35 Burst results for "Nineteen Twenty Five"

What’s Next for Fall Film Releases?

Popcorn with Peter Travers

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

What’s Next for Fall Film Releases?

"I out of the gate for this fall is a movie called shang. She and the legend of the ten rings. It's a marvel movie and marvel finally deciding to have an asian hero in its movie. That's a long time coming. And when you see it you're going to see a story that is modern touch because this guy on plagued by smooth lou. He is in really fierce fighting form but his father was played by the great. Tome lung is an immortal and he doesn't want him to do it. He's doing which is parking cars in a san francisco hotel talent hanging out with akwa. Seen you get what i mean. It's the martial arts that makes this must sit okay. next up. Is the power of the dog as everybody knows especially critic which is may that september is the month where their film festivals everywhere from venison telluride to toronto in new york and the one film to rule them. All is the power of the dark. It's a western set in nineteen twenty five montana and new zealand. Filmmaker jane campion. Who did the piano is the director sir. First movie in twelve years. Expect real awards bus around benedict cumberbatch. She's playing a brutal acid tongue rancher who gets tensions going in ablaze when his brother brings home a new bride and everything goes crazy and deserve this film is sets nature's beauty against toxic masculinity. These are two things that are really updates days next step. The eyes of tammy faye jessica chastain goes all in this. She's backwards on the eyelashes end. The make up to play tammy faye bakker the late televangelist who turned her christian news program into a profitable industry until a sex scandal involving her first husband. Jim baker played by entry. Barfield just brought the whole house card. Sam

LOU Jane Campion San Francisco Benedict Cumberbatch Toronto Tammy Faye Jessica Chastain Montana New Zealand New York Tammy Faye Bakker Jim Baker Barfield SAM
The History of Abbey Road Studios

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

02:13 min | 4 months ago

The History of Abbey Road Studios

"My name is merck stalls. I'm the head of audio products here at kiro studio so i i work with companies. We create software recreation hall. Where re-creations some of our old classic gear. the full. that my previous incarnation. Here bureau studios was as a recording engineer. I'd love to know before we start the tour. What how you felt when you. I tend to work here at you and your first day. You've been here for a while. You still got thrilled walking across the pedestrian crossing looking at these steps. But what was on life. You very exciting. Been a blur. I couldn't actually believe i was here. I remember always touching the wolves to see what's material was on the woolworth's fascinated by this the acoustics in the gear and the desks and it was kind of mind-blowing. First of all the history of even the house is crazy. I mean here we all. It looks like a house because it was a house. It was a townhouse built in the eighteen thirties in this could so useful saint. John's wood neighborhood not a bad little corner of london. Not a bad into the corner. I the reason it became a recording studio was the gramophone company who were the first record company in this in this country in the world in fact so they started in the eighteen nineties obviously completing industry it was not trusted by some musicians and artists. They didn't like the idea being recorded figure. If the unknown of technology but by the mid twenties especially when the Electricity electorates recording act was passed in the nineteen twenty five recording. Just massively took off. I say that because before nineteen twenty five most recordings with just mechanical musicians would crowd around the big acoustic horn. And if you want it relative music to be loud or that musician we just move closer to the whole you know. It's very mechanical. When illiteracy came onto the scene microphones could be used moving moving clo- mara phones and very small basic mixing consoles and an electric driven cutting life so it can change the whole recording industry. It was a big deal

Merck Woolworth London John
The Cabinet Of Curiosities

Not Another Horror Podcast

04:10 min | 6 months ago

The Cabinet Of Curiosities

"Let's talk about dr eugene. Boyne de fall victim to mysterious. Infection was his death which in nineteen thirty two investigation but liberty magazine refers to as the strangest the most bizarre and the least no circus tragedy of this generation a result a supernatural revenge before his career as manager. The you bungee duck built savages star attraction and one of the most infamous kosher misguided. Have flat out. Racist circus sideshows in american history. The doctor was carving a place for himself in the history. Books of african exploration by the time he bought the social of tribespeople so america nineteen thirty key becoming much decorated explore having among other adventures served as naturalists on the nineteen twenty four nineteen twenty five black cruise one of two expeditions sponsored by francis citron company to prove that it was possible to cross africa by motorized vehicles of his you buggies. They were actually members of the sarah tribe in modern day. Chad the monica you bunker came from a ringling brothers and barnum and bailey combined. Our bbc circus spin-doctor female contingent practice lip extension stretching. Both there and laura lives over the years with increasing larger wooden disk former circus historical society president. Richard riddles rice at the explorer. I encountered the tribe in africa during the black cruise. What happened upon his particular group in paris at an ethnological show where he used to be their manager before leading them on a tour through the americas and the united states. You buggies were rb. Bbc sensation shown as part of the circuses. African village exhibit. Because you know. Human zoos were thing which visitors walked through in that concluded with lemons from an actor playing captain callaghan a brave and durable who survived being horribly tortured by aether rochas group of savages and the cameroons who were about to fling his ravaged body until steaming pot of boiling water. After a sadist bees had capitated his penis and testicles. Wow where relations. Between the doctor and his star soon grew sour they accused him of pocketing their salaries which i mean in all fairness he was doing and if you're is exchange in sudan attent witnesses say the doctor emerged badly shaken terrified even a few days later the explorer fledged chicago to sarasota. Florida reportedly fear for his life. Surely after arriving to sarasota on october thirteenth nineteen thirty. He died suddenly of mysterious causes in the end coroner's attributed his death to septic pneumonia possibly brought on by an infection from a pimple on his leg but witnesses who overheard the argument in chicago spread rumors that the sarah tries people who put a black magic curse on him. Ape reported quote from one of the u. buggies possibly generated by the circus spin. Doctor he don't die. We made him die ran. Newspapers and help to perpetuate the rumors of a curse. Liberty magazine describes the explores final moments as spent suffering and agony on his deathbed the victim of an unidentified curse the doctor knew he was doomed. And why but his lips remained sealed and they're in a buys a horrible and fantastic tale. Speaking dark tells and death have you ever heard of a doctor labeling the cause of death as fear. Well that is what happened to the twins. Chang and inc

Liberty Magazine Dr Eugene Francis Citron Circus Historical Society Richard Riddles Rice Boyne Captain Callaghan BBC Aether Rochas Ringling Brothers Africa United States Barnum Sarah Chad Monica Bailey Sarasota Laura Americas
The Great Gatsby

Planet Money

03:07 min | 8 months ago

The Great Gatsby

"In nineteen twenty five. F scott fitzgerald published the great gatsby and like pretty much every author. He copyrighted the book when it came out which you know fair enough the way copyright worked at the time fitzgerald and his heirs could collect royalties from the book for fifty six years. All the way until nineteen eighty-one and during that time if anybody wanted to make movie or play or anything at all based on gatsby they would have to get permission and probably pay a licensing fee to the fitzgerald family. And then according to the law after the fifty six years the book would go into something called the public domain fitzgerald's kids or grandkids wouldn't get royalties any more and more importantly anyone who wanted to could print up and give away copies of the book or rewrite it from toms horses. Point of view or create gatsby on ice anything at all and you know copyright. Is this balancing. Act on the one hand you want to encourage and reward people who write books create things but you also want to let those things enter the public domain at some point so we can all share them and tweak them and build on them and make more creative stuff. The artists figuring out how long to keep something in copyright there was nothing special about fifty six years. That's just a number that congress picked and then they decided to change it in nineteen seventy six just five years before the great gatsby entered the public domain. Five years before gatsby on ice congress changed copyright law. They said among other things fifty six years not quite long enough under the new stronger rules. Gatsby wouldn't go into the public domain until two thousand one and then just a few years before that congress jumped in again and made copies of old works last even longer under the new new rules. Gas would not go into the public domain until almost one hundred years after it was written until twenty twenty one but still sounds like some meat up year from the future to me. And you know congress could have kept pushing this date making the copyright longer and longer until the three thousand or something like that but there's been some pushback on the ever lengthening copyright period. Not enough pushback to start making the copyright shorter but enough to stop making them longer and so on january first of this year. Finally the great gatsby went into the public domain into our domain. It belongs to us now. It belongs to everybody. And what we now own i have to say is a complicated book. It has the romance and beauty of america. It also has the racism and misogyny and anti semitism of america and maybe the most american thing about the It's all about money. This is a book about why people want money and what they do when they get it and what money does to them. In other words. Gatsby is the perfect story for planet money and now that gets me is in the public domain. If we wanted to we could talk about it for a minute at the beginning of the show. Yeah say hello and welcome to planet money sticking ahead break in and then we could read the whole thing. We could read the entire book the entire book and posted on our podcast.

Gatsby Fitzgerald Congress Scott Fitzgerald America
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
Marcus Garvey: Leader of a Revolutionary Global Movement

Black History in Two Minutes

03:30 min | 11 months ago

Marcus Garvey: Leader of a Revolutionary Global Movement

"Over one hundred years ago. The Black Nationalist Movement in America reached an unprecedented level of popularity because of the efforts of the charismatic leader of the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Marcus Garvey. Born in Jamaica Garvey grew up in poverty. He came to understand race relations through the lens of British colonialism throughout the Caribbean and Latin America. As his thinking matured. He began to formulate a revolutionary social. Movement. In, nineteen fourteen he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Dedicated to uniting all the black people throughout the world. Two years later. He emigrated to the United. States. For his powerful message quickly gained traction. We walk you'd believe. This country we weren't ever get to work for walk up. By building. On the Great President of Africa for the public of pickering our industrial cocoa educational. At what it could go configure me arrives in an error where blacks are still being lynched regularly in the south around the same time that movies like birth of the nation are showing extra ordinarily racist depictions of African Americans as monsters. You have really charismatic dynamic individual and he's talking about look all places never going to be here in the states is never going to be in. Europe it's going to be in Africa we need to reclaim Africa. So Garvey is going to be preaching a philosophy of black pride. He's GonNa come up with a scheme to repatriate to Africa and he provides a huge sense of hope for millions of African Americans. A centerpiece of Garvey's program was the creation of the black star line a steamship. LAUNCHED TO TRANSPORT AFRICAN AMERICANS WHO WISHED TO EMIGRATE TO AFRICAN? The Black Star Line. Is this idea that Garvey can buy ships through the support of local African American people sending in money? So you can have a share in the Black Star Line. Any ships were GONNA take thousands of people back to Africa to the colony that Garvey was gonNA. Stab wish. But his advocacy for black Americans to move back to Africa drew the attention of the United States government and especially J Hoover's Federal Bureau of Investigation. Which Monitored Garvey's movement seeking grounds for his arrest and deportation. Garvey was growing too powerful Jagger Hoover is going hired their first. Negro. To Subvert Marcus Garvey and eventually they're going to say that he's been committing mail fraud with the Black Star Line Scheme. He's eventually tried arrested placed in jail nineteen, twenty five. He's deported in nineteen twenty seven and he's never allowed to return to the United States, he dies in London in Nineteen. Forty. Garvey's legacy as the father of the modern back to Africa movement cannot be underestimated. He created the largest popular political movement in the history of black America and would be an inspiration both to the anti colonial movement and black nationalist leaders throughout the remainder of the century.

Jamaica Garvey Black Nationalist Movement Africa Universal Negro Improvement As America Great President Of Africa United States Jagger Hoover Caribbean Pickering Latin America Europe Federal Bureau Of Investigatio Fraud London
Activists, Betita Martinez

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Activists, Betita Martinez

"Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez was born on December Twelfth Nineteen twenty. Five in Washington DC. Her father immigrated to the United. States for Mexico in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen in some ways historic exemplified the American dream. Here. Arrived with little to his name and ended up becoming a professor of Spanish literature at Georgetown University? In other ways his story serve as a cautionary tale he face racism and prejudice and top Petita to think critically about US policies and structures. The Titas American born mother whose family had come from Scotland and Ireland also helped to shape titas perspective. She was a teacher and activist. Batista. Grew up in Chevy. Chase Maryland a suburb of DC or she later wrote she felt like an outsider and what felt like an all white community after high school she left the D. C. Area to attend swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in history and literature in nineteen forty six. After graduation but thiede decided to go by Liz Sutherland in an attempt to better fit in with elites in the arts and Publishing World of New York City? She worked as a translator at the United Nations before moving into research and administration. PETITA studied European and US colonies in Africa and the Pacific Ocean working to shed light on conditions in places that didn't have self sovereignty. She, then worked at the Museum of modern. Art before becoming an editor at Simon and Schuster. In nineteen sixty four Batista became the books and Arts editor at The Nation magazine. PETITA had successfully broken into the New York, city. Cultural, elite. It was no easy feat. PETITA later said that she was a woman in a world dominated by men. Even. So she was adept at moving between worlds. TITA was equally at ease socializing on Fifth Avenue as at the Johns frequented by beat poets of the day. She was a very busy lady. In addition to her day job, the TITA found time to research and write pieces that landed in publications including the national. Guardian Horizon and the New York. Times. She also volunteered for political causes she believed in. petito wanted more than a successful business career she was driven to seek and push for change in the world. In nineteen, sixty, five petito left the nation to work in the civil. Rights movement. She then became the director of the New York Office of the student nonviolent coordinating. Committee or. And Major Civil Rights Organization. She was one of only two Latino women who worked as a paid employee at snack in her role Tita raised money organized events did research on the racial climate the American south. She wrote a book called Letters. Mississippi. About her experience working in the movement not state. Also continued to write for major national publications in nineteen sixty seven but he left snack and turned her focus to feminism before being drawn to the fledgling Chicano movement. Chicano Connex refers to people of Mexican descent born in the United States. Nineteen Sixty Eight petito left New York City for New Mexico. She went back to going by PETITA Martinez rather than the more Anglican sounding Elizabeth Sutherland. In New Mexico petita joined propelled forward what became a movement to promote the rights and celebrate the culture of connects people in the United States. She continued to maximize the power of her pen. She cofounded Allegri. Toe Del Norte a Chicano movement monthly newspaper in Nineteen seventy-three petita back the Chicano Communication Center and Albuquerque and served as its director until nineteen seventy six. The center used arts and media to educate visitors about the culture and struggles at the Chicano community. During her tenure there Petita also wrote another book. This one called five hundred years of Chicano history. From New Mexico petita moved to San Francisco where she continued to fight for a better future she served as the program director at global options an organization working on issues relating to labour conditions and social justice in. Nineteen. EIGHTY-THREE PETITA ran for governor of California as a peace and Freedom, party candy. In nineteen ninety-seven PETITA founded yet another organization the Institute for Multi Racial Justice the Institute served as the embodiment of her life's work to break down barriers between people fighting for justice especially different peoples of color. Following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, petito book called Deca Loris means all of us. But. Thiede has written and taught throughout her long and impressive career and activism. She's lectured at odds three hundred higher educational institutions. She's received many many honors accolades including as a nominee for the Nobel peace prize in two, thousand and five. Batista is a living example of what it looks like to keep fighting the fight against injustice in our own communities across the country and around the world.

Director Batista Petita New York City Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez New Mexico United States New York Elizabeth Sutherland Thiede DC Chicano Connex Chicano Communication Center Mexico Liz Sutherland Chevy Georgetown University Chicano Community Institute For Multi Racial Jus
Siamese Revolution of 1932

This Day in History Class

04:27 min | 1 year ago

Siamese Revolution of 1932

"The day. Was June twenty-fourth Nineteen thirty two? The Siamese political party rots Adine, or the People's Party overthrew the government of King Rama, the seventh, ending seven Hundred Years of absolute monarchy under the kings of Yom. The bloodless coup resulted in the introduction of democracy, the first constitution of Thailand. Since seventeen, eighty, two the kingdom. Or Modern Day Thailand have been ruled by the Chakri Dynasty beginning with Rama, the I who founded the capital city Bangkok. Throughout the nineteenth century, much of Southeast Asia was colonized by the British. French and Dutch crm was never subjected to colonial rule. But Rama the fifth who reigned from eighteen, sixty, eight to nineteen, ten, set out to modernize the kingdom. He introduced social and governmental reforms that were based on western models. The old ruling families rejected his reforms, but from the mid eighteen eighty s to the early nineteen hundreds. Rama, the fifth overhauled the administration established military conscription, abolished slavery and made other major changes in the country. The king was committed to modernisation. He was also committed to maintaining Thai traditions and independence. He instituted all these reforms under the guise that they would save from the threat of Western colonialism. Civilized to colonial powers than it would supposedly avoid Western invasion. Rama the Fifth Son and successor Rama the sixth also worked to modernize the M and welcomed the adoption of some European ideals. His reforms upset members of the aristocracy and nobility as well as groups of progressives and radicals. In nineteen twelve, a group of military officers conspired to overthrow the king, but the plot failed. There is debate over the main causes of the nineteen thirty two revolution, but the rise of western educated commoner elites who become dissatisfied with politics in CSM played a significant role in the event. Rama the seventh ascended the throne in nineteen, twenty, five, He created the Supreme Council of state made up of senior princes who had served in previous administrations. They quickly let go of commerce who had been appointed in the civil service and military. During Rama the seventh rule, returning Western educated students grew disillusioned with the status quo. In Nineteen, twenty, seven, a small group of military and civilian students gathered in periods with the. Founding Party to bring change to see 'em. This group of seven people call themselves the promoters and they decided to stage a coup to end absolute monarchy in the country. To achieve this goal, they formed the canal rot. Sedan or People's Party. The promoters worked on gathering supporters. Meanwhile seamless facing economic problems, the Great Depression made it to the country by nineteen thirty. The value of rice see'ums major export fell drastically land values also fell, so the government had to make a bunch of budget cuts. By nineteen, thirty two, the People's Party was made up of more than one hundred students, military officers and non-royal government officials. On the morning of June twenty-fourth, nineteen thirty two while the king was away from Bangkok. The People's party the coup. The promoters seized control of the army as well as post and telegraph offices, and they arrested royal officials who were part of the ruling group, armored vehicles and troops gathered at the Throne Hall in the Royal Plaza and one of the promoters read the narrow Sadan Manifesto, declaring the end of absolute monarchy and the establishment of a constitutional state. Rama the seventh was playing golf in the south of Seattle. When he got news of the coup, he agreed to the demands for a new constitutional system, and by December of that year he had promulgated a new Constitution A State Council and National Assembly established, but conflict between the CANARSIE DON and the king continued. A couple of years after the Revolution Rama the seventh left for England, and in nineteen, thirty five, he abdicated the throne, spending the rest of his life in England. Was a major turning point in history the next few decades we're still characterized by political unrest and roll by military governments.

Rama King Rama People's Party Bangkok Thailand Founding Party Southeast Asia England Throne Hall Golf Chakri Dynasty Seattle Supreme Council Of State Royal Plaza State Council National Assembly
Belmont sets pace for Triple Crown, with Tiz the Law favored

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Belmont sets pace for Triple Crown, with Tiz the Law favored

"The horse racing season begins in New York today with the Belmont Stakes for the first time the triple crown starts with the Belmont Stakes because of the corona virus and it's a shortened course wanted an eight miles the first time since nineteen twenty five it won't be it's usual gruel and one and a half miles no owners or fans are allowed at the track that usually caps attendance at ninety thousand the New York racing association so Patrick McKenna tells ESPN WABC it will be different it's a different energy but so much more important to be able to to put the show on the last leg of the Triple Crown of the Kentucky Derby September fifth and the Preakness October third Julie Walker in New York

New York Belmont Stakes Patrick Mckenna Wabc Julie Walker Espn
Voices from the Holocaust with Leon Bass

Making Gay History

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Voices from the Holocaust with Leon Bass

"Leon Bass was born in Philadelphia on January twenty. Third Nineteen, twenty, five, the fourth of six children. His parents were born in South Carolina in the eighteen nineties at the beginning of the Jim Crow era. Just after the first World War they joined the Great African American Migration North they settled in Philadelphia with the hope of making a better life for themselves and their children. As a young man during World War Two Leon volunteered to serve in the United States army. In, April, nineteen, forty, five, he, and four others from his unit arrived at the Humboldt, concentration camp in Weimar Germany just one day after it was liberated. Forty three years later on March Sixteenth Nineteen eighty-eight Leon is sitting in a studio in union new. Jersey. He's dressed in a plaid, Brown and based Sport Code. White Shirt and striped tie. He wears aviator, glasses and sports trim black moustache. Leon's interviewers are Bernard Weinstein and mark lender. Leeann recalls the racial discrimination. He experienced as a child in Philadelphia. I went to the school. WHERE THEY! Always taught us. To Care and love each other, but also have love of country. We pledge allegiance to the flag every day, just like every other young person in the city of Philadelphia do. And we said with liberty and justice for all. Just like everyone else only to go out and find as we matured. That was not so as I found out when I went to the theater. When I bought my ticket I was directed to the balcony. It was mandated that I go there. Because I wasn't good enough to go down on the main floor. It's beginning to get a little in the site to the society and how the Society viewed me. A person of color. And we. Always went to the park. And I recall how I look through that wire fence at this large swimming pool. Which I knew, I could never use I would never be admitted. because. The society was saying loud and clear to me. That I wasn't good enough. Those are the kind of things to. Make. You feel bad. I finished school in Nineteen forty, three. I went out and I I volunteered. And when I went down to the induction center. Institutional racism smacked me right in the face. because. Sergeant was there and. He told me go one. When I went through the door, and he told my wife go another way, and so I went into an all black unit safer, the officers they will white. When you enlisted, you realize the military was segregated. You. Don't even think about those things until it hits you in the face. And of course, the thing that made it more real more painful was the fact that they send US south. They send us right into the heart of the place where people would. would. Be a confrontation. We went to camp. Wheeler Georgia for Infantry Basic Training And we spent quite a time in Mississippi right in camp McCain. We spent almost a year there. and. We went on maneuvers into Texas Louisiana. And we came back to little. Rock Arkansas. Now all these places I was given the message. of WHO and what I was as far as the society was concerned. And it was really frustrating to think that you have made a commitment to your country and yet your country is saying to you. All Right? You're okay, but only so far. I went into Macon Georgia. Attempted to get a drink of water while I was in their simple thing like a drink of water. Because, you walk around the town Ucla Fountain drink i. went to drink at. Someone grabbed me and say boy. You don't drink here. Pointed to the sign, which said White. And directed me to. Another sign was said colored. Where was another fountain and you of course in uniform at the time happened? Soldier like all the other lack soldiers we will all experiencing. This was ear perception, though that the black troops generally though. fully understood the fact that. While the rhetoric of the war against Nazi racism, and so forth will was fine. In practice, the country was doing something entirely different. It was as though you were just a fringed. Country had was to personalities Channel One way. We may make wonderful announcements. You know we we've talked about engineer. Christian ethics and We're going to make the world a better place for democracy and all that other jazz, but then when you cut down to a real thing and you start seeing the way they operate. Things we're not. And so I? Began to be an angry, frustrated, young black soldier. After my experiences. I really did not want to be. On A. Specially after. Having to stand on a bus. When there were no seats at the back, having to stand up for hundred miles and looking at empty seats. Didn't endear me. To to my country. Couldn't eat in a restaurant. Had to go around the back. Knock on the door to get food. And I'm in a uniform I. And I. Prisoners of war from Germany. Being allowed to go in a restaurant and sit down to eat, and I was not entitled to for the same opportunity.

Bernard Weinstein Leon Bass United States Philadelphia Brown South Carolina Weimar United States Army Leeann Humboldt Germany Jim Crow Ucla Fountain White Arkansas Macon Georgia Georgia For Infantry Basic Tra Mississippi
Monster

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Monster

"Today a monster. If you're of a certain age, you might remember the nineteen fifty four movie creature from the Black Lagoon. Here's the plot. A geology expedition in the Amazon uncovers fossilized evidence, a skeletal hand fingers from the Devonian period that provides a direct link between land and sea animals further excavation of. Of the area where the fossil was found turns up nothing the leader. The search is ready to love, but it's thought that thousands of years ago, the part of the embankment, containing the rest of the skeleton fell into the water that was washed downriver broken up by the current. The group discovers at the river empties into a lagoon. The scientists decided to. To take a little longer and unaware that amphibious Gilman has been watching had for the lagoon, and that kill man is taking notice of the beautiful assistant. Will you get the idea? And if you think the plot for the film, the creature from the Black Lagoon came out of the imagination of a writer or perhaps a famous film director. You'd be half right. Right Produce Sir William Allen was attending nine hundred forty one dinner party during the filming of Citizen Kane, in which he played the reporter Thompson. When Mexican cinematographer, Gabriel Figueroa told him about the myth of a race of half fish half, human creatures, Amazon River, Allen, rose. Story notes title the Sea Monster Ten years later using beauty and the beast just inspiration. In December nineteen fifty two Maurice Jim expanded this into a treatment which Harry Essex and Arthur Ross rewrote as the black lagoon. The rest is movie history. The story told to Allen by Mexican cinematographer gave Figaro was based on the legend of Jaka. Ruina buried accounts describe. The arena is being Harry with their heads turned backwards and deformed feet. Could be characterized as seductive and sexually dangerous lure humans into water by taking on human forms when people of the Amazon and community disappear, and do not return such as fishermen husbands in young girls, deception is the ACA Luna had seduced and captured their victims. They abducted victims gradually come to resemble their captor the Yakov Bruno over a period of time I. There is turned to resemble the Conrad. Then their head and feet turn backward wants a full transformation is complete. The human has turned. Turned into a Jaka rhuna transformation to Jaka Ruina is irreversible and a person so transformed may never return to his or her home. I researched this story. I thought it sounded like a lot of other folktales that come from tribes of indigenous people that is until I found a nineteen eighty six account of an American doctor who ventured into the Amazon with his wife and daughter to provide needed medicine and medical treatment to several primitive communities. He described in a log I how his daughter! Daughter was taken by Jaka Luna One day one day she was swimming, so it's she was pulled under and vanished. Nobody was ever recovered grief-stricken. He and his wife returned to the states. They soon separated. It was an auditory years later alone and distraught, but he returned to the Amazon River, whereas daughter had vanished that he saw her again still alive, but it transformed into a mermaid. She had married a yacht, Luna and gain knowledge in becoming healer of the waters. No one ever saw. saw the doctor again. The doctors camp was discovered by a group searching for explorer Percy Fawcett. Who vanished in the Amazon in nineteen, twenty five monster

Black Lagoon Amazon Jaka Luna Amazon River Sir William Allen Jaka Ruina Jaka Harry Essex Percy Fawcett Gabriel Figueroa Yakov Bruno Gilman Ruina Citizen Kane Maurice Jim Harry Figaro Director Writer Reporter
Paul's Religion

5 Minutes in Church History

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Paul's Religion

"Welcome back to another five minutes in Church history for this episode. I am sitting here with a book in my hand. It is J. Gresham Megan's the origin of Paul's religion. It was first published in nineteen twenty one and that was when it was copyrighted. And this edition. Looks like it's from nineteen twenty five and autographed. It says with warm regards. Day Gresham Megyn October. Six Nine thousand nine hundred twenty seven. He gave it to George Fisher and George Fisher. Meticulously underlined and put in margin notes throughout this whole book. Sometimes you find books with notes and they stop after the first chapter to these notes. Go all the way through. Well that's the particular book but let's talk about this book Paul's religion. This book originated in lectures. In fact. There's a page here at the beginning that says the James Sprint lectures in nineteen eleven Mr James Sprint of Wilmington North Carolina gave to the Trustees of union theological seminary in Virginia. The some of thirty thousand dollars since increased by his generosity to fifty thousand dollars and it goes on to say that the purpose of that money was to set up a lectureship and in nineteen twenty two twenty one the lectures the sprint lectures were given by the Reverend. Dr John Grissom the year before the lectures were given by G Campbell. Morgan from London. The Great London pastor and the year after making the lectures were given by none other than the honorable William Jennings Bryan the nineteen twenty one thousand nine hundred ninety two lectures just three years before Brian would get into that courtroom in Dayton Tennessee. Well let's talk about mentions sprint lectures. He gave it the title the origin of Paul's religion there were actually three views floating around testament scholarship of the origin of Christianity. You see these New Testament scholars. German English turn of the nineteenth into the twentieth century. Made a distinction between the Jesus of the Gospels and the religion of Paul and they saw Jesus as one who talked about behavior ethics and made religion essentially how we live. Paul's the great systematize her and turned all of those systems of behavior into belief codes that you had to believe. And so that was the argument there was the Jesus of the Gospels the religion of Paul. And so where did? Paul's religion come from while German scholar Adolf von Harnack argued. That Paul was not a foundation not building on a foundation of the Gospels but was his own sort of mix off of the gospels. Harnack did not like Paul. He didn't like John Either. He only liked this synoptic gospels and then not even all of them and he certainly didn't like things like the Apostles Creed Harnack said Paul Deified Christ and turned him into somebody that Christ never claimed to be. There was also the German scholar of Rada and he said that Paul founded the Christian religion on certain Jewish elements from the enter testament period. But certainly not from Jesus and then there was another scholar boo set. And he said Oh wasn't founded on Judaism at all. Paul founded his religion on the Greek Pagan religions. Well Megan did not agree with that at all. An in this very scholarly book which was about three hundred pages when it was done. Amazing wanted it to be five hundred pages but the publisher said No. That's too much But in this very scholarly book Mason makes the case that the origin of Paul's religion is from Jesus himself the very end. This is what made us Paulin. Ism was not a philosophy. It was not a set of directions for escape from the misery of the world was not an account of what had always been true on the contrary it was an account of something that had happened and what had happened was the death and resurrection of Jesus. Megan says this he loved me and gave himself for me. There lies the basis of the religion of Paul. There lies the basis of all of Christianity. Well that's Mason on Paul's religion and I'm Steven. Thanks for joining us for five minutes in Church history

Paul J. Gresham Megan Adolf Von Harnack Mr James Sprint Gresham Megyn George Fisher Dr John Grissom William Jennings Bryan Trustees Of Union Theological Mason Wilmington Great London John Either North Carolina Morgan Virginia Tennessee Rada Brian Publisher
Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

This Day in History Class

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

"APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. This Day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm eaves and welcome to this day in History Class. A podcast for people who could never know enough about history today is may twenty fourth twenty twenty. The Day was may twenty fourth nineteen forty Mexican artists. W fosse GAYDOS and Stalinist agent. Gula Vich along with a crew of hitmen attempted to donate Leon Trotsky Trotsky was a Soviet revolutionary and Marxist threats who was a leading figure in the Bolshevik movement under Vladimir Lenin after Lennon died in nineteen twenty four and Joseph. Stalin rose to power in the Communist Party in Soviet Union Chomsky emerged. As one of Stalin's main critics and opponents Trotsky was against the increasingly bureaucratic Soviet state and called for more democracy in the Communist Party. He thought that the Stalinist policy of socialism and one country would hinder efforts for World Revolution in Nineteen Twenty Five. Trotsky was removed from his post in the war commissariat. The next year he was dropped from the Polit Bureau and in nineteen twenty seven he and his supporters were expelled from the Communist Party. In January of Nineteen Twenty eight Trotsky was exiled to a tie and Soviet Central Asia. He lived there for a year before he his wife and their son were expelled from the Soviet Union and sent to Turkey but he continued to write and criticize Stalin as well as people who had opposed Stalin but has settled for the regime. Trotsky settled on the Turkey island of principle where he stayed for four years. He completed his autobiography and his three volume history of the Russian revolution some of his supporters volunteer to serve as his bodyguards but in nineteen three Chomsky and his family were offered asylum in France soon enough. He was no longer welcome in France either and he moved to Norway then Mexico where he had been granted asylum skis settled in Koya con area of Mexico City at the Blue House the home of painter Diego Rivera and free to Carlo and he continued to write completing the revolution betrayed in one thousand nine hundred eighty six but in a series of trials in the late. Nineteen thirties many so-called old bolsheviks were found guilty of treason and imprisoned or executed many of the defendants confessed to having plotted with Trotsky to kill Stalin and other Soviet leaders Trotsky was found guilty of treason in absentia and sentenced to death on May twenty fourth. Nineteen forty Stalinist agent. Iosif Grigorovich

Leon Trotsky Trotsky Stalin Communist Party Soviet Union Soviet Central Asia History Class Apple Gula Vich Chomsky Iosif Grigorovich Vladimir Lenin Turkey Island Turkey France Polit Bureau Diego Rivera Joseph Mexico City Mexico Koya
National Spelling Bee canceled for the first time since WWII

Jason and Alexis

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

National Spelling Bee canceled for the first time since WWII

"For the first time since nineteen forty five the scripts national spelling bee has been canceled due to the pandemic the cancellation unfortunately means that eighth graders will miss their final opportunity to compete in the spelling bee the organizer say they'll find a way to honor the one hundred and fifty contestants that won their regional titles for a chance to compete in the nationals the competition which first began in nineteen twenty five to cancel between forty three and forty five due to World War

Fashion and War in America

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Fashion and War in America

"Are currently in the midst of international fashion week. Yes and last week. We talked about the origins of the semi-chaotic relationship between fashion and Hollywood film. But we only got into the nineteen thirties so today. We're moving out of the thirties and into the nineteen forties. Which of course takes US straight into World War Two and on the show? We've talked a lot about fashion and war as it relates to Europe during World War One and World War Two but less so about the relationship fashion and war in America and it's actually incredibly fascinating because throughout the nineteen thirties. America's changing perception of their homegrown talent was reflected in Ariz- leading fashion magazines. Such as Vogue and Harper's bazaar at both of those magazines began to feature American fashion designers more and more throughout the decade. Elizabeth Haase reflected on this transitory period in American fashion in her book. Fashion is spinach which was published in nineteen thirty eight and in it. She writes quote in the late twenties ninety percent of the drawings and photographs. Where the work? A prison couturiers and. She's talking about Vogue and Harper's bazaar and then she says many pages and both magazines are now devoted to close created in America for American Life. The outbreak of World War Two and nineteen thirty nine mark significant shift in the fate of American designers who having continued to operate in the shadow of Paris throughout the nineteen thirties. Were suddenly left to stand all on their own and during the German occupation of Paris from June nineteen forty to August nineteen forty four. Many of the leading French couture houses were forced to close and those that did remain open did so under severely limited operations and some pretty severe restrictions as well right and for those of our listeners. Who might not have heard? April actually did a fantastic interview on stuff. You Mr History class which we featured a couple months ago so check it out if you want to learn more about fashion world war two so for the French fashion industry. This meant that communication with America during World War Two. It meant that one of their most important export markets was almost entirely broken and in one thousand nine hundred one after American designers and manufacturers presented promising fall and spring collections New York Times fashion journalist Virginia Pope well. She declared Murck City to be the fashion center of the world and AIRCON designers may have come into their own during the war but they did so under restriction and regulation beginning in nineteen forty two American fashion designers had to grapple with restrictions imposed by regulation l eighty five which were government imposed sanctions at severely limited. Just what designers could and could not produce the purpose of l. eighty-five was to conserve materials. Needed for the war effort and this included fabrics such as silk cotton wool. Leather Rubber Nylon. So you know pretty much. Every material that you need to make clothing and footwear and the regulations thus restricted just. How much material could be used in the making of new garments so we had campaign such as make-do-and-mend which encouraged people to avoid shopping altogether by mending their old clothes. Something we of course support very much today. L. eighty-five essentially challenge the very nature of the fashion industry itself. As we all know depends on the production of new seasonal clothing styles to stimulate consumerism and as we establish last episode Hollywood films while they were actively complacent and encouraging fashion consumption throughout the nineteen thirties and costume designers like their fashion designer. Counterparts were not exempt from L. Eighty five regulations during the war in an eighteen. Forty four article in the New York Times renowned Hollywood costume designer. Edith head called L. Eighty five quote. The greatest boone ever came to fashion designers in Hollywood so it would appear casts that in the nineteen forties costume designers still considered themselves as fashion designers. And she goes on to say about eighty-five quote. It vanished super luxury and brought us all down to Earth. Today we create sensible styles for women the kind that they can actually wear and she goes on to say how. Well I remember the day when we would swirl Fox skins around the hem of a secretary address or wipe satin uniform on a trained nurse. Now we hold to stark realism and by this time had been the head designer at paramount. For seven years she had taken over for her predecessor. Travis Banton in nineteen thirty seven and head like baton began her career in film working with Howard greer in the nineteen twenties as a costume illustrator before climbing the ranks and indeed head is certainly one of the most prolific and fame designers from the Hollywood golden age. Numerous books have been written about this prolific designer who April has eight Academy Awards for best costume design and wait for it. She has four hundred and forty four credits. On that's intense. She worked for almost sixty years in the film industry so she had an incredible career her first credit it dates to nineteen twenty five and her last film is dead. Men Don't wear plaid with Steve Martin. That released after her death in nineteen eighty two so she died in one thousand nine hundred. One at the age of eighty. Three head is quoted and Margaret Bailey's nineteen eighty-two book those Glorious Glamour Years as saying quote. I do not consider a motion picture costume designer necessarily a fashion creator because we do the script tells us to if we do a period piece then we recreate fashion. That was done before. And if we have a character role we do character close. It is only by the accident of a script that calls for fashion an actress that can wear fashion that some of the beautiful clothes will emerge. I don't consider myself a designer in the sense of fashion designer. I am a motion picture costume designer. So just how did head go from identifying as a fashion designer in Hollywood and the nineteen forties to firmly distinguishing herself as a costume designer by the end of her career? I love this answer. You pro because it actually lies with the advent of yours new-look which is a little unexpected as many of us know nineteen forty seven witnessed this dramatic and sudden change in fashion. Thanks to the unprecedented success of Christiane Yours Premier collection and he introduced dresses with nipped in ways. Those padded hips and full long skirts and they stood in direct contrast to the war regulated fashions of years prior which is why so many people loved them. Unfortunately for the many films released the year that this change took place. The costumes were immediately glaringly out of fashion again. Dino Dior's new look was significant reminder. That though film cost you may be perceived and interpreted as fashion it will never be able to truly contend with the whims and follies of contemporary trends. And Edith. Had designed costumes for eleven films that were released in nineteen forty seven so to say that she was affected is a bit of an understatement. Here and looking on this period for the book. Edith head's Hollywood edith reflected quote. I learned my lesson. The hard way just offered Dior brought out the new look every film I had done in the past few months. Looked like something from the bread lines with each screening. I vowed that I would never get caught by fashion trend again and became a confirmed fence sitter. Although despite her weariness of fashion trends did not keep her designs from apparently sparking them as was the case with address she designed for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun which was a nineteen fifty film in a nineteen seventy-eight article for the American Film Journal. Edith wrote my dress for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun was taken up by manufacturer of debutante Party dresses. Someone at paramount wants counted at a party thirty seven Elizabeth Taylor's dancing. All studio designers have created something that influences fashion. But a good costume designer. Shouldn't try to influence style though. Naturally he hopes to hit upon something that many people will like

Hollywood Edith Head America Elizabeth Taylor New York Times Paris Paramount Head Designer United States Vogue Europe Elizabeth Haase Dior Ariz Academy Awards American Film Journal Travis Banton Harper
Talking to the Dead

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Talking to the Dead

"Today we're talking about the seance communicating with the dead has been around for centuries United States just after the civil war when so many men lost on. The battlefields was so little attention to their identification left to be buried until the battle that had killed them had passed often buried in mass graves leaving family and loved ones with no idea what happened to their father. Son Brother husband the grieving American public search for answers in media and through seances across Europe following world. War One sounds flourished often led by celebrities like Sir Arthur conon on and doyle the author Sherlock Holmes but critic arose from the World Magic from roughly nineteen twenty to nineteen twenty. Six Harry Harry. Houdini made a part of his. Life's work to expose. Mediums in the seance but the magician wasn't always so intent on exposing those would communicate with the dead. The great magician had two women in his life his mother and his wife. They were the law of his life when his mother Cecilia. Steiner Weiss died of a stroke. Nineteen Thirteen Harry. Houdini sought out a medium that would allow him to speak with his beloved mother but for decades his axe x his own acts had included. Sounds as were the highest form of deception. When he attended a seance could identify the very tricks tricks adhered used in his own acts? He went on the warpath exposing the fraudulent gatherings. Houdini he's former. Education was slight his self education. Commence the magician had a great love of books and of research built a formidable personal library when in the nineteen twenties he strode into the public public arena to confront fraudulent mediums. He proceeded from home lined with books and manuscripts about their methods of deception. Visitors to the online line collection can view July thirty first nineteen twenty five letter in which we need describes his extensive library of letters and documents related to the spiritualism his attacks stem from both shameless self-promotion sincere commitment to the public photographs and the Digital Houdini collection and show his exposures a rich penelope of psychic fraud sleight riding spirit photographs fingerprinting a spirit and trump and mediums. Who would transmit voices through the musical instrument articles and images present? Houdini greatest challenge many any crandon. The Media Mona's Marjorie. A woman who fooled one established academic mind after another. She found her greatest champion in Sir Arthur CONAN doyle. Genie was never able to expose her as an outright fraud but he did block her progress. Her name was Minna Crandon but the world knew her as Marjorie a pseudonym adopted to protect her from publicity. She lived with her husband successful. Surge in Leroy Crandon on Boston's affluent Beacon Hill. It was there in their house online street in one thousand nine hundred twenty three that she purportedly discovered she had psychic power specifically the ability to levitated objects generator. Called noises. Materialized spirit forms warms. The phenomenon were controlled. She said by the spirit of her deceased brother. Walter who would speak through Mina in a a gruff decidedly unspiritual manner. His No nonsense conference liberally laced with profanities before long binders talents came him to the attention of researchers and she was closely studied on an off for an suing ten years and through examination of the claims and counterclaims counterclaims so the various researchers would require a book length essay. I'm not that ambitious instead what I'd like to do. Compare and contrast the accounts of the initial investigation as presented in two influential books science and Para Science by Brian a angles nineteen eighty-four mediums and mystics. And the occult by Melborn Christopher. Nine hundred seventy five with only occasional forays into other sources verses when necessary and the process. We may not learn anything conclusive about March but we will learn something about the hazards and frustrations nations of studying. The paranormal was Marjorie. A greater magician than Houdini. Or was she the real thing able to call up dead and hold for

Houdini Marjorie Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Harry Harry Minna Crandon Fraud Crandon Sir Arthur Conon Walter Mina Leroy Crandon Europe United States Steiner Weiss Melborn Christopher Cecilia Genie Sherlock Holmes Beacon Hill
The United States of McDonalds

Gastropod

12:45 min | 1 year ago

The United States of McDonalds

"For ME GROWING UP IN CHICAGO. McDonald's was always around. We had birthday parties at McDonald's because her apartment was on on the small size I went to McDonald's after work in high school and after school. It was the go-to meal when my mom Um and I were driving far distances and we needed something to eat and so I have probably spent most of my life inside of McDonald's so the fact that I wrote a book about McDonald's. McDonald's is actually not that surprising. This is Marsha chatwin. She's a professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University and her new book. The book about McDonalds. It's called franchise the Golden Arches in Black America and speaking of the Golden Arches. There's another new book out called drive through dreams. James A Journey through the heart of America's fast-food kingdom it's by journalist. Adam Chandler the Golden Arches are thought to be according to independent survey more recognizable as a symbol. Both then the Christian crosses around the world recognizable or no. I didn't imagine we'd ever focus an entire episode on McDonald's but here we are Dr Together. Adema Marsha Taylor story about McDonald's that is about much more than McDonald's making it perfect for gastropod and we of course our guest repod the podcast. That looks at food through the Lens of science in history. I'm Cynthia Graber and I'm Nikola twilly and this episode. We're getting to the bottom of how McDonald's took over America. The story starts with WHO invented the hamburger burkart. And how did it become so ubiquitous that it gets bigger from there this episode. We're asking his McDonald's basically America's national cuisine and if it is is what can it tell us about who we are as a country less. How did the tax payer ended up funding the spread of McDonald's in the inner cities and why we're civil rights groups on board? Well whatever idea you have of of. How huge fast food is you should double or triple in your mind because the statistics are bonkers? They're completely bananas us. Eighty percent of Americans eat fast food every month. Ninety six percent of them eat fast food every year which is more than the number of Americans that participate participate on the Internet atom. Says there's not a single place in America that eighty percent of Americans go to at least monthly not a library or Jim or any house of worship according according to the Centers for Disease Control which is not happy about this stat. More than a third of American children eat food every day and for the population as the whole. It's roughly the same thirty six percent of us. Eat it every single day out of all the fast food available to us in the US. The biggest I the most popular chain the one that serves literally one percent of the world's population every day of course it's McDonald's which according to somewhat recent stats sells seventy five burgers every second and Serbs sixty eight million people per day. There is no real way to get your head around numbers that large. But what's weird is that's is makes McDonald's the biggest almost everything everything. It does so marshalled as the McDonald's is even the largest distributorship toys in the world just because of happy meals. At how do they get that big to answer that we we have to go back to the beginning. It all starts about one hundred years ago with the invention of the hamburger. Well there is a lot of debate as is debate about anything culinary in this world about who invented invented any particular item there are many authors but a lot of historians culinary or otherwise. We'll give credit to Walt Anderson. And he was a fry cook in Wichita who one day in one of those kind of Isaac Newton Aha moments got really frustrated when he was cooking a meatball on a griddle and smashed it flat right with the SPATULA and the result was a burger that cooked through really quickly and he put them in these specialty buns. And that's sort of the most recognizable version of of the Burger that we have well Anderson's meatball. Smashing moment was a breakthrough. He went onto lunch white castle. And that what is believed to be the very first fast food chain in the nineteen teens and twenties. There weren't fast food chains. Americans lived in a very different world less connected less cosmopolitan. I'm a politician. Even as late as nineteen twenty five only half of all the homes in the United States had `electricity even fewer had indoor plumbing. People weren't used to dining finding out regularly. Generally speaking there wasn't a unified culinary culture. There wasn't one item. We had ethnic enclaves that had their own specific blends of items that that were cherished and part of a tradition but in the nineteen twenties America was starting to change. The model t was becoming more affordable and the number of people who owned cars more than quadrupled. Adam told us that nineteen twenty was the first year that more Americans lived in cities the not the US was starting to become urban. The First World War was the first mechanized war and the nineteen twenties. He's was the machine. Age Technology promise to streamline and modernize every aspect of American life the nineteen twenties was also. The beginning of radio's Golden Age and more and more people started to tune into music and mystery and comedy shows. Radio started to create a national culture at the end of World War One reserved this unifying aspect to American elect. Technology was bringing about and the hamburger was part of that was part of finding a national diet. The hamburger did have one hurdle to overcome Americans. At the time. I'm was scared of ground meat. They were scared of it. Because they'd all read the jungle by Upton Sinclair and they were nervous about the quality of the food. The jungle was a really important book from the Early Nineteen Twenties. We talked about it in our episode. On the history of preservatives. It told the tale of a semi-fictional worker in a Chicago. Slaughterhouse and the nightmarish conditions there for both the workers and the resulting meat while Anderson than meat ball smashing genius behind the hamburger. He was fully aware that Americans thought ground meat was likely full of dirt and and dead rats and even workers fingers so what he did was he designed these stores that all look the same. They had stainless steel interiors white tiles and they look like castles and white castle was meant to kind of convey this stately safe grandeur of a place where you could go and it would be the same everywhere you went so it was meant to reassure consumers. Who didn't really know what was safe to eat? And that really set the tone for what would come in the future of these industries of franchising of seeing something wherever you are in saying. Oh I knew it. I'm going to get here. This is familiar to me. White Castle was the first to open in franchise fast food restaurants. But it isn't the biggest today as you all know. That title goes to McDonald's. McDonald's brothers were these two men from New Hampshire sure who had kind of seen the extremes of the great depression and they headed out to California to see where they could strike business. Gold Dick and Mac McDonald headed West in nineteen thirty. They were in their twenties and their thought was. Maybe they can make it big in the movies. That didn't find as much success as they'd hoped they were two sons of a shoe factory foreman and they found success more for in the business side of production the catering. They went from that into the restaurant business. They opened up a barbecue. Stand in nineteen forty and southern California and and it was one of the drivers of the era. That people are often familiar with car. hops in major at boots and a young guys cruising in in cars and people hanging out and just kind of a big scene and they were successful. First restaurant was called McDonald's and it was in San Bernardino which is just east of La. It's meaningful that. McDonald's started in southern California because southern California was really where a lot of changes that overtook. America were happening kind of on on steroids by the early nineteen forties. The Great Depression was finally over. San Bernardino is shifting from being farming town to more of a manufacturing and service industries industry center people were moving their into the growing city and suburbs and increasingly. They had a little disposable income but also San Bernardino was on route sixty six and so it was a place where a lot of people were traveling throughout California as well through as the rest of the country. So Dick and Mac McDonald. Were doing pretty well for themselves. But but then after eight years in the restaurant business. They surprised everyone by deciding to close their popular successful restaurant and entirely revamp it. The re diagram to what the kitchen would look like they use this assembly line model that White Castle and kind of employed and they cut the menu items from twenty five to nine. They also fired all all of the young women who are car hops because they felt like they were flirty and they would distract from the work that was happening there. They also wanted to pivot away from being a teen hangout to family friendly place. They got rid of silverware because people would steal it or break it and they went to wrapping Burgers in paper and they wanted to create the most efficient kitchen possible in order to serve as many people as possible. And so the revision of the McDonald's drive in is what we are living with today a highly automated mechanized kitchen and that is able to produce high volumes of food and a very short period of time. What they did was they basically just souped up the kitchen and turned it into a factory? An assembly line dusted with Hollywood magic. And the result was they could serve food for cheap even cheaper than their previous menu items had been. I didn't know what to make of it but it caught on very quickly. This new McDonald's factory style restaurant didn't just catch on with eaters. It became a total phenomenon. Within the restaurant industry. Eight people were coming from all over the country to kind of hear and see what was going on because there were these whispers in the industry about this place that was so popular and and you know there were long lines and people were talking about this place. That was not just serving a lot of people but serving a lot of people quickly so eventually the founders of Burger King Taco bell a couple of other chains that didn't quite make it ultimately stopped by and they copied with McDonald brothers. Were doing as Z.. Listeners know some of those copycats are still around today. One of the businessmen who came to see it was none other than Ray KROC. He was a salesman and he sold the mixing machines machines for milkshakes and the McDonald Brothers had bought a shockingly large quantity of these machines so great thought he'd go and see what they were doing with them. Ray had been in nearly every kind end of commercial kitchen available. At the time. He'd played jazz at speakeasy. During prohibition he'd sold kitchen and restaurant supplies around the country so he came to the McDonald's restaurant in San Bernardino we know and he saw the crowds and he was completely blown away by it and so immediately said this needs to be national. This needs to be everywhere. Ray convinced the brothers. Let him start working with them before long. He bought them out. And the tool that ray us to fulfil his dream of taking this model national and then global global was the franchise so franchising is this concept that a parent company provides all of the blueprints and the instructions and the recipes for a product or service and the Franchisee pays Hayes for the right to deliver that good or service to an audience. Ray KROC didn't invent this franchise model White Castle had already been using it and in fact many experts think that at the root of the idea goes back to the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages tax collectors did the work of the church and collected tithes and the kept some of the money for themselves at the start of the twentieth century. Rick Coca Cola had used the franchise model to make their sugary drink available at drugstores across America. But it was ray KROC who really took this franchise idea and ran with it. The franchise model. I think is amazing because it allows companies to pass on all of the liability to this other party so so that was sort of the way in which McDonald's grew really quickly and also took a lot of the risk out from opening places and this is the way they maintained control over franchisees so it was consistent. You didn't have rogue franchisees trying to sell Pepsi when you had a contract to sell coke and so it was a complicated system. But it's what turned McDonald's into the the biggest in the fastest growing fast food restaurant. The

Mcdonald Mac Mcdonald America Mcdonald Brothers San Bernardino White Castle Ray Kroc United States Walt Anderson Early Nineteen Twenties Chicago Adam Chandler California Golden Arches Mcdonalds Marsha Chatwin Georgetown University Professor Of History
Portrait found in gallery's walls verified as missing Klimt

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Portrait found in gallery's walls verified as missing Klimt

"A god not at that age she or the motor not gather in the northern city of Pete chan's up was clearing away IV when he noticed a small panel toll on a wall outside in open to inside the space he found a plastic bag containing a painting that appear to be the missing monster pace you chance a prosecutor Ornella kika spoke to reporters if you're going number two and it's with no small emotion that I can tell you the work is authentic portrait of a lady depicts a young woman sensually glancing over her shoulder against the dreamy cream background claim to finish the painting in nineteen seventeen the year before he died the Galleria quieted in nineteen twenty five and reported it missing in February nineteen ninety seven experts say the painting is in remarkably good condition I'm Sarah Bassus

Pete Chan Prosecutor Sarah Bassus Ornella Kika
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Born in nineteen twenty five holding hands and crying with a white man who would have been an officer at that time it would have never interacted with him and I was so thankful that he was able to experience that kind of healing in his life that the military actually is gone full circle because I used to ask when I was a kid I said why is it that you grew up here and you're the only one who made something out of himself nobody else is driving cattle at summer when I was ten years old my father got the first cattle and I will never forget I was in the fourth grade he drove that car to pick me up from school it was long it was black it it was I don't quite drop top white interior the kids were miles drop I was like I was told by another family he was alone in creating this reality for us and I did not realize how important the military had been bringing him out of his environment and then discriminated against him and then turn around and and it's also created this guy Bob has called the house white friends call enough to speak to bill and Bob is excited it's beautiful I got Bob on the phone to ask straight out if this was a one off of doing the right thing it ends up you continue to spend his life fighting to move the world forward from pushing the Americans with disabilities act into law in nineteen ninety two is current fight for elder care right the real IRA you'll work rarely and go through and is still going through I think it's disgusting and let's face it this way hello there were in with Dan to break the barrier service members now make up almost seventy percent of active duty military progress is being made yet black commissioned officers only make up eight percent of.

officer Bob Dan
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Nineteen twenty five seven com there okay so we have our that you don't want to miss this is actually really great stuff and then we have some wacky white elephant ideas we're gonna have a white elephant party here is can commander show studios and if you have one or if you just have that special someone on your list related by a gag gift I bet she or find something that we put together over on the website there gonna share with you here on the show and the phone lines are open one triple eight eight to five fifty to fifty four once again is the way to join us and just a quick reminder ministry know that you can always make it a point to speak with me I hear on the show which one of his head over to the website commanded dot com there's a link at the top right hand corner is says be a caller just fill that form and we'll get back with you we have Molly who's joining us from Fresno California hi there Molly you can think so much for having me my pleasure so I read a story that you did something that many parents with love to do but we just don't have the nerve to do it Molly tell us about it yes about nine months ago we noticed some behaviors and our kids that we didn't love and they were a little grumpy and so we didn't know if that was screens or sugar or what the one day my son and greeted me at the door when can I play on your phone that was it for me so we pulled the plug we said we're taking a spring break and so for what we plan to be two weeks we took a break and we told the kids know screens until further notice that day okay so how old are the kids so we have five kids right now in that moment foster mommy on two four year old a six year old an eight year old and a ten year old oh my gosh and you took all the screens with video games too yeah all of it you too like I've had all of it we took it off the table and honestly I was terrified I assumed it would be impossible and they would be just going through withdrawals but what happened we couldn't believe it the next morning they didn't even ask and they found other things to deal only they go actually go outside and play yeah imagine that was a so is it really so like after I mean you know so you took it always did nobody said anything like can I have a backing for five minutes okay that was the mind blowing things they didn't really even ask me started exploring new something silly like couch forks and things blowing my child to look in the eighties to be honest with you it was amazing so we plan to do this for two weeks and then it was so good that we did it for thirty days and it was a detox that was our plan so it was fantastic so what we did was we use this time to observe what their interests and talents where and how quickly there they would improve and reading levels and he started to kind of feed those in trance and then we made a long term plan at the end of that like how do we want technology to work in our house but you know and that's really smart so before you you did the digital detox what were what were the limitations on their screen time before and then afterwards I'm sure you I mean as you gave it back to them I mean just and say okay here we go just here's twenty four seven you can do what you want how did that work out yeah good question so that was interesting thing to me is that they only had an hour a day before the detox so we were with him the limits of that what everyone recommends and then since then we've gone to an hour once a week they get to use an iPad or Netflix and sometimes they don't even use that yeah it's been crazy and so what was the biggest surprise that you signed the kids afterwards I mean aside from them just like going out and finding new interests and then I mean you guys going on hikes or walks or was there something really like like like mine you entry like okay this is a fundamental shift yeah that's a good question you know I think it was how pervasive how much it impacts of their behavior and their attitude and their minds all the time even with just an hour a day I didn't expect the result honestly it was like we have a switch all around and so now as okay so be on sure people are listing of well you know there for years old there eight years out there ten years off they're not my fourteen year old my sixteen year old how do you think that's going to work out lately so to be honest with you I have no experience parenting older kids well we didn't have actually a foster placement of a teenager active during this time and she's fourteen and she mentioned to us after a couple days she said do you guys not do TV here what's going on here but she actually liked it and so you know we would use screens in technology or things that helps build connection like a family movie night or we even did a after the detox we did like a Mario kart tournament for twenty minutes once all of us but we just wanted to put technology in its right place in our home and that's what we're able to do after we kind of stepped back and went back to the drawing board and saw how is this we want this technology to work for us rather than the kids being enslaved to it but I think you know what speed Molly you're different okay because a lot of parents are using the the technology the iPad's as like baby sitters right even for more than just an hour a day I mean we're talking like three or four hours a day I mean and so from the beginning you approach this differently and it's really quite refreshing I mean to to hear somebody who's got five kids no do you work I stay home okay which is fabulous and that's where you should be a stay at home mom I think that's you know if you can do it that's that's the best way to start nurturing and and having to you know kids that will turn into self sustaining and dolls you know but this whole digital revolution it's it's hard for for parents to say you know what I want to put a dash of your brothers guy Larry and what he did with his his daughter's Instagram account now this is fascinating so he's so she's she's fifteen okay so I they're having a slumber party a girls slumber party over at our house and the dad gets wind that she sneaking in the voice for now so he goes down there and mom and dad they just lay down longer you know what you boys around here and you might wear my daughter you come with me they give her an ultimatum they said you know what here's the deal sweetie we love you we want to protect you we can take your phone away for a month okay or we're gonna take over your social media account for two weeks which would you rather do so she being a teenager she says in his years a month and she hears two weeks right this is okay I'll take the two weeks all after the first day she was begging her parents to take the phone away because her father got on there you know dressing like a okay her father is a big Texas guy okay gets on there and wearing crop tops okay do in self fees are due in tick tock videos and dancing and like cut offs you know and but as it turns out she had eight hundred followers when her father took over her Instagram account and now she's got fifteen thousand thanks for and so that's anything so it's got you know it's kind of crazy parents are looking at different ways of man and trying to deal with this but thanks Molly for sharing and I'm really inspirational story about just doing the whole detox thing and if any of our listeners you can try that with your kids and I'd like to hear the results from you too and just reminder you can always drop you know through the web page my like a pleasure having you with us are these days everyone's a photographer you have a great Cameron your pocket at all times in you take so many photos is a good chance you might get something for awhile but here's how to bring out your true inner shutter bug in this photography tape is brought to you by the S. and fast photo scanner by the way the most obvious difference we as far phone camera and a professional cameras that you can swap out lenses on the big carriers but thanks to some creative mind you can now get a set of lenses made especially for a smartphone they typically come in a clip on form the got mounts you just position them over the existing lands number two in this tip is don't just leave your smartphone Cameron automatic mode there's so much to explore is going into the manual settings I look at your camera app they came with their phone don't forget to go in and change the settings see how it will impact your images I'm not impressed there are tons of cameras you get reviews over at commander com disco is a good option it has many powerful camera presets filters and also some editing tools finally stabilize your phone and get yourself a tripod yeah I mean it was huge bulky ones that were really popular in the eighties eighties also me was that you just kind of slapping camera right in and even the ones that I do like the mostly have Bluetooth remote so that this way you can trigger that shot her from a distance also makes perfect sense if you're gonna be taking any type of holiday family photos is to get that tripod with that blue to throughout this holiday preserve was priceless and gift a fast photo scanner available vest by office depot staples or an Epson dot com slash bass photo Kim once again that's Epson dot com slash fast photo can stay right where you are we've got some wacky elephant white elephant gift the need to tell you about and in our in our tip about D. L. H. we've got some ways that you might be wasting money on tech you not even know and of course we have more of your phone calls here on the Kim commando show.

commander two weeks twenty minutes fourteen year two four year five minutes sixteen year eight years nine months thirty days eight year four hours ten years six year ten year one day
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"That any of the city council candidates are going to run on this platform but I would at least say this they knew they overstepped they ended up getting hot out on this and now the city is a million dollars for a city that is not is is actually cutting budgets in some areas to move money to other areas and we have a million fewer dollars to do it solely because the city council want to make a political point and break this foe attempt at saving the Showbox and look at this Mike you would agree with Tom Herman he was here completely really dori Monson if he was here complete we all agree on this one thing they blew it and I love it I love the show Bucks and I hope somebody buys it I hope it stays the show busted a favorite place but the city way overstepped its authority in this regard address the Taylor taking a look at traffic Tracy what's going on so I just got an update from met ed metro sorry let's take that back I got an update from as does not only pass that's what I want to say there is an earlier tanker truck it was a fuel truck that was headed westbound on on I ninety across the vantage bridge it ended up spilling a lot of fuel and they had once been ninety shut down for quite awhile I just got the other day saying that they're gonna have a lane open across the vantage rage by four o'clock this afternoon because of this fuel spill so they're making progress out in that direction making progress right now is the clean up from a couple of earlier problems in north on five the express lanes at Northgate and again that crash out near the county line it's still made the drive from Seattle to ever and about an hour back ups on five twenty not so much but I. ninety starting to slow down heading west on outside of the mount Baker tunnel drive through two commas definitely ramped up leaving highway eighteen working its way out towards the Tacoma dome so far so good as we get closer to joint base Lewis McChord traffic brought to you by Amazon holiday hiring an Amazon starts now delivery drivers earn up to nineteen twenty five an hour no resume no special driver's license needed visit Amazon dot com slash apply Amazon is an equal opportunity employer Kyra radio real time traffic and.

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Into give this to you earlier. NCDC show. Dot gov and it says a record high temperature of ninety one degrees was tied at Nashville. Yes, yesterday this ties the record set in twenty ten twenty ten. Wanted. Yes, do we know when the one before that was I don't. For twenty ten. So when is the record before that, that nineteen Twenty-three the I see a trend nineteen Twenty-three probably will probably want. Well, see I'm looking here, and it was talking about the highest temperature ever recorded. In middle Tennessee. My no that is the highest Trevor recorded it was in Clarksville, and it was one hundred twelve degrees. And it happened twice in nineteen twenty five and nineteen thirty. So I'm wondering back them going. We'll see this is this is global. I don't know whether we're blaming it on, then back in nineteen twenty five and nineteen thirty. Also during the time we used to get record snowfall. Like, yeah. Extreme weather. Yeah. It's always happened. It just goes through cycles. And in a I mean we had the nineteen thirties in the dust bowl and all the rest of that stuff. But, you know, people now look at the weather because they've got a short memory or they just think everything revolves around their life span, and they think that that's it. And it's not now onto the other stuff. I got a couple of things here for you. We have one lone, Republican congressman blocking this massive nineteen point one billion dollars spending Bill. His name is chip ROY Republican from Texas. And of course, one congressman unlike one Senator who can filibuster, whatever one congressman can't stop it. But what he did was he blocked a you meant a unanimous consent. Request in the house to pass the Bill a nineteen point one billion dollar disaster relief Bill passed by the Senate supported by President Trump blocking the unanimous consent. That's when they say, you know, all in favor Aye all oppose. Oh, hey called for a roll-call.

congressman ROY Republican Bill Dot Nashville middle Tennessee Aye Clarksville Senate President Trump Trevor Texas Senator one hundred twelve degrees one billion dollars ninety one degrees one billion dollar
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Listen to their thoughts. So one of the things that we've learned in recent years in politics and other spheres of life that women are just almost all the time. Underrated. And you have written about a very underrated one underrated many ways, tell us a little bit about some of the things that she Barbara Bush. Did that people have only a demo wariness of? Thank you this before I respond your question. I'd say this is the first time I've been at the LA times book festival what a fantastic event is. And I just want to think they all times for sponsoring it. And I'd also like to thank you all for showing up because one of my visions last night was known show up, and we would be sitting here talking to one another. So thank you. Page not making that that necessary. I've covered the last ten presidential elections. Really my only job skill. Thank god. We keep holding elections and seven of those ten elections. Barbara Bush played a personal role. I think you'd be hard foot to find someone else in American history who played an intimate role in so many presidential elections in American politics. And yet when people in cover those elections, people almost invariably like Barbara Bush. They felt affectionate toward Barbara Bush. They saw her as a white haired grandmotherly figure who could be funny, and that is not true. But that is really incomplete when you think about Bush because she was also shark and Kostic, and and she could be kind of mean there was a time when I was covering her husband that to mean to me. She was in important advisor to both her husband and her son. Sometimes when they wanted her advice and sometimes when they didn't and she lived. She lived a life of real consequence yet. I think you're quite right. I think she was underestimated throughout her life. She was born in nineteen twenty five that's five years after women got the right to vote. She was understood by her mother who didn't think she would amount to much by her teachers in looking at her high school transcripts save record her IQ, which is something. I hope we've stopped doing we'll district's but her I q is one twenty which is pretty smart. And yet she was a thoroughly undistinguished student. The only eighty ever gotten high school was in physical education. She was underestimated I think by her husband who initially did not see heard vice on for instance, running for president are earlier than that on moving from the east coast to Odessa, Texas. And when he came and said to her decided, we're going to move to a Desa, Texas. She replied, I've always wanted to live in Texas, which is something no one has ever said ever. And yet. As their marriage went on as American history as opportunities and expectations for women went on her role change from being the help mate. To being a real partner for for George H W Bush, and you ask about some of the things he was consequential about. And I'm just mentioned a couple. She was took a groundbreaking role in addressing the aids HIV crisis. That was exploding in America and had been largely ignored by the Reagan administration and the actions that the Bush administration took toward that and her own actions in for instance, visiting grandma's house during the first hundred days every time his first lady and picking up. Donovan a six month old boy who had aids cinema success a country that was credibly powerful. I think we forget today. What a powerful statement that was she didn't make a speech. She didn't scold anybody. She just brought news for Tigers with her to a home for people with aids and demonstrated that you could hug them and pick them up and work beside them. And not be afraid of that. There's another thing she was consequential. That I think has been largely unknown and that was in the negotiations to end the Cold War. You may remember that Nancy Reagan had a very frosty relationship with Jeff. Publicly, basically feuding with each other. And I do not blame Nancy Reagan for this because raise Gorbachev was impossible personality. She was Dacic. She lectured, everyone on the superiority of the communist system, but the fact that she and Nancy Reagan had this. Feud was not helpful for the negotiations that were going on between their husbands, and Barbara Bush told me she looked at that. And one of the interviews. I did with her. She looked at that. And thought that was stupid that was the word he used and she thought it was stupid not because she didn't understand it. Because as I said, raise Gorbachev could be difficult. But because it was so unhelpful to her husband and to the nation and really to the world at during that perilous time so Barbara Bush wrote a letter to her brother Scott the day before she was going to meet raise Jeff for the first time as first lady, and she said, Scott, I'm going to love her no matter what she does. And she cultivated her. Years she made raise Gorbachev feel respected and welcomed I remember once I was covering one of the summits that they had and she walked out of the summit holding hands with Raziq over chip now women in Russia in Russia may hold hands. But women from Ryan New York, do not as a general rule with other women and Barbara Bush walked out holding hands. And looking like, she was totally delighted to be holding hands with Gorbachev. And I was cleaning research whether it mattered that she did this. And I found two people who said it mattered was Brian Mulroney who has done the prime minister of Canada, and the foreign leader who was closest to George Hw Bush, and he said it made a huge difference to have raised a Gorbachev who was the voice Mikhail Gorbachev, trusted, most to have her feel that the American president for Slaney were treating them with rece-. Effect that it facilitated the negotiations that were going on then and then I found in archives declassified by the west German government, a conversation between helmet Kohl who is in that chancellor of west Germany, and Mikhail Gorbachev in which they talked about Barbara Bush as a calming influence in the negotiations. And then said we did not talk about other women, which I'm pretty sure was reference to Reagan. So the book is the matriarch Barbara Bush and the making of an American dynasty woman of consequence important and underestimated I think not only by her family and her teachers, but in some cases, fire husband, and I think in some cases by herself. Well, you've just mentioning the end of the Cold War. There's another yet in your book. I would like to talk about which showed her acute political sophistication and this relates to the rivalry between Gorbachev and Yeltsin and how she handled that so in nineteen ninety one the bushes made a visit to Moscow this was a very difficult time because the Soviet Union still existed, but it was in the process of disintegrating and Boris Yeltsin who is the president of Russia was basically trying to create all the prophecy could for mckell Gorbachev and it was true kill. Gorbachev was on his way out and Yeltsin was rising, but it hadn't yet happened. So the bushes so they go to this reception and. All the other leaders have arrived in gone into the into the grand hall where this is being held, but not Yeltsin and this raise some suspicions on the part of the other leaders on whether he was trying to do something tricky as as he often did so Yeltsin finally arrives sweeps up to Barbara Bush says let me escort you into the hall and a red alarm went off in Barbara Bush's head that this was a trick that walking into the hall on the arm of Boris Yeltsin would send a message to everyone in that dinner and people watching around the world that Yeltsin was in in Gorbachev was out. So she turns and says to to raise Gorbachev raise let's go into gather, and she maneuvers it. So the three of them walking together. And since the message that the United States was not taking size in the friction in the dispute between Yeltsin, and Gorbachev this is a split-second decision at a moment that carried that sent an important message. And there was no one to advisor there was no one signal for God's sake. Don't walk in with Boris Yeltsin. It was her own sensitive moment in her sophistication that enabled her to handle that in the way, she did. One of the other things that I thought was very striking about the book. And it you bring it out with a there was an incident. Perhaps well-known incident at the time in nineteen ninety. Wellesley college in Massachusetts had invited Alice Walker of renowned author writer. Maybe the most famous color purple to be the graduation speaker, and she was going to do it. And then somehow she couldn't do it. So then the president of Wellesley calls up Barbara Bush and says, well, we'd really like you to come didn't say anything about Alice Walker or something, but she had her own antenna up. I I wanna have you talk about that a little bit. I would just want to say one thing. One of the things that I'm saying this also I learned a great deal from this book as you might have guessed a lifelong democrat is. I remember very distinctly, and I was a workaholic newspaper reporter and I remember one Saturday Sunday morning. I met my mother-in-law's house in San Diego. And I'm reading the morning paper. And this was the day after Barbara Bush spoken at Wellesley. And she says something that made a big impact on me. And I just want to read a passage then have Susan talk about the incident and the context of this. Of course, everything is changing for women in this period opportunities are burgeoning or so on and so forth and some women, you know, felt that she was not the best role model, but she had her own ideas, and she stood up for her own ideas. And she said something that was I just wanna read at the she says at the end.

Barbara Bush Mikhail Gorbachev Boris Yeltsin George H W Bush Nancy Reagan Bush president mckell Gorbachev LA times advisor Texas Russia Jeff HIV Donovan Tigers Wellesley
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Net. In search of good news and a world filled with bad beat a woman who is touring the country for stories of train has tonight's cover story on WGN TV news at nine. Right. Nice. We're in the middle of the top five at five here on the Rokon show with me and Atlanta's rose off for a couple of days. So to Roper is here with us, and we're going to hear some movie reviews from you coming up lot lot going on in that department, and it's kind of a good weekend for that as well. Well, we might have the kind of weather that will drive you indoors want to death. And we might even get a chance. Not only do we have all this stuff happened with the movies. The throne game shows where it's a game show or the all try to get the throne, and it's made of iron. I think everyone irons for it. Yeah. Well, that's when is that. Oh my gosh. Episode two hours long. Eighty minutes. Yeah. A little bit shorter than a feature film. But pretty close to that. Yeah. Well, it's worth it cranking out the final season excited about that. All right. We are as I said in the middle of the top five of five. So we're checking in at. Speaking of films, Disney has released the first full length trailer for the upcoming live action lion. King movie it's expected to smash box office records with an all star cast scar the villain voiced by chewy. Tell a Jewish for please help me with that. For narrates the powerful trailer, which gives fans the first up close look at the CGI magic, and it is magical used to bring the animal kingdom to life. The film is set to premiere July nineteen twenty five years after the original film was released..

Roper Disney Rokon Atlanta King nineteen twenty five years Eighty minutes two hours
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Legal Wars

Legal Wars

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Legal Wars

"It's Monday July twentieth. Nineteen twenty five in downtown, Dayton, Tennessee, and the scopes monkey trial has been moved outside. Probably not a moment too soon. Because inside the courthouse. The balcony floor is showing cracks due to the sheer weight of the crowd rather than risk catastrophe. Judge John t Raulston has relocated to a make shift platform beneath sweeping maple and Cottonwood trees around five thousand people are watching the proceedings though, no one expects any serious fireworks today. Smart money says scopes doesn't have a chance despite the prodigious efforts of his passionately pro evolution defender Clarence Darrow. The case is being prosecuted by will. William jennings. Bryan who believes in creationism as taught by the bible. Good word for good word. But now Darrow does something unexpected he calls Brian as a witness. The effect is electric the lawyers on both teams jumped to their feet and judge Raulston looks like someone just slapped him as a dozen men start yelling at once. But Brian he's not shot. He's not agitated. He's delighted to take the stain his mind versus darrow's broadcast live on the radio to millions attorney. Tom Stewart from the prosecution team has a strong sense of what's in store for the oblivious. Bryant before Brian can take the stand steward pipes up. What's the purpose of this examination? It is to show what fundamental. Is before steward can respond. Brian takes over the show. The purpose of it is to ridicule every Christian who believes in the bible. I'm simply trying to protect the word of God against the biggest atheist. I mean agnostic in the world. We have the purpose of preventing the bigots and ignoramuses from controlling education in the United States. I am perfectly willing to sit here and defend the right of the people of Tennessee to protect their children's education. Clause from the bleachers. The people you call yoke goals. I never called them that you call them, ignorant and bigoted. And you say the same thing about all the scientists, and everyone who doesn't believe in your fool religion. It goes on and on after almost two hours. The men are only inches from each other riled up dripping sweat shaking their fists shouting one another down there both consumed with their missions and utterly aware that they're showboating in the national spotlight. Either way the crowd eats it up like it's a Saturday night cage match, but something's changed. No, one is shouting a men's to Brian's words anymore. Now, people are laughing at him Darrow quest. Brian about creating eve from Adam's rib, he asks him about a wail swallowing Jona. And then it's onto the story of Noah and the great flood. You believe the story of the flood to be a literal interpretation. Yes, sir. How long ago was the flood mister Bryant two thousand three hundred forty eight years BC that has been the estimate. I never made a calculation a calculation from what I could not say from the generations of man. I would not want to say that. What do you think? I do not think about things I don't think about do you think about things you do think about sometimes you believe that all the living things that were not contained in the arc or destroyed. I think the fish may have lived. Don't you know, there are any number of civilizations? That are traced back to more than five thousand years. I am not satisfied with any evidence. I've seen you believe that every civilization on earth and every living thing except possibly the fishes were wiped out by the flood at that time. At this point Brian's trying to keep it together. Trying to hang onto some semblance of pride in his blind faith, that's increasingly sounding like sheer ignorance. You have never in all your life made any attempt to find out about the other people of the earth. How old their civilizations are how long they've existed on the earth. Have you know, sir? I have been well satisfied with the Christian religion that I've spent no time trying to find arguments against it. I have all the information. I want to live by and.

Brian Clarence Darrow Judge John t Raulston Tennessee mister Bryant Dayton William jennings Tom Stewart Bryan United States Noah bible Adam attorney BC two thousand three hundred for five thousand years two hours
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Turnovers the ball movement there. It is up there in case you wanna watch some of it. So right there, Murph. Let's get into this. I was just talking about this hawk. I'm gonna watch Steph Curry's passing. Steph Curry's passing has become a show unto itself like his his feel for the court. Now, his vision the way he's dishing like his his passing shooting. Well, the shooting his last thirty two three my favorite being the one where he crossed half court about three steps in the first quarter from the middle of the let him go when he turned. He took the pe- in the Pepsi and not the I p the second p in the Pepsi. He said after the game he said Steph curry said, no, we really weren't making a statement. We just played good. But guess what? That was like, hey, we have an announcement to make where the Golden State to the whole league. I mean. About by about four minutes into the first quarter that whole that. Texter who said to us. I get a distinct twenty fourteen fifteen Atlanta Hawks vibe off of the nuggets by about four minutes into the first quarter as like. Yep. Two thousand fourteen fifteen hawks. That's it. I mean, it was it was it was soul crushing. I mean. They crush their souls and Mike Malone said after the game he said, they have they have levels. That's it. They have they have levels. They get to. And you know, of course, I do want to say one little tiny like asterisk on all this. Yes. The ball movement was phenomenal. Yes. The focus was incredible. But the shooting was insane security. They can't be doing. They made nineteen twenty five in the first quarter nineteen and twenty five of the first one that seventy eight percent and even beat Villanova in the nineteen. They made ten of their first fourteen three incredible. So incredible. I mean as excited as I am I do have to remember they ain't gonna make ten ten or fourteen threes. All time night. Right. Their franchise record and all that but spoke to their focus. It was great to see fifty one. At the end of first quarter is great to see the ten threes. And it was great to see them. Just taking the ball away from Denver Denver try to like work stuff around offensively. And there was a lot of interceptions. Lot of steals. Lot of outlet passes. I mean, they were flying. I gotta say I had this this growing crush on Nikolai Yokich. Sure. I get it. I mean, he looked like go. I heard copes at a gr. He's he went with Dampier. That's phenomenal. I'll try to top it. I mean, give me a. Donald foil. Donald you gave him four right go back to cope is called damp. Okay. I mean, he had he was not just ordinary at times. He looked kind of sub ordinary. I mean, man, I was like that's the guy is supposed to be the MVP. He was out there. Trying to trudging up and down getting his beat. You know, part of that by the way in cope shouted him out a little bit of love for kevon looney today would tasked with a really tough assignment. I it goes out there. He plays a really good solid ball game. Kvant is just become a major part of what Kerr does now. Well, they they have the best record in the Western Conference. This is a good and thus begins though, the incredible stretch because here comes New Orleans tonight, then boogie on Friday against the clippers. And then it gets really fun next week clipper MLK day Lakers. Do we know anything about LeBron's availability on miss? I heard more games Joel Joel Siegal. Let me just give you this after the clippers Lakers and then at Washington and then at Boston next Saturday night. Ooh. And then at Indy which is playing really well, so tough upcoming trip includes the Lakers, the Celtics and the Pacers teams. Really good teams. Bonnie Jill laflin. Good morning to you on a Wednesday. Good Morning Post warriors what phenomenal game. I mean. Talk about shooting. Well, not turning over the ball. I mean defense everything I mean, they were turnovers turnovers in the first half. Joel news coming out of the gate, though. Like normally we talk about them being a little accident and the first quarter straight out of the gate eleven to two crazy nuggets called timeout. And as Slater road at eleven to two almost felt like it was threes. Ten threes. Fourteen Merthyr raining raining somebody threes, I opened an umbrella in my living room. Stay dry. It's bad luck. Lebron is going to be out two more games. So he could come back for he wants to be there for that game. Oh, man. We're we're back. You know, he needs to show up. I don't know if it'd be a hundred percent, so we went to get the LeBron's there. But not the full LeBron greatest healer of all time. No question. We'll see about that. But I'm just happy about this game. Not so much. Okay. Game Willie make the NFC championship. That's my question. There. He will be able to cheer on his ranch. It'd be a New Orleans sheet around they just like data's get everything is easy. Amazing. We've joked at various times during this run this five six year run. We used to say we come in the morning how the warriors last night. Well, how did they shoot from three? That's basically like the question, you know, because there are games when they've had really ice cold threes, and they lose, but when when they shoot from three like this guy's Claes back whole ever since the talk to my hand moment ever since. Yeah. By the way, Lakers play the thunder tomorrow, they play the rockets on Saturday, and then they put. That's perfect timing. Yeah. He said two more games. That's it. They've even put the Lakers even put out a release two more games. How about the Lakers rockets on Saturday night? That's a good one. I think that's a national TV game. Yes. Just to let you guys know clay since that night in Portland, and it's funny because we were off then paulie bears reading, and they were like, you know, perfect thing for Claes to go to Portland because he loves playing up that he does and it's freedom up. Okay. So since then he's got four six ten thirteen twenty twenty seven twenty nine thirty four made threes in. Yeah. I'm doing live stats five nine seventeen twenty three thirty nine fifty sixty one sixty nine say thirty four thirty four for sixty nine. Okay. That's fifty freaking percent last. I'd like to get my percentage. Oh, three four five six seven eight games. Like be games straight has a ten percent of the season. He shooting fifty percent from three back. Yes. I'd like to get that to fifty five. You got to hear that sound coast play for. The other side, the her lot of Steph or heard some Draymond. I heard Steve Kerr. I didn't catch any Klay sound though. Playthings incredible. And I know copes cut it up like playing it in its entirety is incredible. Because the way the give you let it all have eight Wales. Jacket everything they keep asking him about the all-star voting. And so I didn't catch Zaza dunk contest. He he was actually talking to you. Dictated the text as he was calling about the all-star. And that, you know, do you think he's going to make the team and Durant drains like fourth in the frontcourt vote, and they had a at twenty one or something like that? Yeah. No warriors might make the all star team this year. Yeah. No. I mean Steph steps third game helps though it does. And as will this upcoming stretch and coast mentioned it to its later. You forgot about this whole thing that the warriors coaching staff might wind up having to coach the all star game. 'cause they have you know, it's the best record at the and they didn't have to worry about it last year the rockets runaway away head member and so everybody. But now, they're like, oh, man. I gotta go to Charlotte. Wants to throws flipflops on and have a couple of Coronas. I think Mike Brown wants to get on his Harley ride for a couple of days. But you know, it's a nice prestigious honor. If they if they do get if they're in that position, Charlotte's not easy to get to know you and I got there on our way to New Orleans and start Joe we once New Orleans via Charlotte. I'd like to do jill's electrical pass my targeting come back. You turn into our hours. I want to do is I want to spend about three hours in the Charlotte airport when everything's closed airport though, they got well. Oh. Oh, okay. I'm worried about you the you're going to the Super Bowl you see in the stories now, but Atlanta Hartfield TSA lines. No, I didn't see that TSA pre check. This isn't gonna help that. I'm not sure actually, I don't know about that. I don't know the pre check the TSA the government shutdown thing has reached like max crisis at the airports and Atlanta's in particular, Google it up because I haven't noticed our LAX raven Oakland, but maybe you're saying now, the mayor of Atlanta's worried because you know, the whole worlds come into Atlanta for the Super Bowl pre check helps. I haven't read that. But they don't have that line open because they're to overwhelm check it out your main segment. No, it's bad. I saw somebody did a thing where they started at the front of the line. I always get confused is the front of the line where the line ends or the you know what I mean there's like front. This guy's about to go up next. Okay. Because some people. No, that's the front. Upfront. Urine back. You're in back behind the other forty people. You remember when in a Christmas story when ralphie goes to see Santa he walks up, and there's this any steps right in front and the kid goes the line ends here. It begins their way back to the end of the department. I know who's in this car right now pounded his fists begging for a reference overnight. Dave, this one's for you. Hey, murph. You must mean like Ronnie, James DIO. He's the last in line. That's for you overnight. Dave from media, you my man gift, very, Murph. You're right. It's America's busiest airport right now is Atlanta heart air,.

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"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"If you do close one it might be a year. You don't have the time. This is why companies like slack Yam Asana. They did not try to go in and win the top level CTO. They said let's win this group of developers over here. Let's win the group of sales people over here and let them sign up one account at a time used a corporate card. Ten bucks a month per person twenty five bucks a month person and build up consensus in the organization that this is the best tool because what happens when they go to the manager is and I'm a manager and a bit manager for most of my career when your front level troops. Come to the general and say this weapon is allowing us to win the war. Then it puts the general in the position to say. No, I want you to use a weapon that I don't have to use. Of course, they're not going to do that. They're going to give the troops what they want. And that's one of the great things about how the IT business and the tool. Businesses changed over the last twenty years when I started nineteen twenty five years ago, New York, you know, some VP of information science or the CTO or the CEO would go coughing with Lotus Notes is Representative and oracles Representative they'd cut some deal, and then everybody would be forced down their throats to use that software, and it would take years to implement now. People have meant stuff today right now, take credit card, they tried. If it sucks unsubscribe so build up each one of those little franchisees. We've got ten or or even two or even one give you such beautiful feedback. And that's you know, your year one or two as a startup, I take it. Yes. You need to know how to make that product. So indispensable that people when you double the price will say, I have no other choice. I need this product. This is making me money the saving me time or making money or making life easier. And hopefully your software makes their makes them more money and save some time..

CTO Representative VP New York CEO nineteen twenty five years twenty years
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"Six nine not your family another. Oh, no. But you could probably invest in his death. Yeah. That'd be don't you could probably go not in his death. But I wonder if like I wonder if there's like a stock market for that. Yes. I but something like that. Campbell, athletes or rappers deaths. Yes, I bet you there's a deadpool. Oh, death will. I bet you there is one in Vegas. You could bet on somebody who six nine gonna make it to the two thousand nine hundred money or like what's that old? Very white. Like, you could bet Betty white dying every year. Okay. Betty white is no she's that old lady that was in golden girl. She golden girl associated white lady white lady and everything that's funny. What's the guy? What's what's the blood guy? I don't know. I don't know. He's very movies. Matt Morgan from Oregon freeze like the white version of the white. Morgan Freeman grandmother high. So Morgan Freeman going die in nineteen twenty five two thousand twenty five will more freedoms going to die in the past. Yeah. He's over one hundred years. Two thousand twenty five that bit. So to twenty five let's see what else is there. I think there's a comedian Doug Stanhope that would actually do this. He would add like a death pool. Dope. Man. Yeah. I don't know. I mean. Yeah. You could do it with rappers especially represented talking that shit. There's there's a chance that they could they could get Merck. It is a fucked up thing. So why would you life insurance? I wouldn't do it on like young kids like how can you be to get life insurance?.

Betty white Morgan Freeman Doug Stanhope Matt Morgan Merck Vegas Campbell Oregon one hundred years
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on ZigZag

ZigZag

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on ZigZag

"His family since nineteen twenty five, but when Henry discovered how yummy plant milks could be he made a switch you closed his famous dairy and started a milk company. Find your favorite alternative milk. Zigzag listeners can get twenty percent off their online purchase using the code zigzag at elmhurst nineteen twenty five dot com. The code is zigzag use it at elmhurst one nine two five dot com. If you're thinking of taking the leap and starting your own business. You should know. It's not easy. If you listen to the show, you already know that. But you should also know that harvest is there to support you whether you're planning to keep it to a dynamic duo or to grow to a team of fifty harvest turns time tracking from a dreaded task into a breeze. Our audio engineer David can attest to this. It the way that he makes sure he charges us the full amount. It also puts a wealth of time sheet data at your fingertips. You get insights into how your projects are performing. And you figure out where your time is going, and you can invoice clients like us, so you can get paid got plenty of apps integrations, every member of your team can find a way to track time in a way that works for them. Go to get harvest dot com slash zigzag to start a thirty day free trial and get fifty percent off your first month. Get harvest dot com slash zigzag. Last week. You got to hang out with Dan. It was awesome. She was on her home turf in the rockaways here in New York. We talked about how public spaces or social infrastructure is an incredibly important and often.

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"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Starting9

"Jones in eight Mickey mantles in there. Well, no thirty eight thirty five or older. Oh, connects mic already had psoriasis of the liver. I think by thirty five Chipper Jones three sixty four max Carey in nineteen twenty five three forty three. And then both Passat and Chipper Jones seven. Those are the only people had of him Sada I always forget about Passat Avena switch hitter or hey, yeah. Always remember him more from the left side guy. Hawk Harrelson you can put it on the. Yes, he's gone. Yes, he is. He's a legendary broadcaster. And we we've talked about this before about how the the cornerstone team broadcasters becoming a lost art and that you know, no one will ever be VIN Scully known will ever come close to like the Audi fucking years. Was he in the booth? Like seventy seventy five. He's the goat. But yeah, there's the, it's a lost art now. And I feel like a lot of these broadcasters that are coming in. They're, they're young bucks. And I think the whole point is to try and make them be the next VIN Scully which I mean, if you're going to be the next VIN Scully, you got to get in there pretty young. So maybe they become that. But right now, you know the game losing hawk Harrelson's voice. That's that's a big loss. Yeah, I remember you know, if I once I started getting MLB TV in two thousand in ten or eleven back then out switch the broadcast the White Sox broadcast sometimes just to just to go back and watch the home run calls like I would go back to wash the home run calls when when Meinie went to the White Sox, I started like that was really when, like, you know, hawk became one of my personal favorites. Yeah. Yeah. I could appreciate him until then dropped. One of the most famous lines ever. And it's beautiful because it works and it's not foul or out of play or anything. But I believe during a game against the Mariners, he wants dropped a and the sax or full of semen. Really, that is really that is I can't even be yin to describe the level of savant nece that is going on when he conjures that up, like there is. Like Maya Angelou aspires to be hawk Harrelson You know what I what mean. I mean? It was. Oh my, oh, my, you know, those things on Twitter where it's like respond to this or quote this with your least or with your lease popular blank opinion like popular baseball or or TV, or movie opinion. I will miss hawk Harrelson far more than I will miss VIN Scully. Yes. Like I say that I'll miss Hok Hera the MVP. MVP there's a difference, right? I will miss Hok Harrelson's. Baseball calls like game action calls more than VIN scully's game action calls, but I will miss VIN scully's stories in between. Sure. I get it. I just like there was a, a one of them was hanging out with bucket, Jackie Robinson. All right. I could listen to hawk call, Dwayne, Wise's, catch and Burley's perfect game every single day of my life moving forward. And it would never get old. I'm not saying he's a better announcer than Vince gully. I'm just saying me personally, just Justin, I will miss him more so tip the cap to Harrelson David Wright and victim Artigas we will miss you here on the starting nine when it comes to below the belt comfort, there's regular underwear, and there's Tommy John, the revolutionary clothing brand that's redefined comfort for men and women everywhere. Let me put it to you this way. Tommy John doesn't give an f. They give three Fs a fan. Fabric fit and function baby. Tommy John, the baby isn't even in the copy. I just threw that in there. Tommy John obsesses over every little detail and stitch by using proprietary fabrics that perform like nothing you've ever worn before. As a result. Tommy John's men men's and women's underwear sport, a no wedgie guarantee comfortable stay put waistbands and range of fabrics that are luxuriously soft, feather light moisture, waking breathable and designed to move with you not against you..

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"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Female Criminals

Female Criminals

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Female Criminals

"In late nineteen twenty five nineteen year old shichimencho was devastated to learn that her father schick on being was brutally killed by geely warlord soon thuan fung thuan fung further dishonor jentzsch house father by publicly displaying his impaled head in an act of filial piety she vowed to avenge her father's death in chinese tradition after a husband or father's unjust death virtuous widows and devoted daughters were expected to kill themselves as an expression of loyalty and form of protest however shed gin chow's mother rejected the need to complete suicide a testament to the modernisation of women's roles during this time jianchao also chose to live she would later say quote although all i wanted to do was die my elderly mother's illness gave me the will to live and quote suicide as a form of protest was only expected of the women in the family and jen chow's sister was still too young to make that choice so the remaining members of the shift family would forge ahead together after their patriarchs debt jinchon would fulfill her filial duty to her mother by continuing to take care of her while plotting her revenge as nineteen twenty five came to a close shed gin chow was confronted by a headline in the hsun chen times schick cone beans death sentence soon schwann fong adjudicated jenchou learned that as yearly military court found sean fung justified in killing xiewkang bean as a penalty for her father's alleged war crimes as the highest ranking officer thuan fung presided over shit com beans battlefield trial there were no surviving records of her father's alleged war crimes and his killer acted as judge jury and executioner the fact that her father had not received a fair trial he was entitled to under the rules of war confirmed to gin chow that his death was unjust to add insult to injury the man who murdered her father would escape any formal punishment according to psychology today not everyone is inclined to avenge perceived wrongs however people who put great worth on their reputations are quote more likely to seek revenge if they feel they and their honor have been unjustly impugned and quote gin chow's filial duty and the expectation that she must put her family's wellness above her own meant that thuan fung's transgressions against her father could not be forgiven a university of oklahoma study found that a lab of forgiveness wasn't necessarily a deciding factor in seeking revenge instead they discovered that narcissism was a high indicator that someone would seek vengeance in response to injustice according to the researchers quote both the narcissists inflated social confidence and sense of entitlement could produce a desire to retaliate against wrongdoers and could reduce constraints on acting on this desire and quote if jen chow was a narcissist she would have fewer in admissions when deciding how to avenge her father's death dr joseph burgo identifies the vindictive narcissist as a personality type in his book the narcissist you know dr burgo says that when a vengeful narcissist feels attacked their reaction is unrestrained jan chow was not the only one who disagreed with the military court's ruling in soon schwann fung's favor the press was also quick share their opinions newspaper editorials meow way firmly condemned soon sean fung in the widely distributed jingbao way wrote that schwann fong unnecessarily humiliated schick on being by his gruesome decapitation and subsequent public display of his impaled head seeing their own conclusions echoed by the media fuels narcissists need for external validation now at the press had confirmed that her father suffered injustice jin chow could justifiably plan her revenge gin chow had no doubt that her father's death must be avenged but as she grew older she had more immediate concerns although arranged marriage had fallen out of fashion and early twentieth century china gin chow was betrothed by prearrangement we don't know when the marriage was arranged but we do know that jin chow decided to annul the commitment after the betrothed families patriarch went on trial for raping another daughterinlaw this would have happened before gin chow turned twenty one the prescribed age at which women were married the rape trial became known to the public as the case of the tongue because a piece of the rapist tongue was used as evidence after it was bitten off in defense jen chows potential father in law was alternately convicted the case of the.

schick nineteen twenty five nineteen
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on Get Up!

"Fighting spirit since nineteen twenty five that is luca danni change this is adrian oregon is making yourself very comfortable today's incident want set it up in the other room we're delighted to have you and let's start with touch because it seems to be the focal point of a lot of things i stock was rising then it was dropping out here we harder the day of the draft is he going to be the third pick tonight only if he's not the second pick rain will only what well listen you know sacramento has been focused on marvin bagley junior here for for a while he came in and worked out for them and you know sacramento has had like a recent history of players not wanting to go to sacramento or agents really trying to keep them from going to sacramento and but we have the second pick people are going to start to send their players for workouts bagley went in and think that made a great impression on their owner who i think wants to be wanted by a prospect and bag lease very he's a big time prospect he's in score the ball he's gonna rebounded it but that conversation has continued in sacramento and there's a lot of voices there there's there's management there's ownership and so there's a coaching staff who has a voice in this bagley still the front runner there but you know i think there's value in dodge if you want to move back there so many teams behind their who'd like to get it him i still think bagley is their guy there but that conversation has continued in they're weighing that but at number three donncha which is very much at the forefront with hawks that's crazy because i know you guys love bagley and this is just seems just a little bit of shot kaelin shaking his head if don you like well we'll go a roster like i just wanna see his made this is this is this the pit of me of instability okay if you the sacramento kings you must take bagley this guy is going to be a double double from day one he's going to score the ball you took the air fox last year to be your primary ball handler he's a smaller point guard he's really fast i think he has a big time career in the game you don't pair those two guys together to me because donncha which is slow foot and fox is slight a build any shortly to me that's not marriage you have to go up front the pink should be bad and i think it i think it likely will be him and i don't think there's a great appetite in sacramento to trade out of there i think they like having that second pick and but boy there's a lot of teams knocking at the door at two and three and four to get up and to get it largely a dodge so let's focus on four then because your friend and mining and begley was tweeting yesterday that the knicks and their new coach david physical we're hanging out with moba yesterday and i'm thinking i'm putting together and i'm saying all right the knicks of trading up to four and they're getting mobile mogambo tell me that's what's going to happen well here's a signal about maybe how serious the knicks really are about this i was told late last night they have not yet asked of obama's people to get his medical information and if you were if you were ready to invest it it's a that's a steep price to move up that high into the you're gonna have to give up a lot you're going to probably give up a future i you're going to be digging in his medicals right now they did talk to him yesterday and that that goes on the week of it i think new york in my conversations there last night i think they're very comfortable at nine and i think you know whether it's going to be knox kill bridges from villanova they feel like they can get the player they wanted their without having a mortgage something forward i i think it's more likely than stay where they are what's your sense of of tonight it's ours activity level goes go anything.

oregon luca
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Like i say super entertaining content the shouts and murmurs the weekly humor the satire review of books art movies tv poetry literature you get four long form feature stories who hasn't who has not seen one of those cartoon captions and have you never not done that you've done that right at least once tried to come up with a caption for the cartoon i'm not very good at that sort of thing i don't know why my creative abilities don't see sarah apply yeah all right you can even access and this is what's also amazing the complete archive which has digital replicas of every issue of the print magazine from nineteen twenty five with your subscription don't wait go to www dot new yorker dot com slash majority and received twelve issues for twelve bucks that's serious plus a free tote bag wow enter my code majority unlocked fifty percent off your subscription you get it delivered to your mailbox inbox or both by choosing between the print digital or a combination subscribe to the new yorker and read something that means something that's twelve issues for six bucks wait for six bucks no for twelve bucks with six bucks is that really true wow and if cree tote bag when you go to new yorker dot com slash majority and enter my code majority at checkout you gotta do both go to new yorker dot com slash majority enter code majority at checkout all right now back to michael and the interview for the day.

sarah cree michael fifty percent
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Article from nineteen twenty five my god i have a lot to do so we know this is going to be for forever yeah i already have a subscription but if you don't go to the new go to www dot new yorker dot com slash brain kitty and you'll receive twelve issues for twelve dollars plus a free tote bag oh my god that's the best deal and if you use our code in their brain candy you get fifty percent off of that what stop ix bach and you get a dollar for six it's been more coffee i know and you get all these issues and it's delivered to your mailbox but it's also digitally you can access all of that magazine and you can read something that means something right so it's not just like garbage fluff yeah when i was talking to them like i can't believe i get to tell i cannot tell you how much i love the new yorker so go to new yorker dot com slash brain candy and use promo code brain candy to get that deal you will love it period and then like right to us about interesting things urea yeah for sure because i mean they have no shortage of things and they're all different subjects as i said so it's great anyway yeah that barbecue article was in the new yorker so i'll put it in newsletter but if you want to read it you should get that deal.

twelve dollars fifty percent
"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"nineteen twenty five" Discussed on TechStuff

"World war two you had scientists like max born verner heisenberg who were extending our understanding of the quantum world now born and heisenberg along with pascall jordan wrote an extremely complicated but consistent fury of quantum mechanics in nineteen twenty five meanwhile you had another smarty pants erwin schrodinger or urban if you prefer it'd be of showed injures cat fame he was working on his own theory to describe quantum mechanics and for a while those two theories were the focus of a pretty nasty war within physics in which both sides were kind of disparaging the ideas of the other side and essentially one group is saying you guys are full of it my theory described what's actually happening here's his a mess and the other side saying nah arth eerie is far more descriptive of what is actually going on your theory is nonsensical but then in nineteen twenty six schrodinger and carl eckart who was working completely independently of schrodinger both proved that these two seemingly different approaches for actually describing the same thing they were just doing it from completely different points of reference so on the surface they superficially seem like they were at odds with one another but underneath that turned out they were they were in alignment as one book i read on the subject said it's like comparing how you add arabic numerals to how you add roman numerals the two processes look very different from each other but if you do them each correctly for the same two values you'll always arrive at the same answer no matter which method you use now that's not to say that everything was smooth sailing from that point forward many scientists had problems with asp.

verner heisenberg pascall jordan carl eckart