20 Episode results for "Nineteen Forty One"

Acclaimed Spy Novelist Alan Furst Takes Up Nazi Resistance In 1942 Paris

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:37 min | 1 year ago

Acclaimed Spy Novelist Alan Furst Takes Up Nazi Resistance In 1942 Paris

"This message comes from on points sponsor. Indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast from NPR and Wvu or Boston. I'm David Folkenflik and this is on point Alan. I is the master of the historical spy novel. Fourteen fourteen of his previous books explore the corners of Europe from nineteen thirty three to nineteen forty-five they've sold millions of copies one translation into eighteen languages and directed attention to the people. I calls the night. Soldiers civilians who scramble at the Dawn of the war to ward off the inevitable for the Nazis had swept through the continent or who labored the twilight after German victory and occupation to secure reversal. Against great odds. The each contain rich atmospheric detail thrilling plots and variations on a theme. What do you do when confronted by evil in a world of peril and moral ambiguity? His newest book focuses on the resistance in France titled Under Occupation this hour on point my conversation with Alan. I join us. What questions do you have about the historical spy novel or world? War Two and espionage from my guest Allen I which of his books captured your imagination. The Nation Join US anytime at on point radio DOT ORG or post questions or comments on twitter and facebook search worse with on point radio with us from East Hampton. New York is Allen. I his latest novel under occupation is inspired by the true events of Polish prisoners at a Labor camp in Nazi Germany who smuggled valuable intelligence to Paris into the resistance under under occupation marks Allen I Fifteenth Book and His Knights Soldier Series About World War Two in Europe. You can find an excerpt at our website on point dot Org Allen welcomed on point. Hi Are there Thanks for joining us that I let me. Just thank you for many many hours. Many days of of intensive immersive Entertainment diversion and I and thought of enjoyed her books very much over the years. Thank you very conned. Ellen I among your fans is actually a Tom Hanks I. I interviewed him last year. I was talking about his work. His writing his acting the choices he made And Man is that guy in the tank for you in this exchange Hanks volunteered his admiration for rating. But more particularly he explained why. I've read almost everything that That he's got to talk about Allen. I I love that Guy Brecca he you know he writes about He writes about espionage in the world. Prior to the knots on the Nazi. Defeat Ed in Stalingrad. And someone asked him well actually. I've heard them on. NPR and he said. What are you write about this one in the bill digital period and he said because up to that point no one thought the Nazis were? WE'RE GOING TO LOSE WORLD WAR. Two they had not been stopped yet. And so everybody who was in that arena At that time I had a choice of being one of three things That was determined by their character and their circumstances they could either be a he wrote or they could be villain or they could be a coward. That's the three choices you had At the time and I think Oh my Lord so often that is exactly what life prescribes for all of us. What are we? What are we going to choose to be What do we have the where we have the wherewithal to be? What do we have the stomach for the training? or the the desire what's what's our initial instinct to to run to flee or to Lean in get involved. Just a stand back and watch that's That pretty much wraps up every circumstance a human being can can find themselves in Allen I to hero or a villain or a coward the same person can be one of the any give those three. It sounds like in your books. How do you think about the characters that you create making the decision of what path to follow i? I think there's always a period as was in France up until nineteen forty two. There was no French Resistance and I think thank people's almost all people have a preliminary instinct of well. I can live with this. It'll go away and then one day you realize it isn't going to go away unless people do something and that in fact you're one of the people so I I I think comes by as it did to the French it comes by slow stages finally. There's a kind of internal sigh and you Set set off to try to help any way. You can do whatever you can. It's interesting because your characters your primary characters you know you don't focus focused on Churchill and and Charles de Gaulle meeting together in the imperial war rooms right you don't focus on the greatest Figures Landon nor where are you representing scenes of fire pilots or You know G is at the Battle of the Bulge your folks are. You know they're architects or or or financiers were movie makers or in this case and author you know they're people who hold often professional careers and lives but they're not people who think of it's necessarily physically heroic right. These are your nights soldiers. Yes I tend to cashews. Books based on Heroes Profession and that profession has to be one where where the character is knowledgeable about the politics of the time and may not him or herself be powerful but has to be close is enough to power to understand what it is and how it works It can't be just for me at least it isn't isn't going to be A railway conductor Might be a motorman more likely It would be someone responsible for routing outing trains in France who would then route a German trained in the wrong direction which happened by the way. So we'll talk in more depth about under occupation and just a couple of minutes but give us a feel for some of the professions in some of their for the characters that they inspired that allowed you to perhaps navigated gated unexpected pads in terms of applaud of somebody who emerges an unlikely hero well for example sample One of the better books in the past this called mission to Paris and it's about Basically a lawyer. You're an international lawyer because as I read. Do my reading in this area there were a lot of international lawyers involved at all in all kinds of ways You don't necessarily think about that in the forties but it was true I also have of course a diplomat which is not an easy life it's demanding and during World War Two it was especially demanding Also it kind of matters matters what the year is because up until Pearl Harbor Nineteen Forty one. The United States was neutral. So if I want to I can have an American in Paris in Nineteen Forty One B. Because you know because that the the Germans wouldn't wouldn't mind in fact the Germans would like that because I didn't want United States in the war. Because they knew what was going to happen if the United States did get war and Lo and behold. That's what happened. And what they feared came true one of the things that's interesting about the Europe In in the years you were talking about and I guess it really does Cap You know in the early forties where it becomes more clear that the Americans are going to join and ultimately that the Americans and Soviets I together are going to be able to power against the Nazis. But there's this long stretch here nearly a decade where. It's not clear of that at all in the Germans start influencing and absorbing and then taken over and dominating much of Europe all of Europe effectively Where there are a lot of hard choices and people think oh there was as you say not a resistance throughout there was not organized a combat but also not organized opposition and and that people had to make conscious choices that they were going to do things that were very perilous in this book and under occupation? There's one of your characters who rather cavalierly while seemingly helping the the the nascent resistance rats out one of her colleagues at work at a Bar Because she was able to get a guy who Who Do the first woman had taken? An interest in that is that people's lives mortality was very much on the line. For for things they couldn't even predict would would imperil them. That's true And as time went by became more and more difficult to live adorable life the people a lot of the people who were in the French resistance were people who had some familiarity with conflict conflict on the you know the most immediate level for example a policeman for example former members of the army or navy Or Air Force. An all those people in France were were prominent in the resistance B Because I what would you do with them. Some of them were put in prison camps but an awful lot of them mm-hmm especially people who had just who had retired it. You know they might have been in the army from eighteen to twenty one. But now they're twenty eight and here the Germans and here you. Are you know how to use a weapon and you know how to set up an ambush and you know how to move in a clandestine way And so you become involved in the resistance and you describe resistance is taking a number of forms in one case in a little passage in the book you talk about. A police is chief who I think is assigned to go join some sort of mass roundup or shooting of people and he forgets that he left his hat at home and has to return home so he doesn't participate in it. That people are trying to negotiate. What level of resistance they're willing to do but in some ways they're not going along as best they can That story he is true and the interesting thing about that story is that it was told as a very typical French French way to deal with things. He really forget his hat. Maybe maybe he didn't forget his hat. Maybe he didn't want to be involved in the roundup of Jews but he did. He wasn't going to resist by saying you know I'm an ethical person. I won't do such a thing instead. He missed missed doing that because he hit forgotten his hat at home. He couldn't be blamed. Mm for that little resistance pacifist. The French might say passive resistance. We're discussing historical spy novels. With one of the great authors of that genre you can join our conversations. Do you have questions for my guest Allen. I which of his books might have captured your attention. Most I'm David Folkenflik and this is on point uh which this message comes from on points sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste. You need help getting a your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast Haad cast terms conditions and quality standards apply news breaks and big stories. Change every day. That's why we're giving you. NPR's ten minute morning news. podcast asked on Saturdays to. I'm Scott Simon and I'm Lulu Garcia. Navarro up I start your day with us. Weekdays at six eastern and Saturdays at eight a bit later to suture chew weekend from NPR news. This is on point. I'm David Folkenflik. The historical spy novelist Alan. I is joining us for the full hour today. You can join our conversation nation. What questions do you have for him? What intrigues you about intrigue in Europe in the period leading up to and during World War Two follow us on twitter and facebook on point radio with me Alan I I author of the new wartime spy novel under occupation? It's as fifteenth set in Europe during the rise of Hitler and the Third Reich. Thanks again for joining US Alan. I I wonder if you could If I could ask you to do a reading from this book Allen I I want to describe it for our listeners Paul Ricard is a French novelist. Novelist protagonist a hero and under occupation in this scene we are introduced to him on the streets of Paris a far from unfamiliar setting for my guest the novelist Alan I. It starts a occupied Paris. Dieting forty two in early October. For the first of the autumn storms began in the late afternoon with rumbles thunder up in Normandy. Somewhere then by nightfall the rain reached Paris. Were beat against the windows of the grey city and streamed down the channels at the edges of the cobblestone streets. The writer Paul Ricard walked bent over in the downpour headed up a narrow street of ancient buildings in the sixth hour on the read. Gauche the Latin Quarter Ricard. Ricard's squinted into the darkness. Some of the street lamps had been shattered others painted blue for the blackout ordered by the German occupation authority. Hardy and the coal smoked drifted through the rain baited even harder to see anything turning a corner. He found himself on the Rue O.`day on Tom. Once home to Shakespeare company Sylvia Beaches English Language Book Store But the store had closed a year earlier and our ricard. A writer writer of detective of inspired fiction had to get his newly published novels of intrigue at a recently open store called the bookshop on the nearby. Rude Rude Conde. Ricard rain dripping from the rim of his Fedora hat took a narrow alley to the street he could reach out and touch the buildings on either side. He was headed for the bookshop to see a friend who had voice excited telephoned and asked that he come see her at at the shop. That's wonderful entry point to the to the book and the story and the character before we talk a little bit about Paul Ricard himself. You know you take readers over the course of your novels In thinking about world war two surrounding the European arena. You take them to Russia to Poland to Bulgaria Istanbul London at times war saw other places throughout the continent yet. Paris's sort of you know Frances. Is it seems this to me home. Base in many ways in Paris's is almost like the the The fulcrum in some ways Why does France hold such importance to you? in thinking about That era and the challenges that face people living at that time. Well the Germans Germans have always had a motto that goes God lives in France and what they meant by that was that this was. It's a perfect place in terms of its countryside in terms of its rivers in terms of its mountains in in terms of the fact that it has a lot of seashore. It if if you wanted a perfect country you basically create France It's temperate I think. Paris is on that magical Forty degrees latitude on which a lot of the capital cities. The world are why they found why that happened. I don't know I think it has to do with weather. Frankly and The if for the Germans it was always a prize in nineteen forty when they attacked France. It was their third try. Dave always wanted it like I want to own this. You know this is a beautiful thing and I mean to steal it. I can't afford to buy it so I'll steal it. One of the one of the things that made the occupation not so bad in the beginning is that Ah A- all Germans wanted to go to Paris. There was a tourist organization that was ultimately used by the Communist. I espionage service that I forget it in German but it goes a Paris for everybody wants so that all the bear mocked Officers I guess would be Cycled through Paris. So they could get a chance to spend two weeks in there and eat the food and see the women and shopping. The stores Or all of that. So France France was surprise And that's a kind of y right about it is a prize for me too. I've spent about ten years there and I like to think that In in my heart. I'm I'M A. I'm a francophile and I forgive them everything but the fact is really live in Paris somewhere in my heart I live in Paris. sold-out don't let's take a call now the question from a listener Kayla is calling from Johnson City Tennessee. Thanks for listening. What questions you have for Allen I I hi I'm a history student at my local college and I'm interested in the history of spycraft espionage and I was just just wondering what types of spycraft were used by the French Resistance during the Second World War like did they use things like dead drops or different kinds of codes and things like that so so Kayla? Thanks for that call. Let me toss that t allen I would first off. What did you learn about the way in which fresh resistance conveying and information and and spycraft and secondly how did you find out? Oh aren't there ever books about this. Ib really all libraries about it for something. That's supposed to be secret. People do nothing but write books about it. It's quite astonishing. One of the things things that makes it possible for me to write about the subject but the fact is That the French had to invent a lot of the things they did whereas a lot of the other things they were taught by the British it was it the British in World War Two made France into a battleground and because if Germany ultimately subdued France they conquered France but they didn't subdue it if Germany ultimately subdued France Britain was next You know the battle of Britain was was fought in late summer early autumn of nineteen forty eighty and Britain one. But they were very conscious that if they if France didn't win or if they didn't win in France They were next on the list So so you're saying that basically the British SORTA said and you see this in certain scenes in your In your book in this book and others where emissaries come from British intelligence and say look. Here's what you're going to have to do. We're going to have to think about it this way you can use this device. There's this great thing I've read it in your books books previously before but a great moment where explain that people are listening for the BBC broadcasts that will contain hidden messages. And it starts with Beethoven's fifth right Dun Dun Dun Dun because of the Morse code element that's correct attended for victory in Morse Code V for victory and so that presents itself sort of a little Wedding of the signal. That the what's to come is is going to be consequential you are deeply steeped. It seems to me not only in the spycraft right but also the atmospherics of Paris of of Europe at the time. And so it's not. I mean Tom Clancy. I regretted his first books. And he's very good at explaining. Exactly how the motor worse in the submarine below the water. And that's fantastic and you can do that. But there's something about the sense of place there where it's almost as though you can feel the fog on your skin when you write about about what is so important about an and how do you try to capture the sense of place with the details that you select present. Well I try I. I don't consciously make a list of five senses but the fact is that As I try to recreate France and I say recreate because I believe an awful lot of my listeners have gone to France have been there have been tourists there and I put things in these books for them wherever they own And that's that's about the best answer I can give you That's it's a fair fair one. Indeed the your character here. You're you're you're protagonist Paul Ricard is writer and it struck me at certain points that I was like I. I can't tell if he's giving US little glimpses of Allen I soul along for the ride their little moments in this you right Early on he's trying to figure out what he's going to write about and he's like you know is he going to have a poet screaming. Armenia will never die as he fires the revolver he said there was. He realized a novel in this. Yes a detective novel of inform but pitched higher for the sophisticated reader who wanted more than detective with a cold waiting for a train. And I thought but that could be a little bit of Allen first and then there's this moment again. Relatively early on the book you write about Ricard sort of wandering through through Paris. And he's seeing a formally dressed older man buying flowers here bargaining but not too hard for a dozen Red Gladioli kids in short pants playing soccer with a ball made of old rags shouting at each other's they ran in time. Ricard forced himself back to work. Do you like writing. He was asked quite often a difficult question. He hated hard work and writing was very hard work at least for him him. A shrug and I can't really do anything else usually sufficed does that speak French. And I as well as Paul Ricard you bet it does. They can't do anything else. But it is dreadfully hard work. Oh my God it's awful. I hate it but I wouldn't wouldn't know what else to do. I mean that's the honest truth of thought you know what if I retire and I go well retire and do not retire arrived a book. You know well Maury doing that. So I'll continue to write folks as long as I can get my fingers on keys at my typewriter it it's just You're right that is me and I meant to be Because because this is my only writer book you know this is my this is my chance to sort of talk about myself a little bit but not in any deeper serious way I basically basically there are books where where the lead character does nothing but think of him or herself deeply deeply and Anna lyrically and the French by the way. Have a wonderful word for that. The word is number Elise MMA and Oh md our I l. and it means navel-gazing the French half a single word for it. I don't like reading that myself. To what degree have you been inspired by You know some of these great works in the past I think of even a documentaries documenting the sorrow and pity hotel terminus they deal with the Nazi occupation. But they also deal with you. Know the efforts to push back efforts you know Hotel Hotel Terminus. About the butcher of Leeann the head of I guess the police In that French city during the Nazi occupation obviously collaborating closely closely with the Germans Klaus Barbie. I guess himself German now that I think about it. How much do you go? Yeah forgive me for for for muddling ruling that a bit how much. How much does that inspire the kinds of things that you do? Well it AH inspires it completely. I mean The thing the reason I write about World War Two is that it's a war between in good and evil and everybody agrees about that. They show it on television every night. There's reason for that. It's because that was America's Great War and the time when America was at something a lot like it's best You You I. I wouldn't myself attempt attempt to write a novel about Korea and I certainly wouldn't attempt to write a novel about Iraq. Those are those are different kinds wars. But I I like writing about a war where everybody agreed about what was good and what was evil which is to say the Americans were a pretty good. The Nazis were pretty evil and yet it's a time of real more ambiguity like we think about some of these figures in the resistance and not everything they do is good not all of them it turns out are judged to deserve to live by our hero you know. There are questions about ways in which people collaborator people compromise in. Sometimes you figure you have to be pragmatic when you're under such duress and sometimes you. They make very tough and ultimate decisions. There they do. It's true plus when you have something like an occupation it brings out the thugs even people. You didn't noer thugs. It brings those people out it stirs them up and they get involved and they certainly got involved in France in the nineteen forties There were terrible gangs That operated in France at the time and worked for the Nazis and prospered prospered. I don't know what they thought was going to happen to them when the war ended. Maybe they thought the Nazis the Germans were going to keep France for three hundred years. I don't know what they thought but thank God turned out to be wrong. And when you say the professions you mean professions like The the people who are actors or writers eaters or financiers or lawyers or or those kinds of things. Yes I do I do for example I have a book a cold dark voyage which is about a ship's captain. Don't think about it now because of the way shipping works. It's almost like there's there's a computer that runs everything but back in the day in the nineteen forties captain of a ship. Even a freighter was an important person. So so when I wrote that novel turned out to be a well like novel and I can tell because I so you can look at sales and I can see what people like not can see what people don't like quiet as much I also WANNA ask briefly the minute before we have left a number of times. It seems to me that you rely upon return to Elites that is there's a faith that the British leaders are going to help really fig the resistance figures. Figure it out. Aristocrats from Poland and other countries. Hungary are going to help set the tone for this. Is this what you find in your research or is it fun just to have the people from very different. Walks of life intersect unexpectedly When the aristocrats in France in the nineteen forties the good ones? The bad ones were happy to see the Germans because they felt kinship with them as as people with refined tastes and wealthy lives but Other aristocrats I I. I know some of the names but it wouldn't particularly matter here They fought hard. They felt as aristocrats meaning royalty royalty meaning leaders of their country. They were obligated to to fight. We're going to pick this right back up after the break. I'm David Folkenflik in. This is on point When a whale dies in the ocean and its body falls down to the seabed something amazing it happens when they hit that deep seafloor? It's like Thanksgiving. Whale falls the science of a deep sea. Feast this week on shortwave. The daily science ends podcast from NPR. This is on point I'm NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik. We're discussing elements of a great historical spy novel level with perhaps Americans finest historical spy novelist. That's Allen I you can join our conversation. What questions do you have for my guest? Follow us on twitter and the FACEBOOK AD on point. RADIO WITH ME IS ALAN I. He's author of the new wartime spy novel under occupation. It's fifteenth novel about Europe in world. War Two during the rise of Hitler and Third Reich Set in Nineteen forty-two France. We have a couple of callers inspired by our conversation to call in listeners. Calling in Entre thanks for calling in Calling from Detroit Michigan. What's your question for for my guest? Hi I have two things and not not so much a question but I'm floored by your comment that the occupation of France and Paris wasn't bad at first I and certainly Paris was always apprise as with any capital city but it was also a matter of revenge and humiliation to fit the Nazi narrative of blaming the tree and particularly the French who were adamant about punishing Germany. You know the novelization and altered narrative to Really does a disservice to struggle. Fact you know Histories and interesting enough and it's important on its own on altered and also the past will be doomed to repeat it so let let me. Let me allow Allen. I responded Allen in two parts first off the characterization is let me allow you to characterize how you've you The occupation of Paris. And what you meant when you said that I. It wasn't so bad and then we can talk a little bit about the tension perhaps between between between History and historical novels Lanka. Thank you so much for the call in the question it wasn't so bad at first Listeners understands me us just because that's who listeners Harris. Go ahead Sir you you take for example back seems the very famous a restaurant in Paris. A very touristic restaurant but very famous But the French elite used to go there until the Germans arrived then. Germans went there and when the Americans occupied Paris they went there. It's like Paris is a part of the world in a certain in way it doesn't especially completely belong to France In the beginning of the war to answer I think the second part of that question. The Germans goal in in the occupation was to get the French to accept it. They they were. Ah There's the German story was always the same. We are here to help you fight the Bolsheviks. That was their line and it wasn't that we are here to control Poland dominate. You and put you in front of a firing squad and take all Jews way that that that was never expressed. That's what happened but wasn't expressed The way that in the said in the beginning they sought to let make the French field that this wasn't so bad after all they were extremely as they say correct and they were extremely polite. They got up on the Metro and gave their seats to older men and women. They did all kinds of things in the beginning And it took till You know a year or so for the resistance to start organizing itself off and perhaps for the Nazi Occupation to crack down and show show show revealed its true nature in more for more vicious than and even more troubling terms. We're getting calls now from from Other readers and listeners as well Elizabeth is calling from Milton Massachusetts Elizabeth. Thanks for listening. What are your thoughts high? Yeah I want to say that I never did. I think I would have the opportunity to express my appreciation to Mr I directly for his writing. Not only the entertainment value quote unquote entertainment but the great historical insights. That I think A Rita such she's myself who's grown up in. US Post War of what it was like the high drama and the challenges to live during those times. You bring it to life in a way that you know. The Mir history book cannot in particular. I've appreciated your depictions of Poland and the Polish people people I have Polish ancestry on my maternal grandmother's side. And my my mother would send would send a clothing and so forth to her relatives in the old country and they never really understood and you have a really brought brought that to life for me and I highly highly recommend reading your work And others as well but your work in particular to understand the real challenges that Nazism brought and how the many moral struggles that people went through trying to understand how to respond. What is really going on? Is it time to be concerned under. Shall we just say this buffoon will never get anywhere. And it's topical right now. I think anyone can draw some of the Connections between in some of the struggles. We're having now as what I would say. Coddled cuddled People living in the United States that number had kind of challenge of of you know leadership that that is threatening in some ways. So I've really enjoyed every single. One of your books started with the spies of Warsaw movie by BBC which impelled to go read the book which was employed so much more rich. So I recommend your books. Twenty my but I wanna thank you because I have enjoyed like the my re. I found every book of yours that I could. That's still in print and some out of print in libraries and read my way through all of them and they're pretty ripping and No such interesting characters as well. Thank you for that Elizabeth for that That expression appreciation but also the details of why you Allen I wrote about the polls a number of times they play a key role in some ways driving propelling the narrative the plot and the action in this latest book under occupation and the connections between the polls French fascinating one of the things I think is interesting for a lot of readers who come to these books perhaps more recently Z.. Started out Writing about the Soviets during World War Two one of the people on twitter one of our listeners on twitter reaching out to me A about you he wrote I. I want to get this right a his his name is Tim Appello. I believe he might have been a colleague of yours At Cornish Cornish College. Yes I remember. Tim said Tim Rights. And he says ask about Allen's transformation from Seattle comic novelist Lecarr as soulful Parisian successor after a trip to Europe not since Saul turn to saint. Paul has one trip so transformed a writer so Tell us a little bit about what inspired you for that first is novel and how you focused on the Eastern Front In thinking about World War Two as you first started to put pen to paper on this era in nineteen eighty three while got ours writing magazine. Stories Ah I hadn't really written a successful novel yet. I'd written four really bad novels. Those are not listed front them on books usually usually usually you don't hear of. Let's say that out loud right. They've really were awful. I really didn't have anything to write about. That was my the problem I could write good. You know but I couldn't I didn't I didn't have anything that I cared about. And what what a novel takes I learned to my whatever ever. I learned that it takes moral force to write a novel. You have to feel deeply about something so that in nineteen nineteen eighty-three I went to the Soviet Union I didn't mean to stay there for two weeks but the Russians Russians made me do it. They wanted those dollar forty rubles at the time. What I was there for was to go up the Danube which I did in this Pass small passenger steamer that went up to Vienna. But if you look at the Danube it's an incredibly fascinating river It goes through Budapest. It it goes between Bulgaria and Romania. Then it goes into Hungary goes up through Budapest into Bratislav which which is now part Slovakia but was part of Czechoslovakia and eventually winds up in the NFL so that It it kindled me a huge interest in eastern Europe and I like the idea of writing a novel. Level where the Soviets were the villains I had won a trip as I said Where I was in Russia Russia for a while and I had they follow you? They do all this stuff. And you don't really realize that you you've been told that what they're gonNa do that but then they do it. And then you don't like it and I didn't like it and I had other experiences. I didn't like even more so to speak. Let me let me go onto the next question. Oh sure of course. Well it's it's. It's it's interesting to see you do that. You talked about the Soviets. It's and and you know there was in some ways even more compelling where you have heroes who are forced to do things for the for the Soviet secret police Lisa essentially and to do spying and yet themselves or trying to serve as resistance against the Nazis in ways that may work against Soviet interested as perceived by Stalin at that that time or may work for them. It's just they're shifting values shifting forces and people trying to figure out not only what is the right course to do. What is the possible of of course do an where their moral compass lines at any given moment until nineteen forty two? When Hitler broke the hitler-stalin pact and invaded Russia Russia wasn't having anything to do against the Germans are are they were fine with it And that was true. Up till nineteen forty two and the Communist Party in France did not take part in the resistance then Lo and behold in one thousand nine hundred forty two. When Hitler crossed the line and headed for Moscow? Now the Communists got involved. volved just we're talking about real politics. They call it. Excuse me so that that's what you have the the history of Germany and Russia's long and complicated but if you look what you'll see between Russia and Germany Poland and the polls have borne the brunt of both of the ambitions ambitions of these countries over the years and it's the polls really resent excuse me invented resistance extraordinarily nonfiction book by the journalist and Historian Jack fairweather called the volunteer about a Polish resistance fighter who volunteered to go into Auschwitz to try to organize resistance. Is there a sort of an extraordinary series of things you know along lines. I in in parallel to some of the things that you you write about So well well as as well there's a point in which Paul Ricard your French novelist turned a resistance. Fighter is talking about how he comes up with his novels and and he talks about caring about getting things right but at a certain point he talks about the importance of imagination. He says you know so you know. Look I mean going to get at this right. I'm going to get the streetcars right. There I'm going to get this right in that right and the other thing I've invented a yellow wicker chair to go on the streetcars Bucharest. And if somebody somewhere has an eagle-eyed had that notes that there aren't wicker chairs in are not yellow then so be it. Is that how you operate as well you try to offer things that our horse versatility. You'd such specific detail that it can't possibly know whether or not that in itself was right. I can figure out when my readers know what I'm talking talking about and when they don't is very useful for anomalous because Britain they don't then you can make things up but a mine. Readers are pretty knowledgeable however ever so I have to stick pretty much to the authentic facts as they are one of the fascinating things one things that my friends Dr Charles Charles mentioned to me in talking about books over the years is that they're sort of these touchstones these threads that go woman through multiple books characters that recur enrolls major you're in minor The one of your touchstones the Brasserie Heininger. I hope I'm pronouncing that right You know Paris and that that's it was inspired hired by a real such a brasserie right and it plays a specific role. Tell us a bit about the role that that restaurant plays Dobro. The real browser is this cold. Both or both finger if you WANNA put it in English but it's both on Shea and it in a lot of the novels is the center of Parisian life. It's the Brasserie as the all you know for represents life at its best in Paris at night and all the characters that come to that brasserie and they're all different kinds of love their from all different countries. They're very very different people but they're all having a good time And so that that Brasserie for a number of books represented a kind of a magnetic center for the book. It seemed like a place where resistance leaders from different countries might intersect check. It seemed like a place that German officers senior officers like to go and enjoy the the best bubbly. They could commandeer it seemed as though in some ways it was a place where there's a lot of intersection a section. And if I'm remembering correctly the the mark of a bullet strike in one of the mirrors behind One of the bank where people sit to eat people go into the both Nj know that and they ask for table eighteen

France Paris Allen Europe Paul Ricard Poland ALAN I. twitter NPR writer David Folkenflik United States facebook NPR Germany New York Russia Tom Hanks
E011 - First SOLO

Behind the Prop

34:38 min | 6 months ago

E011 - First SOLO

"Welcome to behind the prop podcast. Where each week. We will bring you stories lessons and some tips from behind the pro. Please subscribe wherever you listen. To taste. Checklist microphones check out. Check complete recording all channels checked and verified pre. Show checklist. complete our bro. Tango papa is holding short ready for departure tango papa. You're clear for takeoff hapag ratio clear for takeoff and wilco for tango. What's up walling. Bobby how are you. i'm great. This is a special episode for both of us. I think probably for any aviator one of the days that we all remember the most. Is that first time we solo load. This week is all about the first solo. Absolutely today's a very historic day in in our country december. Seventh and we all Can probably remember the speech December seventh nineteen forty one day that lives in infamy And this isn't about that but This happens to be the thirty ninth anniversary of my first solo. Flight is solo on december. Seventh nineteen eighty-one. I took off on runway four at nine seventeen. Am in tomahawk. Two five four nine alpha in monroe louisiana and So obviously that date Resonates with me because of that. I don't remember the date of my private pilot check ride. I don't remember the dates of any of my check. Rides really but This is a date that resonates with me and in fact next year. Twenty twenty one on december seventh. I plan to be monroe. And i want to coordinate with air traffic control and i want to recreate it. I want to forty years to the day. I wanna take off her only four at nine seventeen in the morning and Just something. I wanna do for me so that that'll be a year from now. That'll be awesome. And if if which. I know we will be doing the show at that point. We will probably be live on the runway while while he does that on facebook or something and let everybody watch. Wally recreate that With live audio of his forty year anniversary my first solo was july twelfth. Two thousand and fifteen and not quite forty years ago but I remember that day vividly. I remember i remember telling my structure for probably a week or so that i'm not ready and you're not going to get out of this aircraft. He kept talking about. you know. we're getting close. We're getting close. We're getting close. And and i knew i could land the plane But i just didn't feel like i didn't have the confidence. Like what if what if what if. What if what if for was probably what was going through my mind. I'm a little bit of a worst case. Scenario guy sometimes so I actually flew over to brenham with my structure. We ate lunch with my dad. Who lives in brenham normal great beautiful day at the the brenham airport and the brenham diner there and we miss you brenham diner and Fly back he's like today's the day we're gonna get back in the. I'm going to get on the plane and i'll never forget that you know twenty five minute flight and one seventy two from brenham house homey. My hands were sweating house getting nervous. I kinda wish he would have told me after we were on the ground but We talk through it. We got back to the pattern. We flew the three laps with him. In the in the in the aircraft with me and i'll never forget we kind of pull up to the triangle. He got out and walked away in here. It was go time and have that video on youtube. I'll put it in the The the show notes make sure you guys can watch it i. It was a big day. i'll never forget. I've probably never talked more than i talked in that cockpit that day Any other flight to date. I was every every airspeed every thing. I was dealing with my hands every turn i was. I was definitely in go mode for sure. I i was the same way i do. Remember talking to myself again was a long time ago. It was before everybody had Cameras or phones in their pocket and obviously before social media and all that stuff so mine was a little bit Lower key There wasn't all the fanfare behind it. I i i remember that day. I don't remember the day of the week. But it was either a monday a wednesday or friday. And i know that because at ten o'clock that day i era dynamics glass aviation theriault one aero-dynamics and i had a Eight thirty or eight o'clock flight With my instructor and he did not allude to me at all that i might solo. This day Obviously i had all my. I had my medical and all that that stuff But i just remember staying in the pattern with them and then he said okay. Let's taxi in. And i kind of remember thinking only done about three landings. Where are we going in. And he said keep the engine running and go to to touching goes on a full stop and I i don't think i had enough time to get nervous I just remember getting out to the end of the runway and taking off and Probably about three hundred feet. I looked over at. The fuel gauges and i realized i probably had about three hours worth of fuel. And i i just remember thinking to myself okay. I've i've got three hours before. I really have to put this airplane on the ground Case scenario and And of course. I stayed in the pattern in in In and did the touching goes. I do remember Air traffic control of minoza controlled airport Class delta and I i do remember the the them giving me right hand patterns. And i'm not sure i had ever done that quite honestly and i just remember thinking. Oh wow Well i just turn right instead of turning left and obviously it worked just fine and and i came back in and I got out of the airplane and nobody was there to meet me. I went into the flight school. And i paid my bill and i drove to school and i went to aerodynamics class. There was no no big fanfare You know when. When i became an instructor we did a little bit more fanfare. We did the Some of the traditions that we're going to talk about here in a little while the the cutting of the shirttail and all that kind of stuff but Yeah i think about that day. It was just one of the A very proud day for me. And it's obviously very proud day for any student pilot to solo the first time. Yeah i looked it up on the internet. That was a monday and The other big thing that happened that day was spain. Became a member of nato. So you'll forget that either So yeah it. We've probably all different experiences whether we knew and maybe As a fly school owner see people that come in. They think today's the day. And maybe the winds prevent it may be. The ceilings prevented Maybe the first three laps. Don't go as good as they thought it was going go in in that prevents it on that given day. I've seen the emotions of of those days. And i've seen emotions of the successful successful flights as well so i'm sure we've all been around varying degrees of excitement and heartbreak as it relates to the solo day. But it's supposed to be an exciting day. It is you know of all things aviation what say maybe all things in in life. There's there's only a few things we do. One time for the first time you know that that is that monumental right and i everyone much like you said We all take check rides. We probably don't all know those dates But we probably all remember that solo day very significantly That may be the day. We got a noise canceling headset for the first time. Some something something like that but My day was it was hot. And i remember how hot it was july twelfth in houston. Texas at sea level is hot humid day. Um we do have a seven thousand foot runway here so There was no concerns for me. But i remember i was i remember being i was countdown. There's number one number. One crosswind number one down when number one based number two crosswind there to one to go one ago. I just remember not that. I wanted it to be over. But i wanted to be. I wanted the accomplishment to happen right We talked a little bit about it if you follow any social media pages for behind the problem. There is a banner Image on lincoln. Facebook twitter all of our feeds and that banner image is a picture of a cessna kind of early evening. I mean it's definitely still daylight sons behind some clouds there. But that picture of that cessna's me on my third supervise solo and that's my third lap and it to me. It's a distinguishing picture. Says that's candidate. Last time. i had to be supervised Had my solo ticket pretty much. After that i had my ability to fly across countries with with endorsements but that stem structure and i had done enough worked where i was able to really fly alone. Yeah course had a lot of work to do. And i've come a long way since that day learned a lot about aviation But that picture on the banner of our social media feeds is my third supervised solo and Was was a was probably pretty important day. But it wasn't like the first time right. And then i i think i go back to that first time before we start recorded they we talked about. How many people do we think this year got their first time in This fly school. We do a lot of cool things while he talked about shirttails. We'll talk about that next but We give away a t shirt for every student that does there. I thas solo. And that's t shirt is a sicelo day on. It's got our logo on the back. It's got the the cutout for the details. I think at the beginning of the year. I bought two hundred and fifty of those shirts. And it's time to order some more so i'm gonna guess hundreds of first solos of happen at this school this year. You brought up man with it. How cool would it be. Didn't know how many people solo d- in all of our aircraft over the thirty three years we've been in business well that'd be a pretty cool stat And as these planes have been around for a long time some of some of these some of our planes have moved onto other places but If you don't know where your aircraft is he sold in look in your logbook. Find that tail number A quick search on google will probably bring up flight. Aware that tail number and you'll be able to see where it was i. I looked mine up before the Podcasts and it was flying. Last week in phoenix arizona so it's moved onto a drier higher hotter climate probably If you don't know where your aircraft is or you're interested go out there and look for the tail number of flatware. I'm sure you can find that aircraft somewhere in the So let's talk shirttails. He said you didn't get cut now. Mine didn't get cut a kinda had heard about it not not regularly around the school At the time. But i think i wore a shirt just in case that it if it did get cut. I wasn't going to lose a good shirt right. Yeah that's why we give one away so that people don't they're good shirts you'd hate to wear tommy bahama that day that offer. Maybe a brand new columbia shirt. I might be bad. But we give that t shirt away and we we want that as a keepsake Do you know where that comes from. Wally well i just heard that it was the the term was clipping clipping. The tail feathers. I've heard that. I've heard a lot of variations of where that comes from. But i looked it up and wikipedia years ago. When someone was asking why do you. Why are you doing this. and wikipedia. Maybe not the the best source in the world but a good source says that Back in the early days when you would fly in a in a plane you would be student in the front instructor in the back so More down the fuselage side by side and that the instructor would pull your shirt tails to turn right. You pull the right side turn left and no inner calms no radios. You're screaming at each other And the wikipedia says that That's why you cut the tail so once you've so load you need your sir tells anymore because your instructor doesn't have to guide where you're going to turn or go which i think's interesting so somewhere between cutting your tail feathers and no longer needing your instructor in the backseat Is why though sir tells are cut and It's a big deal. We cut that piece off and we encourage instructors and students to write the date and tell them tell whatever story they wanna tell her whatever's on their mind We had instructor probably within the last six months. Who i would advise all of you not to take that shirt tail and put it on the few salah's you wrote your messaging A sharpie will go right through a t shirt and onto the fuselage of a cessna. that's white wally. And that will stay there in the perpetuity. If you're not careful. Oh that's that's funny. So is it still on the airplane. It is not. We've done a lot of research and found that if you use. Toothpaste toothpastes with a little. Bit of water will get permanent marker off of aircraft. So that's nice to know that. Go in the log book that did well the solo in the log book but not the time i spent cleaning the toothpaste. Now we've all seen scared. Instructors coming in talking to the owners before but that young man was a little nervous when he came in my door and said I have a problem. I I have. I've written all over of your aircraft with the sharpie plea incidental but it was funny story that day for sure. That's funny i i. I know When i became a cf. i n started soloing. Students I i wanted to make a bigger deal out of it than that. Might instructor did i. I still to this day. Thirty nine years later. Feel like i got a little short change. But anyway i'll get over it the one thing that i realized you know Teaching them in monroe louisiana in the south. It's most of the time it's hot So when i cut that first shirt. It's it's amazing. How how wet wet. The shirt was would sweat. And i. you know it's kind of like. Oh boy this is. This is kind of kind of gross. But i got over real quick and learned. What kind of permanent markers Did best on on wet cotton. Because that's usually what i was riding on but it was always a a fun thing to do with with the student. Speaking of that you instructed for quite some time what what solo story. Stick out to you as the instructor who i ask. All these instructors was your first solo student that you signed off on and let leave the trying per se. Was that a bigger day for you than your own solo And some say quite frankly that it is that that that's more nerve wracking. That's a bigger deal. They've done so much to get to that point. That's a big deal. Tell some of your solo students stories. The you accomplished with your students. I think it is a bigger deal. It's more nerve wracking because it's It's when you when you cut them loose it's totally out of out of your control i remember the the first times. My my daughter's got a car and drove away Much less you know. A of course they both have sold as well but You know it's like oh boy. Did i did. I cover everything that i remind them of this And i had one student who And i was listening to him talking. Atc on the radio and so he took off and for whatever reason they The tower asked them to ident- Little bit strange in the pattern but anyway he did he. I i said I don't even remember the airplane number but they said You know it was probably a piper tomahawk. And i'll just use the one that i sold in top four nine alpha ident- and the student came back on the radio Roger tomahawk two five four nine alpha and then the the controller said four nine alpha ident- and then he just came back and he said tomahawk two five four nine alpha and and i'm sitting there and i'm thinking to myself. Oh my gosh. We have not had the opportunity for me to teach them that. There's this little button on the transponder. That's an ident- button. And the controller wants to push the button and the student just keeps giving the tail number back to the controller so after this exchange goes goes on about three or four times the controller finally says son. There's a button on the transponder says ident- underneath it. I want you to push that button. And and you hear the students In in a very nervous voice Yes sir yes sir and he pushes the button and Of course he came in and as he got out airplane he thought he was in trouble. And i had to come on down. Say you know it's it's fine. It's no big deal. That was my fault. That's an oversight on my part. But i think as an instructor you're always thinking okay. What if what if what if and you know. Obviously the vast majority of students solos go just fine. We did have one instructor At the flight school that i was teaching at who had a student and and one thing that that my father taught me was to never really let the students know that they're going to solo. Don't say hey tomorrow you're going to solo because you know you know you want them to to just get a good night's sleep you don't want them all up all night being nervous that kind of stuff but anyway so i always subscribe to that. I always was very nonchalant about things but anyway this. One instructor had evidently told his student that tomorrow he was going to solo and the the Instructor drove up to the flight school and he saw the truck that a student was driving parked in the parking lot and he went in and he asked where a student was and the the people behind the front desk said well he he got here forty five minutes ago and he got the keys to the airplane and the instructor walked out and realized that his student was up there. Flying around in the pattern by himself Without the proper endorsements and everything and so he kind of freaked out and the guy came in and landed and he said The the instructor said what what what did you just do. And he said well. He told me i was going to solo tomorrow so so i saw load but recently even surprise them yet. Yeah so It all turned out nobody. Nobody got hurt or anything. And i'm not sure. I guess He at that point went in and made the proper endorsements to make what just happened legal but anyway so sure. There's crazier stories than that. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah i like to. I spend a lot of time in the summers up in alaska flying trips up there and they have a city tour. A bus tour. That goes around anchorage and it goes out to the airport. And they talk a lot about aviation history and one thing they like to say is that alaska has you know twenty five thousand pilots and Twelve thousand of them are actually licensed. Heard that a lot that they learned to fly on their own up there and many of them don't have a license but they're really good pilots and yeah those bush pilots are probably better stick and rudder pilots of us. Yeah in the wind in the cold right right. So one thing we worked hard to do was to Obviously share our stories on for solos but we thought that there would be no better thing to do than to interview a student on the show right after they got out of their solo. So we have austin with us. Austin literally just came off the airfield where here hooks airport and austin just did his. I supervise solo austin. How you feeling doing great bobby. Thanks for asking awesome. So austin is working with a shirt named jacoby are process at united flight systems. Is i someone to fly three laps in the pattern with the student. Then the cfi does the infamous exit from the aircraft. And then the student pilot gets in closes. The door buckles everything up and then goes off for their supervised solo. So tell me a little bit about the thoughts that you were having this morning when you got up you guys obviously had this plan you knew today was going to be your solo. Hopefully right yeah. Yeah so Look great. I was even checking it kind of religiously. We had done a night flight the night before. So i got home at about eleven and was checking the weather kind of religiously. Everything looked good. And in the morning. When i woke up everything looked great. Wins calm and i was thinking not a better day Just couldn't be a better day for it. So what was the the last mehtar or the is what was what was the weather just a few minutes ago. Yeah so when we actually ended up going out it was ended up being Like three zero. Three two zero at Five or six or four or five so ended up just being just a little bit of a cross win Meetings interesting. that's good keeps. You keeps you awake and that you do three laps with jacoby. Who has probably talking. And he's saying job. What was what was building as you did. The first one. And then you probably greased it and sex. So i hadn't flown in about eighteen or nineteen days before that solo flights. My first landing was a little rough. And i could. I could hear him without him. Saying it thinking you can do better than that. So the next lab. I just kept hearing him. Say watch your airspeed. What's what speech. What speech to be at. And once i started picking up on that and i could i could hear without him even saying it landings got better and then you know the infamous drop out like you said taxi back to the triangle and he hops out. And you're just kind of in your own world there. Yes so. I remember when i sold I guess it was july. Two thousand fifteen. I remember when mine instructor got out. I wasn't really planned it. We knew we were close to bobby soloing but that day i did not know he was planning on getting out right so it was kind of a. Oh wow this is really happening for me. Wasn't like came in planning but when he got out it seemed like that cessna cockpit grew immensely. Yes four times bigger than it was before how empty that cockpit feel it was. I mean. i'm a big guy so you know for me. I'm very used to bumping into somebody in that cockpit and you're one hundred percent correct you kinda feel almost naked. You're like where am i. What am i doing here be here you know. Am i ready for this type question. And i had every bit of that. I mean my uncle's been a pilot since two thousand six. I did a lot of the training with him. When i was nine or ten years old. So i've always been in the cockpit with somebody. I've always kind of had that failsafe is not being and then you know he steps out and you're just kind of like go. Yeah where am i. And and then it almost became natural. You keep the radio taxi clearance and go up to one. Seven right at charlie and ev- everything from there just like a ball rolling downhill. You got better and better and better and we have some great controllers here very aware of the fact that you just had to see if i get out of the aircraft taking care of you with with white gloves and they do a great job around here but you get the charlie in your whole short for the first time the other thing that i remember kind of at that moment was there's no one to ask a question to Jacoby has a radio in his hand. But you're probably not going to ask him a question on the radio now. And i think i became a better pilot because of that almost instantaneously. Yeah and i can agree with that. There was there was at least one situation where i thought i would ask him for this but then i said you know what it's sink or swim. You need to make those decisions on your own. He's not going to be there to hold in forever and the other radio work the being they're listening for my tail number. I knew that that he wasn't going to be there to pick up. If i miss the radio call some a just listening much better than i was before i think but i did a lot of talking to myself. Did you talk to yourself in the plane. Yeah i definitely did in that very beginning. And then that i take off came and you know we had a negative eighteen hundred. Da so climbing was already awesome. But you know when you're moving two hundred pounds for the plane. I had no idea it was gonna climb as hard as it did so i kind of froze up for a second once. It was Getting to about traffic pattern altitude. And i i remembered i need to be doing something i need to be talking to myself. I need to just be saying what. I'm doing as soon as i thought about that. It was just like you said nonstop talking Just making sure if there was somebody in that passenger seat. they're not getting a word in edgewise. Yup and i remember. I think it was probably my third lap. I took off. And i was like I'm almost done. Gotta do one more and the feeling of accomplishment like this isn't learning how to play badminton or something right. We all have a little bit of fear of the unknown. We all have a lot of work to do. There's a lot to learn about flying air airplane. What would you. What were you feeling when you're wrapping up your third lap. I mean this has to be a big accomplishment. Yeah i was. I was honestly my biggest dog or my head was i. Want to greece's landing and say to myself. Like i finally had one of the best landings possible and i don't think i've i had the best landing i possibly could made myself yet but it was to date one of the best i've had and that felt even better that compounded on top of the accomplishment. So today's the day you're now solo pilot in command pilot That's a big accomplishment. Hopefully you'll solo many more times and get all of your work out of the way and then you'll be ready for a check ride. Who do you think you use for your check. Ride giving it is no honestly don't I kinda me personally as a person. I I tend to think about things only a couple of days ahead so jacoby of just been discussing. What's the shortest next steps as far as getting the cross country done and all that and when it comes to the chart right. I'm just going to tell him. Whoever you think. I trust you immensely perfect. I'm kind of picking on the a little bit since my podcast partner here. Wally understandable available for you awesome. I appreciate you joining the show. And i appreciate you being a student the united flights from it all and if i could i'd like to say huge shout out to you guys. I inform you know letting us do this. You don't have to and second thing. Jacoby has been quite possibly the best thing. I could've ever asked for all far as personality types. Joe's very well with me and he's an incredibly nice guy. Well if you're listening to this podcast and you wanna fly with jacoby sometime take out. Our website unified dot com slash jacoby. We look forward to seeing you at the fly. School an awesome. We look forward to seeing you back at the vice versa. Thanks bobby and you have a great day while he. That's so fun to hear how much fun and excitement is in that person's voice right when they get out of that plane It might have been forty years ago for you. But i'm sure you can resonate with how exciting that must be to do that. For solo for that young man definitely. It's you know as an examiner. I tell a lot of my applicants. That i'm i'm it's my honor It's it's a privilege to get to be a part of a real important date for them. earning a certificate whether private commercial whatever and To for me to get to witness it is is just Very very heartwarming for me. It's just a privilege to be able to be a part of that and Being at a flight school You know every day like you are just to be able to see somebody Walk in from the first solo has gotta be Just gotta make feel pretty good. It's awesome. I love to see it happen. I love to see the pictures. I love the post the pictures. There's not too many people frowning in their first solo picture so that makes it even even more exciting to be around that all day as we wrap up the show. What what suggestions would we give the listeners. Assuming we have a lot of listeners that are going to their first lesson a day thinking about getting into flight training. What kind of tips tricks would we give them around their first solo or getting through that stage of education and training to where they're gonna approach that first solo timeframe back when i solo d- I was in college the to situation and and lots of eighteen nineteen year old At the time mostly males There were there. A couple of females and Fortunately the the scale is tilting to where it's more even but back in the day At least where i was there was a lot of competition and And it was like. Oh well i sold in this many hours while. I sold this many hours. Of course she wanted to solo and the the least number of hours and it was a badge of honor. And i will tell you The where you solo. I think means absolutely nothing in the big scheme of things. I've seen people solo at seventy five hours. I've seen people solo at five and a half hours and The end results Really it really means nothing. So the next few ratings right private still takes forty rider. What if you're part of sixty ones didn't right Doesn't matter if you sell it a fiber thirty nine right. i think the Instruments still has set a number of requirements. That you have to take her win. You sold commercial. Has a number of hours of cross country flight designations. You have to dual no matter when you sold right. I do i as the faisal owner. I talked to parents who are frustrated. Sometimes that johnny's not there yet and we talked through the reasons why he's not there yet but it is such a small window of time as a flight. School owner is a pretty risky time For students to do it. We have pretty strict rules around it for students to protect them Because not everyone makes the process decision all the time. But you know if you think about a solo student. The way i do or if you're solo singer out there and you're thinking man. I'm not there yet. Are struggling or the weather keeps keeping me on the ground this sucks. We've probably all had those days but if you're at twenty let's call it. Twenty to twenty five hours is probably when the large majority of students solo for the first time. And you're at twenty twenty five hours and you want to be a professional pilot in some form or another twenty five to forty is fifteen hours of a thousand our pilot time before the kaneohe the airlines without a thousand hours as a restricted. Atp we're talking less than one and a half percent right of your overall flight time before you're the airlines is that window between solo and private pilots license right and i try to tell people in the front foyer all the time that the winds are too strong and they can't go there long cross country. This is a small small window of time right to pass. It's a big deal to you today and i get. It's a big deal for me today. But let's let this one and a half percent of your training right extend a little bit longer to my safe right And i can't stress that enough for anyone out there. My story has become to the students into you. If you're listening. Find a reason why you shouldn't go stick to that instead of sitting up front and radha computer trying to find a reason why you can go right It's hard but it. That's what professional pilots do Finding the reason why you're not gonna go is so much more pro than finding a reason that you could sneak it in and go So that's my message to all you current future solo students out there. It's such a small window of time. Be patient Follow the rules in and learn as much as you can because it's going to be a short period of time. Yeah absolutely okay with that As always we will ask you to fly safe. Be safe and stay behind the prop. Thanks for listening to behind the prop papa. We are clear. The active runway would like texas department. Pat tactfully departs great. Show have a nice day texas department. Thanks you too abruptly think thanks for listening to behind the prop please follow us on social media at behind prop or visit our website. Www dot behind the prop dot com until next week fly safer.

brenham nineteen forty one day forty years forty year brenham airport twenty five minute three hundred feet Wally seven thousand foot wikipedia three hours thirty three years monroe louisiana Thirty nine years jacoby Facebook forty five minutes new columbia monroe
S2: Halloween: Theodore Coneys

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

15:39 min | 1 year ago

S2: Halloween: Theodore Coneys

"Today is Thursday October seventeenth two thousand nineteen on this day in nineteen forty one seventy three year old. Philip Peters was beaten to death in his home in Denver Colorado at first the police were stumped assode today and true crime was written by Greg Castro. I'm Vanessa Richardson when Peter's was home sometimes he followed his non consenting housemate through the house showing him watching as he went about himself from his tiny refuge of old newspaper clippings and hoarded canned goods and emerged from the hall closet which hid the addicts entrance his life Theodore was lonely and though other people had always mocked him he still longed for a friend Theodore made his thing watching welcome to today and true crime at the top of the Peters residents theodore eating out in the attic during the summer he sweated so much that he now only weighed seventy five pounds fit of rage. Today's episode is part of our series on Halloween where we delve into the fascinating traditions behind the world's way down the stairs and into the kitchen he started making coffee on the cast iron stove as he did most mornings but this morning was with his long face and curly hair he looked like a ghoul theodore lower due to the graphic nature of today's crimes listener discretion is advised extreme caution is advised for listeners under thirteen now let's he stalked slowly through the upstairs rooms he knew how to be absolutely silent having done this many times before even destined to be different turning around Theodore was shocked to see Peter's entering from the backyard he hadn't gone to the hospital he Edward Kony's after several weeks of squatting in the attic a former acquaintance Philip Peters he was discovered and lashed out in and his chronic illness meant that he had always sought the safety of the indoors rarely even glimpsing some light he was as Pale as the snow his wife at the hospital the sound of the door closing was all he needed to know that the coast was clear he shuffled around in the small space scariest holiday if you enjoy this episode of today and true crime be sure to check out the rest of the podcast presents Halloween feed on spotify in truth he couldn't lay down without hiking up his legs theodore was tall standing at five foot ten when he wasn't scrunched in an ad it's an today we're discussing the strange case of the Nineteen Forty One Denver Spiderman Aka fifty nine year old theodore he'd been working outside there was a moment of stunned silence as the two men took each other in but Theodore had considered this scenario uh-huh before it was him or Peter's he reached behind his back where he had an old antique pistol he stole from upstairs Peters was trying to dial the police theodore could hear him he was enraged couldn't they just continue as they were no one had minded nick he had always been weak doctors told him he wouldn't live beyond eighteen his God frame had only become more so while podcast original every day we flipped back the calendar to this date years ago and recount one event from True Crime History I'm Vanessa rushing forward he brought it down on Peter's head the old man clutched his bloodied scalp and stumbled toward the living room oppressed his ear to the floorboards this was his daily routine he woke up on his ironing board bed then waited for Peters two goes Godo Tober seventeenth nineteen forty one as Theodorus it's in his attic hideout and eight by four foot crawlspace in the attic before peters was ruining everything racing over to the living room the door brought the pistol down on Peter's head Theodore was absolutely livid he looked around and saw an iron stove tool sitting nearby brandishing it he stalked his heart jumped in his chest as theodore once again heard the phone dialing this time it was coming from Peter's bedroom award the bedroom when he found Peter's still bleeding from his head once again trying to dial police theodore let out a yell once more this time the old handgun broke apart with the effort as the older man fell to the floor Theodore was sure for that he was unconscious he moved back to the kitchen where he took the coffee off the stove what was he going to do the safest thing was probably to just leave but why should he have to go no one else was using the attic neither peters nor his wife noticed the little bit of food he stole the ceiling the carpet the walls when he was done Peter's head was caved in he was dead all Oh and smashed Peter's over the head with the tool he kept going striking Peter's over and over blood splatter down but a young girl was able to pry open a window that had a screw loose the other neighbors waited outside expecting her to open the door with Peter's in tow but instead there was only silence and then terror the girl lead out a blood curdling scream next will discuss how theodore was able to stay hidden for so long and what happened back later that day a few of Peter's neighbors arrived at the house worried that he hadn't come by for dinner they found the residence in lock once he was finally found now back to the story Theodore Kony's lives sad life always in club in nineteen twelve this is where a young Theodore I met the Peters family and shared his history of destitution and poverty sick and gangly child he was mocked and never fit in when he tried to join the army he was rejected when he didn't die at age eight all theatre could think to do was wipe off the tool put it back in its place lock all the doors and return to his attic whether he struggled with this decision is unclear but in September of nineteen forty one theodore walked by the Peter's residence and eighteen as doctors had predicted he wandered through homeless camps and took odd jobs one of those jobs was teaching Mandolin to the Denver Mandalit hip and was recovering in a lengthy hospital stay though this was disappointing news it presented an opportunity for Theodore Philip Pieterse could hardly imagine that several decades in the future this man would kill him the years asked and Theodore continued to try and make ends meet but his lot never improved in life whether this was due to continued society oh prejudice toward his condition or his own personal failings is unclear but he returned to Denver in April nineteen forty one and sought out the peters family once again he asked for charity but peters had none to give his wife had recently broken her quaintly out visiting his wife in the hospital and when he was home it's possible he stayed confined to the living room and the bedroom nineteen forty however the police maintained regular patrols around the house and in July nineteen forty two spotted the ghostly figure back one patrolman reached out pulling theodore down onto the floor his ruse was finally ended climax of the story the crime actually didn't end there peters was killed on October seventeenth nineteen forty one but and finding it empty and unlocked helped himself to some food in the kitchen as he explored the house he found the door leading to the theodore wasn't caught until July of nineteen forty two for eight months he continued to use the attic as his home terrorizing Mrs Peters her nurse and the neighbors all claimed to see a ghoulish figure in the window or a man chattering his attic it was a small opening but someone has gone to S- Theodore could slide inside as the days and then weeks went psychological analysis of Theodore is difficult as there are few details of his life Theodore's confession was fairly to where he could walk around when Peters was home without being noticed not only was Peter's the only one in the house but he was free he won social conventions dictated that men stay out of the kitchen and allow women to cook and indeed with his wife Gone Peters was why he became an expert at taking just enough food to where Peter's wouldn't notice and eventually he knew the layout of the house well enough in one of the windows to patrolman burst into the house running up the stairs just in time to see a pair of feet disappearing into the ad robbing the icebox. He told police that he stayed in the cramped intemperate foul-smelling attic because it was the first time he had played are a fact he told police officers quote everything would have been all right and Phil Peters would have been alive today if he hadn't caught me not at the bottom of the stairs it was decided that the house was thoroughly haunted and Mrs Peters went to live with her son in a different city going to the neighbors for meals this man that Theodore often had the kitchen to himself and while it may seem that the murder was the mental aspect of how the brain functions the brain maintains a second skin or a perimeter that other people aren't supposed to cross severe loss of self worth and self esteem in this sense Theodore's entire world was at stake it's base such as the homeless the first time they do have their own shelter can be very meaningful as they can finally let their guard down from your pantry maybe call the police when we're in the privacy of our own homes that constant fear of our perimeter being breached goes away for those who have never experienced their own that seems extreme to an outside observer SALT LAKE CITY NBC affiliate K. C. L. Reports that losing a home can result in his

Theodore Philip Peters Peter Denver Colorado Greg Castro Vanessa Richardson murder NBC K. C. L. nineteen forty one seventy thr seventy five pounds fifty nine year eight months five foot four foot
October 17, 2019: Theodore Coneys

Today in True Crime

16:12 min | 1 year ago

October 17, 2019: Theodore Coneys

"Today is Thursday October seventeenth two thousand nineteen on this day in nineteen forty one seventy three year old. Philip Peters was beaten to death in his home in Denver Colorado at first the police were stumped theodore lowered himself from his tiny refuge of old newspaper clippings and hoarded canned goods and emerged thing watching shave friend I wanNA tell you about the new three d. our cast presents Halloween feed on spotify due to the graphic nature of today's crimes listener discretion is advised extreme caution is zing sunlight he was as Pale as the snow with his long face and curly hair he looked like a ghoul inched from the hall closet which hid the addicts entrance he stalked slowly through the upstairs rooms he knew how to be absolutely John at Jimmy John's dot com or with Jimmy Johns APP at participating locations taxes and delivery fees extra a kite out an eight by four foot crawlspace at the top of the Peter's residence there's he was discovered and lashed out in a fit of rage. Today's episode is part of our series on Halloween where we clear he shuffled around in the small space in truth he couldn't lay down without hiking up his legs theodore was tall stand silent having done this many times before even when Peters was home sometimes he followed his non consenting housemate through the thing it five foot ten when he wasn't scrunched in an attic he had always been weak doctors told him he wouldn't live beyond eighteen house shadowing him watching as he went about his life Theodore was lonely and though other people had always mocked him he one event from true crime history. I'm Vanessa Richardson today. We're discussing the strange case of the Nineteen Forty One Denver Spider Man Aka fifty nine year old Theodore Edward Kony's after several weeks of squatting in the attic of former Acquaintance Philip Peter aid seventy five pounds and his chronic illness meant that he had always sought the safety of the indoors rarely even glimpse advised for listeners under thirteen now let's go to October seventeenth nineteen forty one as theodore sits in his ad welcome today in true crime apart cast original every day we flip back the calendar to this date years ago and recount delve into the fascinating traditions behind the world's scariest holiday if you enjoy this episode of today true crime be sure to check out the rest of the each other in but Theodore had considered this scenario before it was him or Peter's he reached behind his back has he did most mornings but this morning was destined to be different turning around Theodore was shocked to see Peter's entering is iron board bed then waited for Peter's to go see his wife at the hospital the sound of the door closing was all he needed to know that the coast was alert Littlejohn from Jimmy Johns a skinny mini version of any original sandwich for only three bucks it's littler than a regular sandwich which is perfect theodore pressed his ear the floorboards this was his daily routine he woke up on his gaunt frame had only become more so while hiding out in the attic during the summer he sweated so much that he now only still longed for a friend the door made his way down the stairs and into the kitchen he started making coffee on the cast iron stove from the backyard he hadn't gone to the hospital he'd been working outside there was a moment of stunned silence as the two men took you're not super hungry or if you WANNA try a couple different sandwiches or if you like bragging that your lunch only cost three dollars order a three dollar little is bloodied scalp and stumbled toward the living room. Peters was trying to dial the police theodore could hear him he was enraged couldn't they just continue as they were no one had minded him in the attic before peters was ruining everything racing over to the living where he had an old antique pistol he stole from upstairs rushing forward he brought it down on Peter's head the old man clutched room theodore brought the pistol down on Peter's head once more this time the old handgun broke apart with the effort all sitting nearby brandishing it he stalked toward the bedroom when he found Peter's still bleeding from his head once again as the older man fell to the floor Theodore was sure that he was unconscious he moved back to the kitchen where he took the coffee off the repeaters nor his wife noticed the little bit of food he stole his heart jumped in his chest as theodore once again heard the phone dialer repeaters over and over blood splattered the ceiling the carpet the walls when he was done Peter's head was trying to dial police the door let out a yell and smashed Peter's over the head with the tool he kept going striking caved in he was dead all theodore could think to do was wipe off the tool put it back in its place lock this time it was coming from Peter's Bedroom Theodore was absolutely livid he looked around and saw an iron stove tool bove what was he going to do the safest thing was probably just leave but why should he have to go no one else was using the attic neither all the doors and return to his attic later that day a few of Peter's neighbors arrived at the house worried that he hadn't terror the girl lead out a blood curdling scream next will discuss how theodore was able her neighbors waited outside expecting her to open the door with Peter's in tow but instead there was only silence and then to stay hidden for so long and what happened once he was finally found now back to the story theatre family and shared his history of destitution and Poverty Philip Pieterse could hardly imagine that several decades in the future I'm by for dinner they found the residence in lockdown but a young girl was able to pry open a window that had a screw loose the other one of those jobs was teaching Mandolin to the Denver Mandolin Club in nineteen twelve this is where a young Theodore I met the Peterson this man would kill him the years past and Theodore continued to try and make ends meet but his lot never army he was rejected when he didn't die at age eighteen as doctors had predicted he wandered through homeless camps and took odd jobs proved in life whether this was due to continued societal prejudice toward his condition or his own personal failings is unclear but or Kony's lived a sad life always sick and gangly child he was mocked and never fit in when he tried to join the he returned to Denver in April nineteen forty one and sought out the peters family once again he asked for charity but Peter One Theodore walked by the Peter's residence and finding it empty and unlocked helped himself to some food in the kitchen as it presented an opportunity for Theodore whether he struggled with this decision is unclear but in September of nineteen forty as the days and then weeks went by he became an expert at taking just enough food to where Peter's wouldn't notice and eventually he knew the layout of the house well enough to where he could walk around when Peters was home without being noticed not and while it may seem that the murder was the climax of the story the crime actually didn't end there peters was killed confined to the living room and the bedroom nineteen forty one social conventions dictated that men stay out of the kitchen and allow women to cook he explored the house he found the door leading to the attic it was a small opening but someone has gone to S- Theodore could slide inside hold on October seventeenth nineteen forty one but theodore wasn't caught until July of nineteen forty two for eight he's had none to give his wife had recently broken her hip and was recovering in a lengthy hospital stay though this was disappointing news he was Peter's the only one in the house but he was frequently out visiting his wife in the hospital and when he was home it's possible he stayed and indeed with his wife Gone Peters was going to the neighbors for meals this meant that theodore often had the kitchen to himself and Mrs Peters went to live with her son in a different city however the police maintained regular patrols around the house and in July in nineteen forty two spotted the ghostly figure in one of the windows to patrolman burst into the house running up the stairs just months he continued to use the attic as his home terrorizing Mrs Peters her nurse and the neighbors all claimed to see is rules was finally ended psychological analysis of Theodore is difficult as there are few details of his life Theodore's confession was fairly matter of fact he told police officers quote everything would have been all right and Phil Peter Ghoulish figure in the window or man chattering his teeth at the bottom of the stairs it was decided that the house was thoroughly haunted but in time to see a pair of feet disappearing into the attic one patrolman reached out pulling theodore down onto the floor his or a perimeter that other people aren't supposed to cross when we're in the privacy of our own homes that constant fear of our perimeter being breached except of personal space and it actually is a fundamental aspect of how the brain functions the brain maintains a second skin meaningful as they can finally let their guard down for Theodore who had lived most of his life in homeless camps the thought of having depart with his smelling attic because it was the first time he had a place of his own neuroscientist Michael Graziano has done extensive research on the goes away for those who have never

Theodore Edward Kony Philip Peters Philip Peter Jimmy Johns Denver spotify Jimmy John Colorado Vanessa Richardson Littlejohn nineteen forty one seventy thr seventy five pounds fifty nine year three dollars three dollar five foot four foot
The Supreme Court | Loaded Weapon | 4

American History Tellers

46:19 min | 7 months ago

The Supreme Court | Loaded Weapon | 4

"The match it's bright sunday morning in december nineteen forty one year twenty one years old. You parked the car at the top of a hillside looking down on the san francisco. Bay and you kneel to share a blanket with your fiancee. Music plays from the car radio. She flips through a newspaper. While you look at the ocean below maybe we should move up to washington state. Maybe i asked walt. If he knew other japanese can marry white women up there. He said he did know well. Walt doesn't know everything. Maybe there's a number we could call like. Hello yes i'd like to find out where your state stance on racial intermarriage please. You try and chuckled. But all you can manages this smirk. The two of you've been dating for three years when you got engaged both your family and hers. Objected joins me crazy. A japanese-american man in an italian american woman both have the word american in them. I shouldn't be any problem. She nods but doesn't say anything who why should she your the one who looks different. She could be irish or french. Like a lot of americans. But you'll always be seen as japanese even though you were born here off folk scrambler often blanket move towards car radio. You turn the radio off as if turning it off could make the news stop. The drumbeat of war has been intense lately but the thought that japan just attacked you and other americans on your own soil leaves you shaking. Your stomach tightens up as you feel a sickness coming on you bring you get going. I i need to see my parents but you don't think it's going to be okay. You're worried about your parents. Your brothers family lived in the city. What will happen to all of you once. Everyone believes you're an enemy. american history. Tellers is sponsored by capital one. When you need your bank capital one is right in the palm of your hand so you can check your balance deposit checks pay bills and transfer money from your phone with a top rated app and when you're done banking put it back in your pocket. A banking experience built around you and your life. This is banking reimagined get started online anytime. What's in your wallet capital one. Na member fdic american history tellers sponsored by monday dot com. If you listen to this podcast all the way through the credits and you should. I tell a joke at the end of every episode. Then you'll know that it takes a lot of people to make the show writers researchers producers the comedy writers who provide me with my end of show jokes. My team is much bigger than me. And there's a lot of room for error. The key is communication monday. Dot com is an easy to use flexible and visual teamwork platform beautifully designed to manage any team organization or process online. You can improve coordination between teams of any size in any industry anywhere. That work is done through. Collaboration which is everywhere plan and track everything. Your team is working on with scores of integrations with tools. You already use like g mail or dropbox all made better by being in one centralized place visible to everyone who needs to see it so if you want your team to be more effective than ever visit monday dot com for your free two week. Trial from wondering. I'm lindsey graham. And this is american history tellers our history. Your story As december began in nineteen forty one war raged across europe and japan was extending. Its reach through asia but the united states had not yet officially entered the conflict. Everything changed on sunday. December seventh when japanese fighter planes bombed pearl harbor president. Franklin roosevelt called it a date which will live in infamy from then on the nation would join a world war against germany. Italy and japan suddenly calls against enemies. Abroad ignited suspicion at home. Japanese-americans became prime targets of wartime paranoia within two months. The us war department would force all men women and children of japanese heritage from their homes into barren internment camps and. It didn't matter that many were american citizens. Japanese internment would mark one of the worst violations of civil liberties in american history and it would be authorized directly by the president of the united states. Three young japanese-americans would fight their government's mistreatment head on challenging the military order in federal court. One of these cases called komatsu versus united states would lead to a shocking decision and an almost forty year battle for justice. This is episode four loaded weapon. Once the united states entered world war two. The military moved quickly to secure the western border of the united states. A sixty six hundred mile stretch of land lay directly across the pacific from japan. Almost immediately the military powerful politicians began to cast suspicion on those of asian ancestry in the eyes of fearful west coast residents and officials. Japanese americans were the so called fifth column of japan's army secret supporters of the enemy spying on americans in their own backyard. This distrust was not new. Asians had been discriminated against since the mid eighteen hundreds when chinese laborers crossed the pacific to fill low paying jobs in the west after congress passed a law to ban chinese workers from immigrating to the united states. The japanese began to fill the void and the american labor force by the nineteen twenties. Japanese american farmers oversaw nearly a half million acres of california farmland providing fruits and vegetables for millions of americans but their success made enemies of the american federation of labor and other groups. Who felt that. Non asian workers should control the land reap the prophets congre soon pass legislation banning most immigration from japan. These laws also prohibited japanese immigrants from becoming american citizens or owning land by nineteen. Forty two. there were over one million german and italian american citizens and some of them. Also face discrimination. Because of the war but japanese americans who number just one tenth of drew most of the focus from military officials and racist propaganda. They lacked political power and a voice in government and were hamstrung in mounting their own defense. West coast newspapers drummed up fabricated rumors of japanese firings. They warned of japanese submarines lurking just off the coast and l. a. Times columnists compared asians to a lethal snake. Riding a viper is nonetheless a viper wherever the egg is hatched stay politicians and many citizens quickly pushed for the removal of all ethnic javanese from the west coast and in the halls of the us government these fears were amplified by lieutenant general john dewitt head of the western defense command to worn president. Roosevelt that if japanese-americans were allowed to so conspiracy and states like california oregon and washington results could be disastrous. Dewitt's theories were founded on conjecture and racist stereotyping. He claimed the so called alien. Nature of the japanese made it impossible to determine who might be spies on american soil citing few details and no proof. Dewitt ominously warned that japanese people had secretly organized themselves to trade the united states and were ready for concerted action at a favorable opportunity before pearl harbor. The f. b. i. Had spied on german italian and japanese foreigners in the us threats but fbi director j edgar hoover objected to do its findings. His agents had find no evidence to support to its claims of potential treachery from japanese americans on the west coast. Nevertheless on february nineteenth franklin roosevelt signed executive order nine zero six six the directive allow the military to set up areas called exclusion zones. Where they decided who could enter remain in or leave controlling the flow of people in and out these exclusion zones included large parts of california oregon washington and arizona. Ethnic group was specifically mentioned in the executive order but it was worded to enable the military to target anyone japanese descent living in the us. Both citizens non-citizens ally for these japanese emigrants and their descendants known. As the nikkei the military exclusions were the equivalent of declaring martial law. Anyone with as little as one sixteenth. Japanese blood was required to turn themselves in the community scrambled to respond officials and the japanese american citizens league had pledged support to both the president and the united states directly following the pearl harbor attack and even now in the face of the executive order. The leadership advised its members to cooperate. Frightened confused and intimidated. Many nikkei did as one of the citizen league organizers recalls. We were led to believe that if we cooperated with the army the government would be as humane as possible to the evacuees. Your organization also stressed the refusal to cooperate would make nikkei appear to be traitors for the family of fred komatsu. The executive order meant that they had to abandon their homes in the san francisco bay area father mother and son would all have to report to designated assembly points in the city where a bus would then transport them to hastily constructed camps many miles away fred. Komatsu grew up working in his family's flower business. He recalled my folks were so worried all they take what they could carry. Many neighbors caucasian people came over asking. Can i have this wheelbarrow. you can't take with you. What about those tires. You can't take them. But fred was also in love. Because of his italian american fiance he didn't want to relocate when his fiancee found an ad for a plastic surgeon in san francisco. He was so desperate to stay. He considered changing his physical appearance. He figured if you could manage to look less japanese get harassed less and he and his fiancee move to nevada outside the exclusion zone. You might be easier for them to get so fred set off to try and chart his own way around the government's executable imagine it's early march nineteen forty two. You're halfway up the stairs to a victorian house on a hilly street in san francisco. The house at the top of the stairs. Looks like any other but it's actually the office of dr. bb maston plastic surgeon. You've already climbed the stairs once turn around but now you're climbing them again swallowing your hesitation. What you're about to do seems pretty crazy but it also makes a lot of sense just days ago you read. The state of california has started building. What they're calling assembly center out of ten for an racetrack but really. It's more like a prison. You're a japanese man with japanese features if the united states want to round you up and put you in a camp and one if you made yourself look less japanese. Hello miss komatsu have. The doctor's office is right in the front parlor. He stubs his cigarette out in the ashtray. While you look around do the surgeries happen here. No not in this room. We have an operating room in the back. It's a small operation here but we get things done at the right price your brow furrows you take a look around and the green sallow carpet potain stains on the ceiling as if the surgeon has been smoking cigarettes at the same desk for twenty years leans forward though all business. Tell me why you want to look spanish. My wife and i will how we're married and i'm japanese-american and she's american to you mean she's why you don't like this characterization but you're not in a position to argue sure. Yeah she's white. And i don't want her to have to be subjected to comment and harassment by other people. That's understandable he. Squint considering your face you wonder what he thinks about. Executive order nine six six about the camps. That are being built at the racetrack. Well i'm gonna come right out and say i cannot make you look like an american but i can't build up your nose and remove the folds round the inner corner of your upper eyelids filipino. Pacific islands. i can give you something like hawaii. You like hawaii. sure. But i've never been there. Well now you'll be from their spanish would be all up to you. I think that's smart. Mix it up a little bit. Make yourself a mutt about the fee. The fee is three hundred dollars which i wouldn't runaway. I only have one hundred. He nods that you expecting to see what you have. You twist around in your chair and you pull out your wallet. Lacing the bills on the table well one hundred is better than nothing at all right. Let's schedule you for two weeks from today as he busies himself with writing. Something on a pat. You take a look around his par. It's not the kind of place you'd ever take your girl. You're doing this for her for your love of her and also for your safety that you wish didn't have to be this way fred. Kuramoto emerged from the surgery almost totally unchanged a surgeon had corrected his previously broken nose but done nothing else. One look in the mirror told the truth. He wasted his money. Still komatsu began calling himself. Clyde sarah to escape discovery he thought clyde sounded spanish. Sarah was his fiancee's middle name. One week after komatsu surgery congress passed a bill making it a federal crime to disobey. the president's executive order for people of japanese descent failure to report to a relocation center was now in itself a crime a memorial day fred core who was arrested while walking down the street with his fiancee precinct station. He gave the name clyde. Sarah and insisted he was spanish hawaiian but born in las vegas. However once it became clear he couldn't speak. Spanish komatsu confessed to his japanese heritage. He was charged with disobeying military evacuation. Orders was held in san francisco. County jail. komatsu's arrest was featured in a local newspaper and his case quickly drew the attention of the american civil liberties union the organization's director ernest becic went to visit komatsu in jail. The aclu was helping organize cases to challenge the government's evacuation order in federal court. There were others as told komatsu other nikkei who were protesting tournament. One was twenty four year old college. Senior named gordon here by he had been attending the university of washington when the government ordered him and his family to board a boss bound for a camp hirabayashi protested and was arrested for disobeying a military order in san francisco. Twenty two year old mitsui endo had obeyed the government's warner and been relocated to a camp with her family but endo was government employee before relocation she worked as a stenographer for the california department of motor vehicles when she was hired she'd formally declared her allegiance to the united states now the aclu was challenging her imprisonment on the grounds that she could not be legally proven as disloyal. Hearing all this sitting in jail. Cell fred core matsu. Considering his options he was hurt by his treatment at the hands of the government but he was heartened at others had fought back at all he would later say. I didn't feel guilty. Because i hadn't done anything wrong everyday in school. We said pledge to the flag. I believed that. I was an american citizen and i had as many rights as anyone else. In september cormack appeared in federal court. His lawyers argued that his constitutional rights have been violated by his arrest. Komatsu did not deny that he had violated the executive order but he testified that he was a loyal citizen of the united states he voted. He carried a draft card. He would gladly bear arms for his country. If so required still the judge pronounced him guilty and komatsu was hustled out of the courtroom by military. police he was sent for ten fran. The temporary detention center erected at a racetrack in san bruno california while waiting appeal komatsu and his fiancee had written letters back and forth to each other while he was in jail waiting to see the judge but soon their lenders dropped off. Fred would never see his fiancee again after his arrest month after month passed by this point most of the japanese americans on the west coast over one hundred ten thousand had to the government's detention centers and then word came through fred was headed to a more permanent facility in utah now after losing his fiancee his home and his job would be on his way to join the rest of the core mossy family and many others in an american concentration kid. American history tellers sponsored by amazon alexa. I'm building out a little wood shop in my garage. I find the work most enjoyable when the tool i need is right at hand. Organization is key. you can't say number two robertson and expect a screwdriver to just appear but with amazon alexa. You can get darn close. you could. 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Today that's ancestry dot com slash tellers while fred komatsu awaited trial with his family at the topaz relocation center in utah over one hundred ten thousand japanese americans and their descendants. The nikkei also face the grim reality of the american government's internment policy. Nearly seventy thousand of them were american citizens. Relocation centers says the government call them opened up as quickly as they could be built. They were constructed at fairgrounds and in desert locations at ten fran racetrack in san francisco and santa ana racetrack in los angeles horse. Stalls were converted into housing. Thousands of nikkei families were crowded into military sites scattered across eight states. A camps like healer river in arizona manson california living corners were bleak cramped dirty and poorly constructed green lumber used to build the wall shrank and gaps formed letting in wind and rain. Buildings were often hot in the summer and cold in the winter and nikkei families had been given precious little time to make arrangement for property or businesses left behind. It was devastating. Blow to the hard work of generations. Japanese-americans lost between one hundred and three hundred million dollars in property and income during interment round three billion. Today's dollars life in the camps was also regimented and difficult role was held twice a day. There were endless lines for bathroom and dining facilities but despite this. The nikkei did what they could to adapt. They decorated built their own. Furniture started clubs schools and held church services. They formed leadership organizations to meet with a military heads of camp an advocate for better quality food and housing in nineteen forty. Three general john dewitt. The architect of the united states term policy issued a formal questionnaire to the people in each camps. There were twenty eight questions designed to gauge. The intern nikkei's loyalty towards the united states. But as detainees read the forms became clear. There only two questions. That really mattered. One would you. As japanese detainee swear unqualified allegiance to the united states of america. And to would you faithfully defend the united states from any or all attack by foreign or domestic forces signatures were obligatory answering. Yes to these questions. Made some detainees eligible for release provided that the agree to settle outside the west coast. Sixteen thousand people were freed this way but the intern nikkei who answered no to both questions became known as no knows around. Fourteen thousand intern. People were branded as officially disloyal and sent to camp tuli lake. In northern california their conditions were harsher. The camp resembled a military prison with barbed wire and guard towers but leaders and organizers branded by the military as troublemakers from other camps. Were now all in one place. They could share stories and tactics. They grew bolder. Impressing from the rights. Prisoners went on labor in hunger strikes. Tensions grew high between the nikkei in the military guards who soon began to retaliate and their own ways. Magic late summer. Nineteen forty-three inside. One of the military barracks of the tuli lakes arrogation center. That's what the name is now. The change it from detention center to segregation center. It's probably the most truthful statement you've heard from the american government and months this room where you live with your brother and is about the size of to hayes. Valley garages from backing. Your san francisco hometown. It's the illusion of freedom but really it's just an open air jail. You're always being watched by the guards in the towers were by the mp's patrolling the chain link fence that separates your camp from the administration building coming this way. Your brother albert draws away from the door frame inside the barrel with you and your father. He looks nervous. What's with you. it's not your name that's on. The stock came list. You're trying to sound tough. You know judo you know how to handle firearms. But what do you do when the american military police are coming to put you in the tuli lake stockade. You might sound tough but you don't feel it. You did nothing wrong. Our families nothing wrong. We've never agitated at santa anita topaz. No we answer no and we did it twice this quieter brother momentarily all three of you. He your father and you refused to swear allegiance to a country. That had already locked you in a prison camp. Now you're here. Herded together with thousands of other japanese americans accused of disloyalty. But you did something worse once you got to lake. You started organizing trying to get better food than the slot. They serve twice a day trying to get better bedding materials for your elders to sleep on. Luther guard just trying to scare me. It's part of the new rules. But what if they kill you. Just shut up okay. I haven't done anything wrong. The guards have done things like this before. They've rounded us up. We're already in jail. Maybe i'm just going to a small one you know it's not much difference janaka. You don't move none of you move one of the officers steph century room. Guntalk yamanaka come with us. On what charge. You are being detained for questioning. We'll have you back soon. But i don't have a choice. Do i officer. Put some handcuffs around your wrists. These are for your security as your lead toward the waiting. Army truck outside brother stands. We are american citizens. Makes you wince. He's right but only technically maybe not even any in the back of the army truck at least fifteen other nikkei men huddle handcuffed like you are wearing tough faces to just like you are but not a one of you feels tough. You're all headed to the unknown in november. The army imposed martial law into lake redesignated as a segregation center. You became an armed camp with prisoner curfew. Barrack searches and the end of normal daily activities after months of repression hardship. The nikkei organizers turned themselves into camp authorities they were locked overcrowded army stockade within the camps they were interrogated and held with no hearing or trial. The army justify their imprisonment and arrest by describing them as troublemakers or with phrases like to well educated for his own good and definitely a leader of the wrong kind. Meanwhile one of the aclu's test cases had finally made its way to the supreme court. It was to challenge the arrest and internment of gordon here by the college student who had refused board and internment bus in washington chief justice. Harlan stone presided over the hearings. He and his eight fellow justices heard cases. Inside the court's new opulent home constructed in the nineteen thirties with wide. Expansive steps leading to a column neoclassical structure. Many noted that it resembled a greek temple more than a courthouse for his part chief. Justice stone thought. The building was pretentious. Complaining that is bombastic design was wholly inappropriate for a group of old boys such as the supreme court but it was in these regal new surroundings that in june nineteen forty three stone delivered the court's ruling in the matter of here by ashi versus the united states in a unanimous decision. The court upheld here by conviction for resisting. Military order court said his imprisonment was a protective measure. That us military had a right to implement. In his opinion chief. Justice stone wrote the basis of race could be used to intern citizens. In time of war he wrote residents having ethnic affiliations with an invading enemy. Be greater source of danger than those of a different country. Court's decision relied heavily on flawed and unproven. information gathered by general dewitt and the war department. In this moment in time of war the court had no desire to go against the military or the order of the white house but justice. Frank murphy concurring opinion read much more like a descent. He compared the country's treatment of japanese citizens to the treatment of jews and germany distinctions based on color ancestry are utterly inconsistent with our traditions and ideals. They are at variance with the principles for which we are. Now waging war following the decision gordon. Here by ashi was sentenced to a federal work camp in arizona. The court's decision was terrible. News from its endo and fred komatsu by the end of nineteen forty three. Both were still in turned into a to lake and komatsu at topaz but then a bit of good news came komatsu's way he'd received the united states loyalty questionnaire answered an enthusiastic. Yes to both questions. And after a few months he was granted a short term. Leave permit to salt lake city. He wouldn't have to leave at the topaz camp anymore. though he'd still have to check in periodically with authorities then a second piece of news arrived a federal court had upheld his conviction finding that the military's evacuation orders were constitutional and the government could arrest him for disobeying but was a silver lining in this decision. It meant his upheld conviction. Meant his lawyers could finally appeal now as he struggled to make a new life for himself in utah franco matsu would find his case headed to the supreme court by early nineteen forty four. The war overseas was still in full. Swing american troops were badly needed in the. Us government was getting ready to send. Its first japanese american soldiers to fight in europe. The year before the military had finally allow japanese japanese-americans to enlist nearly five thousand of them had signed up. They formed a special segregated unit. Call the four hundred forty second regimental combat team. They went on to become the most highly decorated unit of world. War two fighting critical battles in italy france and germany but even as japanese american troops were being killed abroad. Tens of thousands of japanese americans remained held in internment camps at home meanwhile the military's top brass was undergoing changes general. John dewitt who had helped launch the tournament camps two years before was replaced by general de las emmett's emmons had overseeing military operations in hawaii or more than a third. The population was japanese american unlike his predecessor. He didn't see people of japanese descent as inherently dangerous saboteurs or as disloyal simply because of their race general emmons felt that they should be released from the camps immediately but inside the roosevelt white house. Dewitt's internal policy continued to hold sway in january nineteen forty four. The war department released a copy of dewitt's final report to the public. This report was six hundred eighteen. Page rationale for what the government called its evacuation program. The document included a detailed summary of logistics along with charts tables and photographs. All of it insinuated. That japanese people were a threat inherently loyal only to their homeland citizens or not. They could not be trusted. On american soil. Do final report would become a key element for the arguments and fred. Komatsu supreme court case. Komatsu's lawyer wayne collins would use the report as printed evidence that the exclusion order violated several. Different constitutional amendments among these were the fourth amendment which protected against unreasonable search and seizure and the thirteenth which abolished involuntary servitude. In addition collins plan to argue the exclusion owner gave the united states military unlimited power to decide the fate of japanese-americans. But he was the courts not the military that should decide guilt or innocence by the fall of nineteen forty four. The supreme court would have a chance to make that decision itself. both komatsu and endo's cases would be heard at the same time mitsui and remained tuli lake with her family. Camp was still reeling from conflict between military guards and nikkei prisoners some of whom had engaged in work stoppages and other acts of nonviolent resistance. She was not able to make the trial. But fred had been given leave to move from salt lake city detroit. He took a job at a machine shop. Lived in a ymca and reported once a month to a probation officer. He was still living in detroit when the court began hearing arguments in clermont for the united states in october of nineteen forty. Four foot washington. Dc was a far away place from detroit and had been over two years since the japanese and tournament program had started. But after months of uncertainty fred's case was about to find a resolution one way or the other in a supreme court. American history tellers is sponsored by peniel if you have type two diabetes. Managing your blood glucose spikes is key deal glucose control is a safe and natural medical probiotic clinically proven to lower a c and blood glucose spikes and is designed for the dietary management of type two diabetes since people with type two diabetes have a reduced ability to break down fiber to manage blood glucose glucose controls patented probiotic. Formula helps the body's ability to metabolize fiber and maintain insulin and glucose balancing the gut in a clinical study people with type two diabetes experience a reduction in a one c and blood glucose spikes compared to placebo when using pendulum glucose. Control unlike off the shelf probiotics. With general gut health claims pendulum glucose. Control is a medical probiotic contains probiotics and prebiotics and it's backed by clinical rigor and real results annual glucose control is intended for the dietary management of type two diabetes. Talk your physician before taking pg see as it may not be right for everyone get twenty five percent off your first bottle now go to pendulum. Life dot com and use promo code tellers opening arguments and core matsu versus. The united states began on october eleventh. Nineteen forty four. The nine took their seats on a bench before courtroom crowded by lawyers tourists and interested spectators as planned fred. Core macy's lawyer wayne collins argue that the president's order did not technically give the military the authority to detain japanese-americans. The order had been issued without congressional approval. Furthermore the order was a violation of constitutional rights. It was motivated by racial prejudice rather than national security concerns. Charles fay a solicitor. General representing the government countered that. The president's order was not unconstitutional. Rather it was a valid exercise of the power. The constitution allowed for such action. Even though it restricted liberty because the action had been deemed a military necessity. Besides fahey told the justices that the case was not about the detention of all japanese-americans. It was simply about one man. Fred core matsu disobeying a military ordered during wartime. Fay he also the government in the previous years. Case against gordon here by archie and he would argue points against mitsui endo one day after komatsu's hearing so he was well prepared to defend the government's actions. He argued that the camps have been built to actually protect japanese-americans set free in the united states during wartime. Who knew what kind of racial hostility. They might face fahey. He offered many lines of defense for the government's term program but he failed turnover key pieces of evidence in june of nineteen forty two just five months after the bombing of pearl harbor. The japanese army had suffered crippling defeats at the battle of midway by nineteen forty. Three military intelligence was reporting that the army of japan no longer posed a threat to the american west coast. Would over one hundred. Ten thousand nikkei people had already been confined in detention camps and the government could not admit that the military had overreacted without losing credibility. No one outside the military new this information fahey was not about to let on that he knew so. After two days of arguments the government rested its case and wayne collins and the aclu lawyer sat back and held the breath on december seventeenth nineteen forty four. The us army announced that japanese americans would no longer be excluded from the west coast effectively ending the government's racial and termine policy. The had been in place for almost two full years the very next day. The supreme court upheld fred komatsu's criminal conviction writing for the six three majority this time with justice hugo black a franklin roosevelt appointee black. Wrote that the supposed danger of espionage justified the establishment of exclusion zones. Komatsu was not excluded from the military area because of hostility to him or his race. You was excluded because we are at war with the japanese empire. Black stressed that the court's ruling upheld the exclusion act itself but not the detention and internment camps that followed however he continued. Hardships are part of war. And war is an aggregation of hardships. Just frank murphy's dissent built on the critiques he'd made in the previous years here about yoshi case murphy attack the stereotyping on which the court's majority opinion rested. He wrote it was largely an accumulation of much of the misinformation half truths and insinuations directed against japanese americans. Fellow justice. Robert jackson dissented as well. He was frustrated by justice. Black's refusal to strike down the exclusion act itself and worried the decision. Senate troubling precedent for justifying racial discrimination. He added a dark warning for the future. The principal then lies about loaded weapon ready for the hand of any authority that can bring forward a plausible claim of an urgent need the same day. The supreme court also reached a decision in the end. Oh case unlike to hear about yoshi komatsu cases the court ruled in endo's favor it said that although the government may be justified in detaining other classes of citizens during wartime it had no right to hold conceivably loyal citizens because mitsui endo had pledged allegiance to the us. while working as a government employee. There was no authority to detain her. In his concurring opinion justice murphy added that the detention of japanese was an act of racism and utterly foreign to the ideals and traditions of the american people however for mitsui endo and others like her. The court's decision was academic. She'd won her case against unlawful imprisonment. The day after president roosevelt had the camps. By then she'd only been in prison for more than two years. The camps except for to lake would close by the end of nineteen forty five. The sixty one thousand japanese americans still intern at that time began the journey back to their homes. The government supplied them with twenty five dollars for train fare but many found there was no home to return to only the wreckage of abandoned property and businesses farms have been taken over by someone else. Homes had strangers living inside in nineteen forty eight. Congress approved payments more than thirty seven million dollars to settle claims from over twenty six thousand japanese americans who had been detained during the war. But for fred. core. Matsu and gordon hirabayashi. Their legal judgments would continue to haunt them. Komatsu retreated into private life. He got married had children and eventually move back to california but his criminal conviction hung like a yoke around his neck making it hard to get work memories of the case were painful to and he rarely spoke about them to anyone certainly not his children. It would take nearly four decades. The core matsu here by she would finally get a second chance of justice. Imagine it spring nine thousand nine hundred eighty two. You're a lawyer with a small private practice in oakland california. You also happen to be a third generation. Japanese american and a member of a small group called the bay area attorneys for redress or bar for short. Your group has been working for years to make sure japanese american internment is called out for the appalling civil rights violation at was right now. You're standing in a convenience store your office with a man from washington you grab a pack of gum secretly congratulating yourself. It's not a pack of cigarettes Why don't you quit god. is that obvious. Oh yeah telltale signs. I used to be a smoker myself. You're talking to peter irons. He's a young researcher about your age. And he's flown all the way out here from dc to talk to you about something. He recently discovered while going through the department of justice archive so the archivist was out sick that day and i feel just handling the box but i'm going through it or taking notes or anything started reading that i saw well so documents proving the ward of live life to the spring for everyone they destroyed files. You know when you call. It was like something out of a dream. I remember reading core monte. When i was in law school you shake your head and discuss. We were never a threat. My parents weren't a threat to this country. The komatsu decision was about power on justice. If once you told me on the phone holds up this huge. I think so i really do. We fred on board which is also huge. But it's been forty years still. I think especially around here enthusiasm behind us excited for you to meet the rest of the team team. We didn't think it was just gonna be you and me. We've got attorneys from san francisco from the asian law caucus from seattle portland. We might be young but we've got the legal firepower our grandparents never did peter's face breaks into a broad grin. that's fantastic. i just want you to know. I believe in this case. I'm glad we're going to work on it together. You feeling he's gonna fit right into your together. You're all going to try and tell a forty year old story the right way for the first time. In nineteen eighty-one. A researcher named peter irons uncovered evidence that the us government had presented false information to the supreme court. During monsoons case evidence had been altered to make it appear as if japanese americans were dangerous without any hard proof. The documents showed that john dewitt's reports in one thousand nine hundred eighty two which led to the passing of executive order nine zero six six were based solely on racial prejudice and conjecture later during fred core macy's nineteen forty four trial before the court. The government's lawyer. Charles fahey had the line fahey withheld naval intelligence documents that would have disproven to its reports along with the saboteur. Theories upheld the rest of the government's exclusion policy and oakland attorney name. Dale minami along with a team of lawyers many of whose parents and grandparents had been incarcerated during the war. Brought fred core case back to court in. Nineteen eighty-three fred cormack. Who was able to testify in front of a us district court now sixty four years. Old komatsu urged the judge to reverse his conviction not just for himself but for the entire nation. That same. racial discrimination komatsu reminded the court could happen to anyone. During any conflict judge. Marilyn potala agreed in her opinion she wrote that the government had deliberately omitted relevant information and provided misleading information. It's claim of military necessity for interment had been based on unsubstantiated facts distortions and representations of at least one military commander whose views were seriously infected by racism. The united states did not appeal. The decision which meant that fred komatsu's conviction was overturned in the years. That followed gordon here baio. She's conviction along with conviction to several other. Japanese americans were also returned as the decades passed the court's decision began to feel like a relic from a different era recent condemnation to the core matsu ruling. By chief justice. John roberts have done much to ensure the court position in a two thousand eighteen decision. Roberts wrote that. The forcible relocation of us citizens to concentration camps solely and explicitly on the basis of race is objectively unlawful and outside the scope of presidential authority. Komatsu was gravely wrong. The date was decided has been overruled in the court of history. But despite roberson nuncio nation the ruling itself has yet to be officially overturn to this day. The weapon the justice jackson feared in nineteen forty. Four is still voted on the next episode of american history. Tellers the court of chief. Justice earl warren establishes a pathbreaking series of rulings weighing in on some of the most consequential social and cultural issues of the erin from laundry. This is episode. Four of supreme court landmarks for american history tellers. If you like our show please give a five star rating and leave a review. Be sure to tell your friends. I also have two other podcast mine. Merican scandal american elections where he game subscribe on apple. Podcasts spotify the wondering app or wherever. You're listening right now. Join one replacing the one to listen at free. You also find some links offers from our sponsors and the episode notes. Supporting them helps us. Keep offering our shows for free another way you can support. The show is by a small survey wondering dot com slash serving. You can also find out and me on twitter and facebook. follow the show at. Ah tellers at lindsey graham and thank you for more information. On the japanese interment cases we recommend enduring conviction by lorraine k banai along with an justice for all john teddy american history. Tellers is hosted edited and produced by me. Lindsey graham for airship audio editing by molly bach sound design by derek barron's. This episode is written by. George ducker headed by dorian. Marina are executive producers. Are jenny lower beckmann and marshal. Louis created by her non lopez for wonder. Have you ever had a dream something you wanted so bad. You just couldn't let it go for a group of kids in harlem in the eighties. Their dream with change pop music forever. I'm raji hinson when i was growing up in. Dc there was a new sound. We will all listening to nonstop. It was a little bit of armed and a little bit of hip hop. And you couldn't help but shake your booty to it. We just knew something different. And everyone specially and we weren't going to let it go. It's a story of friendship and what it costs them like right before. It's too high note. Gunshot and the whole crowd splits the red sea from universal music. Comes jack premiering november. Seventeen on apple podcasts. Spotify the wondering at or wherever you get your podcast.

Komatsu us fred komatsu fred japan san francisco california amazon pearl harbor aclu mitsui endo komatsu Franklin roosevelt Dewitt washington forty year nineteen forty one year american government two week supreme court
The South Florida Morning Show hr 2  12-7-20

The South Florida Morning Show

41:32 min | 6 months ago

The South Florida Morning Show hr 2 12-7-20

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In heart healthy activity visit find exercise anywhere dot com and speak with your doctor to learn more about the risks of heart failure. The south florida morning show with jennifer. Ross in bill adams on news talk eight fifty w. mtl because we are american heart bleed red white and blue were. I think he was just as much on fire as we predicted during their rally. Yeah he was he was. He was very good covered. Everything you know what it was funny. It was almost watching a rally when he was running for the presidency because he reiterated everything that he gotten done and of course that is going to take it all away. So i was like okay but it was. It was like watching a rally from you know. Five years ago. I was like holy cow. Yeah it was I think in his mind and really technically he is. He's still campaigning. And now technically it was a campaign rally for leffler and purdue. I get that you know. And he did talk about them and i know what they fight for. They could tell you about david. I could tell you about kelly but it all tied in to the real danger facing eradicate democrats if they get power they will immediately abolish the senate filibuster allowing them to pass any bill. They want and giving them free rein to ram through the most extreme left-wing agenda ever conceived well at the same time destroying our military through a lack of funding. Made that case perfectly. It's so true you know what amazes me is then last night. They had a debate between kelly. Leffler in the guy. She's against this reverend This i had this man garnered any more than ten votes from like his immediate family is beyond me is is his parish like thousands deep. Do we know i. I've never seen him at the pulpit in his church is at a small church or is like a mega church. Well known reverend. I don't know how many did he get i. It's it's i would question everything from this state and pennsylvania and michigan and wisconsin and arizona. All of it but you listen to this man and what he says. I think the worst was. he said. You can't serve garden the military while you're in the military. What was that quote right yet. Kids serve in the military. What is wrong with him. He not busy with the marines. Motto is a lo- what their creed is he said. God first incredibly awful anti-cop messages to know another fake man of god you know jumping on exploiting the civil unrest. That happened early in the summer. Of course there. There was a ton of yeah. He's these nice and then they asked him. I guess the moderate i don't know who the moderator was but he said something about marxism would you denounce it. It's important because it was kelly leffler who asked him that directly at the enemy. You're gonna hear nothing because he said nothing. Will you denounce your support of marxism reverend warnock and your writings and teachings you've repeatedly praised marxism and the redistribution of income. Can you hear now for all georgians renounce socialism and marxism. Nothing dead air. Nothing i thought. Wow there's something wrong. He's not saying anything low. Nothing happened nothing and then just wouldn't flat out with an answer. We know why it's because no one calls them in the carpet. We'll have a real press anymore to call him on. This wouldn't even talk about the court packing. I'm wondering if you can answer the question. Do you support expanding the supreme court. I i'm really not focused on a really. You're not so that's how you get out of it. I'm really not focused on it. So that means oh. I can't answer because i haven't really paid attention to that subject book gets away with it because no-one no-one no-one press him and no one. I criticize him. Because we don't have a real real free press anymore. Which is that's the that's the cause of all this. And that's the scariest jets that causes the divide. That's the cause of these these crooks. These far left lunatics getting as far as they have so far is because we don't have a real media. It's it's it's horrifying. I mean you just look at anything that the they're saying now like they're saying a somebody even said that rudy giuliani. Getting covert was like Payback i was like back. Oh god yeah. Oh this celebration. That happened last night. Could you wish on any on anybody. I mean even my worst enemy at one harm to come damn cesspool twitter. This was like this was just under as far as importance to them. The fake biden win. This is the celebration of his. Oh absolutely that's what we're dealing with here. Oh yeah absolutely fuller mean that evil. It's gross their gross horrible. You know what whatever you project upon others should come back and get you. It's stopped doing that. Here's what's the worst thing though. It's not just them. It's not just like individuals who were like just off the off the handle. You know it's it's it's the cultural media now the talking points for the for the for the lefties which is like. Let's take saturday night live. That's just it's not funny anymore because don't have humor so they just didn't make fun of the whole skit making front of that melissa. Cerrone you know the michigan witness there. They they mocked the daylights out of her. Because you know she was getting some attention and pointing out the fraud nece. They mocked giuliani. They mocked the people in new york. Who are trying to save their businesses against lockdowns. They call them babies. This is what it is is what we're up against here Let me tell you. If i were a new york cafe owner like a shown i haven't been able to work or keep my company open or pay any of my employees for seven months. I probably walk over this and ellen beat the crap out all of them. Who the heck of these. You know what they're working even when they work work and they were getting paid because they were doing that that whole. Snl thing from home remember they did that on virtual thing and okay. They're all contracting. These are the new chosen cultural elites by the left and these are the elites and they're making fun of the peasants working class people. They are put down now right well. Let's take their money away and see what happens You know what is quickly as you get. It is as quickly as you can lose it. I can't stand that that bug-eyed guy whatever his name is butthole is him. Know what's his the davidson. I don't like him. Yeah he was the one the called Business owners babies. Nice lockdowns on nice. Fm good stuff happening with the next launch. Yesterday took a day delay happen. Yeah lebanon seventeen yesterday morning and the upgraded version of the spacex dragon. Cargo freighter took off. I think is Three point two tons of supplies loaded on top of it. Isn't that amazing. Wow so anyway took off. It was a picture perfect. It's going to meet up with the international space station sometime this afternoon. And it's gonna unload all cargo astronaut to get download. All the cargo isn't that cool. But spacex kudos to them kudos to them because they're making great strides in space exploration. Mars that one in boca chica. They did a little test. Ron one okay. That's a different rocket altogether. I don't know why they picked texas because texas is giving him a hard time about ruining the environment. Mike okay why would you build a. Yeah oh no. I'm like what's up with that. My fear is with all these companies come into texas like. It's great for their tax rolls. But i'm afraid texas is going to be like the california. It's getting there getting there. Maybe that's because the californians are moving to texas. That's what it is getting out of that state it's great these companies moved there but they bring thousands of california's with them. I don't know we had that conversation the other day i did you hear this. Jimmy buffett left florida. Did he really. He's gone see lego He's going either is Home in beverly hills or he has Apparently saint bart's island. He's got some kind of home there so he left sold his house in palm beach for seven point six million dollars. So jimmy's gone after all these years. And i think this is where he got his start. I mean florida's the reason. He was so successful from key west bars. You know then to you know obviously landed the biplane when he was a drug runner. Ama- remember. yeah that's not true. All about it didn't of course he did so good for him. he's leaving all right. Well i don't know i feel about that. I i am surprised you. Another rich guy bought his house. I don't know who bought the house. But he had seven point six million dollars. You could have bought it well. What the only way the best possible way you can meet your long lost. Dad meet him for the first time that the classic with this is dad had no idea. That's the funny part about it. We'll give you t dressed up as a very famous elf. Had no clue. We got that good news story of the day and the least on. Stop the deal. Big deal happening with the voting machines and michigan. We'll talk about that. And the supreme court next these south florida morning show general queued here morning moving right along in fact we got rapid fire news coming up in minutes care and you get the news. We have the comments. What's going on. Actually it's the anniversary of pearl harbor days right summer. Seventh forget. don't forget well. My mother was visiting me in hawaii. We were in the safeway grocery store on december seventh. She started taking over fifty one percent of the people in a wire japanese. Well true they remember to clean up all night. Yeah anyway but yeah. The governor's has the flags flying at half staff on our state and local government buildings. So your time living in hawaii though. Is it like a touchy subject to bring up in public with so many japanese americans or i mean i put avoid it really yeah. It's not like you'd be. Hey how you doin'. Could i get a lottery ticket. How about that. Pearl harbor Yeah well actually go to pearl harbor and visit thing. It's very intense. Yes but i haven't seen it is the zona. Is it still leaking oil. They said like ripping oil studio. Yeah it's amazing though In nineteen forty one day. They live lymphomas right more coming up on rapid fire. Wow thanks gary. So muddles drew. Though because we're losing civil world war two vets told the story thankfully a lot of them are the in the modern age. We've had so many documentaries about it. We have their stories forever. Thank god yeah. we've had some man from alabama. He just got released from the hospital the day before hundred. Four th birthday. Got that coming up. Oh do you how about that. How do you like fast as a special little Thing he just beat to is an amazing. It's amazing it's like oh my goodness one hundred and four and he's still alive. Let's start there as so it's good news heart and it's good news for rudy giuliani. To look at that as an influence route has got the vid. Apparently hospital stay overnight but the doing fine while in you know what he could get regeneron. If need be a friend of mine has been in the hospital for pro probably close to two month and a half now ventilator who can't get regeneron. they tried. That was one of the key story kind of went away. Member in the with the president talked about regeneron right there are very few doses of it available out there but i would bet you that route. He's gonna get some you. I i would bet to. Considering it was the president. Wasn't it the president's tweet that told the world that we had covert nineteen So he's in. Maybe it's just an abundance of caution. They put him in the hospital. I don't know because it just tweeted out last night. Still keeping up with everything he can do everything remotely two. So we'll see what that but his partner. Jim ellis at something fascinating to say. Antrim county michigan. I don't know where exactly that is in the state but they have confiscated and impounded. The dominion voting machines were given the rights by a judge. I didn't like the trump team to forensically. Look at all the evidence in the machine so their team of experts flew there and they were given a certain time line to take a look at this at the results of it should be out if not today tomorrow. So if you remember this is the county that had this switch of six thousand votes. From president trump to joe biden and that was an unexplained and so called glitch and so our team is going to be able to go in this morning at about eight thirty and will be there for about eight hours to conduct that forensic examination and we'll have the results in about forty eight hours and that'll tell us a lot about these machines at interview from yesterday so they should have been done last night. Get this the interim county sheriff's office said they this coming through the trump team again do so many threats to the forensic and technical experts. They gave them complete police protection from there on out to their transportation. Getting back home with information. Isn't that scary. That baton itself speaks volumes. It does by the way and trim county is in northwest michigan. It sits on lake michigan. It's not far from mackinac island. Actually it's way up there so it's it's probably a. I would assume if since the judge ruled in their favor. It's a heavily republican county. It's the only way they got us machines because they weren't going to get him out of detroit. That's for sure. Yeah exactly that's right so we'll see i don't know we shall see there's another story out now about where. County georgia dominion. I don't know where where county is that the from whatever it is a very small county dominion machines reportedly seized there and some of the results are coming out small amount of machine small county but still equal number of trump and biden votes forensically analysed machines reported eighty seven percent for trump which would be good for trump right right except they also reported one hundred thirteen percent for biden. How many people voted. I don't know how we're going to find news or how many people voted six seven tie. Yeah that's the statistics that impossible. It would be a problem. Yes so you need to go back and look at your machine. Just saying or you mentioned Karen mention it's pearl harbor day and you said the story about one hundred four year old guy that yeah celebrating. His birthday is obviously world. War two vet. But here's what else he did. He beat covid at one hundred four. Oh it's amazing that that's awesome. Is he from. Allah was at alabama. believe it's alabama. I saw this story. This weren't as like this is the great thing in the world absolutely outstanding world war vet obviously Beat it just. It's andrew celebrate hundred four granddaughter. Talk to the local news about the entire story. Champi is he just brings so much happiness to everybody and just seeing everybody and their reaction to him. It makes you very proud to call your grandfather. And i just love him so much a wheelchair out. That's awesome that great. That's that's the to really really good. That made me that made the caucus of my heart warm. Thank you so very much cockles. Yeah those worth. I don't know if we can say that. By the way this movie as you surprised neither one of you commented about the cockles of my heart but more importantly about the shirt. I'm wearing knowing that. I hate this movie i saw. I don't hate it. it's just. We'll i like. We'll fairly just. I mean he just act so talking. You elf the movie. I don't i don't hate it. I just found one of my favorites. Hope you find your done. Any greatest a guy in made and he looks like he's in his late twenties. He's not young. I mean by any might be thirty at that He recently tracked down his biological father how he did one of those ancestry dot com things. You're an ancestry dot com whenever they get a match to you like a hit. They notify you that. Hey we found somebody that you know has your dna well. The guy finds out that his real father is like somewhere in california. This guy lives in maine so they decide to meet for the very first time that this happened at thanksgiving so it's a little bit late but still so the guy decides since i'm gonna meet my dad for the very first time. I'll dresses buddy the elf. Aw like will ferrell's character And he meets his dad at the airport singing a song. This is that what buddy the elf does it's the season and better to wreak your dad dad then the l. Let's go okay now. Here's the problem he gets out of the car. And he's holding a sign saying hi dad. And he's dressed his buddy. The albany singing these dancing. The father has never seen the movie. No idea has no idea l. dancing and singing at the airport on like it now. If that were your son and you are meeting for the first time i turn right back around book new flight and get the hell out of there because otherwise you think i thought would be. This has been one entire joke. I've been pranked his cameras somewhere. This is a joke. Oh you're right. What the guy saw the movie. Well well-liked proudly figured everybody's seen them. Even i don't like the movie and i've seen it two or three times forced to watch it. Here's the rest went. Nope i'm leaving. Wow i'd be out of there. What a free. Oh my god. I di di all right well together and they enjoyed these young rapid fire news coming up next guarantee at all. The news is a lot of tune will chime in. Keep it here next morning. Show this gina bill. Seven thirty time for china. Bills red fire with karen curtis on news. Talk eight fifty at t. L karen has all the news. we've had a whole weekend at load up on it. We get to chime in. What are you starting off with. Wow we just talked about the fact that today's december seventh and we just wanted to remember is pearl harbor day and the governor says to everyone to fly flags at half staff in steve doing it. I know boy did standards has his act together. As right. how you that right now. We're under flood advisory this morning until about eight eight o'clock and it looks like vermont outside right. It's weird looking out. Yeah it does look like it's gonna snow it does so temperatures would and sixty go in the fifty. It's know it'll warm up and then the temperature's going to drop dramatically so once the rain goes away then. The cold front moves so be in the forties marnie. They're saying they're saying wednesday night. It could be like thirty eight degrees in my house. Lord shouldn't the polar express down to work. I can't wait. I love it when it's like that to the animals he'll do. I can't get my and my dogs and they won't come out come on guys well rudy. Giuliani says he feels. Okay battling purna virus. He's at the georgetown hospital. Remember thursday. he's seventy six. He was georgia asking state lawmakers to overturn the election. And they said no no. No you gotta do it in the court so they went to the courts and now the georgia legislature wants to convene to come up with their own electors anywhere. They're getting fought tooth and nail by the secretary of state. Ruffle burger or whatever. His name is and brian kemp. It's these it's these wimpy rhino republicans there the problem. I don airey. I don't know if you watched the daniel horowitz was on last night with The great one mark levin. He just laid out exactly what's going on. I heard that was like outstanding presentation. All the fraud sena but i heard it was great. I'm trying to get him for you because it just made perfect sense the way he laid it out. I'm like oh my god. How can you ignore this. But you can't it's la- amazing. Did you notice. We were talking about this before. Janet were saying the the photos word that all the media sycophants all were ordered to run with was baseless. So we can base was in every report baseless so it went from widespread not widespread to baseless and no evidence. No evidence all. There's evidence alright. Movie gone superintendent. Dr donald fano Says the rapid antigen tests that can detect covid. Nineteen within fifteen minutes is now available. Pilots county schools. It was supposed to be available right after thanksgiving like delay. There's twelve thousand tests so that your kid is okay. Goes to school and then goes downhill at school. You can go to our website and fifty w. dot com signed the consent form there I have it linked but They can test your kid than at school to see this wonderful. Bet that way you can figure out if it's flu or whatever the case may be now if you have other siblings that also are in the same family. Everyone needs to stay home by the way that they did that. At one of the schools in morton county they were twins in one of them got it and the other didn't the one that didn't stayed in school Got eventually got his. I guess so. I don't know if you watched last night i did. I thought it was fascinating. The debate between senator kelly law floor and our seo wore knock. It seemed like he talked more than she did. But she one and she is. She was very well rehearsed here. She is talking about the november. Third election vitally important. That georgians trust our election process and the president has every right to every legal recourse. And that's what's taking place. Of course. He said that she bought her seat. She didn't get elected she was And here's worn out here. We are several weeks after the election. And kelly leifer continues to cast doubt on an american democratic election. I love these are the people that chas doubted election for four years through all they did was claimed russia interference. And now they don't want to hear about your cast any absolute clowns. They're absolute corrupt clouds that entire party. They're all criminals are really good point. meanwhile georgia democrats senate jon. Ossoff was standing at a podium by himself because he said that his opponent Would not sure up david purdue. And here's what he said. Senator purdue. I suppose doesn't feel that he can handle himself in debate or perhaps is concerned that he may incriminate himself. Okay ossoff's and other left wing loonies. A nuttal dangerous is the one. They're both dangerous room debate. You think i think you should. I think you should too. I think we're not though is part of one of these dc abrahams oyo has set up this whole debacle with the election allege no base fraud older far far left leftist socialist absolutely so the elections january fifth. We'll see what happens from my god Senate minority leader chuck schumer urging congress to pass the nine hundred billion dollars over to relief. Built nancy pelosi's all four. Now that biden's won the election allegedly aaliyah. I think that they should not take their salary until his past fish should not be able to go on vacation. Now take a break. This you paid nothing here Coming up on rapid fire. Woody do punch bear in the face if they had your dog in. Its run after that. Yeah this guy is crazy. Time for your eight fifty. Wfl traffic and weather together. Two lanes blocked ninety five southbound at congress avenue rain causing poor visibility and slick pavement so slow down and watch your traveling distance. Wpa first alert weather. Temperatures starting off the low sixty s and rain and then once that moves through. We have some flooding as well this afternoon. Highs in the low seventies colder temperatures tomorrow night ended the forties and thirties actually wednesday night. John says right now. Sixty one degrees and rainy in the palm beach is back to rapid fire back to rainy weather. But then it's going to get cold again and they would have to find your cold weather outfits in your closets. They're probably a little wrinkly and stinky. So you need to take care of that. You need to call and connect with ozone to echo drycleaners featuring free pickup and delivery to find out about it also to usa dot com all right back to rapid fire. Floyd mayor Mayweather junior is coming out of retirement. Kind of he's going to have an exhibition match against a youtube star. logan paul. who's that that's really. Yeah youtube kid. That beat the tar. Out of wasn't nate robinson. At that exhibition he was on the The undercard of the tyson thing. Okay this is so stupid so wait a minute. Boxers coming out of retirement zander. Holyfield fight tyson for scenes money and he laughed. I heard that but he he had two hundred fifty million dollars and he lost all of it out how you lose tour guide or no but he added so i guess he had this huge home and lord this i just think this is so ridiculous ogm paul has no business being in the same ring even the shopping center as whether junior i mean. Give me a break. Goodness is such a publicity stunt smokeless. He did turn out to be way better of an athlete than anybody thought for. Sure he actually. I mean he walks he he can't he hasn't chops meet again. He was going against nate robertson. So maybe you know he looks a lot better than you normally would but still. Hey not not even close. I mean it's it's it's a money. Grab no make money off of it. Because he's a big youtube star and destroy mayweather so it's all about money but hey i guess speaking of haymakers this guy in california's dog is alive because he did a punch the three hundred fifty pound bear in the what you said jen. The eye mouth i will. The dog's head was inside. The bears mouth. He looked out the window. He heard noises. His name is taylor batum and he said he heard growl then. You saw the bear dragging buddies beloved dog away by the head little so he jumped on this bear punched repeatedly in the face and then finally started punched in the eye and the barrel pundits mouth and let the dog loose. The dog ran away. The guy matt thank god. The bear went runaway. He didn't tell you about the four hours of surgery. The dog needed that they were closed. The almost died as driving him to the vet. But he's going to be fine them all kinds of about adrenaline kick it. It really was but now somewhere someway barest on his story and it goes like this so i was having lunch and this guy comes out of his punches me in the eyes of the hell is a venomous nervous because the bear has come back since the attack and he said he's willing to die for his dog these crazy. I love my dogs too. But i don't think i'm fighting at three hundred and fifty pound fail to the situation. I know i'm running. Hi i'm a win guy. We had a couple of weeks ago when the pond. He's still had a cigar in his mouth and he saved the from the allegations of his feet. Long still war still a gaiter gate. If you have any desire to punch you bear. You need to watch the movie on netflix. back country. I told you about it. It's the one where a boy friend and girlfriend go out in the woods and he's going to propose during a bear eats a did she take the ring still hoti. Yeah okay. you don't have to watch it anymore. See still took the ring. Didn't the ring yup me. Buffet finished with florida. But we were sunny there for a while. That was your yacht rock. Oh i did that again. Over the weekend. I drove palm beach so pretty. They're saying that they're looking for schools for barron. Now lock up the girls. Everybody gets these fourteen year old six nine six six six probably soon to be seven feet school school. Probably that one over there. Why is he going to go to school now. Well that's just in case they don't win the backup food anyway. Jimmy buffett's leaving florida said He sold his palm beach mansion for six point. Six million. did you buy jember. Yeah he's my pocket change to the by jewish voice. Sure don't worry he's still got a. He's got a crib. In beverly hills in saint bart. I'm not too worried about him. I don't know if he's just downsizing repeat pissed off at florida. I don't know it's weird. It's odd that he just get pay taxes. Earning here must be better than anywhere else. Yeah you wouldn't expect a guy like that to leave. I guess when you make that much money to texas don't matter are imagine. i got enough. Write offs house. Margherita volvo can't afford. It can't afford a hamburger and margarita. Bill that's bad you've been any more reveals meals that they're building. Not a restaurant like the towns. There's one expensive. All i joined do when they first mentioned him. What three years ago. Remember drill and i sit around going to sign up. Cheap ones are like two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. They're not cheap Moving on real quick the mystery of the monolith and red rock desert see. I think art is you know is all about perception that creates value shorts. You can have a crash like modern art right. you'd has stories and all that crap anyway. Some group apparently What are they called the mo. The most famous artist group taking credit for this global fascination. They're fake news They're selling them for forty five thousand dollars. A delivery takes to four weeks to get one of these monoliths. Didn't one up in london. I i think that's a crossword showed up their artists looking money. Dolphins gotten a big fight. Three dolphins ejected. Apparently they roughed up the punt returner and the head coach almost got in a fight. Brian flores dolphins so crystal make the playoffs. They're eating for one hundred percent. Actually your favorite make the playoffs and have much more on that story into my dose of diener today always with a next all the chiefs. And they're going to win. They are yes. They're going gonna be candidates. What's wrong today on fox. a malkin. the right. I don't care where they're playing rock in miami on at once to keep track of what sorry. I know my music is going to run out but i have to get it in college. Football see law and clemson roll cover lords. Who did their dodger tied. Rolled over ohio over. Lsu ohio state rolled over michigan state. Rocky lombardi sucks not good at all. He got benched. Texas am beat auburn. I don't know if you saw masters champion. Dustin johnson yours green jacket duty royal join college game day depicts the teams that win and he picked his alma mater coastal carolina. Great game yeah. That's quite a story defeated. Byu and byu was down by five. Yep and they threw a pass. The one got tackled at the one with no time left on the clock. Line of Threw him down. It was it and so the green jacket thing. You could just wear it anywhere. I i wear it everywhere. Wear it every day. I didn't know that no actually got the delicious. Usually most of the golfers like what like an a be on it. I'd have dog hair terrible. Well didn't john daly masters once. Yeah imagine his really doesn't stains cigarette. Smells like a pipe. Fire pluck radios coming up next. Yeah they found another model at this morning he has. I love white next. I'm telling you it's artists. He aliens have found europe. Now we've got that coming up. What's the latest and stop this deal. Here's a big decision coming up in The supreme court and in michigan. It's coming up next sale florida morning. Show this janna. Bill really is kind of a yucky day. You're wp tv. First alert forecast. It's gonna rain through most of the day and then by late this afternoon. The rain stops behind it a cold front. We're looking at a high of seventy four but once the cold front passes tonight's lows near forty nine tomorrow through friday plenty of sunshine high tomorrow sixty five right now. Sixty two in lake park by law. I would say. I lost. And i go to florida and take it easy and i go around and i said i did a good job but you can't ever except when they steal and ray and rob favorite part of that is i'd go around and say did a good job search msci. Hey you know. I did a great job walking down worth avenue. Yeah yeah yeah. I did a great job. I did a great job. But he's not done yet and that should tell you if he still had any doubt in your mind whether he's going to like keep fight this to the end or nod They're cleared up everything. He's is no possible way. in fact i don't know maybe reading too much into this but we've paid very close attention over the past five years now to this guy's every move whenever he knows something. There's like a wink. There's a nod the way he writes something as he presents. It and there was a point in time on a lower there. He caught it he was you know like he always does like halftime in the speech at the rally he makes fun of the the media right crew back there because they were so happy. They were jumping up and down with joe. They've been so epi they may not be so happy in a couple of weeks and i wound that like three times. Oh what does he know that we don't know and why three weeks i don't know i don't know 'cause three weeks what what's the deal. Okay so it'd be before christmas. Yeah early christmas present by the way. That's the other two year a lot of talk in the mainstreams about this december. Eight th deadline and then the fifteenth l. arbitrary. It's not constitutional the only date. The matters is january twentieth right. He's may not be is tight deadlines as you think. Those are traditional yes interesting. yeah you know what. It's it's amazing what we again. It's a civic lesson for us. That's right because it's like. I always thought you know their election day you. You ran all the votes on election day. You had a president by that night or the next morning. apparently that doesn't exist anymore. So if you live in michigan you can vote for days. Speaking of that so Big decision sunday afternoon late sunday afternoon from supreme court justice samuel alito. He moved up the deadline for the supreme court to make a decision on this pennsylvania lawsuit to tomorrow and not wednesday now. The pennsylvania lawsuit is about how the elections people there Kind of went around the state legislature went straight to the state supreme court to get the supreme court to say sure. You can count ballots for five days after november third Legally the state legislatures who makes all the election laws. Also just to have mail in ballots in there. They're not they were never approved by the legislature. That's there their unconstitutional. According to their state supreme court while everybody saying the constitution saying true. But everyone who's ever. Who's in the legal world. I mean in these are brilliant minds not ours especially not mine that say it's basically cut and dry you can't go around the state legislature and a change election law. They have to do it so it maybe alito sped it up so they could get an answer quicker which means anything after nine o'clock on november third o'clock whenever there polls closed in pennsylvania doesn't count right exactly unless the other speculation. We've heard from some of the legal experts that says the supreme court just doesn't want they don't want to get involved with this bet. Wanna get involved. You want overturn. They don't want riots in the street so they'll wash their hands of it. So maybe that's what he's gonna do. I don't know i don't know. How can you ignore that now. Yeah i know state law. They're going against the state law. It's scary and they. I hopefully elitist gonna say they're gonna take the case and then they're gonna come down with the ruling in the near future. Boy i hope so. And then it's up to state legislature. So you got arod. Listen to this. I thought this was a joke. I era zona. the state legislature. There wants to gather convene decide. You know decertify. The electoral votes decide their own. Right well speaker of the house rusty bowers last night in arizona. He decided he's going to close the arizona house for a week. Why then of course. That's because rudy giuliani. Was there a couple of weeks ago. Isn't that convenient or last week. Yeah in that convenient they're gonna use covid. Nineteen is there. Choose for everything. Of course they are so the legislators say well we're going to beat anyway. We'll do it online if we have to. Wow good for them. Isn't that unreal though. Well no i. You know what it's it's like think of the dirtiest of politics and then go even deeper go of lower. That's what they come up with every single time. We're learning at all now it really is. It's it's kind of. It's it's so scary. How long has stuff like this. Been going on bradley. For years and years i forever. Wow forever look at. They tried it in two thousand eighteen. Come on yeah. You're right right here in our backyard. But they got caught well. Big news of the day. A fourth monolith. Jeez this time on the isle of wight in the uk yes fourth monolith similar to the ones found in the utah desert in romania was found in the isle of wight sunday mental objects spotted by local on the island on the south coast of england over the weekend. The aliens down only a planted this right there and the famous grounds of the isla white. Go now we're drawing a pattern here well shortly before that community of artists known as the most famous artist posted. A picture of the monolith on their instagram account said these artists from across the globe. Pam who said that Two weeks ago just thought. I'd throw that in there. Why do you think that's true. Is a a group of artists a group of artists who were claiming that They they're responsible for this thing. they know. Well here's the thing they they make a gift. And they say that the previous four were there's and the cash them in for millions they're cashing in for forty five thousand dollars if he would like when they will make it for you know so they call themselves stunt artists. I'm just saying that's what they're taking responsibility for it. Yeah while the aliens are going to them. I trying to take credit for their stuff. What that is. There's no aliens. Billy joel via pearl harbor day. Let's not forget about that of that. In memory of that a world war two vets is one hundred four and he beat cove it. It's a feel good story coming up next. Love this man. The latest on the stop the steel here. What's happening in one michigan county. It's coming up next morning. Show this bill here fan but it said missed a worldwide. And i'm here to tell you about my new podcast from negative to positive route to you but my friends over state farm. I believe that the has success. You've got play the game so the game is a play you you know. The biggest risk takers not taking one is very important that you make sure you can make the most at of your money especially when it comes to insurance state farm offer surprising great rates. They have great agent standing by helping you. Personalize your coverage. All this is backed up by award winning easy use technology. It's a great price with an even greater service when you want to read you like a good name state farm down. You know what this is a commercial right and you know what that means. Time for snack raw. I want you to do some heart. Healthy exercise yes you try. Some seated like extensions right now just lift each leg up and extended straight one at a time. Six to eight times. I can do that. 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regeneron michigan texas biden six million dollars supreme court pearl harbor bill adams eight fifty w rudy giuliani kelly leffler reverend warnock florida south florida safeway grocery store fifty one percent alabama nineteen forty one day california two month
(Rebroadcast) Citizen Kane (1941) w/ special guest Ted Walch

Classic Movie Musts

1:31:52 hr | 6 months ago

(Rebroadcast) Citizen Kane (1941) w/ special guest Ted Walch

"I'm max parrilla and this is classic movie musts where every week we break down a classic movie while looking to provide artistic insight and historical context at the very least. We'll talk about what makes these movies classics. Classic movie must releases every friday. Ready to complement your weekend movie. Viewing plans classic movie. Musk's is supported by listeners. Like you if you want to help support the show. I thank you so much and second head on. Over to patriotdepot dot com slash classic movie musts every patriots subscriber. Cool perks and ways to engage with the show including the opportunity to vote every month on a movie. They'd like to hear discussed on the show. All it takes is one dollar per month. A huge thank you to our current patriots subscribers. You make this show possible. You can read about our support. Here's and the rewards over at patriotair dot com slash classic movie musts. Thank you for joining me this week. As we discussed the orson welles masterpiece citizen kane in this episode during our feature presentation. We welcome back. Ted walsh to discuss the myriad things citizen kane does so well but first let's get into this week's opening credits are film. This week is citizen kane which was directed by or wells and was released in nineteen forty one citizen kane stars orson welles and features just cotton dorothy common gore agnes moorehead and everett sloane for your streaming ease. Citizen kane is available for rental on itunes. Youtube and google play in a mansion called xanadu vast palatial estate in florida. The elderly charles foster kane played by. Orson welles is on his deathbed holding a snow globe. He utters a word rosebud and then dies the globe slips from his hand and smashes on the floor a newsreel obituary tells the life story of cain an enormously. Wealthy newspaper publisher. Kane's death become sensational news around the world and the newsreels producer tasks reporter jerry thompson with discovering the meaning of rosebud thompson sets out to interview canes friends and associates. He tries to approach susan. Alexander kane played by dorothy common gore now an alcoholic who runs her own nightclub but she refuses to talk to him. Thompson goes to the private archive of the late banker. Walter parks thatcher played by george and through thatcher's written memoirs thompson learns that kane's childhood began in poverty in colorado in eighteen. Seventy one after a silver mine is discovered. On her property. Canes mother mary kane played by agnes moorehead sends charles away to live with thatcher. So it he would be properly educated. It's also clear that cane's mother wants to get charles away from his father who has violent tendencies while thatcher. Charles parents discuss arrangements inside. The young charles plays happily with a sled in the snow outside his parent's boardinghouse and protests being sent to live with thatcher furious at the prospect of exile from his own family to live with a man he does not know the boy strikes with his sled and attempts to run away years later after gaining full control over his trust fund at the age of twenty five. Cain enters the newspaper business and embarks on a career of yellow journalism. He takes control of the new york enquirer and starts publishing scandalous articles that attack thatcher's business interests after the stock market crash in nineteen twenty. Nine kane is forced to sell controlling interest of his newspaper. Empire back to thatcher back in the present thompson interviews. Kane's personal business manager. Mr bernstein played by everett sloane bernstein recalls how cain hired the best journalists available to build the enquirer's circulation. Cain rose to power by successfully manipulating public opinion regarding the spanish american war by marrying emily norton the needs of the president of the united states. Thompson interviews. Kane's strange best friend. Jedidiah leland played by joseph cotten in a retirement home leland. Recalls how canes marriage to emily disintegrates more and more over the years and that he began an affair with amateur singer susan alexander while he is running for governor of new york both his wife and his political opponent discover the affair and the public scandal ends his pulled out colt career. Leland asked to be transferred to a newspaper in chicago kane. Mary susan and forces her into a humiliating operatic career for which he has neither the talented nor the ambition. Even building large opera house for her leland begins to write a negative review of susan's opera. Debut cain fires him but finishes the negative review and prince it. Back in the present. Susan now consent to an interview with thomson and recalls failed opera career. Cain finally allows her to abandon her singing career after she attempts suicide and after years spent dominated by kane and living in isolation xanadu. Susan leaves kane. Kane's butler raymond recounted. After susan leaves him. Cain begins violently destroying the contents of her bedroom. He suddenly calms down when he sees a snow globe and says rosebud thompson concludes that he is unable to solve the mystery. And that the meaning of kane's left word will forever remain an enigma. back xanadu. canes belongings are being catalogued or discarded by the staff. They find the sled on which the eight year old. Cain was playing on the day that he was taken from his home in colorado deeming. At junk they throw it into the furnace as the sled burns the camera reveals trade name ignored by the staff rosebud. Citizen kane had a budget of eight hundred and forty thousand dollars and a box office hall ultimately of one point six million but that was only after a rerelease years later adjusted for inflation. It's a budget fourteen million dollars in a box office hall of around twenty seven million citizen kane received nine oscar. Nominations winning only one. It won the academy award. For best original screenplay share between herman make wits and orson welles it was also nominated for best sound recording best music best film editing best cinematography best art direction. Best actor for orson welles. Best director for orson welles and best picture and of course citizen kane is currently ranked number one on. Afi's one hundred greatest movies of all time. Now let's talk rosebud because it's time for our feature presentation joining us for today's feature. Presentation is ted walsh. You know him from two previous episode one on the kid one on casa blanca. Two of my favorite episodes ted. Welcome back to the show. It's an honor. It's great to be back next. This is this is the big one. We're talking citizen kane today. And i feel like you're the only person who could really sit opposite me here to break it all down. Thank you for that. Although i approach it with humility that every time i get near this movie. I'm ashamed that. I can't do better by I'll give it my best shot though. I appreciate that humility. Because i you know. We're this'll be episode. Forty three forty four classic movie musts. And i feel like it's taken me. Forty some odd episodes to build up the courage to kind of take on this movie as you say not because this movie is perfect by any means will talk about the aura that surrounds this movie but just because of the expectations that kind of come along with it and and i'm glad i'm glad to have you as my company and those expectations are a intimidating. When i teach to high school kids and i understand you. Just talk. This week i did. I just go to eighty five kids. Okay and i ha- i feel compelled to announce at the beginning. This movie is considered to be the greatest movie of all time. It's in a fight with vertigo. Which we're going to get to later in the course yada yada yada and all of them after it's over go well. How is that the greatest movie of all time. Now i liked it or i didn't like but how is it the greatest movie and then we try to we try to get inside it and talk about how it came to be known that way. Is it the greatest movie of all time. That's an absurd statement. Any movie yeah. We shouldn't be talking that way. No and i think if we can just say citizen kane is just another movie. Let's talk about it that way. I feel that after the conversation. Its greatness will emerge on. Its own very well put. And i'm glad you kind of start that way off the bat. Now this was unplanned but right before we started recording. You hit me with kind of a metaphor for this movie. And i had planned. Hit you with a metaphor. yours is maybe perhaps a little bit more apropos. I'm gonna start with mine. You're going to then share yours. I think of this movie as a labyrinth with no center. I think that's perfect. I think that is a beautiful way to describe this movie. I look on his as a jigsaw puzzle with some missing pieces. Okay i like it. I think we've said the same essentially saying the same thing. Right exactly excellent. So we're on the same page. Yes we are. We can end the episode. Now that's it done. And i want to add one thing to this that i hope can over not override. But be in. Everybody's mind as we about this movie. And that is to remember that. Orson welles came to this movie at age. Twenty four having never made a movie a having worked extensively in theatre be and extensively in radio drama. See those two skills the skills that he learned in theater and in radio really make this film much more than the visual masterpiece that it always gets talked about being One experiment i do with an audience is you can understand ninety five percent of citizen kane the story with your eyes shut and the only thing you're not going to understand with your eyes shut is the secret of rosebud. Everything else is handed to you on a silver platter. Just like in radio drama. So i just want us to keep that in mind as we talk yes. I'm glad you said that. The back. Because i think as episodes go we will certainly be turning to the sound of music. The whole sound design landscape quite a bit in this movie and send you talked about rosebud right off the bat. I wanted to bring that up as i'm sure it will also come up. I'm sure everything we talk about. Today's going to resurface throughout the episode. So you know. Are we allowed to do. We have to do a spoiler alert about rose butter. We're gonna talk about it now. It will have already been spoiled in our opening credits you. Lucy said to charlie brown and the famous four strip peanuts episode. She just walked up to a rosebud. Sled i mean and we all know that person exactly. So you're fully expected to know not to have seen the movie so rosebud in my labyrinth metaphor. i think it's kind of beautifully frustrating throughout this movie which is right off the bat. We're we're stimulated with this mystery. What is rosebud. and it's it's ultimately. What makes this movie so great watching it and what kind of stimulate the conversation around it as you already alluded to with your own students because throughout this movie you can't help but ask what is rosebud or who is rosebud who is charles foster kane and then because of the place that this movie holds in the film. Canon of history is this. The greatest movie of all time is just an extremely important movie. And what makes it an import such an important movie. Or what makes it the greatest movie of all time if he's already said we don't particularly believe that it can be the greatest. That's that's not really the terminology. One should apply to art but it's that aura of mystery and frustration and ultimately given the fact that we find out that rosebud is the sled at the end. We hope that there is equally a simple answer to who is charles foster kane. Yes this is the greatest movie of all time. And it is because orson welles a complete genius right well all right. And here's here's the beauty from me. They they seduce you at the very big he seduces you at the very beginning of the movie thinking that if we can find out the answer to rosebud we will have solved the mystery but as you say this is a labyrinth with no center because even when we do find out the answer to rosebud it does not explain everything. It only explains something. Maybe it explains nothing. It's just there so we have been taken in a sense on a ride but it's been a fascinating ride to me the most valuable lesson that this film offers to any of us is that we can never really know each other. We can never really know about another human being. We can never really understand who you are. You will always be a mystery to end to yourself. that's to me. Is the beauty of this movie i. We're waxing poetic here. Sorry no it's it's great. I like it. I mean it was very well. It was very well put as you say from the very beginning we are taking on this ride of what is rosebud and i would say. And i'm sure you'd probably agree with me that it starts even before that and so let's begin at the beginning all right very good place to start and thanks sorry but to me you know how by the way what you just said pertains to citizen kane. Who was the editor robert wise direct. There you go onto music okay. Sorry it's all working on a subliminal level here perhaps. it's all very freudian. Orson welles describes his cane as dollar book. Freud and he said that's how i understand freud and so it comes through something i'm sure we'll also come back although i detest conversations about like. Oh it's all very freudian. It makes things credible algae inaccessible and we want this movie to be accessible. So we're going to begin at the beginning. We're going to begin at the beginning. I love the opening sequence. It's often talked about but the fact that the film opens with this. No trespassing sign. And then what do we then. Proceeds to climb over the sign. It sets up the audience immediately from the beginning to be detective like right. We climb one fence than we climb another. Then we climb a gate. Then we're fixated on a window which is in the upper right hand corner of the frame which we can't take our eyes off of and then because we're burglars and trespassers. We go through the window and as far as we can tell we are the only ones who hear rosebud now the butler at the end claims he heard it but we didn't see him there right that that to me is one of the great. And 'nigma is in this film. I feel that it's purposefully. Enigmatic unexplained but there you go so i totally agree and even before we know before we have a sense. That rosebud may hold a secret to this. You know moustachioed face that we don't yet know even before that as you say we've climb these fences and then we proceed through the grounds of xanadu which we don't quite yet not be xanadu right and we see monkeys. We see tropical settings we see venetian boats. Were already trying to put together. The mystery of what this place could be who could possibly own it. How does this all make sense. And then rosebud is just the final element that says okay. This is what this is the key to a potentially unlocking all of this right. And that's the journey. We're going to go on but it's it's a brilliant to get you already in the mindset of the detective and also there's a little sleight of hand going on a way because a couple of my students got confused and i'm always interested because they are good audience and that is we think may be the snow globe is rosebud um but we find out later that the snow globe is not rosebud but evokes rosebud. I also also like juno. I don't mean to put you on the spot. Do you know where after we see the snow globe that opening scene we next see the snow globe in the chronology of the storytelling so to my knowledge and the snow globe was something i was planning on bringing up on more than one occasion but is on the vanity desk of susan alexander. That's why you were a good student and that. Was he doing that night. So all right. Let's fast forward. This is not a particularly chronological film. So i feel no pressure to approach it chronologically here here so the snow globe. Let's get into it right away right. The very night that he meets susan alexander and in his peripheral vision and in ours sees the snow globe on her vanity. Table is the night that he is going to a warehouse where all the belongings from his mother's boardinghouse the belongings that he associates with his youth are stored. He's there to check them out so somehow in his mind that night. If only subconsciously that snow globe intersects with rosebud because rosebud had to be on his mind. The night he was going to look for the things in his mother's warehouse and their susan. So that wonderful intersection of susan snow globe rosebud and all that that entails so that when he picks it up at the end of the movie out of her childlike room room. We start to go particularly the second time we through the movie. We have that. Aha moment. And i think all great films need to be seen more than once. This one needs to be seen many many times. For all those jigsaw pieces to start to fit together or not. I agree one hundred percent. This is very much a movie that it begs to be re watched. It's almost essential to be rewatch because there are so many layers. Incongruency cheese clues. I mean we talk about this snow globe on her desk in her apartment. It's not that there's a close up now of it by any means. It's quite easy and quite understandable that you would go potentially many viewings of this movie without ever noticing whatsoever because while he while charles foster kane sees it he draws particular attention to it. We don't even know if he really consciously sees it to the or if it's just a sub-conscious presence and as you say we know his mindset of the moment is one of memory and there's no question that this snow globe is very much associated with his memory of his childhood and the traumatic breaking up his relationship with his mother being taken away by thatcher feeling abandoned by his mother which is clearly. if there's one takeaway in this movie it is that is the largest driving influence on his personality. Is his relationship with his mother even in that scene as you say he was planning on going through his mother's belongings he associate. He begins to associate susan alexander with his mother. We have the snow globe. It reminds him of his childhood home. She has several lines to the effect of you know how mothers are yes. It's understandable the attachment. He then develops with her. And then the desire to control that relationship in a way that he wasn't able to control his relationship with his mother. And i also like to to say that his second mother after he leaves his mother is a bank one hundred percent bank and that's not much of a mother. No no it is not an a very reliable bank at that as he says exactly. But i i think the the snow globe is. It's it's kind of this ingrained importance. That i think even extends beyond the object itself right. I mean without going into the freudian aspects of it but the connections between things and being able to evoke memories. Obviously things themselves are incredibly important in this movie. We we hope. By in interrogating various people we will get the answer to who charles foster kane is but really we. We need to look more to his possessions. Things to understand who this man is and and the thing that he holds onto memory and i could actually suggests that it is a memory that is largely reconstructed every time he thinks about it as we know that memory works but in any event the one thing that he holds onto is the least impressive piece of stuff a little wooden sled in the midst of all of those statues art and you name it that that that that wonderful shot at the end of the movie. It looks like a city of stuff. Yeah it's just a sled and what happens to the sled. It goes up in smoke up there. You go anyway it before for long before it gets put up in smoke. It is quite aptly buried in snow. Yes frozen preserved as though in a snow globe for the moment to kind of come back to the surface put. And it's that connection between you know. I think props meson san it all works together with his film on a level so deeply that. I wonder if you would agree with me. That we go and meet susan alexander to hear her tale of charles foster kane twice. We go there. The beginning won't talk. He won't talk. We then return both times of which we go. We have this beautiful shot of the rancho and then ascend through and then through the skylight. We're doing a second story job here. We've gone we've fence. We've gone through a window now. We're doing a second story job but we descend through the skylight much. Like charles foster kane looks into this snow globe at his own memories exactly in hope of finding the memory that will unlock this whole jigsaw puzzle. There's another reason to have susan at the beginning of the movie only to not use her and then have her later almost book ending the memories that that has to tell us something about the way. This journey is being undertaken. Indeed i think that it brings up the very structure of the film. Which is this. This movie is approached in many ways like a classical hollywood bio pic. You know who is charles foster kane. Let's tell the life story of this great man and and we're forest particularly an audience today. Who has many of whom have never experienced an old fashioned newsreel. The kind that. I grew up with thirteen minutes of a newsreel about somebody. You don't know anything about right. And and the newsreel is designed purposely to suggest that you do know something about him it actually give gives you not all that much information the most important piece of information that he gives you is how the fortune came to be in defaulting border. But it really just kind of goes past you. You could even miss it yeah. It's it's stunning. That it trust you as an audience to go almost twenty minutes into the film given the opening shot and then the newsreel before we get down to business right but somehow it holds our attention and notice. The sound design that the newsreel is. The sound is jacked up for the news newsreel. So yeah oh yeah so if you go have this sort of lulling opening and then bam news. When that news on the march comes up thank you. It's so it's it's shocking your. I'm like the cockatoo. Much later in the film is also an excellent point. Seven by students said in case you fell asleep. I like that. If you gotta wake up. I fell asleep in this movie. Anyway let judgment judgment you know. Maybe it was a long day or early in the morning. Exactly so we come in with this bio pic approach the news on the march. Kind of help. Set that up. This is a great figure. He lived a long storied life. And we need to help. We want to understand more about who he is. Because unlike the movies in the movie assumes we understand who he is because it opens with xanadu landlord. Not even by name already assumes you know what xanadu is and who his landlord landlord is. Let's get into it now. We are all the more peaked of like all right. Well let's i need to know more and that's the story. This movie is going to take you on a bio-pic it's not unheard of to say. Well all right. Let's go to the people that this famous person new best to understand this story. And as i mentioned earlier we expect these people to paint this picture that fills in all the gaffes has all the puzzle. Pieces that you mentioned. And they don't they don't don't know have glimpses. They have elements of the story. That seemed to be at odds with each other. They tell you about pieces that they wouldn't actually therefore so. How do they really know. They're filling in their own gaps and only one of them is an entirely sympathetic appealing person. And that's mr bernstein. I mean at least in my humble opinion. I wanna talk about that. Yeah and we'll talk about all these psa side characters so you're asked to relate to somebody who's not particularly sympathetic and as you very wisely point out in news on the march you have to wait about five minutes into that newsreel before you even get the name of who the heck they're talking about so you go. What is going on here. I'm being toyed with your. You're absolutely right and what what makes it so interesting as well is how much information they give you about the trajectory of this movie right up front. I mean we want to know who's charles foster kane is where assumed we are a hollywood audience. We live in the world of heroes and villains. Is charles foster kane hero. Or is he a villain and right there in that opening segment. You have one person saying he's a communist one person saying he's a fascist and him saying i'm an american light and that's exactly what this movie is. We want to think of him either. Just give us some clarity. Is he a hero. Whose miss understood is he a villain who did horrible things neither. He's a person. He's a complicated man who doesn't even fully understand himself who these the people closest to him don't fully understand. He's just a person in each of the people who talks about him can only talk about him from their point of view as and life. This this is why. I think this movie holds up so beautifully. We are all familiar with this. How well am. I'm repeating myself. But how well can we get to know. Another human being and the answer is even when we get a lot of information a lot of stuff. And i do mean stuff. Both literally and figuratively. We do not know who you are exactly right. So shall we go. I guess maybe segment by segment here. Let's we'll start then with mr thatcher. Oh yes and which. I think is also fascinating in part of the reason why we go to susan alexander i only to learn nothing is to create a juxtaposition between her and her situation in her reality here. And then mr thatcher as we go into this one is in life libraries and is completely human sized whereas thatcher is is. There's nothing there's almost nothing humid about in you. Go to this. Almost mausoleum cleveland the library. And they're the radio drama comes in the minute. You hear the sound of that place. It's all hollow an echo with these two almost end raj creatures who run it and nobody in the library. Walled off in every possible. Way is not a place you want to be. You are confined. You can only look at these pages of his notebook That's it and you're going to be here for thirty by spy. Just it's crazy and then you go into what is the most talked-about and possibly the most remarkable piece of the whole movie. And that is we'll be go to his childhood right. Which of course sets up everything. And i'd like to point out. We just mom keeping my snuggle. Metaphor live again. A key. a key sunlight in that room as well despite being a mausoleum-like place descending as though it can be looked in through like a snow globe to this man. That's a beautiful way to think about this. This is just according to me. And this isn't fully fleshed out. But as we learned in this segment the tension that exists between thatcher and charles foster kane. Where charles foster kane that he so eloquently puts it as the stakeholder in the public transit system that owns eighty six thousand four hundred twenty or you know shares is very angry and blah blah blah. But as the publisher of the inquirer he he has these two sides of him where he is a man of the people that were he thinks of himself as a man of the people. But he's also the six wealthiest person in the world. There's this tension. And i think right off the bat you learn and obviously it's kind of juxtapose with thatcher who is the banker who extremely wealthy but has none of those liberal feelings that that has it's set up right there in the same way that we've just come from new which is also a mausoleum of staggering proportions. But it's filled with all the stuff in the eccentricities and now we move to this man's mausoleum which has nothing it's completely austere it shows. There's that connection between these two men where they're both exceptionally wealthy. They're both exceptionally powerful. But there's a difference there. There's a key difference here variance. Then we part of going back to of course his childhood. And i'd rather have lunch with charles foster kane than with mr thatcher i although i would most like to have lunch with mr bernstein but that's a whole other. We'll wait for him. Well we'll get to mr bernstein short enough so then we go back to this log cabin which we then learn of course at the end is kind of the crux of this particular telling of the story and we have where now we start to get into the artistic. Excellence of this movie where you have this long. Take and depth of field and layering of sound design that gorgeous. It is gorgeous and it is why i think. Gregg toland shares a title card with orson welles at the end of the movie lee. Arson wells had a giant ego. But he didn't have solarge an ego that he didn't know that this movie would not have been possible without gregg toland because it seems like all on a daily basis. Greg told the cinematographer is asked by this twenty four year old. Tiro i need this. And greg tolan's go on you need what well okay. I'll try to make that happen. And he makes so many beautiful visual moments happened and he does. The same thing with bernard hermann. The remarkable composer who again was early in his career who creates music and a sound. Feel for this. Add to that wells' experience with radio and you get all of the magic. That happens in what i do. Feel is one of the greatest moments in film. As the parents are negotiating. What's going to happen to the kid. The kid is playing in a window a game with himself. He's a lonely kid but he's a happy kid reasonably and saying things like they union forever. You can't lick andy jackson and and disappearing from the window and then popping back up in the window and occasionally apparent will obscure the window particularly as the negotiation is being completed and then we also begin to understand that the father is really not much of a father is an abusive father but that comes a little bit later but we understand that. The father is willing quite quickly to give up the kid for money right. Yeah i mean he he comes off as you sympathize with him as a father until that moment of yeah you'll be paid fifteen thousand dollars a year and then it's probably best for the child. Thank you and you're like okay. Now we get a sense of who you are. And then the ultimate payoff. Is you say that he thinks that. This kid needs a good thrashing and mary mary jane. That's exactly why we're sending him away and credit to agnes moorehead as her performance as this mother who comes off so so harsh and then to realize that she is doing this. Unspeakably painful thing entirely for the good of her son or what. She believes to be good for her son. Here here. and it's a wrenching a gut wrenching. Mo- heart-wrenching moment to say that she's doing this for urge responsible. Not responsible incomplete. If we don't point out the fun little detail as the camera is clearly pulling back To keep the depth of field and the kid in the window. If you listen carefully you can hear the camera movie. And then you see the top pat on the table wobbling just a bit because they had to negotiate had to move furniture about in order to get the camera through. Yeah i love that but you only notice it. If it's called to your attention right you don't you don't notice it otherwise but it's i love that that you can see fingerprints on a movie that that it has. It has some reality to when we talked about casablanca the same thing how cheesy some of the scenery was. But we don't care right and we don't care that we notice these little things exactly very well put thank. It's it is the first. I think kind of peace to resist moment of the film of saying this is. This is what we're doing on an artistic level. I mean. I love. Also i mean. We'll talk you've already brought up the sound. The music the score of this film carry such power. It conveys as you talk about the entire trajectory of the movie on just on the sound design alone. We are introduced to the music that that charles foster kane is associated with in his childhood and specifically with his mother and with his sled which really only resurfaces in the movie in variations on the theme when he meets susan alexander and then of course the burning of his his sled at the end. This is the music associated with that side of him that emotional connection to his childhood and is contrasted because it is far more subtle with the other key piece of music. Which is the music associated with his rise to power characterizes. Much of the first half of the movie was basically just for notes. But it's the power theme. And and herman understands the power of the motif in writing a film score and then with striking originality. I'm not much. I'm not enough of an authority to talk about how clever it is but his instrumentation is so different than what people were accustomed to in films at the time. It's a leaner instrumentation. It's surprising instruments like a best soon. A taking the lead and and that makes it all the richer and this is another reason why. I love to shut my eyes when i watched this movie. And just wallow in the score right. I'm a great herman fan. And i think as your audience knows. Herman went on to become hitchcock's composer of choice. And give us some of the greatest film music that we know. I happen to believe however and okay. I'm just going to say this. I think the greatest film score ever written is bernard hermann score for citizen kane. So i've said it there it is there you have it okay. All right and guess what tony. The two films that are vying for number one on the list share in common bernard hermann. He wrote the music for vertigo. He wrote the music for citizen kane. Maybe bernard hermann has as much to do with the two films as all the other folks who worked on them is a total aside and one that you know but i am a fundamental believer. That music carries such weight with film. And that so many of the amazing films that we love that have such great places aren't our heart are entirely there because of the music off script for just one sale needs. Yeah jonny greenwood jonny greenwood. There will be blood phantom thread this. This guy is going to be. The next bernard hermann that you heard it here heard it here. I think we only talk about the old movies. Keeping you on your toes the future so okay. So let's progress. We're we're out of the cabin and it's one of those things that you know as we say the movie that begs to be watched and it's certainly not to be very watch because you know what rosebud is and you realize that this movie has nothing to do with rosebud in the end of it is irrelevant. What really is but you go back and you re watch it and you say from the beginning. How many clues. There are two that it's rose about. I mean the number of just extremely disting- lines of dialogue. That is probably something completely little and unimportant. And maybe it's a thing he lost and he leaves the cabin and the very next seen. He's getting a sled for christmas that he hates. And if you go back to the news newsreel. One of the first spoken lines you here in the newsreel is thatcher in the committee investigation responding to question about being hit by a sled. Yes but you didn't know right you didn't know and so you appreciate that on later viewings. How many clues. There are along the way and that's enjoyable in its own right but we so we progress out of the. We get a fairly a fairly strong trajectory citizens of citizen. Charles foster kane's because thatcher was there for for much of it that he kind of ultimately bails him out at the end. Yes but you realize other than that beginning. We get very little insight into charles foster kane beyond his antagonism of thatcher which is important. Don't get me wrong. And the bluster that he brings of hoping to bring down thatcher and everything he stands for and wanting to be everything he hates is a powerful moment. But where we have not probed far beyond the surface and i. I think you're really onto something when you talk about the juxtaposition of thatcher world and charles foster kane's childhood world that those those two things being together in this sequence tell us something about the power money and the power of memory and the innocence of childhood and the happiness that that this man never could get back. There is one shot during the thatcher. Sequence that i think i don't know if it's important but it's useful to the viewer and that is when you see all of the narrators together. With the exception of susan and the exception of the butler in a shot you see. Jed uc bernstein uc kane and you see thatcher they are all in one shot and you go okay those are going to be my storytellers now again. You don't really know that until the second time through but there they are right. This is the cast of characters. Thank you very much. That's that's an interesting point. You're one hundred percent correct and you take away the beginning is exactly thatcher's takeaway right. He understands the rise and the fall of cain based on his business doings as as as a newspaper publisher and that ultimately he had to bail them out and that's his takeaway right. We don't we don't get any real emotional insight other than what we read into. As empathetic human beings of this was a traumatic. Start to this kid's life right and thatcher never liked cain thatcher never believed in anything cain was setting out to do. And that's the end of that story. Thatcher is just simply not a nice guy i almost. You're gonna disagree. I think thatcher cares for kane. I think it's not that he. He's disappointed in the in the in the man's choices but to me he is a he is you know he's obviously a father figure by force but he's you know he's a father who doesn't know how to show emotion but he cares. He never disassociates himself from kane if he really didn't like him. You know. I feel like cain would have turned twenty five and it would have been. I'll see you never again. That's fair enough max. I and there's this element you know. I think the scene which is a. There's a humor to it when he's writing the letter to kane who's often you know europe somewhere. I don't think you understand the importance of this situation that you have the sixth largest fortune in the world and this and that and the other and therefore i'm enclosing a list of your holding so that you understand i mean it's just those are the terms in which this man knows how to show affection quote unquote my family. That the only way he really knows how to show. Affection is through how you look at the money and the stuff of life and it doesn't mean that they're a bad person it's just the currency with which a work right and to me. I think it's two scenes in particular that show that he. And i think it goes both ways which is also fascinating. That as much as kane likes to make it seem. He hates thatcher and everything he stands for. There's an affection of these two men just on having spent so much time together and it's the scene in the newspaper. When cain shows you he's not an idiot he understands exactly what he is holdings are but that he is going to pursue the life he wants to pursue and there is this. i mean. It's a confrontational seen of him. Saying i'm going to publish these stories bringing everything you stand for down. But they leave on a note of what we can put that behind like we understand that. There's this tension. That's irreconcilable between us. But we still have a connection. And i'll add to that because i think you're onto something that the the spatial world that cain ultimately lives in defined by xanadu is a spacial world. That borrows its outsized. Snus from the world of thatcher. Because if you look in thatcher's world both the and his office with this wainscoting that is as high as a human head. That's where that's where. Cain gets in the way he he thinks about space. And that if you're rich you need to have a big fireplace right. You need to have high wainscoting. You need to whatever. That's an excellent point. I think. I think you're absolutely right. That thatcher would approve of all the places that other than maybe the office of this newspaper of how charles foster has appointed his lifestyle at this point. One of the things that gets talked about citizen kane so often is ceilings because we get to see ceilings whereas that would not be usual in films of the time because they like to lower equipment through a nonexistent sailing on a sound stage but the world of thatcher's thatcher ceilings are almost out of sight. And when when the when the movie gets human sized. The ceilings lower and and particularly after kane is defeated in election. the ceiling is almost oppressive. I do think the spatial design of everything about this film. The spatial design the audio design. The musical design. I could go on and on and on the camera design is so completely thought through without ever calling too much attention to itself it. There's meticulousness that's graceful. And that's what i love about it. Well put you mentioned the ceilings. I reminds me that orson welles is reported to have watched stagecoach. Yes forty summertimes. One of his favorite movies blown away in large part of the spatial design. That john four did stagecoach movie. I think we talked about episode. Four classic movie muscle him. Check it out. Check it out. But i'm struck particularly of the scene. You're right that wants. He loses the election but his presence in the inquirer that he is this sized presence in this undersized space oh my guy and he is just begging to burst out of it or to grow it here to surround him on an appropriate level. It makes me. I'm always struck by how much of the ceiling you see. And then thinking of the scene in stagecoach when they're in the in the house where ultimately the woman gives birth. How much of the ceiling. You see scrunching on these call Because there's no question as you say on the spatial design that he is just begging to burst out of it and it's something we come back to and also something. We obviously is tremendously emphasized by gregg toland and these stark angles from which we view the newspaper. Fewer only remember when he keeps sending stuff back from europe. This this pathetic little room just gets jammed with crates of stuff of which never even gets opened right. That's the other thing he. I think we all know hoarders today. Who will order stuff from amazon and just loaded in a room and never opened the boxes. What kane is a little like that. He so much of the stuffy bought he never uses or enjoys or occupies his world with just stays in a box as as he says right at the end of thatcher sequence that he used his money to buy things right. And that's you know if there's ever a clue that really the answer to the answers were looking for as detective audience or in the things and not in the people. But i think that's a good segue to move onto your man. My man bernstein. Who is i agree with you. I think he's probably the most likeable character in the entire movie. He's he's the only character i mean you understand. He's a total yes man. But there's a sympathetic quality to him. And one of the things that i think is so important to remember about mr bernstein particularly in one thousand nine hundred. Forty one particularly given that joseph mankiewicz herman mankiewicz the co writers is jewish. Is the bernstein is clearly. A jewish character whose jewishness on one level is stereotyped in the film and another level is commented on in the most sympathetic of ways. And we'll hold off when we get to later sequence talking about that but when we first meet mr bernstein in a we hear him tell what i am told is herman mankiewicz favourite piece of writing that beautiful story about the girl in the white dress in the parasol. And it is. It's gorgeous then. When next we meet him he's riding on top of a carriage almost like a jewish immigrant peddler with stuff and then we get some sort of vaudeville shtick when he arrives in the newspaper. Office all the stuff falling around him. And so we're sort of invited into the stereotype and as you say correctly the yes man but we get to the famous scene when we watch the dissolution of a marriage and we get the ad semitism from the first mrs cain she does not want mr bernstein and his vulgar gift in the child's nursery. All of it not commented on directly and all the more powerful. Because it's there that that moves me deeply and mr bernstein moves me deeply. I love the guy. I've just plain love the guy and i love the fact that no matter. What even though he was a yes man i think he really loved charles foster kane the most outsized thing in his office is the photo of portrait over. Absolutely right. I mean you really truly believe this is a man who's proud to sit beneath it. He always proud to hold the position. He held in association with kane. And do you notice that. He calls everybody by their full name. Mr cain mr leland whatnot whereas everybody else gets and he's always called mr bernstein right but the others call each other by first name. Charlie jed susan yada yada yada all that's coded in the movie in the subtlest and best of ways. I keep saying it. Because it's not underlined. Right if you underline your message well then. It's just a message. If you don't underline it and you get it then you get it in your gut and i think this movie is powerful. In that regard. Well put an a movie. i mean. Obviously the trajectory of this movie that deals you say with with the power of memory the understanding of who a human being is the fickle qualities of just being a human. There is i mean. It's it's told over the course of this two hour movie. It is so perfectly specifically told in that story of the woman with the parasol on the ferry. That in just that moment you understand that that is exactly what being a human is all about that you could have seen a person for a split second that never even acknowledged you that that stays with you for the entire rest of your life and the the unknown ways that it would probably alter the trajectory you you go and who could ever identify that if you wanted to understand who mr bernstein was if this were citizen citizen bernstein and whenever and that was the you could never trace it back to that woman on the ferry no it would be impossible but it clearly has had this outsized effect and as important and as unimportant as rosebud indeed so now we get into the mr bernstein segment which is really the ultimate. I takes us through citizen kane kind of at his peak. I keep calling him citizen kane charles foster kane citizen kane you know it works it works and i like that but bringing it back to the music that music just grows and grows the segment and then of course climax is in the scene in which the chronicle inquirer has now out past the chronicle bread. We have this parade of marching band and dancing. Girls office just bought the report. The solution was just spend money by. There's no particular cleverness other than just buy them just like you buy and then you get the earworm song of all time that that that song they sang to celebrate in the marching band. And it's like early rap. Almost it's a patter song and you can't get it out of your head and then he's gonna use that tune later in the movie a to to break our hearts in some ways. There's something there's one moment in that celebration that that i really want to focus on and it is if you remember when we saw charlie in a window. That was back when he was a kid and he was playing with his sled. The next time. We see charlie in a window. He is reflected in a window. As jed and mr bernstein talk about him as he's dancing and and they're really speculating. Do you really that. The conversation is about really. Who is this man. And how great is he and and what is he doing but you see a reflection of him in the window and then the cigar smoke from jed almost just eats up the reflection bringing up both for me window and smoke which i think. I think it's intentional. But i don't care if it's intentional. It's something that that struck me forcefully. And also in that same moment if you look at the ice sculpture of jed and mr bernstein behind jets got his big cigar and then in another ghastly stereotype. Mr bernstein's knows is exaggerated to almost fagin like length. It's it's it's again and mankiewicz. I am told by a relative of his. This was they thought about this. They wanted to both employ the stereotype. And then turn it on. Its head when we meet. Mrs cain talking about him. I liked very interesting. I'm curious to see where that goes now in in the susie section. But you're absolutely right. That scene in which i mean jed leland with his. I wanna keep your declaration of principles. I think that's going to be a very important document. Not unlike the constitution and the bill of rights and all these things and then this is the first moment where we start to see him really beginning to question. Is this man really going to live up. And did you notice that. When cain is reading the declaration of independence of principles thank you when he's reading it. Did you notice that. His face is totally unlit. Yes it is dark. Just like the reporter's face because if you actually listen to the declaration that's not the kind of journalism that cain ends up employing impact. He's a yellow journalist of the most egregious kind of the headlines. Big enough the news is big enough. You supply the pros. Also supply the war fake you and yet the declaration of principles is. I'll tell only the truth. It'll be pure it'll be simple. I'll serve the people. There's a lovely and then when it gets torn up much later in the film along with a check then that's it doesn't get torn up. The check gets torn up. And then can't yes cares about. I feel like this is a good moment to pause and look at the historical context of this. Because what i find particularly fascinating about this citizen kane was i mean. It's quite overtly in reference to william randolph hearst. The newspaper magnet. It was quite poorly received by william randolph hearst due to to be quite the representation of him as it is clearly to be. Orson welles denied that fact but that is was undeniably the context and audience and nineteen forty. One would have seen this movie as clearly in reference. It's clearly in reference to the politics of william randolph hearst. Who is an isolationist. Orson welles was not. He was Quite the supporter of the new deal and fdr. So the i mean. This movie is super overtly political. I think anyone who has the same year we have casablanca casa blanca against america. First let's get into the war. Let's do our thing and echoing as you say correctly. What the hearst position was. I just say one thing and i'm happy to have this conversation. Isn't it wonderful. However how beautifully. This movie works without any knowledge of william randolph hearst. So that's that's exactly the point. I was coming to make. Which is it's two thousand eighteen. I can't imagine. I mean william randolph. Hearst in many ways is the least relevant is ever been since he existed not a topic of conversation in the slightest no but the echoes of hearst in fake news and also something we can an mar-a-lago actually makes its way into this movie. If you want to go there in xanadu in florida in any event but but that the political things about this movie fascinating as they are and and and for me. They're the least for me as as a student and teacher of film. That's the least interesting thing. And when i teach this film to kids today i spend about three minutes on that part of it. I say you can talk about this in your history class if you want to. But that's not. We're going to talk about here by continue please. I agree with you and at the same time. I find the intersection of of the history. And the arts so fascinating to say that this movie so clearly a response to that or using that. It's not it's not that he said. I want to make a movie. About william randolph hearst. They had this idea in play. And it worked in with hearst and played off of those themes. But at the same time i mean. It's on last week's episode. We talked about the manchurian candidate. And i talked about mark twain saying that history doesn't repeat itself but it certainly rhymes and as you say we're living in this era of fake news without trying to be overtly political on this show because there's not a political show but there's no question that citizen kane fabricated the news as he charles foster ten and the real the real grandchild of william randolph. Hearst murdoch it. Right i mean. I don't think anybody would deny that that. That's a direct kind of connection as as we look at. How news is. Has you look at it handle and you almost wonder take it as you will to the extent that had charles foster kane had gotten elected. Are we living in that reality to a certain extent. I don't think with without question so this movie is going to continue to hold up on so many levels and that that level is without question invited yes. Donald trump charles foster kane. There are many connections. So it's just it's interesting to think that a movie with such a direct political context in one era could really almost lose entirely that context and still be fascinating but can also regain its entirely new contacts in this era and it could be applicable to two new. The new status quo. When are when the people who follow us fifty years from now doing a podcast about citizen kane. I can't wait to know what they're going to talk about. Because it's going to hold up indeed all right. So back to mr bernstein under his his retelling. Which is you know. It's told with such care and affection and law. I mean he's such a sympathetic old man comparative to the other stories. We hear which are not told with a great deal effect. You get glimpses of the affection. Yes but there's so many complicating factors. There is almost unqualified affection for kane in the bernstein very well put very well put and it carries us through canes height and carries us into his decline his downfall however you want to take it and it it gives us what has to be. I mean there are so many amazing sequences in this film but another one. Just like the log cabin. Is the breakfast sequence. Two minutes we watch a marriage fall apart in two minutes and visually. I think i love most about the falling. Apart of the marriages scene is that everyone thinks that it's a bigger table. At the end of the scene it is not in fact. It is the same table but the angle which shot the way in which they're sitting at a small intimate breakfast table for young lovers who just got married has turned into a war zone where they no longer talk to each other. They look though they're miles. Apart and the music and that seen each piece of music you begin with the waltz. Which is the music lovers and then you go through a kind of a different kinds of dances that show you that. This is not working and then at the end. We're just in this kind of almost ominous silence which they're reading rival newspapers and and and and and then of course don't forget the antisemitic moment when she says you know your mr bernstein sent the most vulgar is the. She hadn't used that word chooses in other words. I can't remember what it is. Yeah heinous maybe she said it's and i just simply can't have it in the nursery and he says well mr bernstein's likely to visit the nursery and she says in that withering tone that you always hear that is racist in its in. Its in its tone must he. Yeah and we know what we hear that again. They don't underline it but it's there right and it's rick the costuming we talked about the the costuming the set decor but by her her clothing throughout his too but hers particularly she at the at the beginning is open and vulnerable in there and at the end she has just encased in in in clothing up to her neck hiding behind the rival newspaper. It's awesome right i. I teach that seen so much that my kids actually start screaming at me to stop teaching. But you could. You could build a whole film course. It's such an hit me of showing and not telling which is its own cliche. But it's all working together right. It's the staging of them. Moving slowly and slowly apart from each other the dialogue which gets snappier and more pointed and more cutting to the point that you erase dialogue completely at the end. And then you bring in props as you say. It's again not highlighted. But the fact that she's reading the chronicle and he's reading his of course. The enquirer tells you everything you could possibly need to know about the state of their marriage and again to go back to my point. If you only listen to it you'll still get the whole story. Oh yes even. The silence even an aside. The silence speaks volumes. It's and it such as you say such a succinct seen to two minutes there were alterior versions of this script. Wear where mary kane did not die. Her son grew up to actually be a nazi and was killed. Trying to pull off some sort of raid in washington. Dc and we end up learning that she and her son their son killed in a car accident which necessitates the fact that. We're not going to hear the story from her perspective and so this breakfast scene is the perfect stand in for their time together and the trajectory you know as you say we learn everything we need to know in two minutes and then of course we have the introduction of susan. We've already gone over kind of because of the snow globe. The her importance of her introduction into the script his political downfall which is quite overt. And now we start to see this man's pride really getting in his own way So can we talk about susan. Now let's it. We talk about jed. Well yeah okay. I know we're running. No no no. I don't mind because if there's ever an episode to have a long episode. I think listeners would agree. It's this because you mentioned susan. There's one thing about the beginning of susan's that this is as good a time as any to mention to listen to. And it goes back to bernard hermann. He's playing nightclub music on the piano as we re meet susan and as we segue into the beginning of her seen. She's doing the mozart aria with the piano vocal instructor and the way herman goes from the blues z. Music right into mozart without missing a beat is just so. Just listen to it right. It's time around and you'll love it but let's go back to jed because we have to we can't we can't forget jet right because we're we're in jad because that's where the the marriage falls apart. It's also where we hear the most heartbreaking version of the rosebud played. I believe. I'm almost certain on this. A harmonic -ly sounds like a synthesizer but of course it's not right now anyway. No i appreciate that. So yes we get jed story and credit of course to this movie and the just the makeup right. I mean the aging technology of these people. It's so it's the it's the theater folks purse west more of the great west more clan. Who did more makeup than anybody. I think in the history of movies. Yeah which one purse falls in which iteration of them all purse falls into. Maybe we should do some research on that but anyway the makeup is amazing. Yes and there's something. I think particularly satisfying in the jed leland sequence. In the fact that he's the he's the character we go the longest until we see him in his old right warm while having seen him for much of the movie as a young man correct. That's because we see susan right off the bat. And we see thatcher right at the beginning mr bernstein. Well there's something about building up to all right now. This is the first time we're seeing jed. He's older he's in this wheelchair he's in hospital old age. It's the only is only disease that you don't crotch as crotchety and he wants a cigar. And he's playing games right like i mean he's and you understand. I mean it's it's in many. I don't know about most. Susan has her own strong reasons. But you really start to see jed and susan the anger and that that lives on towards charles foster kane because things don't end well because of who he was but then you still have those moments of you know all i heard he was living down there all alone and you know i i. Maybe i should have called him because he was probably lonely. And that's just one of those regrets that come late in life about an old friend who you've fallen out with and it's those little lines that that craft who these people are and the trajectory they've gone on and that that particularly affecting seen when jets drunk a and they've lost the election and You hear the theme. That was played during the celebration of cain At the newspaper played as a dirge as they're talking and the camera. They've actually dug a hole in the floor to stick the camera so that they can shoot from this absurdly low angle to make them look almost grotesquely large and yet the ceiling is just weighing on top of them and all the confetti on the floor. That's a heartbreaking moment because that's what they lived for and of course. The beauty of that is incense. Cain was hoist by his own petard after he got caught in a love nest the very kind of journalism that reports that is the kind of journalism he practiced and gorse at. And i love that dude. If you're going to practice it then it can also bite you know where if you if you do something wrong so well put and we start to see that arrogance of you know thinking that you can't take the love of the people away from me over some they're going to under you know. He thinks he can overcome it. And as you say no you've created this system where people thrive on that kind of scandal and love to tear those people down. Of course you'll be the next one. If you you know you engage and you did also love to headlines. They might use fraud at polls. Yeah it's a great sequence as well that's murdoch world absolutely you have exactly. It's charles foster kane defeated fraud at polls and the headline is big enough as they say. The news is big enough. Thank you As we start to see very much in the sequence w- we see it throughout but those low angle shots that gives so much power to both charles foster kane and jedi linda. I mean they're both kind of in that privilege space of the low angle often because leland accompanies charles foster kane. It's more meant for charles than it is for leland. And but as you say that low angle which gives so much power we see it most in its strongest moment when he confronts susan and completely consumed or her in his shadow which is such a height of that kind of power. But it is you say. It creates this sense of claustrophobia. As well for these men who want power want the success and are not achieving it quite quite in the way they hope and i think the only if you're going to dig a hole in the floor in order to get your camera all the way down there then you are turning. What could make these. Men looked powerful into a comment on their power and their loss of power. In this particular instance. It's it's spatially handled in a breathtaking way. Yes do you want. I'd love to talk now because you just mentioned about susan. When when when he he lets her know that you know you have to go on singing. He says no matter what. I've bought you an opera house. I bought you. i bought you a career. I've paid for coaches. You're going to have to go on singing and then we get that breathtaking. Montage right out of german expressionism. By the way that that could be an f w murnau scene and sound and bernard. Hermann just goes out there and then she tries to kill herself and then when he sits by her bedside after she's tried to kill herself. We hear and this is herman at his best. He takes the mozart. Aria puts it in a hertie gertie. Sounds like a some messenger on the street Right out of german. In some german folklore the hertie gertie is the agent of death. And it's so the'real it's so special it's so magical at breaks my heart understandably so i it is that sequence of after her. Attempted suicide is so emotional. Obviously you feel this woman's pain as she got in this situation particularly ask for and is caught up in this cycle of this man's ego and and emotional district and she turns out to be the one thing that money he money cannot buy her after all is said and done no matter how much money he built xanadu for her. He built a career for her. He spent gazillion dollars on her and she leaves him. Yep and obviously we see the emotional breakdown of that to him completely. Losing control in her bedroom. Which i like how you described it as so childlike because it it does look like the child's bedroom and if you see the first shot one of the first shots in that room there's a. There's a doll resting against the pillow. That in profile looks exactly like susan in profile. I hadn't noticed. I check that out. And then of course the greatest one takes seen probably in movie history is when he destroys the room. Right now. I just don't think you can redo that scene. And they didn't it was the first take. Has his hands were bleeding at the end of it and he was he was in it one hundred percent i do wanna i want to take a step back even before i know we get to her attempted suicide that montage sequence which you already mentioned is so i mean it's so well put together the layering that goes on of obviously her continued performances. The reviews that accompany them. The lights flashing it. All is layered quite clearly on top of each other to create this meaning that we associate. And what's what's so interesting to me or the elements that this film combining this film is best known in history for its depth of field. And it's long takes it. That was a technological advancement. What they were able to do with the long take in this movie and the depth of field and that's completely valid. It's gorgeous to watch the scenes in foreground and background play out but it's not just a movie about depth of field and it's keenly aware of saying we know how to use the right technique in the right moment to convey what we're hoping to convey the montage is already hinted at early on because this film has great visual irony from the beginning. You know. obviously it's not cut to anything but him saying you know there will be no war in that opening segment is nine hundred forty one. You know we know that that that's incorrect. The scene that immediately precedes kicking off the montage. But susan saying oh well charles said that if if they won't have me in new york he's going to build me my own opera hall and he says well that won't be necessary and the immediately cut to a headline saint charles foster kane builds an opera house in chicago. I mean these visual ironies of saying we're pointing out that this is this is this is a flawed outside his own ego. And then it culminates in this montage sequence to convey this the chest the exhaustion of this woman's decline you hear her singing and then musically it almost becomes a scream which dies out at the end. It's like it. I won't imitate because i'll do a badly. But but it is the the and she never really wanted to be this kind of a singer show. She said from the beginning that she doesn't want to sing that kind of saw him. It's not for the beauty of the way they do her singing the movie is she's not god all she's just not good and there's a difference. She's not florence foster jenkins right but she clearly bad. We're gonna go with not good okay. And she's not meant to be on an opera stage. Not certainly you can almost sense singing. A different song wouldn't be. It would be fine but but but it's and then the other sequence actually. It's very much going. We consider the long takes. There's one particular scene that actually has very traditional hollywood editing of the shot reverse shot and it's the scene in susan's apartment as they are falling in love if you will but clearly. He's quite smitten with her particularly mostly because she doesn't know who he is and she likes him anyway but it's that seen as they are falling in love that you get that very traditional hollywood shot reverse shot back and forth because falling in love is typically hollywood so why not use the typical hollywood language for it. Exactly you we just they orson welles gregg toland rubber wise as you all these people have a sense of. These are all the tools at our disposal. We don't need to stick to just one and they can all fit together. Still be a very coherent visual theme and style that carries the whole film right and it is the elegance and precision with which they use all the elements of the language of film without really over using any of without. I think calling too much attention to the magic of what they're doing would and at the same time honoring so much tradition in movies from john. Ford german expressionism. And doing doing it. All with with with grayson style and care and a certain amount of what's pa but not too much. It's not it's not a. It's not a film that brags on itself. It's not it's very well done. Don't get me wrong but it's not. Hey look what i'm doing. I'm just a kid with a camera. it's in a film that does so much. It would be easy for it to feel like an exercise in filmmaking. Perfect and look how much we can do right. And it doesn't come off that way at all and it is the restraint. it's the combination of enough restraint. The deliberate approach and then the sophistication of the people involved. I mean orson welles clearly extremely talented but as you say has long background of artistic expression but has not made a movie yet at this point in his career is very young and knows appropriately how to defer to people like gregg toland. robert wise. Megabits bernard hermann. I mean and you think all of these men combined this could turn into an ego fest of no. It's going to be the visuals. No it's gonna be the sound. no. I'm going to tell a story through montage and editing. No it's the dialogue. No it's the perfect balance of all of these things and that's really where the movie excels by tapping into the right thing at the right moment. Layering multiple pieces together to my now is the only real tension. That existed was between mak- wits and orson welles in that wells was going to try and take credit for having written the movie and at absolutely not the case not that he didn't have a strong influence on the writing but ultimately they share credit one of the thing i think we should mention and that is almost all of the actors are unknown to the movie going public they are theater actors and wells has the generosity and and and to a certain extent the false humility to introduce them at the end with the exception of himself which he keeps to the last credit but introducing them visually because they're they're newcomers are theater folks and and their skill at acting is brings a certain kind of acting to this movie that the movie going public probably hadn't seen acting such depth one in particular like to mention because maybe some time we can do. This movie is the magnificent. Amerson is coming up starring joseph cotten who plays gently and think we have to do it. And it kind of you know. It'll be an ongoing conversation surrounding wells. And his style and things like that. I think we're we're nearing the end of this film. Obviously we haven't given susan exactly her full shift yet. We go back to her. And now we do get those sequences in xanadu. We get to see them living there. If you want to call it that it's absurd. I'd be the distance between the chairs the size of that fireplace the sound when you're talking there sounds like thatcher's library. I might add exactly this connection between xanadu thatcher. And his style. The olympics in there two moments in that sequence that Just astound me. One is that sort of interior screaming when they're often the picnic and he slaps her. And then we hear this scream and we think for a second must be coming from an adjoining tent or we don't know is it inside. Her is some pain. she's feeling we don't know and then shortly thereafter we get the cockatoo which is great one of my students. Point out real definitely wake you up if you fall asleep and it does But it's that moment is so that sequence there is so charged for him so he can't understand this it. Nobody can leave me. i can leave. you can divorce. You can abandon you. I can do whatever but you can't leave me. And she does and he responds. yeah. I mean in fantastic. That's sequence of you. Almost get a sense when he approaches her to convince her not to leave that he's almost saying the right things to get her to stay so close and then it's you can't do this to me and re clarifies for her exactly why she's doing this in the first place. That is somehow being done to you that it's all about you in your mind you control everything. Nothing is going to change whatsoever and then in case you thought you were getting to know him a little better. You see the shot of reflection upon reflection upon reflection upon reflection of him and you go which one of these infinity of images is the real man we will not no. He doesn't know he doesn't know absolutely neither neither do i. By the way. And so i mean so many visual stunning visuals early. I mean as you say her with her. Jigsaw puzzles endlessly him stepping into his own fireplace practically in the in the flames of his mouth like fireplace. Saying i have no desire to go to new york. This is our home. This is nothing but there's some for some reason one couch and one chair in this cavernous place. I love the line of dialogue in the tent later on and first of all. I don't know if what your thought was the first time you saw this movie. But let's just say the charles foster kane and i have extremely different perspectives on. What a picnic and said you think. Oh here's he's like let's go have a picnic. It's an intimate thing to people on a blanket. Something lead of car. It's a fleet caravan and what you have to assume people paid to come and spend time with those who are these people and they don't they don't talk to them one little thing about the picnic scene as i think you know they they make it look everglades. They use some footage from king kong. And if you look if you look in the background you can see pterodactyls flying about which probably would not be true in the everglades but that's kind of fun. Yes but then there's very dinosaur important in that scene and that sequence here in xanadu that hearkens back for my mind to something else in the movie that i'd like to mention when we go early in the film. The sled getting covered with snow. And we move into. The world of charlie being raised by thatcher and the bank. We get time passing and we hear train. We hear clock or music. That sounds like a clock. The next time we get that same feeling is when susan is doing her jigsaw puzzles. And the season's pass and we hear a clock again music. That sounds like a clock and time and trying to fit together. The pieces of the jigsaw puzzle are conflated. And we're getting a little clue and then here's a delicious thing for me. I'm told i believe i'm correct about this. The last major not major but the last player of any kind and citizen kane to die is the woman who speaks the line about. I bet you know. She has the jigsaw puzzle. And she says i bet if you could figure out what what rosebud is that answering the and thompson says no i don't think so. He's he's at least come to realize after all his investigating thompson being the reporter. Yes and i think it's fascinating that that's the person who has left the cast last. That is a poetic. If nothing else here you're absolutely correct and we do have that ending of the endless things narrow the only vestiges left of this man most of which are being burned or sold off. And we think i mean as thompson says because he is very much are kind of standing over the course of this movie that none of this really is is getting at anything. No there's not there is not that one key piece. It is very much jigsaw puzzle with the missing piece as you say. It is very much wandering through a labyrinth. Never finding a center as as my metaphor goes love. Your metaphor the two of them. I mean they're both. I think we're saying the exact same thing. We want to ascribe meaning to this in a way that life just doesn't particularly allow for and the and we think we get the answer we see rosebud in the fire and then it just goes up in smoke and then we have to climb back down the fence and be reminded than all along. We weren't even supposed to be there. We were trespassing and we were told not to but we we did it and we are only informed about this but it is a profound discovery. We are informed that we human beings are mysteries to ourselves and to others. I can't top that. So i hope at the end of this hour to an hour and a half long episode which i hope the listeners. Don't mind i've certainly enjoyed partaking in it as max that i don't think you can you can say a a movie is the best movie the greatest movie but this is certainly an a very important movie. A movie worth studying worth talking about and its influence is is obviously extremely great one of the very very interesting factoid about this movie going back to the historical context of it was that hearst. Obviously william randolph. Hearst very upset with this movie's creation and this man held tremendous power both in hollywood and in the country in general and of no pressure of his direct pressure his own. The heads of the other major hollywood studios offered are ko. Who released this movie. Had the deal with austin wells. They offered a million dollars which obviously no short some money at the time to not release it not only to not release it to burn the negative. An arco declined the offer now given the controversy surrounding it and the desire people not to make this man angry. The movie did not do well. I think it made back. Its money in the end. It did not make a million dollars in profit by any means but credits who knows exactly their motivations at the time. But we're certainly all luckier as a society that are. Ko wasn't completely dollar incense driven in that moment in time and said no. This is an important movie. Say too close so there you have it. Ted thank you so much. I am very well. I'm very excited to have you back. I hope our audience feels the same way. I'm sure they do because you're episodes do well and rightfully so i enjoy our conversations over and out. That concludes our episode on citizen kane. I would love to hear what you think of this. Classic movie must feel free to tweet at movie must spot or email. Classic movie must g mail dot com. You can listen to all our episodes or learn more about the show on our website. Classic movie must dot com support the show and received cool perks on patriotic like becoming a producer of the show. And get your name read at the end of every episode just like our current producers. don hoffman lee eleanor. Be and max on redid. Thank you all for your generous patronage. Checkout all our support tears and the rewards over at patriot dot com slash classic movie musts on the next episode. We're discussing the roman polanski horror film rosemary's baby rosemary's baby is available for streaming rental on itunes amazon youtube and google play. Remember episodes released every friday on all podcasts services. Thank you so much for listening until the next episode. keep up with your classics.

charles foster kane kane thatcher susan alexander orson welles agnes moorehead mr bernstein dorothy common gore rosebud thompson ted walsh susan cain bernard hermann Cain charles foster Kane mr thatcher gregg toland max parrilla nineteen forty one citizen kan
How to Avoid Your Neighbors

Aerial America

01:10 min | 2 years ago

How to Avoid Your Neighbors

"It's rumored the J lover in warden built his home a rock. So no one good bother him. Brenton neighbors were skeptical that the house would exist here or that the owner which day in. But wouldn spent every summer here until he died in nineteen thirty eight. His wife remained into lived after nineteen forty one. For the next twenty years, the house stood empty when architect Henry would bought the home in nineteen sixty one with three thousand six hundred dollars. He's owned it ever since.

Brenton Henry three thousand six hundred dol twenty years
S6: March Mysteries: March 27, 2020: Yoshikawa Arrives

Parcast Presents

12:14 min | 1 year ago

S6: March Mysteries: March 27, 2020: Yoshikawa Arrives

"On March Twenty Seventh Nineteen Forty one twenty nine year old Japanese spy. Takeo Yoshikawa arrived in Honolulu Hawaii. He was tasked with observing the positions of naval forces in Pearl Harbor and would be a prominent figure in planning the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor later that year. If you enjoy this episode and WANNA listen to more true crime events from history. Check out our series. Today in true crime you can find new episodes every day followed today in true crime. Free on spotify or wherever? You listen to podcasts. I today is Friday. March twenty seventh twenty twenty on this day in nineteen forty one Japanese spy take. Ko Yoshikawa arrived in Hawaii. He was a key figure in planning surprise attack on Pearl Harbor later that year. Welcome to today and true crime apart cast original today recovering the espionage activity of Japanese spy Takeo Yoshikawa. Let's go back to Honolulu. Hawaii on March twenty seventh nineteen forty one when the Japanese passenger liner need Tom aroo docked at Honolulu's peer eight. The customs officials waiting on shore had no idea it was carrying a spy. And even if they had known spy was amongst the ship's passengers he wouldn't have aroused their suspicion as the twenty nine year old disembarked. He naturally blended into the crowd he was of medium and build and his slicked back hair fit well with the current style his neck wreathed in a traditional flower lay. The spy headed for the customs. Line it was his first major test. If the immigration officials suspected him his operation would be over before it even began. He identified himself as Tadashi. Morimura the newest junior diplomat at the Japanese consulate but in reality he was to Keio Yoshikawa Naval Reserve Ensign and Japanese spy. After graduating with honors from the Imperial Japanese Naval College in Nineteen Thirty Three Yoshikawa had passed submarine and pilot training although a stomach ailment ended his combat career after only two years. Yoshi choas experience still made him a valuable asset to his country offered a position in the navy's intelligence division Yoshikawa dedicated four years to learning English. And everything he could about the American Navy's resources in the Pacific in March nineteen forty one. Yoshikawa was called into action. The Japanese military was preparing to go to war with the US and to stage a surprise attack on Hawaii. Yoshiko was job would be to observe the American naval positions and report on any movement as the plan developed despite his relatively low rank. Yoshiko was job was of the utmost importance. He was Japan's only military spy in Hawaii. If he couldn't reliably convey is observations. The attack would fail. The operation was so hush hush only the Japanese consulate general and the vice consul in Hawaii. New Yoshikawa was real identity although every spy has to avoid detection Yoshikawa was unique. Position made secrecy all the more important but his diplomatic status paired with Hawaii's sizeable Japanese population made it easy for him to move about the islands without drawing suspicion he could simply stroll through southern Oahu and visually keep stock of the ships in Pearl Harbor. And the plane's on Ford Island additionally his military training gave him a unique advantage in observing the naval positions. Yoshiko was swimming. Prowess allowed him to detail underwater placements along with tidal flows beach gradients and General Marine geography. His pilot training came in handy as well. He had no problem renting planes from Honolulu. Airports and getting a bird's eye view of the assembled military forces but in all reality there was no need for covert operations from Yoshikawa favourite tea house in the hills above Honolulu. He could see both the harbor and the airstrip. There were even convenient tourist telescopes inside the teahouse giving him a better view. Even if he had fallen under suspicion there was little the authorities could do to investigate Yoshikawa since he communicated through the consulate. The American counter intelligence agencies were prevented from legally monitoring his messages back to Japan by September. Nineteen Forty One. Yoshikawa had provided a near complete picture of the assembled American forces. Confident that they had the Intel. They needed the Japanese put their plans into motion. But YOSHIKAWA was job. Wasn't done yet coming up. The attack on Pearl Harbor takes shape now back to the story upon arriving in Honolulu on March Twenty Seventh Nineteen Forty one twenty nine year old Japanese spy. Takeo Yoshikawa was tasked with observing the Americans military positions specifically he monitored the naval forces in Pearl Harbor and the airstrip on Ford Island armed with his Intel the Japanese government honed in on Pearl Harbor as their target for a surprise attack on the United States following that decision. Yoshiko received a flurry of requests for the latest American fleet positions. Although he didn't know exactly when the attack would be Yoshikawa knew it could come at any moment over the course of November nineteen forty one. The questions from Japan became increasingly detailed ten days before the attack. A Lieutenant Commander in the Japanese navy disguised himself as a ship's steward in this disguise. He was able to personally get answers to nearly one hundred questions about Pearl Harbor from Yoshikawa after that exchange Yoshikawa was instructed to give daily updates on the fleet position the attack imminent at seven fifty five am on December seventh Yoshikawa was eating breakfast as usual when he heard the first explosions looking out his window he could see smoke rising from the harbour if the near constant explosions were obvious enough. He knew the attack had commenced when the Japanese radio station. He was listening to broadcasted the secret phrase. East wind rain during the weather forecast upon hearing the secret message Yoshikawa Hurry to the consulate and burned his code books and archived instructions. His actions didn't come a moment too soon. By eight thirty a M American authorities entered the Japanese consulate while Yoshikawa and his colleagues were held under guard. The FBI ransacked the Japanese offices. Thanks to Yoshiko was efforts. All they found was a half drawn. Sketch of Pearl Harbor in his trash can suspicious but hardly enough to out him as a spy. Still the consulates. Entire staff was confined in the building for the next ten days. Despite the lack of concrete evidence the Japanese men were escorted to a coast guard vessel and taken to San Diego in March. Nineteen forty two they were sent to an internment camp in Arizona that August Yoshikawa and the other diplomats were exchanged for American prisoners in Japan. Through it all. Nobody realized that Yoshikawa was a spy. They simply saw him. As a Japanese national in Japan Yoshikawa resumed working for naval intelligence. Though now that he was on the Americans radar he could no longer work as a spy. But that's suited him just fine as the war raged in the Pacific Yoshikawa married and had two children however he wasn't out of danger yet. When American troops occupied Japan in the wake of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Yoshikawa feared he'd get arrested because of his military position before they could track him down. Yoshikawa fled the city and posed as a rural Buddhist monk. The deception worked he remained undetected throughout the American occupation. Once they left in nineteen fifty two he returned to his family and lived the rest of his life in peace. However that didn't mean life was easy. There was no longer a military position for him and Yoshikawa struggled to find work. Ultimately his family had to rely on the money his wife made through insurance sales. Despite the incredibly important work he'd done for his country he received no recognition and no pension for the millions of people whose lives irrevocably changed. This would probably seem like a fair punishment. For one of the key cogs in the Pearl Harbor attack but like many spies Takeo Yoshikawa was just doing what is country asked of him and like many spies. He was ultimately tossed aside. Thanks for listening to today and true. Crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson for more exciting stories of covert operations and spycraft check out the podcast original espionage. Today in in true crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and all other podcast originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy. All of your favorite podcast originals. Like today in true crime for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream today in true crime on spotify. Just open the APP and type today in true crime in the search bar at podcast. Were grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network? We back with a brand new episode tomorrow. Intrude crime today. In true. Crime was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original it is executive produced by Max Cutler. Sound designed by billy pace with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Freddie Beckley. This episode of today in true crime was written by Alex. Benetton with writing assistance by Nora. Battelle. I'm Vanessa Richardson.

Takeo Yoshikawa Pearl Harbor Keio Yoshikawa Naval Reserve Honolulu Hawaii YOSHIKAWA Yoshikawa Japan Yoshikawa Japanese consulate Pacific Yoshikawa Yoshiko Hawaii Nagasaki Yoshikawa Japan Yoshikawa Imperial Japanese Naval Colleg spotify American Navy Ford Island Vanessa Richardson United States
Traveling Route 66

Aerial America

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Traveling Route 66

"Dusty ribbon reaches to the horizon. It may not look like much, but it's one of the most legendary roads in America route sixty six. John Steinbeck was the first dub this route. The mother wrote in his famous novel, the grapes of wrath. Commissioned in nineteen twenty six it ran from the mid west across the Great Plains to California. Cutting the drive from Chicago to Los Angeles by two hundred miles in Oklahoma. The new highway used existing primitive roads like this one called the ribbon road, a nine foot wide stretch, just big enough for passing model TS that plied the new route sixty six in the nineteen twenties and thirties. It wouldn't have been able to reach California without bridges like this one. The now historic pony bridge was completed in nineteen thirty-three. Named for the steel pony trusses that were used to build it for Oklahoma's. It was finished just in time within just five years, thousands of depression era migrants packed, all their belongings, into whatever vehicles. They had and crossed the pony bridge fleeing Oklahoma and it's dust bowl devastation to search for jobs and a better life. For those early. Travellers and others road houses and gas stations were their lifeline, and there may be no fuel. Stop on route sixty six more famous than this one. Lucille's place. Lucille Hammonds and her husband Karl opened this restaurant in nineteen forty one. When times got hard as they often did Lucille would trade gas for whatever weary travelers had to offer. That's how she earned the nickname mother of the mother owed. But as America's interstate highway system snaked across the land, Lucille's place and route sixty six were rendered obsolete. Though that hasn't put an end to nostalgia for this historic highway or new stops along the way.

Lucille Hammonds Oklahoma pony bridge America John Steinbeck California Great Plains Chicago Los Angeles Karl five years nine foot
December 15, 2019, on the National Day Calendar

The National Daily

01:57 min | 1 year ago

December 15, 2019, on the National Day Calendar

"This is the national daily. Welcome to December fifteenth on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate our nation's basic rights. It's and the pursuit of happiness found in small cakes. More after the break from her founder Marlow Anderson. Do you love to start the day with a smile joined. Join the celebration nation by picking up your very own twenty twenty national day calendar visit our website National Day calendar Dot Com for our full. Oh color printed guide to all the fun and unusual ways to celebrate every day. President Franklin D Roosevelt. I declared December fifteen as the bill of Rights Day in nineteen forty one on this day. He called upon the people of the United States to display the flag on public buildings and to meet together gather for such prayers and ceremonies as May seem appropriate to them passed by Congress on September. Twenty fifth seventeen eighty nine the bill of rights. It's places limits on government power celebrate by learning the lesser known facts surrounding are in alienable rights originally originally known as the one two three four cake for its recipe's ratio of butter sugar flour and eggs. The A cupcake is now more popular than ever. Because of its diversity and convenient schering size I documented in the eighteen twenty. A cookbook by Elisa is Lesley known as seventy five receipts for pastry cakes and sweetmeats we celebrate this classic confection on National Cupcake Day. Eh with our favorite modern twist. That fits any party thing. Learn more by following us at National Day calendar Dot Com or on facebook instagram and twitter. And thanks for joining us on our journey as we celebrate every day.

President Franklin D Roosevelt Lesley Marlow Anderson founder Congress facebook United States twitter instagram Elisa Twenty fifth
The Jedwabne massacre

Retropod

03:46 min | 2 years ago

The Jedwabne massacre

"Retro pod is sponsored by tito's handmade vodka drink responsibly hey history lovers on mike rosen walled with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered wars never really in there were the scars both physical and psychological then there's the matter of blame who costs what who is to blame earlier this year poets lawmakers advanced a bill that would make it a crime to blame polling for the nazi death camps and other german atrocities committed within the country during world war two the bill sparked an outcry from historians any israeli government that polling with white washing history in many critics used just one word as evidence yet about me here's what they mean in the summer of nineteen forty one the small eastern village of yet bought me with occupied as well as all of poland by contingent of german police on a blistering july day a group of polish men from around the town began rounding up jewish male residents forced the jews including the local rabbi to pull down the statue of lenin that leftover from the soviet occupation of the region then with the germans looking on the jews were taken to a bar in club in stabbed to death by their fellow townsman the carnage historians say didn't end there the rage why did as the day wore on more and more jews of all ages were packed in the barn with a crowd of townspeople in german police looking on the structure was set on fire of those basic facts there's little dispute about everything else there has been a raging debate the most serious controversy has centered on rock questions of complicity versus compulsion were the local so vietnam compelled to kill or were they instigators of a mass murderer cohen was under brutal nazi controlling time out three hundred miles to the south what's holding polish political prisoners it would become a killing factory in the final solution within a few months the nazi certainly set the conditions pretty extermination of the towns jews and the germans in the town could have stopped the massacre at any time but many scholars through the wreckage mastering numerous postwar trials in a three year investigation by national commission makes clear that the massacre amounted to the wheeling murder of polls by pulls it polish historian put it this way quote one day in july nineteen forty one half the population of a small east european town murdered the other half other scholars an increasingly published nationalist had push back hard on those who have held the townspeople responsible arguing giving that poll shouldn't be blamed for an atrocity that happened under the gays of armed occupiers as right wing factions have gain influence in the country and eventually a governing majority the denials of complicity have grow louder a memorial stone in the village was defaced faced with swastikas and two thousand eleven and two thousand sixteen the country's education minister speaking around the anniversary of the killings totally dismissed the idea of polls burning jews it was she said simply quote in

tito three year one day
The Ghost of Nol Coward Is Nowhere to Be Found in the Dull Blithe Spirit

TIME's Top Stories

03:57 min | 4 months ago

The Ghost of Nol Coward Is Nowhere to Be Found in the Dull Blithe Spirit

"The ghost of noel coward is nowhere to be found. And the dull blithe spirit by stephanie's jaric and no cowards nineteen forty one play blithe spirit in the film david lean made of it in nineteen forty one a delectable bon-bons laced with the driest of remove a writer toying with the occult as research for his next novel inadvertently conjures the ghost of his first wife who proceeds to wreak havoc on the life. He's built with his second towered one of the slighest wits of his century. The idea of pining for a loved one drained of all potential. Sentimentality and fashioned. It into a lively sophisticated farce only could make champagne out of grief. Now there's a ginger ale version to not that anyone asked for it. Director edward hall and writers piers ashworth meg leonard and nick more kroft have taken cowards premise and pumped extra sugar into it as well as some unnecessary preservatives. Dan stevens stars as blocked writer. Charles mine desperate to finish the script. He's promised to his father in law film producer. His wife ruth isla fisher flutters around him supportively when she's not tending to the couple's lavish property adecco modern sprawl of a house. That's the opposite of classically. Genteel british taste. The film is set in england in nineteen thirty seven but ruth is losing patience with her husband. He's been distant and preoccupied and their love. Life as suffered big ben stopped chiming charles tells. His doctor friend played by julian. Rhind tutt with forced tina's uncowed -ly vibe. If there ever were one ruth catches her husband gazing a photograph of his first wife elvira and feigns indifference then a seemingly phony spiritualist. Madame arkady played by judi dench surprises even herself by summoning a spirit. From beyond that of elvira. A devil may care. Blonde with a destructive streak. Played by leslie man. Charles who is at. I the only one who can see her falls under his deceased wife's spell. Meanwhile ruth goes about her shallow society lady business even as elvira strives to undermine her the ensuing. Battle is a supernatural cat. Fight over a man who's hardly worth their time. Cowards characters as he wrote them aren't exactly likable but their dazzling and they're sophisticated self-absorption. You wanna hang around them just to find out but they'll say next not so with versions hall gives us here. The problem isn't that the actors aren't up to the idea of coward. Man has a dizzy but sharp. Screwball quality stevens. Capable of terrific dashing. Goofiness gave one of the finest comic performances of last year as a stuck up puffed up pop star in eurovision song contest. The story of fire saga and fisher has marvelous comic timing as well. As an expressively cherubic face. Right out of a nineteen thirties comic strap but in this blyth spirit every gag. Hits the cartoonist. Thought you feel walloped rather than tickled and the writers of this new not so improved. Version have concocted a sentimental backstory. For madame auto coty. That throws the movie's tone out of whack. It says if hall doesn't trust his audience to appreciate cowards delightful acidity he scrubbed all of that away as if it were tarnished and not the actual shine studied an overworked this blithe spirit trips over its own echo plassnik feet somewhere. Coward is scowling.

jaric Director edward hall piers ashworth meg leonard elvira kroft Dan stevens ruth isla fisher ruth david lean noel coward chiming charles Rhind tutt Madame arkady stephanie Charles judi dench nick julian tina
December 7, 2019, on the National Day Calendar

The National Daily

01:49 min | 1 year ago

December 7, 2019, on the National Day Calendar

"This is the national daily welcome to December seven th on the National Day calendar. Today we are brought together in bittersweet celebration of of traditions that honor both life and death more after the break from our founder Marlow Anderson. Do you love to start the day with a smile. Join the celebration. A Nation by picking up your very own twenty twenty national day calendar visit our website National Day calendar Dot Com for full color printed guide. Hi To all the fun and unusual ways to celebrate every day National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day honors the more than thirty five hundred Americans who were injured or who lost their lives on December seventh nineteen forty one this attack by the Japanese. On our Hawaiian island bases was designed to destroy our US Pacific fleet and mark the beginning of our military involvement in world war. Two we remember the day that will live in infamy by displaying our nation's flag they get half-mast until sunset and listening to survivors share their stories of those first American casualties. Dating all the way back to the fourteen hundreds it wasn't until nineteen nineteen o four. That spun sugar got a wider audience. Very floss was introduced at the world's fair by dentists. William Morrison and confectioner urgency wharton whose machine turns sugar into pure profit selling over sixty eight thousand boxes for twenty five cents a piece today. We celebrate great national cotton. Candy Day as a treat that can still delight the young and old at circuses fairs and carnivals learn more by following us at National National Day calendar Dot com or on facebook instagram and twitter. And thanks for joining us on our journey as we celebrate every day.

Marlow Anderson Hawaiian island William Morrison founder facebook US twitter instagram
Cover-Up: The Cape Girardeau Crash Pt. 2

Extraterrestrial

43:10 min | 1 year ago

Cover-Up: The Cape Girardeau Crash Pt. 2

"It was a warm and sunny afternoon in Washington DC nineteen forty one just months before the US had joined World War Two forty-seven year-old Ohio Reverend Turner Hamilton Holtz ascended the stairs of the Oh Missouri where multiple civilian witnesses glimpsed the remains of an alien spacecraft and its inhabitants before being bullied into silence the military last week we discussed Reverend Huffman's experience being called to the crash site and performing last rites over the deceased extraterrestrials are we alone ever been alone will we be alone believable others may seem all too real but these stories shed light on human nature human beliefs and human psychology and fortress that had hosted many important men throughout history but hold wasn't there for an ordinary tour of the nation's historical landmark hot the statesman entered cautiously and the pastor hesitantly followed behind when Ho flipped on the lights the evangelist could we've visit the marvelous and strange stories about our encounters with beings from another world we're aware that some of these tales may seem completely on stories of alien visitation have been ingrained in human history alien life may not be confirmed but our obsession with it can't be ignored welcome to extra each story has garnered thousands if not millions of true believers and for that reason we think they're worth exploring at podcast we're grateful for you our listeners you're his instincts were right the secretary of state led him through a labyrinth of twists and turns until they finally reached a giant closed door or to keep what he was about to see a secret from everyone including his own family the day's events had to stay between the two men Oh had something important to share with him something that required the man of the cloth to take a solemn oath before entering the building Holtz one local reporter allegedly snapped an image of the scene and then passed the photograph off to the Reverend for safe keeping but after a family dinner do you allow us to do what we love let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter podcast network and if you enjoy today's episode the already the alleged photograph went missing and was never seen again this week we'll explore what could have happened to the materials that were collected at the terrestrial apar- cast original I'm bill and I'm tim you can find all episodes of extraterrestrial and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or where capital a section very few people even knew about Holt began to wonder whether they should turn back he felt like he didn't belong here ever you listen to podcasts to stream extraterrestrial for free on spotify just open the APP and type extra terrestrial in the search bar every Tuesday orioles have led to some of the biggest scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century Cordell Hull led his cousin passed the usual tour stops to a set of stairways that lead to a subterranean section beneath the knee believe what lay before him it was a chamber filled with a silver discs metallic debris and three small bodies around nineteen forty one reverend Turner Hamilton Holtz a forty seven year old ex-farmer turned minister travel served jars evidence that extraterrestrial life at nate contact with Earth Gerardo site is it possible that Cordell hull and Turner Holt Foul Net same wreckage in the basement of the Capitol building and could these material best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening the really does help this is our second episode on the Nineteen Forty One UFO crash landing in Cape Girardeau time to attend religious conferences halted also been appointed as a government advisor although his exact title is unknown to Washington DC from his home town of Greenwich Ohio he was a long married and respected member of the community who ventured to the country's capital from time to frequently the reverend would catch up with his seventy year old cousin entrusted friend. US Secretary of State Cordell Hull Hull was a well known was involved with important issues like developing closer relations with Latin America and advocating for trade liberalization he was clearly a familiar face own and accomplished politician who had access to many government resources he'd also played an instrumental part in getting his cousin the advisory role and inside the walls of the Capitol building as hall mentioned in his autobiography he spent years working closely with President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and thus was able to discuss any confidential issues candidly with him in turn hall says he received Frank Answers to most secret matt here's aside from his access to information hole was well acclimated with the layout of the Capitol building itself this happened to include many of the Secret Terry Hall met at the State Department headquarters it was on an afternoon sometime in mid nineteen forty one that hall asked his cousin to take it subterranean chambers that were off limits to the public during one of Reverend Holt frequent trips to Washington he and second quick trip across town with him to the Capitol building it was no secret that the Capitol building had just received a large group of new security officers sent from the FBI acted building in the entire nation and with good reason it's likely that members of Roosevelt's new security forces were already familiar with Secretary Hi Secret Service and the DC Metro Transit Police Force under Roosevelt's orders Roosevelt was confident that the capital was now the most ever witnessed the room was dank cold and sterile and on the floor in front of them were stacks of open crates filled with metallic debris shards and shreds of an unknown silver material. There were some larger round objects partially covered by rose to one of the capital's Darkest Secrets Cordell hull let Reverend Hall down a series of stairs and into the Unin have Hallway Holt got his answer Secretary Hall opened the door and flipped a light switch revealing one of the most baffling scenes the reverend head where are we going he was beginning to get nervous as the silent hall refused to give him any warning about what would come next when they reached the end of the lawn formaldehyde as each jar seemed to be preserving what he described as a gray and extremely slender non human creature the of State Cordell hull which is possibly why they let him enter with his gassed unquestioned little did they know that Holt was about to be expe- gray skinned slender and shape with extremely long arms but they're most striking feature was there giant bulbous heads even Chen was absolutely shocked just how light the other worldly material was reverend holds description of the found objects is nearly identical while the whole looked around whole continued to reiterate just how top secret these findings were secretary hall whispered the wasn't some sort of Prank or hoax Ho was dead serious once the flabbergasted whole Zabel to gain his bearings Cordell hull do they left the subterranean basement Reverend Holt and Cordell hull spent plenty of time obsessing over these massive cranium 's they continue to discuss the sheet and propped against the opposite wall in moments it became clear to Reverend Holtz that he was looking at the crash debris from a damaged aircraft he's are creatures from another world hold new the secretary was an honorable and knowledgeable man and by the look on his face this mummified stuff door mounted meant that they were most likely being shelved for some sort of future use but the question is why encouraged him to get closer and even handle the evidence the odd Holtz approach the silver disc and grab the edge he effortlessly lifted the most peculiar artifacts in the room with a large glass jars filled with transparent gel reverend hold assumed it could only be added basement they ascended deeper into the sub basement which many historians believe is even larger than the space above ground hold asked to the craft that Reverend Huffman saw on the night of the crash in Cape Girardeau since Holtz account takes place only a few months later in the two men were complete strangers it seems extremely unlikely that Reverend Huffman told Holt his story especially since Huffman was allegedly sworn commits that the Cape Girardeau evidence was critical to the American atomic weapons program disturbing attribute for years afterward the to sincerely speculated about what the head size implied about the creatures intelligence is alien bodies were kept in one of the most important buildings in the United States with these creatures return and one day threaten the nation's capital if the just jars he simply couldn't believe his is the metallic disk and debris was one thing but the small bodies encapsulated in front of nineteen forty one and what Cordell Hall certainly didn't know was that these materials may have gone on to aid in the research and am appeared to be other worldly specimens the creatures were about four feet in height in a fetal position inside the jars they were apps he was even shown the materials the same secretive manner as he shared them with the reverend unfortunately secretary hall never told Turner Holt where the evidence came from or how the government came into possession of it but one thing is for sure the timing seems to line up well with the Cape Girardeau crash sure beings from other planets fascinating but out of this world body odor not so much that's why I recently decided to switch from regular antiperspirant to nate Russia's findings keep in mind the United States Pentagon didn't officially open it's doors until nineteen forty three so it's possible that the Capitol building I'm in using Promo code extra during checkout that's native deodorant dot com and Promo Code Extra at checkout for twenty percent off your first purchase if I can record in the morning run errands during the day and still feel fresh enough to grab dinner out with no sign or smell a voter needed eliminates wetness leaves no stain it's an abundance of old episodes across their entire catalog that means seventy four cults episodes eighty-three serial killers episodes and a whopping one hundred you've all natural deodorant designed to keep you feeling fresh all day my days tend to be pretty long so finding deodorant that lasts can be a tall order with native then again it's possible that Cordell hull was never formally briefed on the stored alien materials but only stumbled upon them by accident asked yet native offers free returns and exchanges in the USA. So you can try it out for yourself. risk-free received twenty percent off your first purchase by visiting NATIVE DEODORANT DOT COM. Hey what was the government hoping to learn from these strange little creatures Ho allegedly told Reverend hold that afternoon we can't no where the evidence had come from or what would happen to it next but one Nazi scientists may have had the answers in the nineteen forties and but they did features a variety of classic fragrances for men and women such as Coconut Vanilla lavender and rose and seasonal sense perfect for the holidays and thirty four unsolved murders episodes are available to listen to right now you can revisit podcasts classics about the terrifying Manson family called the killer clown Carr's highly classified nuclear weapons program the Manhattan project was beginning to take shape and eventually proved to be a success the top secret John John Wayne Casey and the world's most famous killer Jack The ripper plus there are dozens of episodes from shows like haunted places conspiracy theories unexplained doc ration- produced an atomic bomb that would make history and aid in ending the war five years later when World War Two was in its final stages American ask you let us do what we love and for that you're the best fans around get caught up on all these episodes for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts secrecy terrified to tell anyone outside his own family about the UFO crash after lifting the saucer hall took a closer look at the contents of the glass and is made with simple and safe ingredients like coconut oil shea butter and Tapioca starch that means no aluminum or harmful chemicals added I like cucumber in an allied forces scoured occupied Germany to collect as much military technological and scientific research as possible or related secret than the atom bomb itself he made it clear that the hardware was not from this world but instead of an extraterrestrial nature hell the American people about this as it would probably start a panic at the secretary of state's all ready been briefed on the topic was this something he had thirty five year old auto krause was one of those scientists as a nuclear physicist krause was put to use in a variety of nuclear materials and documents were confiscated and some of the country's most brilliant minds were seized and interrogated roughly one thousand six hundred Germans other contemporary researchers uncovered krause claim to be involved in creating a highly classified propulsion device it was allegedly was the most suitable place to store the evidence for further research during that time period and the fact that the bodies were preserved in formaldehyde instead of dried out designed with aerodynamic alien technology that was also said to be collected from the crash in Missouri in nineteen forty one which leads us to and now back to the story in mid nineteen forty one forty-seven-year-old Reverend Turner Holtz accompanied Secretary of State Courts Element of one of the most dangerous weapons ever created by man coming up one scientist from Operation Paper The American scientific community was able to finish the operation thanks to very advanced technology called from a crash disc that was intas were brought to the US and forced to aid in the development of new weapons and technologies this covert affair was known as Operation Paper Clip Research Sites on American soil according to Paul Blake Smith's Book M. O. forty-one the bombshell before Roswell Krause hint stories and many more and here's the best part you don't even need to do anything these episodes are already in your feed thank you again for your incredible support of parking Russian in the Oval Office the timing of this meeting lines up perfectly with the Cape Girardeau crash which happened on April Twelfth Nineteen forty one if these beings were able to travel from planet to planet than what else were they capable of perhaps hall and halt were also genuinely disturbed that these L. Hall to the Capitol building where he discovered extraterrestrial materials that had been recovered from the crash site Cordell Ho claim to not pushes meeting with Roosevelt on Wednesday so General Marshall may have felt somewhat entitled to the materials he recovered maybe even responsible for them conceal a crashed UFO guy claimed that the materials used in the exercise were unlike anything he had seen before called from a landing site in Missouri in nineteen forty one krause went on to say that the evidence gathered for the research was considered more tops the hey it's ten and bill have you heard the big news as a thank you to all of you credible fans park asked has re released while Bush was eager to get his hands on the debris for his research Marshall possibly felt that the crash was a matter of national defense as unsually made its way onto the military training grounds of North and South Carolina one source named Guy Simone claims he was part of a massive military Dr Bush was dedicated to FDR and the two had a close relationship he was also known to be the president's trusted physician in fact range hieroglyphic markings that he could not understand in fact guy simone story was nearly identical to Reverend William Huffman's account of the crashed saucer developed the atomic bomb was ordered to keep this project secret some recovered memorandum's indicate that Dr Vanita Bush may have assembled even down to the gaping hole that allowed him to peak inside however with no way to verify either story we can't be sure what's truth the famous Capitol building at his side was his cousin and US Secretary of State Cordell Hull Holt was transfixed by the majestic assault George Marshall did his best to keep the materials locked away from Dr Bush or anyone else who had plans to tinker with them perhaps training program in the summer of nineteen forty one in both states guy apparently participated in an exercise that taught soldiers how to recover and this is why the materials were temporarily kept in the basement of the Capitol building however if some individuals are to be believed the craft mm-hmm FDR had a potential new weapon that had landed right in his lap and Dr Vanita Bush would be one of the first people invited to play with a new they're kind was being stored and experimented on nearby during a time of war could invading nation enter the building and confiscate the Roosevelt's new toy but one man's do it between Bush and the evidence from the crash General George Marshall the army chief of and what's fiction one thing that is known for certain is that in October of nineteen forty one FDR finally gave Bush go ahead cereals to the Missouri Institute of Aeronautics that fateful night hypothetically he would also have been the most qualified candidate to deliver a report on the crash the fifty year old doctor Bush reportedly joined FDR on the morning of Wednesday April Sixteenth nineteen forty one for a top secret one American engineer and inventor Dr Vanita Bush who was appointed president of the National Defense Research Committee under Roosevelt in nineteen forty dealt with before or discussed in meetings it seems as though the secretary already understood the impact this information could have all team to specifically focus on the crashed technologies in Cape Girardeau this effort is suspected to have gone on well into the nineteen fifties Ashen recovery firsthand to President Roosevelt General Marshall Probably briefed the president sometime between the Monday after the wreck and Dr Staff was possibly the highest ranking person at the scene in Cape Girardeau this means he's also likely to have overseen the recovery and delivery of the mission including a cracked open space ship through which he could clearly see a cockpit with a switchboard and tiny seats inside or some Roosevelt ordered top American scientists including Professor Einstein to infuse their atomic research with the technology recovered from the new onto President Truman's term some of this theory seems to be backed up by FDR's office memorandum's one such missive shows that intern Charlotte shared the story shortly thereafter her testimony was the first time that the wider world learn anything of the Cape Girardeau crash other accounts surfaced after Charlotte went public but there was only one piece of civilian evidence that seemed to exist garland phony Frana burgers picture the snapshot allegedly showed two men in matching hats propping up a four foot alien with extremely long arms stating this conclusion was reached as a result of comparisons of artifacts redacted discovery in one thousand nine hundred forty one the redact Manhattan project conducted a large amount of its research and development most shockingly the paper states even the recovery case of nineteen forty one found at Cape Girardeau were in fact nothing but a small plane crash why did the paper trail and secret studies continue nearly a decade later the proof was last seen in the hands of Walter Fisk the self proclaimed a former US adviser and psychologists turned insurance salesman as we and did not create a unified intelligence effort to exploit possible technology gains with the exception of the Manhattan project we now have an he was the head of the AMC or the air material command as well as the foreign technology division based out of Ohio's right field there was another top secret discovery made in nineteen forty one that had nothing to do with extraterrestrial beings or a crash landing we have to return outside of Roswell in nineteen forty seven the leaked documents were written up by key air force personnel under the orders of General Nathan F twining in a set of documents known as twining reports a series of classified letters that discussed some elusive and foreign materials that had been recently discovered your weapons research at a base in New Mexico presumably twining was talking about the famous research facility known as Los Alamos where the twining's reports made references to a one thousand nine hundred forty one UFO crash in addition he discussed foreign materials being used for words or phrases it's difficult to categorize this as concrete evidence for the Cape Girardeau crash when key information is missing but if the materials of comparisons of artifacts from the Missouri Discovery in one thousand nine hundred forty one but that blank space could also fit any number of other work if there were no valuable other worldly materials that aided in the war effort then what was general twining referring to his reports could it be that and although Fisk maintained that he returned the photo to Huffman in nineteen ninety one UFO investigator named Ryan would reportedly found the elderly clear weapons as well as other heavily monitored classified materials maybe even extraterrestrial spacecraft earned the report is definitely referring to the Cape Girardeau crash one line in the document has a slight redaction that makes the sentence even more suspicious did block holds just enough space type the words from the Missouri which would make the sentence read this conclusion was reached as a result what happened to the Huffman's alien photo while Walter Fisk did seem to remember Charlotte Man's mother even casually referring to her as fortuity to extend our technology beyond the threshold that we have achieved could this be the smoking gun as far as you follow a circus the night of the crash in order to analyse its legitimacy there are quite a few accounts recorded from the night of the crash the most influential being according to wood when he was welcomed into fists home he was fascinated that the man had endless books on. UFO's during the Fisk in Albuquerque New Mexico he claimed to have visited Fisk attractive middle-class home which was located only a few miles from Kirtland Air Force Base perhaps he was just some UFO fanatic who was dying to get close to the truth either way Ryan would seem to only care about one answer conversation Fisk also admitted to having taken a photo of an unidentified flying object from the window of a well known government building in D Kevin William Huffman's his wife Floyd reportedly recounted the story to her granddaughter Charlotte Man in Nineteen Eighty-four while on her deathbed Sandia national laboratories and the Manzano weapons storage area. The ladder was rumored to have been at one time the home of closely guarded new researcher Linda L Wallace reportedly contacted him hoping for a different story the irritated old fisk was less than forthright but did we see the Cagey fisk refused to go into more detail on the topic so was it a mere coincidence that he now happened to live down the husband had been an army spy an undercover operative who was assisting with top secret operations but since his death there has been no evidence discussed last episode Fists Asks to Borrow The photograph after the Reverend Sun Guy Hoffman showed him the image at a dinner party it was never seen again of any of that being true the Huffman's alien photo never resurfaced was the image lost handed over by Fisk to another red he claimed to not remember ever taking or even seeing the photograph after hitting a dead end with the elderly Fisk Ryan would La army base where Walter seemed to spend a questionable amount of time Mrs Fiske reportedly told Linda that she was certain her of these small Missouri town were all participants in a massive hoax coming up we'll take a closer look at Cordell Hall Mitt to Linda that he'd seen the priceless alien photograph he then reverted back to his original story that he'd already given the photo back to Huffman but fisk also admitted to Linda that he'd shown the image to a friend who was eight Marine biologist back in the day hoping to get a better idea of what but he always managed to maintain the same closing statement he gave the photo back to the Huffman Family Linda was the last person known laughed with no new or useful information shortly before Walter fix death former Psych Ston resident and Dan Turner Holtz Story and analyze the legitimacy of the huffman's prized alien photograph and now back to our story St from a few of the most top secret government facilities in the country is it possible that fisk was actually some sort of operative or expert government employees to archive and keep hidden or is it possible that the Cape Girardeau crash never happened at all and the people interview fisk before he died when she spoke to his wife she learned that the woman had always been suspicious her husband especially after they moved near an they're under the orders of sixty year old general George Marshall the US Army Chief of staff who allegedly went onto stage similar UFO Recovery Operations Hilton no concrete evidence that three alien bodies and down spacecraft were recovered that April night which leads to questions about the legitimacy thought to be the remnants of an alien spacecraft very similar if not identical evidence was spotted by seventy year old secretary of S- The creature was the story then morphed into Walter having only told his friend about the image instead of showing tour physics narrative was shifty and a supposed UFO in Cape Girardeau Missouri in nineteen forty one led to the gathering and classifying of materials only gave her father the print so if he was genuinely worried about having the evidence in his possession why not hand over the negative as well one of the most difficult records and seeking out corroborating sources westwood had an impossible time finding anyone who had even heard rumors about the Ufo Lynn State Cordell hull and his forty seven year old cousin Reverend Turner Holt in the Capitol building that same year the materials were most likely stored but aside from the leaked twining memorandum's which contained a brief but vaguely possible mention of Cape Girardeau in nineteen forty one there is lit or were they also scared into silence on the night of the crash perhaps they assume that phonies film was collected along with any other evidence get with his men fifty-year-old Dr Veneer Bush inevitably pride the materials from the generals hands in order to further progress on atomic weaponry development photograph where do they go and what happened to the original roll of film and the negatives neither Linda Wallace nor any of the later named James Westwood later put Charlotte's account under a microscope when Westwood arrived in Cape Girardeau in nineteen ninety eight he began reviewing all things about Charlotte's story is that the account is not her own since the story was passed down from her grandfather William Huffman to her their story to paranormal investigator Stan Hernandez but Hernandez found a few problems with Phillips account there seemed to be no hard Arvo be short the county Coroner Cape Girardeau novel was used to handling dead bodies as part of his daily routine and therefore seems like the most likely candidates

US President Franklin Delano Roos Washington Cordell Hull Hull Fisk Reverend Holt Secret Terry Hall Secretary State Department hall Latin America UFO Kirtland Air Force Base Kevin William Huffman DC Metro Transit Police Force Frank Albuquerque FBI Manzano
Spies: Claire Philips

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:19 min | Last month

Spies: Claire Philips

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Manica today's spy was spurred to action after seeing the horrible japanese treatment of american prisoners of war during world war two. She used her skills as a nightclub hostess and entertainer to gain information and funds to help the allies. Even after she was captured and tortured. She never gave up her fellow spies. Let's talk about claire phillips. Claire may bell. Snyder was born on december second. Nineteen hundred seven michigan to jesse marine engineer and his wife mabel when clare was young her family relocated to portland oregon. Clara graduated from high school but she didn't care for academics and ran away to join a traveling circus and nineteen twenty-three cleared then performed with the baker stock company a theatre group based in portland for a short time before working in nightclubs during the nineteen thirties. After that she joined another traveling music company and toward east asia eventually landing in the philippines performing in a nightclub in the philippines clermont filipino. Sailor manuel went debts pair married and had a daughter named dan but the marriage fell apart nearly as quickly as it started in clare turned back to portland with their daughter that said it seems their marriage would be on again off again for many years. Claire didn't stay in the. Us for long. She returned to the philippines. Nineteen forty one to perform in nightclubs. Once again this time under the name. Claire fuentes while they're claris. Seductive singing attracted the attention of sergeant. John v phillips of the thirty first infantry regiment according to claire she and john got engaged but the happy occasion was marred by dangerous times ahead. World war two was well underway in december of nineteen forty one. The japanese imperial army invaded the philippines clarin. John fled with the us. Army away from manila to the bataan peninsula on christmas eve. Nineteen forty one. Clear leader said that she and sergeant john phillips were married. The couple was not together long before john. Return to battle in nineteen forty two. John was taken prisoner of the filipino. American army surrendered. He was sent to a prison camp. Where american prisoners were treated brutally. He would remain there until his death. Clare witnessed firsthand with the american prisoners. Endured during the bataan. Death march this knowledge of what her husband was likely. Subjected to in prison inspired claire to join the resistance she decided to go undercover as a philippine. Born italian dancer named dorothy clara went s alongside filipino. Dancer felli corcuera clear open to cabaret and gentlemen's club named club. Sabaki claire used her singing to attract japanese officers as patrons using the cabaret as cover. Claire obtained information from the japanese. She also used the money. She earned to smuggle food and medicine to posters of war. Because claire would smuggle messages in her bra. She became known as high pockets club. Sue baki was home to a successful spiring for many years. The information claire collected was transmitted to american forces in the pacific and used to predict and counter japanese military activities but in may of nineteen forty. Four clair's operation was exposed. Japanese military captured. One of her messengers clare was apprehended and sent to prison. Despite being tortured with waterboarding beating cigarette burns and mock beheadings. Claire never gave up information to the japanese. She was rescued in february of nineteen forty five. When american soldiers liberated the prisoners after her release. Claire moved back to portland. Clare suffered from post traumatic stress disorder due to her time in prison. She wrote a memoir detailing. Her work experience titled manila espionage which was released in nineteen forty seven. The memoir became the basis of the nineteen fifty. One film i was an american spy starring and russia at the recommendation of general douglas. Macarthur clare was awarded the medal of freedom in nineteen fifty one. Well hello jen clark. Yours is a heroism of which all your fellow americans may. Well be proud on may twenty second. Nineteen sixty cleared passed away from meningitis. She was fifty two years old all month for talking about spies for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter romantic weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia manica special. Thanks to liz. Caplan at my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow.

philippines Claire jenny kaplan Manica portland claire phillips jesse marine clare baker stock company Sailor manuel claire Claire fuentes John v phillips thirty first infantry regiment japanese imperial army bataan peninsula American army mabel dorothy clara felli corcuera
Meat Supplier JBS Says It Paid $11 Million Ransom to Hackers

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:47 min | 5 d ago

Meat Supplier JBS Says It Paid $11 Million Ransom to Hackers

"Edward jones it's time for investing to feel individual learn more at edward jones dot com slash. Advice here's your morning brief for thursday june tenth. I'm keith collins for the wall street journal supplier. Gps had it paid eleven million dollar ransom to cybercriminals who temporarily knocked out the company's plans last week the head of the brazilian companies. Us business told the wall street journal that the ransom in bitcoin was made to protect jbs. from further disruptions. The hack was part of a wave of cyber attacks that have hit a number of companies cryptocurrency platforms coin base and four one k. Provider for us all or teaming up to offer a small group of workers the option to invest in digital currency. The deal will allow eligible workers to invest up to five percent of their 401k. Contributions and bitcoin and other digital currencies starting next month in the uk today president biden and prime minister. Boris johnson are expected to announce that a task force will work to restart travel between the us and the uk that was suspended. Because of the pandemic the two leaders will also unveil a wide ranging atlantic charter aimed at solidifying relations between the nations. It's modeled on the nineteen forty one agreement between franklin d roosevelt and winston churchill. According to johnson's office markets in asia mostly ended higher european shares. Were mixed in early. Trading in the us investors will be watching consumer inflation figures and weekly jobless numbers due out this morning. We have a lot more coverage of the day's news on the wsj's what's news. Podcast you can add to your playlist on your smart speaker or listening. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts lately. It's been hard to think about the future but at edward jones. We want you to get back to drafting dreams and building plans for tomorrow. Learn more at edward jones dot com slash advice.

keith collins wsj edward jones Edward jones president biden jbs franklin d roosevelt Boris johnson us uk winston churchill johnson asia
March 27, 2020: Yoshikawa Arrives

Today in True Crime

13:55 min | 1 year ago

March 27, 2020: Yoshikawa Arrives

"On March Twenty Seventh Nineteen Forty one twenty nine year old Japanese spy. Takeo Yoshikawa arrived in Honolulu Hawaii. He was tasked with observing the positions of naval forces in Pearl Harbor and would be a prominent figure in planning the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor later that year. If you enjoy this episode and WanNa hear more tales of scandal murder and whodunnit checkout podcast presents March mysteries. You'll hear episodes from some of your favorite podcast shows like unsolved murders conspiracy theories unexplained mysteries and more follow. Parkas presents. Free on spotify and anywhere. You listen to podcasts. Today is Friday March twenty seventh twenty twenty on this day in nineteen forty one Japanese spy take Ko Yoshikawa arrived in Hawaii. He was a key figure in planning the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor later that year. Welcome to today and true crime. Apar- cast original today recovering the espionage activity of Japanese spy Takeo Yoshikawa. Let's go back to Honolulu. Hawaii on March twenty seventh nineteen forty one when the Japanese passenger liner need Tom Meru docked at Honolulu pier eight. The customs officials waiting on shore had no idea it was carrying a spy. And even if they had known a spy was amongst the ship's passengers he wouldn't aroused their suspicion as the twenty nine year old disembarked he naturally blended into the crowd he was of medium and build and his slicked back hair fit well with the current style his neck wreathed in a traditional flower lay. The spy headed for the customs line. It was his first major test. If the immigration officials suspected him his operation would be over before it even began. He identified himself as Tadashi. Morimura the newest junior diplomat at the Japanese consulate but in reality he was to Keio Yoshikawa Naval Reserve Ensign and Japanese spy. After graduating with honors from the Imperial Japanese Naval College in Nineteen Thirty-three Yoshikawa had passed submarine and pilot training although a stomach ailment ended his combat career. After only two years Yoshiko was experienced. Still made him a valuable asset to his country offered a position in the navy's intelligence division. Yoshikawa dedicated four years to learning English. And everything he could about the American Navy's resources in the Pacific in March nineteen forty one. Yoshikawa was called into action. The Japanese military was preparing to go to war with the US and wanted to stage a surprise attack on Hawaii. Yoshikawa job would be to observe the American naval positions and report on any movement as the plan developed. Despite his relatively low rank. Yoshi caused job was of the utmost importance. He was Japan's only military spy in Hawaii. If he couldn't reliably convey is observations. The would fail. The operation was so harsh hush only the Japanese consulate general and the vice consul in Hawaii. New Yoshi cowboys real identity. Although every spy has to avoid detection Yoshikawa was unique. Position made secrecy all the more important but his diplomatic status paired with Hawaii's sizeable Japanese population made it easy for him to move about the islands without drawing suspicion he could simply stroll through southern Oahu and visually keep stock of the ships in Pearl Harbor. And the plane's on Ford Island additionally his military training gave him a unique advantage in observing the naval positions Yoshikawa swimming prowess allowed him to detail underwater placements along with title Flows Beach Gradients and General Marine geography. His pilot training came in handy as well. He had no problem renting planes from the Honolulu. Airports and getting a bird's eye view of the assembled military forces but in all reality there was no need for covert operations from Yoshikawa 's favorite tea house in the hills above Honolulu. He could see both the harbor and the airstrip. There were even convenient tourist telescopes inside the teahouse giving him a better view. Even if he had fallen under suspicion there was little the authorities could do to investigate Yoshikawa since he communicated through the consulate. The American counterintelligence agencies were prevented from legally monitoring his messages back to Japan by September nineteen forty one. Yoshiko had provided a near complete picture of the assembled American forces confident that they had the Intel. They needed the Japanese put their plans into motion. But YOSHIKAWA was job. Wasn't done yet coming up. The attack on Pearl Harbor takes shape high listeners. I'm excited to announce that crime junkies Ashley. Flowers has a new podcast original series. I think you'll really enjoy. It's called supernatural with Ashley. Flowers and you can find brand new episodes every Wednesday. We all know that most mysteries can be solved by looking at the facts but sometimes the facts don't lead to a logical explanation and the truth lies somewhere in the unknown in supernatural with Ashley. Flowers Ashley takes a deep dive into the strange and surreal to explain some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences each week. She'll dig into a different crime or mystery where the most fitting theory isn't always the most conventional from exorcisms to unsolved murders to alien abductions. Ashley will take on. The tails challenged the unexplained and dissect the facts with a heavy helping of skepticism and rationale. So are you ready to get to the bottom of history's most peculiar events? Follow supernatural with Ashley. Flowers free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back to the story upon arriving in Honolulu on March Twenty Seventh Nineteen Forty one twenty nine year old Japanese spy to Keio Yoshikawa was tasked with observing the Americans military positions specifically he monitored the naval forces in Pearl Harbor and the airstrip on Ford Island armed with his Intel. The Japanese government honed in on Pearl Harbor as their target for a surprise attack on the United States following that decision Yoshikawa received a flurry of requests for the latest American fleet positions. Although he didn't know exactly when the attack would be Yoshikawa new could come at any moment over the course of November nineteen forty one. The questions from Japan became increasingly detailed ten days before the attack. A Lieutenant Commander in the Japanese navy disguised himself as a ship's steward in this disguise. He was able to personally get answers to nearly one hundred questions about Pearl Harbor from Yoshikawa after that exchange Yoshikawa was instructed to give daily updates on the fleet position. The attack was imminent at seven. Fifty five am on December seventh Yoshikawa was eating breakfast as usual when he heard the first explosions looking out his window he could see smoke rising from the harbour if the near constant explosions weren't obvious enough. He knew the attack had commenced when the Japanese radio station. He was listening to broadcasted the secret phrase. East wind rain during the weather forecast upon hearing the secret message. Yoshikawa hurry to the consulate and burned his code books and archived instructions. His actions didn't come a moment too soon by eight thirty. Am American authorities entered the Japanese consulate while Yoshikawa and his colleagues were held under guard? The FBI ransacked the Japanese offices. Thanks to Yoshi call was efforts. All they found was a half drawn. Sketch of Pearl Harbor in his trash can suspicious but hardly enough to out him as a spy. Still the consulates. Entire staff was confined in the building for the next ten days. Despite the lack of concrete evidence the Japanese men were escorted to a coast guard vessel and taken to San Diego in March. Nineteen forty two they were sent to an internment camp in Arizona that August Yoshikawa and the other diplomats were exchanged for American prisoners in Japan. Through it all. Nobody realized that Yoshikawa was a spy. They simply saw him. As a Japanese national back in Japan Yoshikawa resumed working for naval intelligence. Though now that he was on the Americans radar he could no longer work as a spy. But that's suited him just fine as the war raged in the Pacific Yoshikawa married and had two children however he wasn't out of danger yet. When American troops occupied Japan in the wake of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Yoshikawa feared he'd get arrested because of his military position before they could track him down. Yoshiko of fled the city and posed as a rural Buddhist monk. The deception worked he remained undetected throughout the American occupation. Once they left in nineteen fifty two he returned to his family and lived the rest of his life in peace. However that didn't mean life was easy. There was no longer a military position for him and Yoshikawa struggled to find work. Ultimately his family had to rely on the money his wife made through insurance sales. Despite the incredibly important work he'd done for his country he received no recognition and no pension for the millions of people whose lives irrevocably changed. This would probably seem like a fair punishment for one of the key. Cogs in the Pearl Harbor attack but like many spies Takeo Keio Yoshikawa was just doing what is country asked of him and like many spies. He was ultimately tossed aside. Thanks for listening today and true. Crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson for more exciting stories of covert operations and spycraft check out the podcast original espionage today in true crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music? But now spotify's making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like today and true crime for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream today in true crime on spotify. Just open the APP and type today in true crime in the search bar at park cast. Were grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network? We'll be back with a brand new episode tomorrow in True Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original it is executive produced by Max Cutler. Sound design by billy pace with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Freddie Beckley. This episode of today and true crime was written by Alex Benetton with writing assistance. Bhai Nora Battelle. I'm Vanessa Richardson High Listeners. If you haven't heard already I highly recommend you check out the new podcast original series supernatural with Ashley Flowers every Wednesday. Take a deep dive into the strange and surreal to find the truth behind some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences search for supernatural with Ashley Flowers in the spotify APP and listened free today.

Takeo Yoshikawa Pearl Harbor Yoshikawa Keio Yoshikawa Naval Reserve Honolulu Hawaii Takeo Keio Yoshikawa spotify YOSHIKAWA Japanese consulate Ashley Flowers Hawaii Japan Yoshikawa Pacific Yoshikawa Keio Yoshikawa Nagasaki Yoshikawa Japan American Navy Imperial Japanese Naval Colleg Yoshiko Yoshi
May 26, 2020: The Sir Broughton Trial

Today in True Crime

14:23 min | 1 year ago

May 26, 2020: The Sir Broughton Trial

"Today is Tuesday may twenty sixth twenty twenty on this day in nineteen forty one sir. Broughton stood trial for the murder of Lord. Erol both were English noblemen living in Kenya and both were carrying on a relationship with one Diana Broughton. Welcome to today and true crime. Apart cast original. Due to the graphic nature of today's crimes listener discretion is advised extreme. Caution is advised for listeners. Thirteen today were covering the trial of Sir. Henry Delves Broughton in Happy Valley. Kenya Sir Broaden stood accused of murdering his fellow British ex Pat Sir Jocelyn. Hey Lord Aero. Let's go back to a courtroom in Kenya near modern date and Yary on May twenty sixth nineteen forty one Harry. Morris had reached the point in his career where he could be selective as a lawyer. His clients either had great cases or were obscenely rich. Today's client Sir Henry. Delves Broughton was a little love each and if that wasn't enough the case was making international. Papers certainly a case worthy of flying from South Africa to Kenya. Broughton stood before the court accused of murder. He had the motive he had the opportunity. But did he have the means? That was the question. Morris would argue today. The motive was simple enough. Morris wouldn't touch it fifty seven year. Old Sir broaden known as Jock to his friends had been married to seven year. Old Diana Caldwell broaden for six months two months into this marriage Diana told jock she was in love with someone else. The couple had apparently expected this. Having signed a complicated pre-nup Diana fell in love with a younger man. During the course of their marriage Jock would amicably divorce. Her and support her for the following seven years to the tune of five thousand pounds a year. When Diana said I do she instantly guaranteed herself a some worth close to two million dollars today. The only thing that kept jock from believing his wife had duped him from the start was the fact that she only met this man. She was in love with after. The newlyweds moved. Happy Valley Kenya. And perhaps it was in moving that Sir. Broughton said his marriage up for failure. Happy Valley described by writer Colin Evans. As more of an attitude than a geographic location was a haven of drug abusing ex. Pat swingers. And Diana's Paramore Lord. Erroll was its ringleader. The Lord was young handsome and rich the endless flow of drugs and alcohol and Happy Valley meant the husband's never minded when Lord erroll borrowed their wives or at least they never complained. But Lady Diana broaden was different. She didn't only want an affair with Lord Erroll. She wanted a marriage. Given that Harry Morris new his clients motive for murder was immutable and as for jocks opportunity. Well on January twenty third nineteen forty one. He took his wife and her lover to dinner making things either more or less awkward. The trio brought along their friend. Mrs June carberry sands her own husband. Ostensibly the four were uncorking the champagne to celebrate Diana and Lord Errol's new love and by the end of the night Sir Broughton toasted to the future happiness of his wife her lover and their future children. After that Lord erroll took Diana dancing with the promise to have her home by three a m jock continued drinking with Mrs carberry until they returned home around two. Am About fifteen minutes later. Lord erroll and Diana arrived as promised by three. Am Sir Jocelyn. Hey Lord erroll was dead so Jock. Broughton had a clear opportunity but the sticking point for the British Crown's Court on May twenty sixth nineteen forty one was the way. Lord erroll was found his Buick. Saloon had nearly driven off a quarry on the side of Angang road two point four miles away from broadens manner. The Lord slumped under the car steering wheel as if he'd been pushed under there a body hidden. There was a thirty two caliber bullet in the car and another in his head. Sir jock broaden was still the obvious suspect would he was arthritic walked with a limp and at the time exceptionally drunk could the drunk sick fifty seven year old have overpowered a hail. Thirty nine year old shot him and run over two miles back home. All within the span of twenty minutes and making this less likely according to broaden. He didn't even have a thirty two caliber gun. His had been stolen the week before. For lawyer Harry Morris. The case was clear sir. Broughton couldn't have murdered Lord erroll he's simply didn't have the means. Did Sir broadened do it? The answers up next now more than ever self care and self love take top priority will park has an incredible new series aimed to brighten your days and renew your outlook on life. It's called daily quote and it's a quick two to three minute daily podcast for you to get inspired by every day on daily quote who be given a quote meant to motivate and uplift. You'll also dive deeper into the context surrounding the quote learning more about its origin and the meaning behind it out of all the quotes featured so far. It's hard to pick a favorite but the words that probably stuck with me. The most are by poet and activist Maya Angelou so enlightening and so important whether you're jump starting the morning searching for that mid-day pick me up or trying to finish the evening off strong daily quote offers some of history's most inspirational quotes whenever you need them. Three hundred sixty five days a year. Follow daily quote free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back to the story on May Twenty. Six nineteen forty one sir. Broughton stood trial for the murder of Lord Erroll. The proceedings lasted five weeks prosecutor. Walter Harrigan represented the deceased while defense. Attorney Harry Morris represented. The accused. Morris was actually hired by Jock broadens wife. Diana Morris was an expert on firearms cases and as the police gathered evidence and her husband sat in jail. Diana Broughton learned the case. Would hinge on the bullet that killed Lord. Aero the day he was murdered. Officers collected the bullets from the crime scene. Each bore small lines from when it spun inside. The gun's barrel called rifling. The inner barrel of every gun is slightly different. So the bullet rifling pattern. It creates when fired is unique. Each bullet was aclu pointing to the gun. That fired it. A Colt thirty two. If police could find the gun they'd have a pretty good guess. Who Shot Lord erroll? Has they narrowed in on suspects? The police asked to examine their revolvers with his motive and proximity sir. Broughton was key from the start but when the police asked to look at his revolvers he was unable to help them. He had guns. Of course every Britain Kenya did between the Popular Hobby of big game. Hunting and the local hazard of predatory lions but the week before Lord erroll died Sir Broadens. Guns had been stolen however when interviewing Diana officers gleamed an incredible lead back in November. Just after arriving in Kenya Sir Broaden had visited his old prep school friend. Jack Soames during the visit. The two engaged in target practice at Jack's farm it was possible that bullets shot that day. Were still on Mr Soames lawn. If so they'd have the distinct to rifling signature of Sir Broadens Colt thirty two wading through the African Bush of Soames farm officers hit the Jackpot. Not only did they find rifle bullets. They found live cartridges still filled with gunpowder. Not only could they match these new bullets to the Crime Scene Day could match the explosives and match they did. The ballistics experts confirmed the bullets and gunpowder. Found at Jackson's farm were shocked by the very same gun that killed Lord erroll the Happy Valley Police promptly. Arrested jock broaden and while this evidence seemed damning. Defense Attorney Harry. Morris had a star witness Mrs June. Carberry as you'll recall Mrs carberry had spent the evening of the murder with Sir Broughton and was able to provide a clear timeline of January. Twenty third and twenty fourth nineteen forty one she placed Sir Broughton in her bedroom at both to ten. Am and three. Thirty am coroner's estimated. Lord. Erroll died between two thirty five and three. A M so this provided a very limited window for Sir broadened to kill him and get back to miscarry bury's room. No one in the house reported the sounds of a car other than Lord. Errol's that night nor noises made by anyone entering or exiting after Lord erroll dropped off Diana around two thirty am so in order for Sir Broughton to kill Lord erroll. He would have had to leave. The House silently likely through a window and down a drainpipe. Stowaway Lord Errol's car shoot him and then hike back through two point. Four Miles of Lyon infested wilderness in the middle of the night while drunk in under an hour not to mention the fact that Sir Broughton was arthritic nearly deaf and walked with a limp. Not exactly the type who could shimmy down drainpipes hide in cars or feel safe hiking. The African Bush after midnight given Broadens Age and health and the testimony of June carberry Diana Broughton. And the Brockton. Servants Harry Morris. Insisted that it was impossible for Sir Broughton to have killed Lord erroll and the jury agreed. Sir. Broughton walked free despite the ballistics evidence despite the fact that his likely lover June carberry may have been covering for him. Despite the fact. That sir broaden had in the past hidden his own possessions and claimed they were stolen to commit insurance fraud however just because he walked free didn't mean he went without punishment the events of nineteen. Forty one alienated. Sir Broaden from his friends and family his wife Diana Divorced Him Anyway. He was forced to sell his assets and move back to the UK and by the end of nineteen forty. Two Sir Henry Delves Broughton had died of an overdose. Some say this made him more guilty of Lord. Errol's murder others. Less many many cuckolded men of Happy Valley had the same motive. And Opportunity as Sir broaden and several of them had better means of murder. After twenty years the Happy Valley mentality was a balloon waiting to be popped. Eventually one of the betrayed husbands was going to explode. As for witch betrayed husband will never know for sure the murder of Lord erroll remains unsolved. Thanks for listening today and true crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson. If you want to hear more about the murder of Lord aero tune into the episodes of unsolved murders true crime stories for a look at the other suspects. Today in true crime was created by Max coupler and is a podcast studios original it is executive produced by Max Cutler sound designed by Nick Johnson with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carl Madden and Freddie Beckley. This episode of today and true crime was written by Maggie. Admire with Writing Assistance. Abigail cannon. I'm Vanessa Richardson.

Henry Delves Broughton Lord erroll Lady Diana Sir jock Harry Morris murder Pat Sir Jocelyn Lord Erroll Sir Henry Delves Broughton Lord Errol Sir Broaden Kenya Sir Henry Lord Aero Diana Morris June carberry Happy Valley Diana Caldwell Mrs June carberry Valley Kenya
Episode 47 - MIA Ghosts Trapped on the Bottom of Pearl Harbor

NO HOME FOR HEROES

16:39 min | 1 year ago

Episode 47 - MIA Ghosts Trapped on the Bottom of Pearl Harbor

"Hello and welcome to this episode of no home for Heroes Know Home I'm for Heroes Explores histories military mysteries regarding Americans who are missing in action from our past wars. These long forgotten am I as are remembered Emberg here. Today's episode is titled a Ghost Trapped on the bottom of Pearl Harbor. Today's episode Oh home for heroes is the last of our forty seven episodes recorded during our inaugural year podcasting. I'm your host Rick Stone and it's been the tremendous honor for me to bring you these episodes this past year. No hope for heroes is a trademark production sponsored by the chief Rick Zone and Family Charitable Foundation for more information on the foundation visit our website at WWW chief rick stone dot com. If you're hearing being this preview of no home for heroes on Youtube or audio burst we invite you to listen to complete podcasts on apple podcast. Or whichever podcast or streaming platform warm. You prefer stay tuned while we tell you about a story that is probably not in very many history books. The story of heroism for for sure but a story of the indomitable wheel to live. We dedicate this episode to our loyal listeners at the Navy history and Heritage Command Dan History is not only made by those who live it. History is also made by those who ride it and now on with our show today is we said marks the end of our yearly podcast production it also heralds the seventy eight th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December seventh nineteen forty one in a very special podcast episode. Today we want to tell the story three of three very young sailors who were trapped inside their sunken battleships for sixteen long days on the bottom of Pearl Harbor. It's a horrific story. It's a nightmarish story. But it's a heroic story if you listen to our other podcast. You know that one of my assignments at the Department of Defense between two thousand eleven and two thousand twelve was to investigate. The cases of young kids actually elite. Who are still listed as missing in action from the attack on Pearl Harbor in nineteen forty one hard to believe? I know that seventy years later we we could still not account for hundreds of these brave heroes my cases included. Mia's from the USS Arizona USS California the USS Pennsylvania the US west. Virginia and many others are podcast this year feature just some of those cases but I work after only eight years since I worked those cases the defense. POW Mia Accounting Agency has finally identified side. Six of my twenty five m I a case investigations from the US West. Virginia and none of my twenty cases from from the USS California or any of the other Pearl Harbor cases. I work at this pace from DPA. We'll have to wait another roll. Fifty years or so for all of the time is from the weavy which was the nickname of the West Virginia and California to be identified and returned home to their families. Well hopefully some of you listening today. We'll be around to see all of my Pearl Harbor. Kids finally come home but today stories on three cases I didn't work. I didn't work because they were already recovered and identify but not without becoming a part of each and every Pearl Harbor case that I did work especially those from the. US West. Virginia known as the we the let me set the stage for you one of the great things about working at the J two intelligence section of the joint. POW My Accounting Downing Agency was the navy. Id Card that. I possessed for me. It was a magic key to a time machine which allowed me. Access to some of history's most incredible scenes. One of these was Ford Island in the middle of Pearl Harbor which had held battleship row along its shores. I will not fateful day in nineteen forty one on Ford Island. I was able to see the seldom scene backside of where all the battleships were more I could easily toss a rock to the still visible concrete pier where the US West Virginia was more. And I I could hear the ghost of Louis Buddy. CAUSTON CLIFFORD OLDS and Ronald Tubby into Kat on December eight. Two thousand eleven my time machine. Place me in the exact spot exactly seventy years before that very moment. This is what I heard. Some of you recognize as Morse Code. SOS The time recognized distressing only in Nineteen nineteen forty one. The binding was coming from deep inside the forward part of the sunken. USS West. Virginia Clifford. Owl's was twenty years old. From Stanton North Dakota Ronald Tubby Endicott. Scott was only eighteen from Aberdeen Washington and Louis Buddy cost was the eldest twenty. One years of age from Henry Ville Indiana. They've been sailors on the battleship. US West Virginia which was hit by a series of bombs and torpedoes from Japanese naval. Aviation the ship's commander Captain Mervyn. Binion had been killed earned the early moments of the attack but quick thinking by young lieutenant who was also the fire fire control officer ensure that the West Virginia would sink on an even keel slowly into the muddy bottom of Pearl Harbor with much of its superstructure superstructure still remaining above the oil and gasoline covered water fearing a Japanese invasion marines. Were posted all around the Harbour Arbor to guard against another surprise attack. It was worse at night said Marine Corps Bugler Dick Fisk you could hear Bang Bang Bang Bang and then stop and then Bang Bang Bang from deep within the bow the ship. It didn't take long to realize that men were making that noise pretty soon. Nobody wanted to do guard. Duty especially at night was quiet. The banging didn't stop until Christmas Eve. Jack Miller a buddy of Clifford old later told a news reporter. He knew his friend was one of those making the noise that was coming from the bow. Section Clifford it often invited him into the pump room for conversation and just for laughs they would close the hatch and scream all manner of episodes into the air type hyperspace knowing no one in the outside could hear them. The term swear like a sailor comes to mind. Ronald into cottage joined the naval reserve at age. Seventeen you'd been on active duty for a whopping ten months when Japanese rain death on his ship and and he found himself in tomb and trapped in pump. Room number A Dash One zero nine with his buddies old and Causton those top side on the we be also knew that. Rescue from below the waterline by drilling a hole through the hull will result in a blowout. Blowout killing the diver. Those above knew it was not a question of whether old costume and INDYCAR could be rescued. It was only a question of how how long they would last day after day. Night after night. The three thought on to Survi- the three and tomb young man who had only three years of service between them probably did not know that they were soon. They wanted to live and they had more on their side than their comrades above new. ooh CAUSTON old and indicate. Have emergency food rations access to fresh water compartment and flashlights enabling them to see he and two other things an eight day clock and a calendar so they banged at the end of each twenty four hour period. They mark their calendar with a red pencil. They Noda no doubt wondered. Does anybody up there hear us. Well they heard but nothing could be done. I would probably have never known about buddy and Tubby and cliff. Decide not found the original report file. Commander Paul dies during the eventual successful salvage operations of the West Virginia in May nineteen forty two while many of the hundred and six six deaths associated with the USS with West Virginia or from drowning when compartment hatches had to be closed on those trying to escape dice immediately noticed that pump room eight dash one zero nine was completely dry. Three bodies were found huddled together on the storeroom room shelf. Commander I saw flashlights and batteries Trona all about the compartment along with empty food rations cans official reports matter of fact and it's devoid of emotion quote. Three bodies were found on the shelf. Storeroom storeroom a dash up one one one Klatten Blues and jerseys. This storeroom was open to fresh water. Pump room a dash one zero nine which was apparently the battle station assigned to these men. The emergency rations at the station had been consumed and the manhole manhole cover to the freshwater. Tank's had been removed. A calendar which was found in the compartment had an X.. Mark through each day from December seventh nineteen forty one through December twenty third inclusive in quote. Commander is kept the eight-day clock he found in the compartment until as an old man he donated it to a museum in Parkersburg West Virginia which was his hometown. He sent the calendar. A foot high fourteen inch long calendar the naval headquarters in Washington. It has never been found. It's probably still there. The Archives of the naval history and Heritage Command. Maybe someday like Indiana Jones. I will find it in a long stored wooden crate buddy. Tubby and cliff were buried in a mass grave with twenty two others in nineteen forty two in one thousand nine forty forty nine when the National Memorial Cemetery. The Pacific was opened. The bodies were disinterred and given separate burials Clifford. The older remains were shipped. Home to Stanton North Dakota Causton and Kat are buried in the National Memorial cemetery in Honolulu which is commonly referred. Heard too as the PUNCHBOWL. When Buddy costumes locker was cleaned out? After the West Virginia was raised. A water. Soaked ladies eased wristwatch was found. It was intended as a Christmas present or his mother. It was forwarded to her. She had it restored and she wore until her death in nineteen eighty five. The cost and family is made show furled pilgrimages the section q eleven o five of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific were buddy was buried. I went there to cemetery. I could hear it. indycar sleeps forever in the PUNCHBOWL too. You know it's kind of funny. Because he was tall and thin but everyone called him tubby. It was probably a nickname that went back to the time when he was a baby. I'm guessing Clifford family. Had Him returned to the family. Burial plot in the cold and frozen ground of North Dakota the date on all of their tombstones is wrong. The date read December seventh nineteen forty one but it should read Christmas Eve December. Twenty four thousand nine hundred forty one Louis Buddy causton clifford olds and Ronald Tubby Endicott. Deserve more than a purple art an incorrect date on their tombstones. uh-huh they deserve to be remembered as three heroes. Only am I A for sixteen days. Thank you for listening to this incredible but true episode of no home for heroes. Today's episode was inspired from investigating the case files of the chief Rick Stone. Family Charitable Foundation. We hope you've enjoyed today's production and we invite you to check out our other episodes on apple podcast a gas or whichever podcast platform you prefer. This is our last. This year's forty-seven different episodes of history's military mysteries. He's missing in action. We hope you enjoyed all of these episodes. We greatly appreciate your comments and a special link is available for you to contact because on our website at WWW chief rick stone dot com on behalf of our production engineer Cindy and all of the team of researchers investigators in cheap briggstone family charitable foundation from all over the world. We thank you for your overwhelming support of our mission. I'm personally going embark on a different adventure in twenty twenty but the foundation team continue our mission dedicated to providing information to the families of missing zinc American servicemen and missing American servicemen. But as Douglas Macarthur once said I shall return. I've always wished he you said we shall return but nonetheless I shall return to the podcast episode here again next year until next. It's time be careful. These say in wishing you fair winds and following seems. I'm your host Rick Stone reminding you that fours the nation that has no heroes but shameful is a nation that having heroes forgets them uh-huh.

West Virginia Pearl Harbor US west Rick Stone Virginia Commander Pearl Harbor Louis Buddy Ronald Tubby Endicott Virginia Clifford US Family Charitable Foundation CLIFFORD OLDS Ronald Tubby apple WWW PUNCHBOWL Youtube