted threat that ranges across the spectrum of from potential military conflict, all the way to information warfare. Francis Fukuyama, you couldn't have been moron. We talking to Bill guts, editor for the Washington free beacon national security correspondent columnist for the Washington Times. Follow him onto at Bill guts, and check out his superb book, I war and peace in the information age mole with built momentarily. But.

China Bill guts Mike Pompeo Trump Francis Fukuyama South China Sea president United States tenement square Washington the Washington Times Obama CNN Asia Square UK senior editor State Department
"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Before the nineteenth century Notre Dame. Had no spire said phillipe's feel Duke who added it and this competition will decide whether we should rebuild it identically to the old one in wood and lead or adapted to our times. Viola Duke is the flamboyant nineteenth century architect who restored many of France's dilapidating mediaeval churches and chateau's the win vehemently started renovating Notre dam. It was a wick that's ministry of culture Paris tour guide, Stephanie Pohl. She says no Twitter was a different church after being desecrated during the French revolution in seventeen eighty nine for brief time. It was cold. It had been a marketplace Napoleon Bonaparte when he has his combination actually have to cut short the ceremony because of the stench of Wilton vegetables animal meta in the cathedral, Paul says. The city's beloved cathedral is a living breathing building that has changed and more through the centuries and people must accept that. It can't be kept the way it was eight hundred fifty years ago urban architect is y'all Michel Vilma agrees. He says the cathedral can be restored in five years using the most up to date materials and technology. New swimming had its medieval history, but it can also have a passionate new story today says Vilma. He says the fire is now part of the cathedral's history. So why not a new roof in titanium and a spire in lightweight carbon Eleanor.

Michel Vilma Stephanie Pohl Viola Duke Napoleon Bonaparte Twitter Notre dam phillipe Paris France Paul eight hundred fifty years five years
"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"People in the nineteenth century understood that if you were speaking of America, you were speaking of the Americas the whole region that changes in eighteen ninety eight partly out of this desire to find a new way to describe the country shorthand for it America. It's vaguer more expansive term and the president who takes office after the war with Spain. Teddy Roosevelt uses the word America in his inaugural address. And there's a two week period where he uses it in different speeches more times than every past president has used it collectively in the entire history of the country and ever since then it's off to the races. Why was eighteen ninety eight and imperial shopping spree. What was going on the United States? Balkans. The Pacific the census in eighteen ninety had issued a report suggesting that the frontier was no more and inspired a few such as teddy Roosevelt to try to make new frontiers to find new places where the United States restore its vigor. So explain the Philippines, partly has to do with teddy Roosevelt. He's the assistant secretary of the navy. His boss leaves the office for an afternoon to visit an osteopath and Roosevelt springs into action and orders the fleet to prepare to invade Manila. If the United States has a war with Spain and his boss doesn't countermand the order possibly fearing looking weak. And so in the United States does go to war with Spain engages the Spanish fleet defeats it. And suddenly, the United States has the Philippines on his hands. Not suddenly takes awhile, right? The actual conquest of the Philippines. Takes an enormous amount of time. Part of the reason the United States is in a good position vis-a-vis, the Philippines, is that the United States has allied itself with Filipino insurgents who've been fighting against Spanish colonialism for quite a long time. And they think that they're doing so in the name of liberating their colony with the aid of the United States. They're able. To conquer the archipelago. The United States ends the war by purchasing the Philippines from Spain. But then it has to deal with these Philippine insurgents and ends up fighting along excruciatingly, bloody war that Philippine archipelago isn't restored to civilian rule until nineteen thirteen. It was only recently surpassed by the Afghantistan war is the longest war in US history on what grounds did the US go to war for the Philippines, because the US was still hesitant to say. We do this for the sake of empire. The US was never quite as Frank about this as say, the British were well, this is a really interesting and rare moment in US history where the leaders of the country will start talking like the British the reason that the United States needs to fight the Philippines and fight to retain the Philippines is in order to civilized and uplift Filipinos the most famous poem justifying empire. Roger. Kipling's white man's burden.

United States Philippines Spain assistant secretary Americas president Roosevelt springs Manila Kipling Roger Frank two week
"nineteenth century" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"nineteenth century" Discussed on KGO 810

"Was modern to understand that you were going to build a building that was fireproof. There were a series of fires that swept mid-nineteenth century and late nineteenth century that frightened the people of Manhattan, New York. Burn down a couple of times one time in seventeen seventy six while the British were here burned down again several times in the nineteenth century, the answer to that was iron buildings that is iron works that the building would be hung on the convincing presentation was that would be less less vulnerable to fire now the interiors burn we understand that. But at least it wouldn't be the beams to explain that. Yes. You'll see many of those with the little Cornell label on the bottom and the Cornell label is still prominent in New York everywhere ascent, especially on the rolling doors. Yes, it is. It's a treat to know that I can now somebody will ask me why I'm bending over that rolling grill. So late at night trying to get good light. I'll say well. I'm looking for the Cornell name, let's go way back to the beginning. Katie because this is a family legacy that includes.

Cornell New York Manhattan Katie