20 Episode results for "Nine degrees fahrenheit"

Midday Brief for Wednesday, January 30th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:19 min | 2 years ago

Midday Brief for Wednesday, January 30th

"Uh-huh. I'm Jay are Whalen in the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal in New York, the polar vortex has plunged temperatures in the mid west of their lowest level in decades closing schools and knocking out mail delivery. A national weather service says the coldest spot Wednesday morning was buffalo North Dakota with a temperature reading of minus forty nine degrees Fahrenheit and the coldest wind chill was in park. Rapids, Minnesota at minus sixty five air travels also suffered with more than a thousand flights affected as temperatures are too low for airfield workers to load bags or get planes ready for take-off United cancelled about eighty percent of its schedule and its hub at Chicago's O'Hare international airport or about five hundred of the more than six hundred Delhi flights at operates there. Plus about seventy percent of all flights to and from Chicago's midway airport were cancelled Wednesday as well, including Southwest Airlines, which cancelled more than seven hundred flights and midway and in Washington, the committee tasked with hammering out a deal and border security meets for the first time. Wednesday with a deadline to avert a second government shutdown as February fifteenth draws closer. But the lawmakers will be mostly focused on reaching a homeland security deal on border security, and potentially broader immigration issues for more on these and other stories of the day, go to wsJcom or the WSJ app.

Wall Street Journal Chicago O'Hare international airport North Dakota Southwest Airlines Whalen New York Jay Rapids Minnesota Washington forty nine degrees Fahrenheit seventy percent eighty percent
80 Seeding with Ara Katz, co-founder of Seed

Well Made

55:48 min | 2 years ago

80 Seeding with Ara Katz, co-founder of Seed

"You're listening to wellmade a podcast limi but the people in ideas behind your favorite online brands i'm your host stephanie go eric hats welcome to the show thank you for having me it's great to have you here in person you are the co founder and co ceo of seed secede from my understanding comes somewhat from ebay insight light that the scientific community has had over the past fifteen twenty years that the human body is at least half bacteria in half human cells end that leads to all kinds of interesting things i people who've been reading the news might have seen that de microbes in your gut influence your mood and that all kinds of other things relating to these bacteria that are living all over us and inside of us affect us until you're creating a variety of products that try to help wave building a healthy microbiomes is that a fair way of describing it yes let me let me unpack that a little bit so seed comes from the biological term seating and that process is basically an infant in your experience you're first exposure the microbes which is the seating of you're microbiomes which is if you think about planting a garden on which is kind of a little a little bit of what happens during the development of an embryo and then a fetus and eventually in an infant used to be thought that and it's probably why you've you've heard a lot about like maybe the controversy between badgen all birth and c section for example at birth you certainly do get what they call kind of like the mother lode of microbes whether it's through the original canal or c section it's kind of like you're moment that you're exposed to the most you've been exposed to as a life but what we now know that that process of seating feeding actually happened prior tubers 'em they use a think that a the fetus sterile and they now have in the last few years discovered that microbes are actually present prior tubers but seeding itself just describes that process seven infants since first exposure to microbes and that is the seeds quote unquote that kind of begin the the development in the growth of year microbiomes 'em which is the collection of all microbes that lives on within your body and so for example right at birth of agile born baby there microbiomes resembles more the microbes that come from the moms vagina some fecal matter a little bit of the skin and then eventually of course what's on the nipples and then some environmental exposures of course once they're when they're born but friskies action baby just at first and i don't wanna sensationalize that difference science is starting to prove otherwise they're microbiomes of course resembles more not the national microbiomes but the skin but a baby doesn't yet have like fifty percent and microbes and everybody that that's when you how how long does it take to get to that so so what you're referring to is what they call kind of a steady state microbiomes there's kind of a a window i don't think there's like an actual date but somewhere between two and four years of age amish win and some of that is impacting on whether or not an infant is breastfed many other environmental factors and whether non infant has antibiotics and let's say the first couple years of life so but for a normal kind of breastfed ed a healthy child regardless of optional bursar csection a particularly if they're breastfed and didn't have antibiotics by about two and a half somewhere between two and four years they reach what they call a steady state microbiomes which is kind of basically you're microbiomes for life and that and that sets the stage for and certainly determined and they're starting to understand that more the direction for much of how you will you're at least your digestive system you're immune system for example will develop give people like an idea of you know in that study state how many different organisms different species different things there's hundreds of species on a two year question about how long have we known about her bio and you said fifteen twenty years it's actually you know we've of course known about bacteria sure very long time microbiology of course but it wasn't actually until the human genome project that we had what was called a sixteen as sequencing technology that allowed us to understand and characterize the genes of the microbes in what year was that so that that's fifteen years but really microbiomes science it's really been more in the last in celebration just like research going on in this area and the discoveries are like pretty profound profound because we think of ourselves as like what weaken siani outside the organs are bodies but there's so much happening a you know the cellular microscopic level that is influencing the overall body and everything there's so many different microbiomes we focus a lot on the gut you mentioned the vast journal microbiomes there's a lot going on in the feces like transplant area the stuff that's happening in your mouth stuff that's happening on your skin like all these different areas in a i think it's just something that were getting used to so yes you are absolutely correct that microbes play a role in our biology in ways that we have now characterized and no 'em of course you know gee i health and digestive of health and of course immune health is probably what's most top of mind because there's been so much marketing a put on top of it because the microbiomes such an interesting space and it's such a strange confluence of factors that have driven this which is that you've never had a field of science on the velocity and acceleration that microbiomes sciences on that is equally haired west the growth in the consumer category like probiotics so you have the microbes inside of view that were starting to understand and and characterize and understand mechanism and of course you have these different ecosystems of you're bodies you're you're kind of you're skins like a coral reef the voucher microbiomes like a rain forest you're guts like a tightening each one is its own ecosystem which is owned species your and my skin microbiomes is more like then your skin and your got yeah so they truly are totally different ecosystems which means they have different mechanisms they impact and interplay with one another in very different ways i mean if you think about it we sequenced the human genome can't go to whole foods by anything regina mhm but we sequence in microbiomes and all of a sudden you start we start to understand not just how are owned microbes behave but how administration of microbes to our bodies will behave so probiotics are bacteria that administer some sort of health benefits of the host on and those bacteria that is a field that it also kind of on paralleled the the rise of microbiomes science and that's 'cause my grandsons is such an interesting field and not so much of what we start to understand about are microbes in some cases is immediately actionable whereas in other areas of science you know like sequencing the human genome there are options but it's not as a driver consumer category like product which is the fastest growing health category in the world that's pretty crazy on so what is seed china do you have you have your own research enjoined be going on which is kind of fascinating i wanna hear more about that and you've got your products in the first set of products launched about a year ago or so so we launched a one we we launched a daily symbiotic which is a combination of probiotics prebiotics last june we have a male and female formulation yes so almost kind of well little lesson ear although we sold out very fast so we have a lot of customers like and when is the shooting so i apologize to two reasons that we we founded seed one is that we believe the potential kind of what you spoke so articulate you at the opening which is the potential of the microbiomes understanding microbes in their impact on human a planetary health it's extrordinary we're like in the friendster period of microbiomes at the moment end of probiotics because but what happened was is that because as the term probiotics is not regulated everything's a probiotic now you just throw bacteria in something in a probiotic there is however a very real scientific definition those authored by the w h o u n two thousand one better chief scientist and that has not been upheld and that is where you need human clinical work that is where you need to actually understand the benefit and then conserve what we studied in the product to be able to claim those benefits that is currently not regulated and so what we saw is looking at the potential of probiotics and how they are going to grow at the field on touch all kinds of categories and ecosystems of her body as you pointed out whether it's her skin offer women of course national hall of when you think about a nurturing those early windows of microbiomes development front infant those were all areas that we look at but no one was doing was saying who's gonna be the scientific standard of probiotics if nobody's regulating this if you're gonna have provided tortilla chips in probiotic shampoo and every fermented food is called the pro biotic and everything which is called the probiotic and every supplement that decides throat bacteria in sometimes no specificity of like which stranger in it just says the species you know how is that all of her biotic on who's gonna steward the future of this can you repeat the definition the vision or it's live live microorganisms yeah when administration an adequate amount mm confer a benefit to the human host and so when you think about stuff that people can find off the shelf how does someone what are tipsy you would give someone who's like looking at something on a shelf that's like telling them it's say a pro biotic how to deal with that i mean the first question to ask is what her the human clinical studies behind the strains so it's about the strains within that particular brought i saying i take probiotics is like saying i like books mhm right that's how right which books do they say anything they just have a you know if you just say the species 'em it's like it's like having a it's like having a cover with no words inside interesting thing so end do you do you find that there are companies out there that do a decent job with that you know we don't spend a lotta time policing or or trying to poke holes in in other companies i would say we started this because we didn't we couldn't find find the companies that we felt i think in europe they're absolutely are some 'em i think one of the other loopholes that happens is that you know not only people not disclose the strains 'em or the clinical studies but what they do is that if there is a clinical study very rarely early are they taking the dosage that we studied in the human clinical study and making sure it's preserved indy and the dosage that's in the product and so that's a really important distinction so even if there is a study then the question is well did you preserve the conditions under which the bacteria where by fermented did you on the mediums for example the ph the way that mean fermentation as we as you know from like people who love wine is a is an art form a lot of things impact the gross 'em of how bacteria grow and so then the question is where the conditions preserved from the clinical trial and the dosage onto the product what are some of the other myths out there about a pro biotics or this these types of products a lot of the methods just the use of terms so the idea that you could just throw probiotics into a product and then call it a pro biotic x y z provided chocolate for example is is a mess on the cf you you know that big number that's like the billions the germans we're very proud that we were pursuing you know much much more specific testing methodology is which demonstrate their real active and viable bacteria versus cf you which is kind of a very crude older methodology put a lot of people play the numbers game there and it's really miss representative of what's actually viable in the product by the time it gets to you're not just your body but you're colin v missed the product need to be refrigerated to be viable i think that that puts the confers the responsibility to the consumer instead instead of the responsibility of the company to figure out how how destabilized microbes we also don't know the impact of confrontation bacteria that's an interesting one that people might ask questions 'cause you're product comes like in a jar in a pill form in it's room temperature how does how do you stabilize it a lower currently stabilize up to seventy nine degrees fahrenheit but we actually have a new technology that were launching soon there that is getting confer even longer shelf stability and higher heat stability capsule outside or what is it the others well there's a couple there's a there's a couple of things primarily it is the layoff was ation process so laugh legislation is just a fancy word for kind of freeze drying and so there's a couple there's a couple of pieces to it one is a micro cap solution that we use for some of are more sensitive trains attaching algae polymer on that actually like on a micro level like encapsulate some of are more sensitive strings and an algae very ph sensitive so it constricts in the higher ph which is kind of higher in the gi tract and then as it gets the coleman which is the lower ph and they open but that's not for all of our trains on certainly are capsules are are are resistant but really it comes down to how they're laugh last which is an important time i've ever heard that term before you learn anytime so in it's not refrigerated so people a as long as they're keeping it sort of in a cooler place they don't need to keep your product in the fridge now that's interesting i mean those these some of i mean one of the things that we left understand it see it is kind of the the way that marketing being teaches us about health products which is really fascinating so if you go back to be understanding of like the way we've been message about fat or cholesterol really anything that's enjoy this moment of demonization in pop pot writer like nutrition a science it's very fascinating the us you know whether it's yogurt industry or you know the supplement industry and just the ways in which and and they're not i mean they come from of course like we don't think everybody at port intentions but it is fascinating the us the way that marketing shapes the way we decide what something is good or bad and then ultimately like it's very hard to undo some of those and so we spend a lot of time on her instagram 'em and are in are kind of an art community in and are messaging a myth busting not just among bacteria but if you think about it i mean the history of bacteria is i mean bacteria's had a really bad rap sure you know over ninety nine percent of bacteria is honestly kind of non what what they what they kind of call commence or you know or or good for the most part good or just kind of in fact innovative and non pathogenic but of course you know we we first decided that bacteria which a lot and it's kind of been you know the theater kid of microbiology for a really long time yeah i mean i'm sure people have read the stories about like antibacterial soaps you all that kind of stuff is basically like destroying you're micro yeah i mean i mean we you know we decided that you know and and i think just we have a history of humans as as as purists and i think we've unfortunately down this to people a and in various communities of humanity as well as 'em in this case bugs and bacteria and so you know they they really were associated with this notion of being dirty 'em i mean look you can think of victorian aristocracy for like the toilet which fundamentally is not actually a good for rg i track on totally changed the angle for like elimination in early what's what's healthy 'em and then of course you end up with sixty eight million americans constipated not just for that reason but for many other reasons but it's you know it's very odd how these these ideas that we had you know listerine and a and if you look at the history of kind of bacteria in how a seems like listerine anton listerine of came up with you know of course ways that we could kill them in her mouth and you know you look at as you mentioned all the soaps and and this kind of obsession with cleanliness and so we've cleaned are so sick mhm we always talk about what's happening right now with their health as kind of the climate change are insides you know you learn in like you know fourth fifth grade about like the rain forest and you know how the diversity of the reinforces decreasing well if you think about you're gut microbiome as a as a reinforce it it is the same thing on diversity is one of the main markers of health of microbiomes as that diversity has 'em decreased a on eighty in the various ecosystems of her body specifically are got being part of the most notable one on we've seen this huge rise in auto i mean we've we've never had the rate of non communicable disease and human species ever in history that we do today we're dying from things are not contagious yeah never happened while when you launched in your website first came out it was very different different than any other website that i had ever been to an in i thought that that was a rare thing like these days it's it's not i basically work my main stuff is being a web designer basically if you wanna simplify it so it was fascinating book drowning i wouldn't necessarily that might be over me okay well but my data day job is like user interface for this like a platform that were building but 'em so it's a very fascinating fascinating in but it's not just about the way it looks at the information not that you're sharing you've a gun out of your way to spend a lotta time on education the photography on your website is beautiful some of it is like microscopic photography a of of actual bacteria end there's a component there of how do you make this interesting for people how do you get them excited and curious in want reid up about the science of this how did you go about like the citing what the identity and the approach to telling the world about seed 'em should be well first of all thank you the team will be happy to hear that 'em and the and the truth is we spend way more time i think we always joke that are google docs like you know always get the latest version thirty before we do anything and i think a couple of things one is that we think science has a real communication problem one of the reasons that so many of these wellness companies and and the the vernacular of wellness has been able to persist speaker science just simply doesn't know how to reach the mass consumer so the reason that we consider freely talk about cleansing and detoxing and actually you know detoxification which is a biological term you know the reason that those things things have been able to be so easily co opted by things that have no science is because science does not have a good methodology for reaching people a nice both in its aesthetic and its language and so i think one of the things that we there's kind of two to driving ideas behind everything we do the first is this notion that friction is the future so i think we've realized that all the things that get in you would appreciate that as a as a someone on the web which is you could see this in very very nuanced ways in like in culture and in an ops in kind of what's happening in our in our live and even to a certain extent meditation which is a form of friction i think is this notion that you know everybody went through a period of time it's kind of like i almost like it's like the the digital technologies industrial revolution which was that you know it's kind of like you know metropolis fritz lang metropolis where you know we got everyone just realize you oh you could you could download a lot of you get a lot of users really quickly you could get someone threw a funnel really fast checkout scout you could figure out how to game of fi something to be able to get everyone just like wally style rhyme staring at a screen or like of course in in certain social media you hire you axes you could get the get something gamified to the place place where somebody actually starts opening it without even thinking about it right such and such a feedback loop would like dope man in a lot of ways you know what ultimately industrial revolution did was figure how you could replicate something very quickly and so one point or of what would this last period of internet technology and all these brands and these particular with e commerce the methodology has been how do you get someone really quickly do things have you get many people to do that same thing over and over and over again right that detect dictator value yeah so when you arrived at the seed website it's not add to cart it's like no i find that a us product page through layers of like education so now of course everyone's writing blogs about like well maybe it's more about ltv maybe it's more about the value maybe it's about smaller communities engaging more maybe it's and i think they were watching this kind of happened across as i mentioned many areas of our life and culture but i think what we really believed that how could you make science so engaging and beautiful and crude that empowerment dr someone to feel like okay i actually trust some this company i made it buys anything right now i just learned something and that could you that point of just like that a ha moment for somebody which ones you know if you ask a lot of scientists way they became a scientist they'll tell you that many of them had this kind of a ha moment about the world about their bodies about their health and so to go to my other as i said there's kind of two things we talk friction is the future and then the other one is we talk about what could mean to empower what we call the interview effect which is have you heard of overview affect no i mean it sounds familiar early overview of factors coins in the late seventies 'em menashe not in an astronaut let's talk about the overview shirts because it's the first moment right astronaut looks back at the earth from grace and see the entirety and there's this a ha moment of a kind of stewardship of a kind of i must that's my home like i must care for that like there that has to persist yeah everything i know everyone i love everyone they love you're speaking my language i mean yeah that's like the the pale blue credit a whole earth catalog yeah exactly yeah and so and so we always say like in one of are scientists just george church you you may know who is the the scientist bringing back the woolly mammoth from extinction did right right climate and brandon yeah they're they're working on that yeah yes may in fact the two little dogs in her office sasha and luca come from the tundra trip that george church church in store brand a went on with with roger recently well and he rescue them from the tundra so everyone everyone be cute puppy from the tundra come to my office on and so that idea of will if were so enamored with the cosmos how could we not find a way to be so enamored with right art and that'll ourselves yeah and i think we really try and 'em at least invoke that wherever we can because i think we we treat our bodies very transactional early yeah we don't treat space that way and we don't treat are all of other things that way and i think you know we talk about climate change talk about saving the ocean and we you know with this idea of like somehow we are not of right it we're like we are here to save it and we are other and so i think we really try and draw that connection 'em and decides that like if you could change the way science looks and feels and sounds could you make somebody like so in all of themselves that every time they're about to make a decision about what to eat what to put in our bodies what's on their bodies you know what would it change you know could you seizure body from that spaceship and see it the way you would see earth for example 'em and so those are the those are the two kind of guiding principles frus that is very philosophically powerful because i think that you were talking about this before with like the human instinct to cleanse things where i think maybe over the past couple of decades we've started to appreciate especially through understanding mental health a little more that were really not in control of ourselves were not in control the there's a lot of things humans want to have control over but we don't end when i think about bacteria i think it's like an uncontrollable for us it's there it's it's end if it if you accept the fact that they're living inside of you all over you that there's so many of them you gotta wait help you a lot of yes and are in are fighting for you like protecting you from diseases in helping you digest food and do all kinds of stuff it's like it opens up this mindset where it's okay for things to be chaotic like there is this idea this is one of my personal philosophy is that chaos is good like the nature of humans in life forms is in enhanced chaos it's the increased amount of complexity in chaos as opposed to the emptiness that is like space in rocks and in the void cast to me if you when you understand like what complex or even some more simple organisms arguing is not cast me sure it is simply the wiring to sustain life well it's it's sort of what i mean by that is more like this is very old idea of nature of the hordes of vacuum light check it is looking for places to find a new ecological nation grow into it and try to understand it and it's very complex and sprawling maybe is more more a early then chaotic well certainly it is extraordinarily come complex but with a symbol mission i mean there's no news on through yeah yeah absolutely to sustain right if i let you know we we talk about yes of course bacteria help you digest food what they have found in you as a warm place to liz and a constant nutrients supply yeah so that that in in nature i think we always need to put something in terms of its working for us or against them and not is the binary way in which humans must see the world but actually in in biology is called mutuel ism which is the notion that we could both exist in both get what we need which of course a lot of relationships well i mean it's like a you know a cleaner fish or something living on another fish like a symbiotic relationship but this is on a different scale if there's hundreds and hundreds of species like living on you and around you this gonna take us off track but are you a believer in penn sport and panspermia they the the the theory that going back to the idea of seating that earth seated from maybe a meter they came in like brought bacteria from another place to this planet like it's it's one of the ideas of where like medium to earth yeah i mean the the the joke in science is bacteria or arcadia yeah because i think we we now believe that 'em mitochondria of of the human soul is a vestige of bacteria and mom and i think there's yeah i think i i absolutely prescribed that notion that kind of one day a bacteria in her calf yeah and and all kind of came from there where divisional by bacteria came from i i don't i don't know yeah it's interesting i mean we are causing other forms of panspermia possibly because we're sending space probes and we've probably not clean them super thoroughly even though we try our best there also i mean not says also consciously bringing bacteria distaste for a number of reasons one is dot m ash not sustain all kinds of issues when they're in space so starting understand because of the the solar radiation is like more powerful and i my my i i think it's probably more judah motel lady i mean i'm sure there's a number of co founding father but probably a little bit of lack of motel eighty because of gravity which is just it makes it that you know digestion probably more more challenging these other aspect is bringing microbes his face because of course at a certain point if people are really gonna sustained space travel exploration and living you're gonna have to figure out how to grow food in of course fermentation is an excellent the only way to sustain food source yeah so from that perspective and then i think the and then the last way the microbes are kind of consciously making their way into space purposely 'em it's understand how they're gonna behave in some of these environments and so now says working a archie scientists actually is working with mass on a few of those initiatives already when when looking at your background is the correct in another life you were a film producer yes obviously it's funny on my way here as on a film called 'cause there's a member of documentaries that a as laughing talking about film a film negotiation terms again because while we are involved a number of documentaries that will be coming out in the coming years how does that influence anything about seat is there something about storytelling but you learned in that you're bringing he says influences everything on by the way but buddies with him i grew up in paris out of the movie i loaded one but you worked on that side of that is a big chunk of my life yeah that movie with very challenging to make but when i'm very proud of i i think a lot of the films i was involved in always kind of broke some typically broken structure 'em 'cause that's a it's like a what would you call that it's a movie that has like a seven different directors something like i think the final cut had nineteen around one oh my god in but every every around just wanna parents had a different director wow yeah as great as crazy yeah i haven't seen the color you know their own brother is one was shot in the metro station steve shammy and it was yeah i mean there's some incredible incredible scenes and it it was a it was a really interesting exercise also in perspective so every around disclosed told there's someone else's perspective we do that a lot with seed 'em i think of course using different mediums you know i love marshall mcluhan blue in the medium i really believe is the messaging unfortunately science has really understood that you're a well on and so i think we're always thinking about art and design different aspects packaging yeah of course in how we shopping somebody's life to be able to communicate something scientific and and in a way that could be really empowering and so i think i also think that three act structures are really wasn't for most of our marketing we think a lot in terms of user experience and user design in three acts were given example that i mean you know you humans one a beginning a middle and end and then if they really like it they wanna sequel there they really like and if you're thinking like subscription commerce it's like every every month as a movie or an opportunity to tell the tell a story and so you know we think of these i i think whenever were designing like email flows and you were thinking about customer service flows were working on a number of things now that will touch kind of a much broader base of consumers you know i think we and then also when we do like me think about a lot of instagram campaigns i think a lot of them follow this kind of flow of like an introduction some sort of like climax to 'em in the second act and then some sort sort of conclusion and take away and and often eight like a dangling of a cliffhanger yeah so yeah we think i will i always think in three act structure is i think it's even even in terms of you are you act in terms of you know how you bring somebody into a story story i think it's absolutely informs everything i do in marketing marketing just you know kind of this weird intersection of storytelling and design so we were were in the beginning the introduction of seed what what is the climax what is the where where would you like it to be in in forty years old you that well when when you dream about a world in which the philosophies you have are more widely adopted like what is the world look like how's it different than today i'd say we make decisions decisions about our bodies not driven by fear that everybody kind of almost like what tedtalk did you know we we always say we like we just wanna be dinner party social capital we just wanna be there like did you know you know and i think a lot of people who reader instagram around for example are always like oh i was the smartest one of the all these cool facts the say and i think that kind of empowerment i think you know from a product perspective i think we like to be known as the global standard in bacteria in microbiomes related products and so you know if you fought hours you bought it whatever is a reflection of the best science and that's manufacturing the best testing but what does that do for the world how does that change depends which product you obviously but i think overall i think we believe that microbes you're gonna make a huge impact on human am planetary terry health so whether it's are provide extra honeybees 'em or for honeybees for honeybees way explain that you're you're pro biotic for api's suceed lot see lobsters are are indie arm that all of our environmental an ecological research and so are first project with on honeybees yeah so we have eight bio patty in a spray that we are actually open source he i p four to farmers and testing starting canada expanding to california now so you're selling this to honey you don't so right now we don't sell ever okay it's in anyone who wants access at can just make it themselves even actually meeting and you don't need to be so i mean we weaken like i train sorcerer like how skin someone grow it themselves or how does that even mean i mean you make it we can provide we will be providing adding the strains by the patty itself it's pretty it's a very simple it's like making a pancake okay but the stranger what we would what we provide wow it's funny 'cause in this reminds me when i was thinking about okay you're you're selling this hill basically is it for human or is it like who you got some actually and unity of bacteria that lives on yeah you who cnn who either yes bacteria isn't just fear bacteria mhm so probiotic sexually signal have all kinds of host microbe interactions so it's like human cells and microbes as well as micro micro interactions so it's kind of a bus yeah i just fight a group subscription well it's funny because we've had this conversation on the show before like we've had 'em ali which is a dog food subscription the consumer is the dog but the person who's buying it is the human or we had a a few different on subscriptions and web sites that are focused on kids clothing and they have to appeal to the parents so it's just a weird idea of like okay you're you're buying this product for a community of of like single celled organisms that is living in on you how do you convince bill like one big has a credit card that it's a good idea to do this yeah that's a that's a it's a really good point i do it in art case it's hard to make an allergy just because a lot of it is freer human parts and ashley that is another myth about probiotics is 'em you know that this idea that you kind of putting the good stuff in and then letting it grow and somehow like you just kind of take it for a period of time and then almost like an antibiotic and they don't need to provide especially transients microbes which means they do their work on the road so on that they actually benefit confirm continuous consumption not from just like taking it for like a short stretch a like like you wouldn't even tie back i wanna talk about sustainability 'em i as as we wrap wrap up i don't know if it's been a little bit of a relationship on ben subject but there is the thing we were talking about before we started recording i tweeted about this i was trying i'm gonna try again to put this term out there and see if it sticks 'em that we are in a in an era at like eight geological time that i'm pointing the plastic the first time it's like a subset of these anther put seen it's the plastic means well you know it's the one before the last scene because there's a time period called the carbon ferraris which is when basically trees evolved involved in started reproducing like crazy their trees everywhere in they were uncontrollably growing and they were falling end piling up all over the place until bacteria evolved loved to dissolve it to ingest 'em lincoln then end be able to turn that into like mulch which can then be eaten by other organisms in that process from the evolution of trees to the evolution of bacteria's could eat that material took like a hundred million years something like that so were in a phase right now of the earth where we are creating a new substance but didn't really exist in plentiful amount which is plastic dick and were putting it all over the place like these dead trees and there are already seeing that those trees propaganda and south and yes you the carbon is structured pays well there's there's there's that's a whole other thing i can go into but 'em you should veto stamp touched on this morning up carbon okay well in any case my my my general point is there are already 'em scientists studying how we could use bacteria for dissolving plastic material and actually like i mean digesting it really and turning it into something that can be used by other organisms that has all kinds of dangerous implications for the world because we the reason plastic is is used so much is because it doesn't degrade like that's a property that we look for but i noted it's something that you mentioned on the the bio on on on the seat a website so i'm just curious about like i dunno where do where does that take you i'm i'm not an expert on this but i can tell you that the two distinct ways that we have experienced that we are looking at and and certainly aren't aware of in terms of how microbes you're going to impact plastic they're using of of bacteria to degrade microbes that scale so putting them into landfills for example being able to figure out how you could take care of some of these like plastic islands 'em by basically like putting microbes all over them and letting them eat them mhm and then of course on in in i know they're people working on how you could put microbes in two bodies of water and also could metabolize and then of course take out a lot of like the the micro plastic right there are materials that are now being embedded there's a company in the uk uk but it's very far along in understanding which i i agree with you is kind of ironic that it's it's up application chew plast single use plastic bottles that actually after their use basically the activated activated degradation period on and so they're kind of like coming with almost like they the bottle comes with its own like self destruction mechanism that bacteria so the first is as i said like applying microbes to like large areas of plastic where you could degree them which they not to my knowledge we've looked at a number of solutions it's very hard to at scale through they've done it in smaller a testing the second is of course putting it inside plastics so that you shorten the lifespan of that plastic on after its primary use and then the third is which i think is most interesting awesome well what is more interesting to see labs is by the future bio plastics which is what would it mean if you could give bacteria something to metabolize and then create substance like bacteria could create like some some sort of polymer a then you could three d print injury plastic so it was coming let's say saving like corn waster agriculturally for example so you would feed them something that's already needs to be wait you know not not plastic but something of you know natural substance on that they could metabolize and then create some sort of polymer from that would then be able to be three d printed or 'em molded into to a plastic that had all the properties a plastic but actually came from like corn yeah and that that area of research explain more interesting yeah and i think it's interesting to talk about this because on your website you have a page about sustainability that focuses a lot on packaging effort transparency we make some of those things but there's this bigger picture of how does are understanding of microbes potentially offer a solution yes there's certain problems were dealing with an it's a very fascinating area are there other things aside from 'em digesting plastics you think of as like these big problems it could be solved through mark microbes oh i mean i mean the stain ability oh of course i mean i mean the most notable most notable one will be the soil i think i think there there will be the reinvigorates soil yeah into the soil microbiomes is really important because it you know microbes are such a righty park i'll give you a good example of a project one of are scientists working on that that that i think we we find most interest which is you know in areas for example as natural resources deplete how could microbes makes soil nutrient dense how could they maintain moisture how could they make a route more drought resistant for example so that in a place where you and not getting as much water you you could still grow them same amount of food on and microbes could play a big role in those things so yes i think in terms of thinking about the future of food supply a both in areas today where there's issues as well in the future as are natural resources deplete there is no question question that probiotics where the soil microbes in in in in the cleansing of water for example so micro metabolize led a and other metals you're on to make clean drinking water yeah hundred percent if we think area a you know we may have tried to kill them for a long time but i think that they not only will they be here they were here before as will be here we after as they they will likely saved us wow sustainability let's come back to that in general topic of like how did you approach broaches when you first kicked off 'em kind of the the packaging side 'cause that's an area that you talk a lot about and you mentioned to me before we started recording but you have some a controversial views which i don't know what they are you you just sort of said that in passing but i'm i'm driving some of them might read a brave like made it all the way out of the podcast you know the the the most controversial perspective on sustainability is that you and i shutdown are company his we we go put all of these people that are incredibly smart and solution oriented i eat start up entrepreneurs who are capable of raising billions of dollars in a room and we start one by one tackling the things that are fundamentally gonna change our planet and make the human condition on the condition of our planet better i mean ultimately it stopped making things yeah stopping needling people to make things that's that's the ultimate sustainability i mean i don't think people like to talk about but you know we could talk all i've only thing i get asked about sustainability is what's the most sustainable materials used repackaging the first principles approach which is another thing that you know we employ almost entirely at seed everytime we think about something which is you have to throw out the existing framework of what you're thinking within like i always say like look microbiomes is to biology and are health what the debt was in the music industry right like it it it you must totally only you can either be what the music industry wasn't a and allow things like napster and hunting or or you can decide that you're gonna be like oh new framework new piece of math major piece of data and major piece of information how are we gonna refrain frame this and i think all i get asked about is what do you think of this material a you know or like you know carbon offsets which we talked about for transportation so how could you off that you're you're transportation costs oh what if we look to the natural environment a free materials because nature's been so smart and is the best designer and so let's go commercialize nature and so that to me it's like i was talking earlier about like the notion of tinkering vs you're the one mhm that to me it's all tinkering it's important tinkering so i don't wanna i don't wanna not underline that because the kind of ten grand we we do it too right we we went out and trying to figure out like well what is the most sustainable way to do what we do and it's an important conversation but like i think entrepreneurs preneurs and the people who used the word sustainability aren't entirely honest if you're not talking about what ultimately which is you pointed out before we started speaking which is that you have to change consumption yeah number one consumption sometimes doesn't change on the part of the consumer sometimes it changes because industry says his how you were going to consume something and i think that that you know i think we there's a responsibility if you make things at least not be blind about the fact that like you still make things well i mean this is such a he's insane area to try talked about like it as as you know we have a couple more minutes ago but in the sixties people were worried that the human population would grow exponentially to an unstoppable level end were actually not seeing that that's not the case in that most likely in in developed nations at some point you know within the next twenty thirty years were gonna start seeing most developed countries declining population in that goes totally against against the way the capitalistic system that we living is set up because were set up to where world that is constantly growing the number of consumers constantly increasing the amount of consumption per person and 'em making you moved through more stuff end whether we like it or not we're gonna have the faith that reality at some point that the way the system is set up is not going to continue to work the same way on unless where like colonizing some other planet or something and that's are methods were growing population or something like that or what will happen which has all also happened in the history of humanity which were very close to absolutely based on the number of people who are no longer getting vaccinated based on road overuse of antibiotics but if we think that bacteria are also that one percent that 'em art grave if we if we think or or other communicable viruses for example or other pathogens if we think that they're not gonna get smart enough to do what they've always done in and were in a world today where you know where everyone is closer to everyone else ever before we went awry scientists say we've never brought are microbes all around the world the way we do now you think microbes you know every time we travel microbes that involved in in africa over money in the guts of of someone in like for example gonna it now takes those microbes and goes to japan goes u s and goes or like you know in america myself it's like i i i take my microbes around the world and certainly they did not evolve to to do that yeah and it's such an interesting way of thinking yeah i encourage people to go to seed dot com and go through everything but also sustainability section 'cause i think you do a good job of explaining some of the choices that you've made and we also open source i mean go see you guys i know you said full disclosure but we'd you fully disclosed you're who make all of our packaging i think we while we did scour the world and put a lot of hours and a month of time into it 'em we do believe that that stuff should be open source and we try end us support all the vendors that we think are actually doing well because you're point we were talking about earlier is that many of them are more expensive now because they're harder to scale some these materials but we believe that if more companies support them on they can get the scale and therefore we could start hitting some of the cost of goods that some of the bigger companies required to be able to justify some of the more of materials one of them that you're using is the insert search which has made of a my cillian i guess a fungus like explain a little bit for people who don't know that that product and i feel like it fits well with the identity of beer company yeah there's there's to mention 'em one is eco data which is a company i upstate state new york and they figured out a kind of impact agricultural waste and then in trays they used my cillian which is just the route structure of a mushroom the kind of grow these skin so if you've ever order 'em i highly encourage you to order are welcome kid because you can kind of feel it it almost feels like a cheese skin it's but it's also kind of almost like a swayed like it's very soft and so that is what forms the skin a over the waste and they're able to mold that anything you need to be like kind of a almost like what you would typically because he has like what what did you all automated styrofoam ray simple sexually contained in 'cause you're product is shifting glass which is fragile yet but also recyclable yes exactly and we only ship you a glass jar once yeah so you only get that once and then in every month you refill the thinking was you would just keep that one glass jar and if you don't if you don't if you cancel we need a pretty enough that it could just sit sit somewhere but sometimes it and then also ship it with a little a glass file a lot of people when they travel they used a block bags are single use plastic baggies or other ways of kind of transporting their capsules are more or other supplements if they take or as my friends who would've burning men have reminded me other substances and a and so we use we we we provided a vial is well so there's no more of that kind of like single use plastic baggie seven so and then in are refills we work with a company called green cell phone out of hockey and second time in a row they're they're mentioned on the earlier yeah so we love them a vast watch their videos there really funny like baseball bats and like hit bottles of wine packed in there corn phone and they make a phone out of corn the coolest thing about it is that it's 'em it has both insulating properties of course it has all the padding we need but then you literally can't just well you could eat it as my three year old thinks it's so funny 'em or ice and water and another nutritional content is particularly high corn corn heisman fiber well everyone should go check out your website c dot com very good domain name what is it that you need help right now do you a people yeah listening what what a how could they help you first of all where all of are 'em job dropping her up on my website in 'em if anyone is inspired by what they heard today or just curious monkey he is on a check out what the open but the biggest need which might come from your audience is someone around social media for us yeah we have a tall order what'd you learn more at extrordinary synthesizer of science some pop culture and someone who can think and beams and also on wants to learn microbiology at or has a little bit of understanding someone who who i think would be so inspired you wake up every day and not just tell the story of seed but but really trying invoke some of those ideas and i talked about earlier which was you know how could you make science so all inspiring and fun and exciting and empowering that a you could build a huge community of people that really care so much about the spreading of ideas that at least make you question everything else that you're told a which is really exciting is this person gonna be more of a creator or like share oray wordsmith there what are they they don't have to be like a designer signer we have plenty of design resources and photography resources it's much more somebody who can look at the course heavier and say here the stories that we may be telling on these different channels here's the way we wanna be telling them here are the format and the franchises and the styles we want employee on this is what we were doing stories to bring are company life this is what we would do in the feed to be able to kind of tell 'em for example we just kicked off a campaign last night called 'em a basically basically kind of exploring what we're made of 'em end so it would be like for one week were just gonna remind people like what they're actually made of someone who wants to bring are scientists the life and the incredible super organism so we always kind of come into contact with in the world triggering such interesting work 'em the person who gets excited to think about how do we talk about rb research on youtuber on read it on you know someone who could really just think like you know again the medium is the message and so what are the ways in the tech the the the strategies and the 'em format that you employed it'd be able to kind of give me communicate with some of these big ideas but also you know all the way down to you know for valentine's day we need like funny screen shot double valentine's day cards that were you know science jokes and so someone who who can kind of have a really on a range of storytelling tools and actual cat i saw that you mentioned curiosity is a big thing and it's actually been number one we put this on every job posting it are list of things we look for that we expect people who come till we need to have the number one thing that we look for i'm curious how do you test it out when you're hiring a number of ways 'em were very cognizant of the way people engage with us even on email even unscheduled the time they're coming today office we can usually tell honestly within even just the way someone responds and reaches out to us in about two seconds you're a weather not someone has that it's a it's a barometer and i think also like even in a first meeting dancers what did you reach to get here right like how could you show up at our office like how could you reader website reid the description come here and not be able to tell me what the microbiomes and not have like hundred questions yeah and so rich typically the curiosity is i would say the number one barometer is language or or i should say are are compass is often around language not because someone needs to be like piper always like hyper intellectual and use big words but actually there's a a care in language i mean i can't let me go tell us the writers and they write us emails with spelling errors you know it's a part of the first wave of mind we put spelling years into you are writing a r r i a writing descriptions instead of tests and then they the quality of questions in bama care about because quentin questions are you know questions are the the reflection of how you choose to synthesize information and i think that is a fundamental the mental idea 'em and core tenants who we are it says a lot about how your brain works like what question you ask and if you have any questions sometimes you know i'll be interviewing someone and i tried to open things and ask them hey do you have any questions in there it's very like polarizing thing like some people have immediately a million questions and some people don't end tells you a lot about their i dunno the way they think hundred percent in that to i think it's the questions and then i'll say let's see 'em it's the it's inform them fascinating thank you so much this is amazing and everyone should go to c dot com there's so many books and authors indifferent people mentioned or try to put all of those things in the show notes at wellmade that show thank you so much for having me thank you who one last thing before we go and talking to you at home what's your favorite brand these days is there

stephanie ceo co founder ebay fifteen twenty years four years seventy nine degrees fahrenhei hundred million years ninety nine percent twenty thirty years hundred percent fifteen years fifty percent forty years one percent two year one day
An Overview of Some of the New Features in MacOS Big Sur

AppleVis Podcast

19:38 min | 5 months ago

An Overview of Some of the New Features in MacOS Big Sur

"You're listening to this podcast. Hey apple visser's tyler here with the demonstration in walk of some of the new features in macos big sur. If you've been following some of the mainstream tech news regarding the release of big sur you've probably heard a lot by now about the interface redesign and if your voice over wondering of your voice over user. You're probably wondering what does this mean for me. I've been using big sur for a while now and i can say that voiceover works. Generally the same in that the concepts from version to version from catalina to big sur remained constant and the interface design that is often referred to is primarily visual. No one exception to that. I've found is the increased prominence of the actions menu although mac os has had an actions menu for a while. Now it has gained increased prominence in big sur and. I can demonstrate this most immediately. I'm on my desktop. i'm using up aero dropbox alias. Use the down arrow drive volume options available actions available if you use. Irs and ipad os. The that phrase will sound very familiar to you. So i'm gonna access the actions minute with vr command space transmitter two items and use down arrow. Donald oregon children u. And those the only two options in that particular menu. But i'm impressed escape. And if you're using a mac that doesn't have an key press function tab instead drive volume and keep in mind that the show menu action is actually the same menu that you would get to. If you pressed via shift 'em so i can seem a little confusing because you have both the actions menu and the contextual menus and as a general rule i found that in apps that have been on mac os for a long time like finder mail safari etc. The contextual menus generally work as they always have and the actions menus feature most in apps ported from ios and ipad os. Like taps. so good thing about that is like say with the messages app. The actions in the actions menu are the same or similar as the ones in the rotor. On providing a sense of consistency. Once you memorize that keyboard command and normalize it here everyday use moving on one feature on sort of mainstream feature is the revamped notification center and that does change some things for voice over some open. It now with video with construction. It's a new shortcut information center window school area. So i'm gonna vera at it. Which which is greed fear left notifications list notifications less list. And those are the three elements in vacation center. Simon interact with the notifications left with the down arrow time two days ago. Weekly reports available. So that's my screen time notification to go available screen your screen two days and that happens to be the only notification i have currently and to interact with notification. Just press veto command space items and this menu only two items but children you show menu close and close and that's the equivalent of clear or dismiss on i s close screen time so now that notification has been dismissed and for other types notifications like for example messages. You can use that actions menu to reply directly to the message from notification center. So many get out of this notifications list and vr right to the widgets grid. Which here's where things get a little interesting and it seems to be an area where apple could do some work on this. There's much room for improvement. But if i interact with grid calendar calendar weather stocks stock screen time and screen time so if i interact so for example. The weather widget stock other would interact with the shift down in weather. Which at thirty. Nine degrees fahrenheit partly cloudy high of one degrees tonight low of thirty four degrees fahrenheit kinkel cape elizabeth and. That's the only information spite in the wichita. And i can hit the edit which it spun if i stop. Interact out of out. We just grid. And viagra edit button space search. And that's another thing. Why i'm at a notice how when i hit a button with the space. Any element activated in mac. Os big sur. Instead of the classic press announcement in now does the irs style. Double tap sound so. Just keep that in mind. When you're using big sur. But i'm gonna go right image calendar. Calendar luck vir unlabeled images. I don't know exactly what these are. Notes note photos photos. Podcast reminders reminders. Screen time screen time image stocks stocks whether whether which is an which it's grid grid next to track of come to events in meetings so that refers to the calendar which it which apparently is selected but if i stop in iraq whether image stocks and go to stocks for example head. Vr space. If i go back to the widgets grid which is grit in which grid symbol. Price goes on track performance of a simple throughout the day so stocks is displayed description of that. Which is slid but as at the time of recording. I cannot figure out how to add widgets to the notification center. Might be a way. But i'm not sure how it's supposed to work or it could be a bug. I don't know out of which is to get out of that. I'm not right again. Which is grit and this is the second widgets red with the existing widgets. I have added in notification center. Some interact without the schiff down calendar and calendar widget. I'm gonna shift down alan six minus minus button. That's to delete the widget. So if you want to delete a widget you just focus on your existing widgets. Interact with the widget. You want to move and hit minus. So that's basically overview of the notification center again. I think it's an area where apple has some work to do But i think it could be a very useful feature particularly if third party. Developers take advantage of this and add more interactive widgets. So many get out of this with escape finder. And i'm going to demonstrate the control center if us ios. You're probably well into the control center. It's an area where you can configure some basic parameters without needing to dive into settings control center mac. Os has the same objective. And you access it through the menu extras. There is no keystroke as far as out to access control center twice and usa's and veto left siri. Siri siri menu control center. The space application controls dialogue music. We selected a toggle button. Music be selected wifi. That's yeah alex just seems to mispronounce that for whatever reason the do not disturb toggle about to not disturb bluetooth select bluetooth airdrop selected toggle airdrop keyboard spot keyboard brightness screaming screen mirai sixty two point five percent display. That's my display brightness. Apparently sixty two point five percent sixty two point five percent sound volume flatter sixty two point five percent sound toggle airplane audio music play button and notice how these all have actions available so if they go over to airdrop for example your sixty sixty sixty sixty screen keyboard like airdrop selected toggle button options available via space on that will just turn it off. 'cause it's slanted that seemingly implies that it's on but i have a little more granularity. So i can customize it with the actions menu similar to how. If i was using i would use the actions. Rotor to expand controls in center actions to items show details show details on a use that airdrop check check box. Astronaut contacts only selected toggle contacts on everyone toggle button every everyone top and if i wanted to turn our job while check out. Just do that to this box. Or i would simply not even need to go into this action into the show details. I would just the space on that control to disliked it and you can configure. What appears in control center in system preferences just go to dock and menu bar. Somebody get out of control center now finder and there are a bunch of different things that can be configured in control center I'll just give an overview preferences are preferences drive old system preferences system for just talking menu docking menu bar loading many our window docking many bar table. Talking menu are selected down arrow. We many wi fi. We've we've always control center. So that's something that's always in control center and those you'll see that in the table there are a couple of things that remain in the control center that you cannot change. But i'm going to continue going down this table tape bluetooth airdrop do not disturb keyboard. Rightness screen hearing controls display menu are sound menu are in control center. Play menu are in control center now. Playing image is now playing now playing now playing table. Accessibility accessibility shortcut customize accessibility. Show men bar on chat show controls object and show and control center. So any of these things that you'd want to have shown in each either your menu bar or your control center a picture. The menu are being an area where a couple set just a few quick access. Settings are and the control center where you can have a more expansive list of quick settings But of course that's up to you depending on your needs and your use case some closer this finder and that's just basic control center so now onto the new messages app that is. I've found one of the most dramatic changes at least to my use case of mac. Os is the revamped messages app. And what they've done is they've apparent. Apparently rewrote it to catalyst app so much closely parodies the messages app on ios and ipad us open now and hopefully siri will work for me open messages. Alex window and attacks is an ad. Alex in this case. Context is my colleague that i was messaging with earlier. So all veto left to give sense at the interface apps the apps. I'll come back to that in a sec collection messages collection so frana review the contents of my conversation just via ship down arrow and messages collection message. Confetti for fifties group. And that's what. I said at four fifty six pm all left alex. I am not sure what it was. But he worked for fifty five replay. This affects verify. Going okay so. Those are just messages. That i sent and of course to find the most recent message you go to the right alex and that says that he read the message yesterday. So we'll get out of this out. And via left vertical splitter conversations conversations so interact with this and this is just basically a list of conversations and conversations collection selected alex confetti yesterday and for messages for the new messages app. It's instead of a table. It's a collection and in order to activate a conversation. You need to via space on a conversation so just keep that in mind because that was one thing i sort sorta get used to. Is that because it's not a table anymore. I would need to select each conversation if i wanted to send a message someone else. And as an example of how messages. On mac os now parodies messages. Us i focused on. Alex and i'm gonna veto command space and enough six hundred and this actions menu high alerts hide alerts delete delete replay button pin. Just just show on top of everything of other messages. Press press show. Can you show menu jumped in just jump to messages clutching somebody get out of that and via left again alex. That's the verticals. Litter conversations collect search toolbar and the toolbar. Alex alex conversation details conversation details. And that's where if i wanted to share my location or hide alerts for this conversation. It'd be in that view conversation. And that's the all the all the tennis toolbar. So i'm gonna get out with vio. Shift up out in toolbar and over again vertical slip. Alex alex and in messages in the messages collection alex edwards and. I'm focused on a message. And like on iowa i can use actions to react for example so fi activate the options menu with the space copy. Reply it can reply. So that if i was in a group message i could reply to an individual center and that helps keep the conversation tidy because i found when you have a lot of messages sent by a lot of people things can get a little convoluted so you can do that react. You can react press show menu. Which doesn't seem to do anything and jump to the message fields. You'll press react so for react of course heart but you have the heart which is like to love something. Thumbs up thumbs up to like thumbs. Down thumbs down to dislike button to laugh exclamation button exclamation mark question. So that's basically an idea of what you can do with messages and reacting to missiles but there's now something else you can do with The apps button go to that to demonstrate this emoji. I'm aspen button. Emotion message message aspect menu app so that opened a menu down air photos photos. So i wanna send a picture. Stickers me emoji stickers. I've not explored that i don't really know how that works. Number hashtag images. That's i think for trending memes again. Don't use that feature. So i can't speak to it whole lot. Message facts and message effects and that would be for example. If you write happy birthday it will intelligently sound balloons animation of balloons but to see what some of the effects are. I'm just going to select this type of message. The message message a tax is anything and it wants me to type a message. So t's t apps button effect message faxed apps button message. The message affects collection. Select message affects collection selected interacted with that so they love fact. Let's love effect loons button balloons. Effect invisible ink button invisible ink effect. Confetti buttons and fatty effect slam button slam effect button lasers loud celebration but celebration event. I go button effect. Spotlight spotlight effect fireworks. Fireworks gentle button gentle. And i don't know in what context someone would or wouldn't use these other than the balloons for happy birthday. But like they're they're now on the mac and you can also receive messages with full screen effects that people send to you that you can do on your mac. So that's just a basic overview of message is and now to take you to just show you these sounds preferences pain because one thing that mac os spitzer has done. Is they've changed. The system sounds not necessarily voice over. Sounds but sounds for example when you press a key keyboard key when you're not in a text field it will sound a little different Think the best way to demonstrate this. Close the messages window close. We know and notice massachusetts messes as no windows. There's nothing open but the app is still running. So if i press just any lead on the keyboard notice that sounds different from earlier. Versions of mac os because they have done away with the old sounds and put new ones in someone to quit messages now. And show you into sound preferences. Finder open sound preferences references. Sally window toolbar. Sound sound effects selected a tab one of three. That's what i want. In selected selected advice for sound of england. Select alert sounds table alert. Sounds breeze this sound. Br breeze bowel crystal crystal. Funky funky irwin heroine. Jump jump mezzo. Mezzo pebble howell hook plug on sonar soon so new. Me urge submerge. So those are the sounds the new sounds. You can get from big sur. If you've you'll find also please sound effects through alert volume at one hundred mexico's startup. Check box sound on startup. If you're a longtime mac user or if you've had a mac made before twenty sixteen you may be used to the sound. The post sound when the computer turns on Now you can choose because new. Max by default didn't have that But has brought back so you can choose if you want to play. You can check this box interviews. And that's just please side effects that's always just been there so that's an overview of some of the features that i find most important. Obviously there are a lot more changes throughout the that. I cannot cover in one recording. But hopefully that gives you an idea of some of what's new and i hope. He found this useful piece. This apple podcasts. Have been brought to you by the community of alvis dot com for the latest in resources and tips and tricks to get you the best experience from your apple. You dobson apple with dot com.

five percent Nine degrees fahrenheit one degrees thirty four degrees fahrenheit apple two days Siri siri mac alex Alex alex visser Alex tyler frana Donald Irs vera alex confetti wichita oregon
65 | Michael Mann on Why Our Climate Is Changing and How We Know

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

1:18:28 hr | 1 year ago

65 | Michael Mann on Why Our Climate Is Changing and How We Know

"Hello everyone and welcome to the mindscape podcast i'm your host sean carroll and i'm doing something a little bit unusual in the podcast today in the sense that you know i like doing unusual things we're always trying to experiment here but usually every episode is completely different topic than the previous episode and the following episode but you can think of this week's episode and last week's as sort of a matched set last week we talked to ramez naam about the optimistic view on our energy future how we can switch to renewable energies and really combat global climate change today i'm talking to michael man who is a professor of atmospheric science distinguished professor of atmospheric science at penn state university university one of the most informed and most well known experts on the bad part of climate change that to say how fast it's happening the evidence for it and the deleterious effects it's going to have on our world so i think that because climate change is so challenging this is the right order to have these podcasts in as optimistic as we wanna a. b. it's really really important to keep the challenges in mind mike man of course is famous or infamous for being involved in all sorts of political controversies in in climate change not really his fault if you look in to the information but he and his co authors were the author of the original hockey stick paper and graph where you could see you over hundreds of years how the earth's temperature have been more or less static and then was zooming up in recent times the so called hockey stick graph that got him the ire of all sorts of well-financed opposition people so we talk a little bit about that but honestly we spend most of our time in this episode talking about the science mike was actually a physics undergraduate major and so he knows i'm physicist so we're digging a little bit to the physics of how the earth's climate is changing how we know that it's it's changing and what we might do about it even though this is sort of the pessimistic of the two shows there's still some reason for optimism here basically it's in our hands what we he wants to do that's always true for climate chains it's an especially urgent message the mindscape podcast is supported by wicks dot com wicks dot com is a way to go on the internet with your own website with a professional really compelling look literally today i was talking to one of my students who told me they were building their own personal website for the first time i asked them how they were doing it and they said using wicks dot com i promise you that was a coincidence i did not set it up this way way you can start by building from scratch or you can choose a template and then customize it if you need to get online fast all you need to do is answer a few simple questions chins and wicks will instantly build a website just for you complete with design images and text you can choose your style change the layout look like an online online store or booking system or whatever you need to do and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code mindscape you'll get ten percent off when you're ready to go premium liam if that's what you wanna do that's which dot com code mindscape for ten percents off any premium plan get your own site on the internet today remember you can go to the website preposterous universe dot com slash podcast to get transcripts show notes and links also links to our patriotic page if you want to support report the podcast you can get ad free versions of the episode as well as monthly ask me anything episodes and with that let's go it's they like man welcome to the mindscape podcast thanks to be with your son i presume that everyone who's is listing has heard of the fact that our climate is changing a little bit might be warming up storms and things like that but because of all that stuff that we're already inundated with i thought it'd be fun just to start with taking a step back remembering what's going on here remembering that there's something called the greenhouse effect that we've known for free very long time so why don't you give us your version of the quick and simple here's why things are changing and why we should care yes so you're absolutely right the basic science here the science science underlying human caused climate change because back nearly two centuries those of us who were trained as physicists of course appreciate the name joseph fauria and were familiar emilia of course with his fundamental contributions to mathematics the foyer series in forty-eight transform the law of heat conduction solids for foia law will for a actually understood didn't you know he hadn't worked out the details but he understood that there must be a greenhouse effect because the surface us of the earth is warmer than it should be given the output of the sun in our distance from the sun and so essentially over the past two centuries we have been refining fining our understanding of the basic science but it's nearly two centuries old so this is an old you know this isn't new controversial science i answered science that goes back farther than the theory of evolution moreover we would not be able to explain basic observations sounds like venus why is venus as hot as it is and why is mars as cold as it is without understanding the greenhouse effect so the basic basic science behind human caused climate change the greenhouse effect is irrefutable in fact in the absence of any greenhouse effect at all earth would be a frozen minus eighteen degrees celsius yeah i think it's a very important point it's not like the greenhouse effect is something that we're bringing into existence this and and we're tinkering with it a little bit right and we should we should be thankful to the greenhouse effect because earth would be a frozen almost certainly lifeless planet in the absence of the natural greenhouse effect on natural gases in the atmosphere water vapor being important among them carbon dioxide methane tain that have this warming impact on the surface they absorbed some of the outgoing heat energy that's trying to escape the space and they send some of that energy back down towards george the surface of the earth and so that warms up the earth and it brings it to the relatively balmy eighteen degrees celsius or roughly fifty eight fifty fifty nine degrees fahrenheit temperature that the planet actually has a habitable planet the problem of course is sorry let me just stop speak very quickly because i as a physicist i just have to dig into this a little bit yeah the the the amazing thing here is that of course these same gases are perfectly transparent to visible light right we get light from the sun and then we sort of process it a little bit and guess what the entropy increases this is this is one of my favorite facts about the universe and so we radiated back as infrared light at different wavelengths different frequency and these same gases scissor opaque to that that's what causes the heat to be trapped because that that's right it just goes back to some of our you know early early semiclassical physics we studied litas undergraduates weans law the temperature of an object determines the amount of black body radiation it produces this is through this stefan boltzmann law and so the sun which has a surface temperature about six thousand kelvin i believe through weans law that tells us is that the the center of the distribution of the radiation it's producing is in the visible we see the sun we see visible radiation coming from a six hundred a six thousand kelvin object whereas the earth is about two hundred and eighty eight kelvin's and the same law weans law tells us that the peak peak of the distribution of radiation that the earth is producing the black body radiation the earth is producing is centered in the infrared a completely different from part of the electromagnetic spectrum and with these greenhouse gases do they can actually absorb those wavelengths of radiation so if we were wearing infrared sensitive glasses in we were looking at the atmosphere it would look relatively opaque to us because those those greenhouse gases water vapor which is natural see you to some of which is natural but were increasing it by fossil fuel burning those molecules follicles because of their vibrational and rotational modes of freedom are able to absorb emit radiation in the infrared part part of the spectrum of the point five microns wavelengths of radiation and that is indeed why they act as greenhouse gases and they warm the surface of the planet you must have been physics major back in the day this is great i still you know i look back fondly on the days and in fact i i often find myself drawing upon my training as a physicist in the work that i do today and in four a or wasn't for you but someone back in those days did did point out you know we're burning fossil fuels i don't know if they call them back then but we're probably putting new CO two in the atmosphere so the idea that we're increasing the greenhouse the fact is also pretty venerable yeah that's right and in fact i believe it was actually iranian you know the the it's amazing releasing these sort of renaissance people of science you know back in the nineteenth century who could work on so many different important problems iranians of course is known for giving us one of the the prevailing definitions of an acid in the field of chemistry but he also recognized that you know that there was the greenhouse effect of course that had already been established and that we were probably increasing it by by burning fossil fuels he he didn't think that that it would be that much of a problem but he was aware of the basic science behind it okay so he turned out to be right now of what will go in a little bit more to the details there but let's just very quickly say of course there are also complications right it's not quite that simple that that is the simplest basic story and then there are things that work in extra influences in both directions that's right you know and as you know physicists we like to start out with assumptions assume spherical planet fox that's pretty good and and the sun so those assumptions are are pretty good but we have to make of course all sorts of other assumptions when we speak of the the problem at this level of simplicity because they're always are complexities we can for example abstract the earth as a point in space and we can simply work out the radiative balance of that point in space of of the earth as if it was just a mathematical point in space and we would be balancing the incoming what we call the shortwave radiation that that that high frequency in for sorry ultraviolet and visible radiation coming in from the sun and we have to balance that with the outgoing what we call the long wave that is the infrared radiation being emitted by the earth taking into account this layer of greenhouse gases and we can construct a very simple zero dimensional model title that literally a model where there's no latitude there's no longitude and there's no altitude the earth is just a point in space but we do account for the fact there's an atmosphere through our treatment of the greenhouse effect and using such a simple model zero dimensional energy balance model you can come up with a pretty good answer you can actually leapt estimate the temperature of the earth very accurately using the you know the parameter the mississippi that measures the the the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere you can go further than that you can actually use zero dimensional energy balance model to model the response response of the global average temperature that's all this model can tell you can't tell you the temperature in the arctic or the temperature the equator or the temperature up in the troposphere versus way up in the stratosphere it can only give you a single number the average surface temperature of the earth but it does a good job with that and you can actually model title changes in the average temperature of the earth back in two thousand fourteen i published an article in scientific american where i used a simple zero dimensional energy bounce model it's a it's where where the simplest de differential equations you could hope to write down a first order linear differential equation that you can solve analytically or numerically if if you like and i use that model to demonstrate the response that we can expect the average temperature of the planet to various scenarios of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the numbers i came up with virtually indistinguishable from the numbers that climate modeling groups using the most elaborate britt three dimensional climate models of the ocean and the atmosphere in the stratosphere in the carbon cycle and the clouds and everything else you can imagine that that are run on supercomputers they come up with pretty much the same answer that i come up with that zero dementia using zero dimensional energy bounce model and that scientific american article article and in fact in the supplementary link you can go there and download that program and run it yourself on your PC if you like you could never do that with a full-blown global climate model but the zero dimensional energy bounce mile isn't gonna tell you anything about changes in rainfall patterns or ice ice sheets or sea level rise or shifting wind patterns the el nino phenomenon of what's going to happen to rainfall and central pennsylvania where i live or out in california where you live all the questions we would really like to answer that models not gonna give us the answers we need so we go to increasingly singley more elaborate models that incorporate you know that account for more of the processes in the system is a hierarchy of models and we see this of course in in physics physics is well known for you start out with a simple conceptual model or even a good dunkin experiment and you build up from that but but that's where you derive your intuition about a problem and it can guide our interpretation of of the problem it's absolutely interesting to me that the answer is so close i mean i have a great deal of confidence that the simple models should be in the ballpark and then you can tweak it but we know that there are or other effects that do push in both directions and is there some physical intuitive explanation for why they either do they balance out or they just all just smaller than you would think yeah so i was a bit glib in the way i characterized i in reality you have the advantage in a simple model of this sort that you've got you know a small all number of tuna parameters if you will parameters that you can tweak and you have the freedom to choose those parameters in such a way that you get the the right answer so there's the probably the most important parameter in that regard is what we call the climate sensitivity how much warming do you get for a doubling of c o two concentrations in our best estimates are that that's probably somewhere in the neighborhood of three degrees three degrees celsius CBS so a little less than six degree fahrenheit warming if you double the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere preindustrial levels were about two hundred eighty eighty parts per million so we will hit that doubling of about five sixty parts per million in a matter of a few decades if we continue on the course that were on and one of the key metrics of climate change is the so called climate sensitivity now in a full blown coupled ocean atmosphere ice icesheet the most elaborate climate models you can imagine that is an emergent phenomenon you can estimate that from actually putting being you know all of the representing all the processes and seeing what answer you get in the zero dimensional energy bounce model that's just a specified parameter got so all of these feedback feedback processes that we know are important associated with the melting of ice or the evaporation of water into the atmosphere or changing vegetation there are lots of feedback processes responses of the climate system itself to the warming that modified the warming and so they they are positive or negative feedbacks that have to be incorporated paraded if you're gonna describe the full nature of the response of this system in zero dimensional energy balance model we can summarize all that with one parameter it's the climate sensitivity city even though we're not representing the ice sheets or the carbon cycle or any of the things that actually end up determining that sensitivity no that's actually very helpful i love that you called convergent phenomenon it's actually very reminiscent or in fact exactly the same as what we would call the normalization group approach in fundamental physics where there's a lot of stuff going on underneath the surface but for the net effect on large macroscopic scales can sum it up in sort of one simple parameter right exactly yep and but nevertheless there's still complications we do care about i mean one that i just got to get out of the way right away is what are we even mean when we talk about the global mean temperature right you know the temperature here where i live in los angeles isn't even the same as it is in pasadena would twenty minute ride away where my offices so how do you go about doing that average what what really counts when you say here's the temperature of the earth right now yeah so it should really be thought of as as just a again i suppose a metric i it's a measure of climate change that is useful in characterizing rising certain global scale responses for example sea level rise by and large is a function of the average temperature of the planet there are are various other attributes the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is essentially a function of the average temperature of the planet but as you allude to we don't live in the global average we live in particular locations land turns out to warm faster and more than oceans when you increase the greenhouse effect effect and that has to do with a number processes but the oceans have more thermal inertia a greater heat capacity so they respond more sluggishly ashley to the increasing downward flux of of heating from increased greenhouse gases whereas the the land response more quickly and so there is a very large amount of regional variation if you shut down the north atlantic ocean current known and as the a conveyor belt sometimes called the gulfstream although technically speaking the gulf stream is something a little different it's really a wind driven geijer the the the north atlantic drift is this water that continues north on into you know in your iceland and greenland and then eventually sinks ah because it becomes cold enough and salty enough to sink in it forms this so-called conveyor belt this relatively warm surface current that flows north towards iceland and greenland and europe and if you shut that current system down you can actually get a cooling in certain regions this was popularized of course in the film the day after tomorrow but as you and i i wouldn't be surprised if you actually reviewed that film i know you it's one of those i it's it's it's fun you know when when hollywood you know an science intersect to talk about you know what they get raw right and what they got wrong they they got a lot wrong you have to get a lot wrong to take something that would play out over time scale of decades to a century and have it occur in a matter of days and so it's a caricature of the science but but but what happens in that film there is a grain of truth as there always is is to the scenario and if you were to shut down the the north atlantic drift or the conveyor belt ocean circulation you could get a cooling for example in iceland flint and so you do have to understand regional responses changes in ocean currents changes in wind patterns all of that for california for example mhm what happens to california when it comes to drought you know we've we've seen epic drought over the last decade a little bit of relief over the last year or two yeah yeah well relief if you want to call the drenching fly relatively eh yeah yeah i mean we got a lot of rain here in LA but i'm not even sure if we're technically out of the drought yet i think i think we've finally are but it's not exactly as if it's a tropical rainforest around exactly i was i was actually looking just the other day at the the drought map the current the US drought map and there there's a very faintest yellow mom which indicates very slight drought in corner near san diego but otherwise the rest of california gornja is white which is to say neutral it's sorta neither and drought or or having sex expecting an excess of rain so but we've seen epic droughts and they will likely get worse more pronounced and more extended as we continue to warm on the planet and and why that happens you know some of it has to do with the warming of the soils and you get more evaporation but a lot of it has to do with changing accu atmospheric circulation relation the sort of belt of deserts is located in an area where you have sinking motion in the atmosphere it's part of circulation sale we you have rising motion near the equator and sinking in the subtropics in that sinking air is warm and dry and it's why you know large parts of california and other areas in the subtropics tend to be relatively dry in the winter you get some of these mid latitude storm systems the front sorta trailing edge of the fronts coming down into the region and that's where you get most of your rainfall well with the models predict is at all those patterns shift alward so the dry subtropical optical deserts shift powered and the mid-latitudes storms the mid latitude cyclones loans that bring rainfall with them those shift po word as well that means that california increasingly large part of california will find it self itself well within sort of the core sort of belt of deserts and missing a lot of the rainfall that it used to get in the winter from these trailing link storm systems but how bad that will get how quickly that will happen that all depends on getting you know whether right getting these weather other systems in their behavior right in these models and and that can be a tricky thing because whether it's really complicated there's a lotta chaotic of behavior non linear dynamical michael behavior things that are sometimes difficult to capture in in in in a model for example that's too coarse in its spatial resolution that it doesn't get the all of the detailed the regional processes right so there are real wildcards question marks when it comes for example to you know how oh you know what will happen to rainfall in california there's still uncertainty about a precisely what will happen there even if we can say california warm up and and there'll be less snow pack and and more operation from warmer soils all of that favors drought but what happens to these storm systems that's still sort of up in the air no pun intended yeah i definitely want to get into that because i have some serious questions i mean not serious like i'm doubtful but i don't understand but but i i think that my actual question was a little bit simpler just want to know what it means to say the global average temperature if the air has different temperatures both fled to longitude wise but even in altitude like what what is the thing that we are defining if we imagine having a thermometer at literally every point in space and the atmosphere here and then taking the average or is it something number yeah you've put your finger right on it it's literally if we had a thermometer everywhere over the surface of the earth and as you allude due to reduce that thermometer measurement to sea level because obviously that is going to be colder so you're implicit in that is the notion that you could define find a surface that would be at sea level covering the entire planet and if you could do that and if you could make measurements everywhere on land at the ocean surface and at elevation reducing those temperatures and there are various ways to do that but a dry atmosphere cools at about ten degrees celsius for co per kilometer we call that a lapse rate and so you can reduce temperatures to see level e- that's the number that you would theoretically come come up with it by the way is the only number that is estimated in his zero dimensional energy bounce model that exact model is envisioning a temperature it's measured precisely in the way that we just described okay so there's more or less agreed upon procedure for taking the data we have about the temperature at different locations on earth and converting that into a best fit number that we would call the global mean temperature yeah that's right and you got your start as far as i understand it in actually actually trying to push this idea backward in time right trying to figure out what it had been over time so tell me how you got into that and how we do that the sure thing yeah so early on in my my PHD studies i was interested in understanding came in is a physicist and i was interested in constructing models for describing the natural variability of earth's climate i wasn't really looking at climate change inch i was interested in natural cycles in the climate that have to do with oscillations in the way the ocean and the atmosphere interact with each other the most i well known of these is the el nino southern oscillation are and no one denies that the climate does change even without our help absolutely and and even when we talk about natural literal climate change there are two types of natural climate change they can be externally driven by changes in solar output or volcanic eruptions that have a cooling influence silence on the planet there are various natural you know on longer time scales the ice ages are driven by changes in earth's orbital geometry autry relative to the sun so there are these natural external drivers and then there's the fact that the climate like the weather is a chaotic system and and in fact one of the claims to fame of our field of field of atmospheric science is that that is where our modern conceptual understanding of of chaos actually arose it was in a set of equations that might peach advisor in fact berry saltzman awesome and back in the early nineteen sixties he'd been studying these equations these equations had described it was a simple system for describing describing weather and it consisted of three coupled partial differential equations and he noticed that these equations were giving rise to who very unusual behavior he thought it was some sort of numerical instability his former MIT colleague ed laurenz recognized that there it was something more fundamental going on here in laurenz was trained in sort of the earlier work by punk carre in the early twentieth century into non linear dynamics and understood that this was in fact a real system exhibiting what had been theorized chaotic behavior so the atmosphere and weather weather exhibits chaotic behavior but so does the climate the el nino phenomenon which californians are coarser intimately familiar with yeah that is a non linear interaction between the tropical pacific ocean and atmosphere we understand the physics of those interactions pretty well and when you model those interactions they are described by a set of non linear coupled differential equations that give rise to chaotic behaviour bob so there's a there's this chaotic component to the climate that even if you weren't changing any of the external parameters just leaving the system to run on its own it would vary in this chaotic matter just the same way that the weather varies chaotically over time but in this case el nino who is a three to seven year sort of cycle the weather you know mid latitude weather systems have timescales of days to a week the el nino phenomenon phenomenon because of the longer time scales of the tropical pacific ocean those oscillations happen on time scales of years three to seven years i was interested in potentially lee longer timescale oscillations in the climate system related for example to mid latitude ocean gyor's the gulfstream being part one of them these are ocean circulation systems that sort of have intrinsic decatur timescales so if there's an oscillation it could have decayed or longer time scales i was interested in the extent to which those oshawa there's oscillations exist and it turns out you run into a problem problem if you're interested for example and multi cadle oscillations like fifty the seventy year cycles and there's some evidence that they may exist then you've only got a century of widespread thermometer measurements so you're sorta stuck you that's that's basically one cycle and you can't really identify an oscillation you can't do a forty a you know a you you can't do a four year transfer a spectrum you can't estimate the spectrum of of one hundred year data set and hope to isolate a peak take that has a a a timescale close to the length of the data set so that led me to become interested in other types of climate data they could take thus farther back in time so called proxy records like tree rings corals and ice cores and that's what led me on this sort of journey which which ultimately led to an estimate of temperature changes over the past thousand years and the so-called hockey stick curve that placed me right at the center her of the very contentious battle over climate change but the questions that motivated that work actually had nothing to do with climate change itself that is hilarious areas i didn't realize that it came from the lorenzo and the you know initial forays into nominee dynamics and chaos but it makes perfect sense in retrospect yeah no it's it's and it's interesting the the the interplay between atmospheric science and meteorology and physics it really goes back to the origins of you know to some extent of of both sciences so there is this this very nice interconnectedness which is appealing to me because has again i got my start in physics and so a thousand years i presume that the non arbitrary number there's a reason why that's the reason the regime in which we can accurately really measure the global temperatures at the time in fact in nineteen ninety eight we published our first estimate and that only went back six hundred years then then based on the analysis of other records we found that there were enough longer records that we could actually obtain meaningful results two thousand years back and and there are sort of internal diagnostics that you can look at it's a statistical problem in their statistics that you can look at the tell you whether or not your your prediction or your estimate is likely to be meaningful or not and so you can look at the time of that i study nineteen ninety eight those statistics told us we i couldn't go back any farther than six hundred years with the data we had and get a meaningful answer but by digging into some additional long records we were able to extend that back a thousand years now scientists have literally extended these sorts of estimates millennia back in time there's one tentative estimate of this sort that now goes back well into the last ice age twenty thousand years back in time and now we understand that the spike of warming that we found in our study which which was demonstrated the warming of the last century to be unprecedented in a thousand years will these studies show that it's unprecedented in tens of thousands since of years and potentially although we don't have the data to conclude that it's likely that the warming spike we're seeing now is unprecedented in hundreds of thousands of years if not longer when what is there some particular proxy that is the best i mean what is the best way to figure out what the temperature was as a thousand years ago yes if you if you want to go back to the nice thing about the timeframe of the past thousand years or so is it you do have a a number of annually resolved records which is to say you've got corals are ice cores or tree rings that have annual layers in so you can get an annual annual chronology and that's actually very helpful when you're trying to calibrate these data against modern records that you can literally align them and you can we do a statistical calibration if you want to go back farther than that you start to become reliant on sort of lower resolution records sediment kors and paulin these are things that can be dated but not annually they can be radiocarbon dated or their other methods of dating that that provide rough time scales but you lose that annual resolution which creates additional challenges when you're trying to calibrate the records against the modern temperature longtime mindscape listeners will know that my cads ariel and caliban play a big role in helping me make the podcast occasionally they're meows or heard in the background cats are a wonderful thing overall but we all know that there is the issue of kitty litter it's a necessary evil it's not really fun so i was really glad when a new mindscape sponsor came along in the form of pretty litter pretty litter is a new kind of kitty litter which is everything you want in kitty glitter it's lightweight because it's made of crystals not of clay it's environmentally friendly it has this wonderful property that one bag will last you an entire month they ship ship it to your house you don't have to go to the store to get it all the time and it's really good at preventing odors the best part for me about pretty litter is that it monitors your cats health health when your cats are not feeling well pretty liberal actually change color depending on what's going wrong with them so you should do what i did and make the switch to pretty litter by visiting pretty litter dot com com using promo code mindscape for twenty percent off your first order that's pretty litter dot com promo code mindscape for twenty percent off say hi to your cats for me while oh you're at it for you to the hockey stick the fact that right now in the last century the temperature zooming up which of course if you plot it at the same meantime is your plotting the co two concentration the atmosphere that also zooms up and it's exactly what would've predicted i suppose that's right that's exactly right h sean i'm i'm glad you you put it that way because it's really important for people to understand that that's how science works it isn't that we found a warming spike is that what else is going on oh fossil fuel burning that must be the cause and it's just the opposite we have understood for so long that increasing greenhouse house gases have to warm the planet and these observations in these temperature reconstructions are simply confirming what more fundamental science pretty much tells tells us has to happen in in that's that's really important for people to understand because it's a one way in which science is often misrepresented right it's easy to create creating these scientists were just looking for 'cause you know in the two things happen to correlate that's not how it works well and also one of the popular responses responses among climate sceptics is that there are many natural ways for the climate to vary and of course that's true but nothing like the timescales were seeing here a and correct me if i'm wrong but investigations such as yours have helped us understand things like the medieval warming period and little ice age and these surreal but they're more gradual and we understand them is that fair you know that's absolutely right and those past climate patterns we now understand quite well those those past climate anomalies if you will the little ice age the medieval climate anomaly in fact we we've moved away from calling it the medieval warm period because it was actually quite cold in a large part of the tropical pacific eurocentric there to call that's right and and we now understand a good deal of that i'm that what's going on with these past natural changes unlike the warming that's happening right now which is pretty much globally ubiquitous warming happening just about everywhere everywhere over the surface of the earth these past periods you might have warmth in europe but cold in the tropical pacific cold in parts of north america and what's happening is you're seeing the response to changes in ocean circulation patterns and wind patterns those those are things that tend to cancel out in global average you're not changing the overall radiation budget of the earth like yeah are with greenhouse gases you're just sort of shifting heat around and increasingly recently these past periods very much appear to to reflect those sorts of changes have regionally cancelling so oh that if you look at the global average of the little ice age of the medieval climate anomaly the there are changes global average temperature of a couple tenths of of a degree celsius that are consistent with the drivers changes in solar output of volcanoes those can warm cool the global climate the they can change the global average temperature pitcher but here's the also interact with these climate modes like el nino or the the pattern known as the north north atlantic oscillation how the jet stream varies over north america and europe these forcing these these radiator these external changes can interact with modes woods of climate variability leading to large regional changes that largely cancel in the global average and if you do the global average you find that it's consistent with how the underlying factors are changing the global radiation budget of solar or volcanic forcing so it's kind of the difference between heating things up overall and moving leaving the heat around from place to place which any one place might seem like a dramatic shift exactly and and that's where you know the modeling and the observations shinzo really come together because in this area of science and in all areas of science you know th there's always theory and modeling and then their observations in observations or king in the world of physics observations in our field can be a little tougher to deal with they're not quite as precise as the measurements that you're able to make in you know in in particle physics you know often we have large error bars ars on our observations but but but the observations and the theory work hand in hand in in this field as they do in physics and in that's when you you start to have a comprehensive foundation ah for understanding a phenomenon when the observations and theoretical modeling and really align agree with each other and we've seen the science move in that direction when it comes to our understanding of a little ice age in the medieval climate anomaly family yeah so let's good let's drag it back then to the present day in what's going on so obviously we're dumping CO two and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere this year primarily from fossil fuel burning what what is the relative rate of other things i know the cows burping has to do with it too well i'm glad you you know you you you you didn't misrepresent the cows they've been much maligned i know which ended the cow comes out of the cows house aren't nearly as as as as exactly as as sometimes implied you know so that's that's part of the problem was a report that just came out IPC special report the IPCC comes out with their major climate reports roughly every five years and the the last one came out a few years ago and they'll be another one in a couple of years but in the meantime they often publicize interim reports on specific sort of areas of the science and in this case they were focusing on land and part of that was focusing on the role of agriculture and livestock in generating greenhouse emissions and and if got a lot of play and you know it's it's sort of interesting is the topic of the book that i'm actually working on right now is sort of about what are known as deflection campaigns you know if you're the fossil fuel industry it's very convenient to point at those poor cows say no there the problem or or two point at us and say you're the problem because you're eating beef and you're eating meat in its the problem is on us is anew rather it's it's not the burning a fossil fuels we've seen these sorts of deflections campaigns many times in the past when it came to the beverage industry the and and bottle and can litter the tobacco industry and and and many others well we're seeing that to some extent the fossil fuel industry where there's a grain of truth truth you know those some of those emissions do come from agriculture and livestock but you know beef is responsible for a only i believe it's six percent or five six percent of total carbon emissions associated with beef chiefs livestock in the eating of okay that's a pretty small piece of the pie we also hear a lot about flying a lot of criticism of well you know flying is two percent of the carbon emissions it's not zero and personal responsibility is part of the solution and we should all try to do everything we can and minimize our own personal carbon footprints and often those are sort of low hanging fruit no regrets decisions on our part because they save us money they make us healthier healthier they make us feel better and they reduce our carbon footprint suit we should all do that but when it comes to the main source of the problem of the lion's share roughly you know just about two thirds of the carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels for energy and transportation i and we sort of have to keep our eye on the ball ball because we as individuals can't reduce those emissions if we don't work for systemic change that changes our entire energy infrastructure transportation infrastructure are you know our energy infrastructure and to do that we need policy and we need kneed politicians who are willing to support policies that are good for us in the planet rather than the policies that might make huge profits for the you you know fossil fuel interests who fund their campaigns and so i in my view that's where we really need to be focusing but let's not lose sight of the fact that there are things we can do in our everyday lives and and reduce our carbon footprint and these things are synergistic when we do that we send a message to others it puts us on a path of no engagement where we become a more committed to doing more anti trying to influence policy for example to solve this problem yeah yeah i'm actually huge believer in solving these kinds of things or tackling them mostly systematically mostly through government or international cooperation personal virtue is great but it can it can it is great i honestly i shouldn't say sarcastically but it also can be a an excuse to sort of not worrying about the real bigger thing i did have i'm doing i did a podcast interview i'm gonna publish these back to back from as with ramez naam tom absolutely sure so he's he gave the optimistic side of the story because he's all about how renewables coming and we're going to be driving electric cars and it'll be great great and i'm counting on you to remind us that it's not automatic and if we don't actually make an effort to do it then really bad things are going to happen happens so i don't wanna i don't wanna say to you the pessimistic side of the story but a little bit of the realist ingredient in the cocktail here yeah well my my mantra these days is urgency and agency ency so good very out we have an urgent problem and we need to act and it's not going to solve it itself it's not going to the solution isn't going to happen on its own but there are things that we can do and our reasons for cautious optimism it's not too late to make the changes necessary to avert the the worst impacts of climate change so i imagined that you know he and i probably agree somewhat the bigger picture of but perhaps i'm you know more likely to emphasize the need of dramatic policy change now and in particular holding during the feet of bad actors to the fire taking to task bad actors in the politicians in their in their pay who are blocking eh literally trying to make it more difficult for us to shift towards renewable energy there blocking incentives for renewable energy they're doing everything they can and to throw a monkey wrench into the works and we need to make sure that they don't get away with doing that i do want to talk specifically about the politics and the policy but one more important science thing that i want to be clear on which relationship of the overall increase in warming with sort of local features of the weather weather right i mean more dramatic weather events have been happening or at least perceived to be happening it seems like there are more droughts and floods and hurricanes canal than there were a few years ago it's not obvious to me that there's a connection there with warming but there seems to be so hopefully you can explain this to us yeah thanks thanks i'm so glad you asked that sean because actually relates to some of the research that i've been doing in recent years i'm best known for the paleo climate work and the hockey stick that the decades ago but my research these days focuses to to some degree on sort of the impacts of climate change on extreme weather events and in fact last march a had an article in scientific american about the research that we've been doing that interestingly enough taps into my physicist training and background because some of the mathematics that you use to solve this problem you actually use the WKBD approximation summation nice all of my physics students listeners heart just fluttered when you said that well yeah it's delightful of course when when i encounter you know an opportunity to actually draw on my training you even in quantum mechanics who would have thought that my you know are the study of the behavior uh of a matter at the smallest scales could have implications for our understanding of global scale atmospheric patterns but but the mathematics addicts work out to be similar because it turns out that there's a phenomenon resonance phenomenon in the atmosphere and we've seen this in recent summers if you think about these really persistent extremes like we've had in california where you have one of these blocking patterns or ridge of high pressure system just parked over california for weeks at a time not budging or back east we've had the opposite we've had a low pressure system tendency that get these low pressure systems that just remain locked in place normally these weather systems sort of move along from west to east with the jet jet stream but as the jet stream slows and as you change temperature patterns in the atmosphere miss fear you can actually create a resonance effect i'm wear these systems become stationary and they grow greatly amplitude boots get these really deep highs they sit over the same place like california for weeks on end and that's when you get record heat and drought and wildfire and because of the wave of the jet stream if you've got one of those deep ridges high pressure parked over the west coast there's a good chance you've got the flip side of that sign you soya no wave the low pressure parked over say the eastern US which is exactly what we saw last pattern last summer and we had unprecedented rainfall and flooding now what our research shows is that as you change the pattern of temperature with latitude food so it turns out that the jet stream owes its existence to the difference in temperature between the subtropics which are warm and the polar regions which which are cold and that north-south change in temperature actually drives east-west variations in wind strength through use something known as the thermal wind and it's a combination of the hydra static balance in the atmosphere and the so-called local geographic law that involves the coriolis force and pressure gradient forces in the atmosphere so sound scienc- i like yeah no it's it's really it's fascinating leading science tells us why the jet stream is located where it is also tells us that if you reduce those temperature contrasts for example if you preferentially warm the arctic dick and you don't warm the subtropics much you're going to reduce the temperature gradient that north south temperature gradient you're going to reduce the strength of the jet stream and that means this it systems are more likely to stay parked they're not getting sort of moved along as quickly but the growth they can grow in amplitude because of this resonance effect and it turns out that happens through essentially a wave guide phenomenon where the mid-latitudes are acting sort of a wave guide where the those the undulations in the jet stream which are these weather disturbances we call them roxby waves or planetary waves typically they lose energy they radiate radiate energy vertically but also latitude mainly they sort of lose energy radiating to the south and to the north but under certain conditions when the the north-south temperature variations are just right the atmosphere behaves as a wave guide there's basically a wall at at sort of the subtropical end that the sub polar end and these raspy waves are funneled through wave guide with minimum loss of energy and it turns out that the mathematics to solve the for the the dispersion relation it requires the use of the same w k b approximation that's us to early twentieth century yeah that's great and so early in the twentieth sorry so in some sense the the the atmosphere is not unstable in the traditional sense like it doesn't poke it and it runs away to either zero or infinite temperature feature but the it sounds like the sizes of the fluctuations that undergoes when it comes tries to stabilize itself the amplitude might be increased by the increasing temperature overall that's exactly right this is one mechanism by which you can get these larger amplitude whether disturbances this is now obviously there are other mechanisms that that come into play so they're in limiting you know there's a limit on how much of that strengthening can happen open and it turns out in this case it's because what we call the simple theory the barrett tropic theory which is sort of like a vertically uniform atmosphere ultimately breaks down because has the atmosphere isn't bear tropic and so these eventually this condition breaks down and so it doesn't reach infinite strength just like hurricanes don't reach infinite strength strength there are dissipating mechanisms that kick in when they become strong enough but the upper limit as to how powerful they can become whether it's hurricanes or the the amplitude of these weather disturbances does appear to be increasing because of climate change yes i was just gonna say exactly that and hope that you would agree with me that it's it's fair to imagine that we're going to get more droughts we're going to get more hurricanes we're gonna get more floods we're going to get more extreme events as well as an overall increase in temperature richer that increasingly no penetrated appears to be the case in another area or is an area where the science has progressed when i would say a decade ago if you'd asked me this question these things were very much up in the air on you know are the models have become far more sophisticated and realistic our observations every day we're getting new observations we've really refined our understanding of these connections quite a bit to the point where i think one can say there is now emerging consensus that we will see more extreme weather events and we we'll see more intense hurricanes and tropical systems as a result of a human caused climate change and you can't point to any one hurricane and say a oh this is because of climate change but you can point to a lot of hurricanes over a period of time and say yeah this number definitely has something to do with how we're messing up our atmosphere yeah that's right eight and in fact we can even point to some of those individual hurricanes talk about how you know not the climate change caused you we can't say climate change caused the shortwave wave disturbance you know again it's chaotic system and and you can run a model ten different times and get a different result of you know whether or not a hurricane forms are not in each of those simulations because it is fundamentally chaotic but once it does form and it begins to strengthen we know that warming atmosphere warmer ocean temperatures there's more evaporative a transfer of heat from the ocean surface which is the energy that drives and strengthens these storms in fact a colleague of mine carry a manual of MIT i think now more than two decades ago worked out a very elegant theory for a tropical cyclones you can actually model them as a carnot cycle nice and there's a a a sort of cold temperature reservoir at the troposphere at the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere which is sort of the lid on the rising motion associated with these systems and the the surface of the tropical ocean is the the warm reservoir and the efficiency the work done which is a measure of how intense in fact the hurricane can become is a function of the differences between and those temperatures in terms of karnal yeah it's a very elegant theory and it's essentially right and so what happens is that upper temperature that cold temperature reservoir pretty much stays the same but the warm temperature the surface of the ocean is increasing in so the efficiency increases more work is done these hurricanes become more powerful and so we can talk about how with given hurricane it was likely you know more intense had more water vapor in it because that's the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is another nice simple physical relationship knows the classiest clapper on equation basically basically the evaporative evaporation rate increases as an exponential function of the temperature so warmer atmosphere for each degree celsius the atmosphere holds about seven percent more water vapor and so we can say that these storms have more moisture in them that means more moisture to turn into record flooding rainfalls like we've seen over the last two years we've seen the two worst flooding events on record for the US with harvey and then with florence well okay i mean so why don't we just remind our listeners of all of the terrible things that are going to have i mean again i'm not necessarily i wanna get later to the policy soon to the policy because we can do things to change things but it it is good to to keep in mind how bad things will get if we don't change anything i mean so there's extreme weather events there's also rising ocean levels there's changes in crops and farming what what are the things that you fred about when it comes to climate change the most yeah the things that keep me up at night are are are are the things where there isn't certainly right too often we hear uncertainty offered by the critics as supposed reason for inaction oh well we're not sure so so why should we do anything well from a risk management standpoint is just the opposite of that and it's especially true that's especially true because has the the uncertainties have been cutting against us if you look at the projection say you know a decade ago and you look at where we are with respect to the melting of the ice sheets the rise in sea level or many other measures the loss of sea ice in the arctic we are seeing changes that are at the upper end of the uncertainty ranges that we put forward at every juncture and and what that tells us is that uncertainty has not been our friend as we've the result that uncertainty it's turned too you know it's turned out that you know the processes that we hadn't represented very well when you get those in the muscles eh into the models they actually tend to for example accelerate some of these processes of good examples ice sheets in the old day ice sheet was treated as just a huge mound of ice but we understand they're very dynamic in fact you can use a modified sort of set of fluid dynamics equations to describe the flowing of ice in the constituent of behavior of ice on it has a complex dynamics to it i can collapse you have ice cliffs that collapse you has ice shelves that provide buttressing support for the ice sheets you have cracks what's that form in the surface that allow meltwater to rush to the bottom of the ice sheet where lubricates the base and allows the ice to surge more quickly out to sea and so as we get the more the physics into these icesheet models we're finding that they're more dynamic and that they can collapse faster and we're seeing that and we're seeing sea level rise faster because of it so uncertainty is not our friend and that's what keeps me up at night it's the fact that there is uncertainty and and and certainly can take the form of the known unknowns as you know infamously once described by a political figure you know they're the known unknowns and the unknown unknowns in the things that keep me up at night or the unknown unknowns that are lurking out we know they're out there and we just having discovered them because the known unknowns have worked out to not be in our favor that's likely to be true for the unknown unknowns ncis well well but what about the knowns i mean we now the the sea level is rising right i did i'm sure that you're safe central pennsylvania i did check that here in LA our height above sea level is enough that even if all the ice on earth melted we would still not be underwater but some of my friends on the beach are not going to be quite so lucky is that going to be worse overall for the planet than the simple fact of the temperature is going up or does it just depend on who you are where you are yeah yeah well i mean sea level rise is certainly proceeding faster than we expected and it's true you know if you live in in jersey shore pennsylvania you'll be fine there's town called jersey shore in the middle of that i drive through whenever i drive east and you on the jersey shore of new jersey different seven story when i grew up when i was growing up i had grandparents in philadelphia we would go to the jersey shore in the summer and if you live on the josie show jersey shore you're familiar with or you know anywhere along the mid atlantic coast new york city for that matter we're already seeing miami beach you know it might even the best example there is increasing talk about managed retreat we may be essentially beyond the point where there are or any adaptations building levees or other means of of preserving some of our large coastal cities we have to literally retreat retreat from the the coastline and obviously as their becomes less land available and that can be true because because of sea level rise literally eroding our coastlines reducing the amount of of coastal land or or the the the the the amount of total land and you've got the tropics becoming potentially too warm for human beings to to occupy so you're talking about seven and a half billion and growing people competing for less space less food did and less water now that doesn't keep you up at night you're not you're not thinking about it because this really represents it's a potential crisis from a security standpoint from a conflict standpoint that's where the the scenarios that we that even in our military experts have gained out some of these scenarios you know in some of them don't look unlike unlike the the post apocalyptic the dystopia of futures that hollywood has depicted that we of what you know our future could look like if we don't get our act in gear and what is your feeling about the currently on the table political solutions the paris agreement and so forth i mean solutions not the right word but at least strategy for trying to do better i mean is it is it enough if we actually all did what the paris agreement said we should do would that be enough or is that just a little stopgap yeah it would guess behalf way to the emissions reductions we need to avert warming coming of two degrees celsius which most scientists who studied the impacts of climate change we'll tell you if we warm the plan more than two degrees celsius low lesson four fahrenheit height that's where we we start to see some of the worst impacts irreversible impacts of climate change increasing and how much have we women already we've warmed about one point two degrees celsius already so when you hear there's lot target about talk these days about the two degree celsius target but also lower one and a half degree celsius yes target because if you're a low lying island nation that's already you know ca- catastrophic warming we will probably lose many of our low lying tropical local island nations and other coastal regions we may lose the great barrier reef at at a warming of one and a half degree celsius there yeah credible credible arguments for saying that two degrees celsius is too much we shouldn't let one point five degrees celsius when we've already done one point two so that tells you there isn't a whole lot of wiggle room left is the someone put a gun to your head when would you predict we would hit the two degree celsius warming mark they don't have to put a gun to my head in my twenty fourteenth scientific american article using that zero dimensional energy amounts model i i made a prediction of precisely that at sort of business as usual if we do nothing then by twenty thirty six or so we hit we hit that number and and so that tells you that's two degrees celsius one and a half degree celsius comes earlier and you know we're warming the planet at about point almost point two degrees celsius per decade so if i tell you we're at one point two and actually more like point two five per decade in we're at one point two and we're trying to avoid one point five we get there even even sooner so in fact yeah we're we're warming closer two point two degrees celsius i should say and and so we got point three degrees celsius to work with their and the US kate yeah the US is the worst i forget which way it goes the US is the worst per capita or the worse overall we're the worst up per per capita on the average carbon footprint of an american is about twenty metric tons of carbon that's the weight of two large african l. african male african elephants that's the the the massive CO two that the average american is putting into the atmosphere a year a year and you know carbon footprints are literally orders of magnitude smaller than that for most of the developing developing-world increasingly countries like china and india as they industrialise are approaching a more american sized footprint and that's obviously a big part of the problem as well arguably that's why those of us you know in the west last the US europe who built our economy's on your two centuries of free access to dirty energy we obviously we have a major responsibility for we're going to tell other countries like china and india that they don't have the same right to that you know cheap energy to to build their own economies if we're going to tell them that they don't have the right to do that we've got to have her own house in order an- and that's part of why it's so important for the US to lead on this tissue of course under the current administration and a mature how much you want to get into the politics of this we of course lack that leadership and that's a real problem well i think we can in you know state objective facts are current leadership has essentially said that we're just not going to follow the paris accord that we agreed with well in fact you know who are current the current occupant of the white house has characterized climate change is a hoax perpetrated by the chinese obviously that's not a good starting place lice from meaningful conversation about solving this problem but do you think do you get a feeling because i'm sure that you are involved in a whole bunch of of international events here do you think that worldwide people are gathering the determination the willpower to try to do something about this or is is it maybe a little too little too late kind of feeling now i i do in in part of why i'm optimistic is the way that our young folks are sort of taking control of the the public discourse you know the youth climate movement and there's gonna be a huge march next month in in new york city the greta thunberg this famous a sixteen year old girl from sweden but there are other prominent tom figures in the youth climate movement who have sort of really helped to reframe this in the manner that i think it needs to be reframed a this is as a matter isn't just science and economics and policy this ethics this is a matter of intergenerational ethics are ethical obligation into not leave behind a degraded planet for our children and grandchildren for future generations and it's you know i the fact that young folks are now speaking up about this i think that's a game changer i think it's reframed the conversation i think it's a a big part of why we are going to act in time don't have a whole lot of wiggle room as already said and it's it's it's it's the eleventh hour but we're also seeing a lot of progress we're seeing the reframing of this problem in the way that it needs to be reframed as ah existential threat to an ethical obligation to act now and we're also seeing remarkable changes in sort of the the energy marketplace we are seeing exponential rise in in renewable energy electric vehicles california of course leading the way but providing a a you know a providing a blueprint for what to the rest of the states can do and i think we're gonna we're gonna do it i'm encouraged by the progress we're seeing but i still fully cognizant of the uphill challenge the uphill battle that we face here that we really do need to to to get off fossil fuels quickly if we're going to avert catastrophic warming the planet will there's also the issue that is closely related to this of course but but the issue about how science is done and how the discourse over science has done i mean i know i'm sure you have a long set of things to say about out this you've been heavily politicised probably completely out of the blue when you were attacked in various ways or did you sort of see it coming as soon as you started working working on climate change yeah you know i can tell you for certain that when i double majored in applied math and physics at UC berkeley and went off to yale to study theoretical physics i didn't think that i was on his name rabble rouser you know political debate but when i moved into the climate science and went really went our work started taking us in this direction when i realized that our work on paleo climate did have implications for climate change with the publication of the hockey stick curve back in the late nineteen ninety s it became clear to me at that point that i i was probably you know given the history and of you know how other scientists were prominent in the climate change arena had been attacked and vilified by fossil-fuel so fuel interests in in front groups and in the hired sort of hands that do their bidding i i sort of started to suspect that i might have to deal with some of those attacks and ultimately when the hockey stick did become this icon in the climate change debate yeah because it tells this simple story you don't understand the physics of the climate understand what's telling us that there's a dramatic change that's a foot and we're responsible for we're at that was the threat to the powerful vested interests that don't wanna see us move away from our addiction to fossil fuels and and i realized is pretty soon that i may find myself in their sights a central target their efforts to discredit the science and so that ended up taking in a completely different direction from the one i imagined when i again i started off in physics it isn't in what i envisioned a life in science looking but that having been said ultimately i've come to embrace the opportunity that that's given me it isn't the the the role that i chose it isn't the path that i signed up for but it's given me an opportunity to help inform the societal conversation about do you know perhaps the greatest challenge we face a civilization i feel privileged to be in that position i did do a podcast interview with naomi russkies and it was it was is a merchants of doubt it was quite an eye opener like i hadn't actually been familiar with her work and the this is the thing that i think that we don't understand and if we don't follow these things closely is that these controversies don't just organically appear all the time right i mean billions of dollars of prophet and income are at stake where there are vested interests it just makes perfect sense that there will be a concerted effort to affect the way these things are talked about and the most bizarre thing to me is the idea that people seem to push with a straight face that somehow climate scientists are financially benefitting from pushing a global warming story clearly these people have no idea how science actually works now that's exactly right and part of the problem here is scientific literacy let's see in the fact that the public doesn't really understand what scientists do how science works and so as possible for bad actors to put forward these narratives that that we know are silly and they know or silly right people making these are against no it's silly but it sounds credible to somebody doesn't understand that oh you're you're grants they don't go to your pocket they they fund your research program in your your publications and it's really easy to take advantage of you know a scientifically illiterate literate in a relatively scientifically illiterate society it's interesting i was just reading a book about the life of carl sagan carl sagan life by davidson it's a fascinating read and you know and and sagan prophecy prophesized this he worried about a precisely future that we're now in where the we have a public that's so poorly informed about out basic matters of of science that they are vulnerable the specially vulnerable to the forces of pseudoscience which was sagan's primary worry but but moreover of anti-science concerted efforts to to misrepresent science into confuse the public in in policy i see makers about science and its implications were living in that world now it's it's the very world that sagan feared we might like find ourselves in it's a it's a chilling it's really a chilling prophecy it's chilling to read what he had to say about these matters decades ago because his worst fears are sorta coming true and in this is a manifestation of that if the sign you know if the public doesn't understand how science works and if there's a concerted concerted effort to discredit science to to attack the integrity of science and scientists and we've seen those efforts that's an effort to undermine the the the the trust that the public has in in scientists what they have to say so i think we have to recognize that the challenges challenges we face whether it's in climate change or in science writ large are part of a larger problem which is sort of the lack of good faith in our our public discourse and the emergence of a true fake news and alternative facts in the challenge that represents presents to those of us who who deal in a world of facts yeah i think no matter how depressing it gets is that certain people are resistant to facts people are not rational right there's tribalism this confirmation bias as a whole bunch of things but at the end of the day we have correctness snus and truth on our side i think it's very very powerful weapon so i- insist on being optimistic about where things are going to go as long as i think that that is ultimately i think that that will win out but in the meantime we have a real challenge ahead of us michelman thanks for you're fighting the good fight and thanks very

sean carroll professor penn state university universi michael distinguished professor hockey thousand years two centuries eighteen degrees celsius six thousand kelvin six hundred years twenty percent fifty eight fifty fifty nine d three degrees celsius twenty thousand years eighty eight kelvin ten degrees celsius two thousand years
What Is the World's Longest-Living Vertebrate?

BrainStuff

08:00 min | 5 months ago

What Is the World's Longest-Living Vertebrate?

"Today's episode is brought to you by capital. One you are miles. Go further with the capital one venture card the travel card that lets you unlimited double miles for more than just air travel right now earn a hundred thousand bonus miles. He can actually use redeemable for vacation. Rentals car rentals and more when you spend twenty thousand dollars in your first year. What's in your wallet. Limited time offer terms apply see capital one dot com for details. Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey brain steph. Lauryn boban here. They may not have their own cult. Classic movie like the infamous great white shark but equally massive greenland shark. Taxonomic names on nusa microcephaly. Pretty impressive record there. The longest living vertebrate known to science. It's estimated they can live up to about four hundred years beating out the former record holder. A species of bowhead whale that can live a little over two hundred years a greenland shark alive. Today could have been swimming in the deep during the sixteen hundreds despite having been around for well. What seems like forever. The greenland shark was only recently. Recognized as the longest living vertebrate because scientists have been stumped for centuries about how to determine their age other sharks and most other vertebrates have hardened spines that form growth rings similar to what occurs inside a tree and those can be counted to determine how long any given sharp sharp-toothed beast has been roaming the seas mutt. The greenland shark lacks hard. Tissue making age measurement nearly impossible that is until the recent intersection of danish scientists human cadavers and bash of murder mystery. The story starts with one yawn. Haina myer an expert in radiocarbon dating at our who's university in denmark. He didn't specifically have the greenland shark on his radar but he proved that you really can tell a lot about a person by their is. His team was studying. The crystalline switch are a type of protein that remain stable over time and the carbon fourteen levels in the eyes of human cadavers. Since the carbon level fluctuates from year to year every period in time has its own carbon fourteen signature allowing researchers to use radiocarbon dating to determine a bodies age using the lenses of the is but before the technique helped age sharks. It found its way to forensics. His team got a request from police in germany to help them solve a bizarre murder mystery. The victims had been frozen for years so the scientists were able to use this technique on their islands is to precisely determine their ages and thus the year of the crime then when marine biologist john flying stephenson reached out to hanna myer to see if they could use radiocarbon dating on shark vertebra. He learned about the murder case into new approach. Isolated tissue that formed when a shark was very young could be radiocarbon dated to give scientists the sharks new approximate age. So how does the greenland shark. Managed to live so long. One theory is that extreme. Cold produces anti-aging qualities and for these sharks. They hang out in water. That hovers around twenty nine degrees fahrenheit. That's negative one point six celsius alot. Metabolism is also thought to be at play but scientists don't have the full answer yet. That is a studies are currently underway to examine the sharks jeans heart and immune system. Help solve this age old age puzzle and there may be a bonus. They're hoping to be able to use what they find to create immune-boosting therapies for us. Humans given the green sharks need to conserve energy. They creep along at an average pace of just point three meters per second or point eight miles per hour giving them the nickname sleeper sharks but don't discount their ability to attack when truly necessary they can increase their speed and short bursts. The greenland shark can grow to be up to twenty four feet or over seven meters long and weigh in at up to twenty six hundred pounds or about twelve hundred kilos but they don't exactly have a teenage growth spurt. Instead they make an extremely slow steady climb to their final size only growing about half an inch or one centimeter per year with that slow growth. Come slow sexual maturity. They only become able to reproduce. Once they're around a hundred and fifty years of age and to add to their quirkiness. These slow giants might not even be able to see. Well we spoke by email with dr steven e campana professor of life and environmental sciences at the university of iceland. He said greenland sharks in the arctic. Often have copa pod or crustacean echo parasites attached on or over. There is. there's no known advantage to these parasites and indeed it seems likely that these parasites obscure or even block vision of the shark. Even though they have a coveted spot at the top of the food chain the greenland shark doesn't always hunt for live prey when they do they mostly catch seals and fish but more than anything they seem to enjoy living more of a scavenger lifestyle eating animal carcasses such as polar bear or reindeer. The may have fallen through the ice since the greenland shark usually hangs out in such deep waters. It's rare to see one at times. Even for scientists component said. There's almost no direct fishing towards greenland sharks rather they are usually caught accidentally as bycatch fisheries or other deep water or cold water marine species. A small number of people do in fact hunt the greenland shark for their meat but eating it is a risky endeavor. The meat must be dried and specially processed over time to remove the m. o. A which is a substance that causes heavy intoxication in humans. Anyone who eats unprocessed meat will end up shark drunk with a really nasty hangover for a few days. And there haven't been any documented attacks on humans but that may have to do with the depth of their living quarters while they're true conservation status is unknown. Professor campana said the fact that greenland shark densities remain high in some areas suggests that continued catches over. The past century have not been enough to push the population into a critical decline. Although there almost certainly at low abundance overall today's episode was written by katie carmen and produced by clan for more on this month of other sharp ethics is it has to forts dot. Com brain stuff is production of iheartradio or more podcast. Heart radio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Nearly six hundred years after the invention of the printing press the most important book the history of the world has arrived. There might be overstating things stuff you should know an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things. It will change your life forever. Well that's not necessarily true. Most scientists agree that stuff. You should know an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting. Things is proof that time travel is possible because that is the only way to explain. How a book. This impressive was possibly made. Why what stuff you should know an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things will re grow hair. Whiten your teeth and improve your love life. That's just not at all right. We'll the love life part. Maybe if you find someone who thinks smart as sexy stuff you should know an incomplete compendium of mostly interesting things of fatal for preorder. Now at stuff you should know dot com. Now that is true.

greenland twenty thousand dollars Lauryn boban two hundred years Haina myer john flying stephenson twenty nine degrees fahrenheit four hundred years three meters per second twenty four feet seven meters twenty six hundred pounds twelve hundred kilos steph one centimeter dr steven e campana myer denmark university of iceland sharks
Wall Street Breakfast November 19: Coronavirus Concerns Resurface

Wall Street Breakfast

08:55 min | 5 months ago

Wall Street Breakfast November 19: Coronavirus Concerns Resurface

"Merrill self-directed gives you more than just free online stock. Etf and option trades. you'll get access to research and insights from top global mines along with powerful trading platform and best trade execution is our number one priority because merrill does not accept payment for order flow start trading with merrill lynch self-directed today investigate securities involves risks products and services are offered by merrill lynch pierce fenner and smith incorporated a registered broker-dealer member. Sipc other fees may apply. Welcome to seek alpha's wall street breakfast your daily source of market news and analysis. Subscribe to this. Podcast on apple podcasts. Google podcasts spotify. Stitcher good morning. Today is thursday november nineteenth. and i'm your host. Steve brown our top stories. Today corona virus concerns resurface encouraging results for the elderly and deliveries before christmas leading. Today's news vaccine euphoria that propel stocks to record highs is wearing off as traders focus on a surge in corona virus transmission rates in the us or deaths from the illness surpassed two hundred and fifty thousand. According to johns hopkins university. The number of fatalities has remained above thousand a day for eight of the past. Nine days a tally that was last seen in late. August sentiment was particularly dented. After new york city's shed schools and switch to fully remote learning for its students because of surging cases of covid nineteen us stock index futures fell point four percent overnight on the news after bouncing around the flat line for most of wednesday only to turn south in the final hour of trading chances of stimulus from washington are also dim as lawmakers remained deadlocked over the size of a corona virus aid package in other news. Some positive news was still seen overnight. After a jab from the university of oxford which is working in collaboration with astrazeneca shown to have generated a robust immune response and adults in their sixties and seventies preliminary results revealed that the vaccine chid o x one in nineteen prompted. What's known as a t. Cell response within fourteen days of the first dose as well as an antibody response within twenty eight days of a booster dose. We hope that this means our vaccine will help to protect some of the most vulnerable people in our society said dr mahachi ram asami a co author of the study at the university of oxford phase. Three trials of the vaccine are still ongoing with early. Efficacy readings possible in the coming weeks with pfizer and bio intech having concluded there phase three study of their covid nineteen vaccine candidate which showed a success rate of ninety five percent and no serious adverse events. The drug might be headed to securing evidence. Use approval next month. If all those well. I could imagine that we gain approval in the second half of cimber and start deliveries before christmas but really only if all goes positively bio intech ceo. You're signing told reuters. Tv storage and distribution is still complicated. Pfizer's vaccine must be stored frozen negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit or negative seventy degrees celsius most likely needing dry ice at negative one hundred and nine degrees fahrenheit for shipment city officials in phoenix have unanimously voted to authorize a slate of financial incentives and government support for taiwan semiconductor manufacturing planned twelve billion dollar chip plant in may the company disclosed its intention to build a five nanometer chip factory in arizona. Which would be. Its first. Advanced manufacturing facility in the us american lawmakers have been pushing for high tech manufacturing to address national security concerns over the industry supply chain and even proposed billions of dollars in subsidies to the sector in june. Not everything has gone as planned a heavily. Touted deal by foxconn in wisconsin. Back in two thousand eighteen still hasn't fully materialized and was recently denied tax credits for failing to meet investment and hiring goals president trump plans to attend a virtual apec summit on friday following a similar high level meeting of asia pacific leaders last week that saw the signing of the regional comprehensive partnership agreement trump's involvement will mark his first participation in the events twenty seventeen the following year a delegation from the us and china failed to agree on a joint communique for the first time in the blocks history given opposing stances on trade and investments. We will not reverse course or one against the historical trend by decoupling. Openness enables a country to forward wall seclusion hold back china's g jinping said ahead of the gathering. It's unclear whether joe biden would rollback tariffs on china analysts have said the. Us will likely continue to take tough stance on beijing under the new administration. Universal had explored a direct digital release earlier this year but reached a deal with. Amc that saw films at the box office for three weekends before going online as well as truncated theatrical window with cinemark warner brothers is now experimenting with its playbook announcing that wonder woman nineteen eighty-four would arrive on. Hbo max on december twenty fifth the same day. It hits theaters the decision to keep the coming blockbuster. On the twenty twenty calendar will allow theater change to make cash op ticket sales and also dr subscribers sign ups to the streaming service. The i wonder woman film had one hundred million dollar opening weekend domestically and went on to notch more than eight hundred twenty million at the global box office as more vehicles are sold with built in. Internet connections automakers are branching into services that capitalized on the data produced by their systems. Gm is launching a car insurance business through its onstar connected car service which will set insurance rates by remotely tracking drivers behavior like obeying the speed limit and avoiding sudden stops. Gm will begin a pilot this week for its own employees in arizona and plan to offer it nationwide later in twenty twenty one for much of its history. Gm offered insurance to drivers but in the business during its two thousand nine bankruptcy after unloading its gmac. Financial services arm amazon's drone project has already been seven years in the making completing. Its first delivery in twenty six teen and receiving us regulatory approval part one thirty five certification to begin limited testing august now the unit is laying off dozens of rnd and manufacturing staff as it reached tentative component deals with to external manufacturers austria's f. Acc aerospace and spain's nova aerospace to financial times reports. Keep in mind. That amazon brought in former boeing executive david carbon to run the unit in march replacing gir-. Kimchi who ran the operation since twenty thirteen. According to details released in mid two thousand nineteen primary will make use of a hexagon shape fully electric drone that can fly up to fifteen miles and carry packages weighing under five pounds as of six twenty. Am today us. Futures crude oil golden. Bitcoin are all set to open in the red on. Today's economic calendar initial jobless claims her out at eight thirty a. m. eastern time. If you enjoyed today's podcast please be sure to rate and review it below. Your feedback is deeply appreciated. That concludes today's wall street griffin. Thank you for listening for the investment analysis and news on the web. Does he dot com. Subscribe to this. Podcast on apple podcasts. Google podcasts spotify stitcher. You can sign up for our other. Podcast behind the idea as referees. Let's hook ups cannabis investing podcast and marketplace roundtable. Almost as well a great day merrill edge self directed gives you more than just free online stock. Etf and option trades. you'll get access to research and insights from top global mines along with the powerful trading platform and best trade execution is our number one priority because merrill does not accept payment for order flow start trading with maryland self-directed today investing in securities involves risks products and services are offered by merrill lynch pierce fenner and smith incorporated a registered broker dealer member. Sipc other fees may apply.

merrill lynch pierce fenner merrill lynch self university of oxford four percent twenty eight days dr mahachi ram asami bio intech ninety five percent ninety four degrees fahrenheit seventy degrees celsius Pfizer nine degrees fahrenheit us twelve billion dollar five nanometer Steve brown Sipc Nine days johns hopkins university
Credit and the COVID Mushroom Cloud: DB- Nov 11, 2020

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

41:09 min | 5 months ago

Credit and the COVID Mushroom Cloud: DB- Nov 11, 2020

"Support for this podcast comes from goldman sachs companies in the top core tile for ethnic diversity or thirty three percent more likely to have industry leading profitability and those in the top korte gender diversity or twenty one percent more likely to outperform this data was the catalyst behind launch with gs a five hundred million dollar investment strategy that continues to focus on increasing access to capital for women black latino and other diverse entrepreneurs learn more at gs dot com slash launch with gs Welcome vision it's wednesday november eleven twenty twenty just after market close in new york. This is the real vision daily briefing. I'm joined shortly by our managing editor at harrison. But i with the day's stories jack farley thanks ash markets resumed their assent today with the tech-dominated nasdaq leading the way the announcement of the pfizer vaccine continues to shape markets in ways that are evolving the vaccine needs to be stored and transported at extremely cold temperatures as low as negative nine degrees fahrenheit in fact. So we're seeing deep freezing corporations and vaccine logistic companies having a monumental rally companies like diane scientific and snowman logistics one sector. That went on a tear on mondays. Decks seen news the movie exhibitors their sales had been absolutely obliterated by shutdowns. You look at. Amc's third quarter sales. Were down ninety one percent year over year but the prospect of a vaccine breathed new into this industry whose future is on the knife edge cinemark and sin a world are holding firm today but amc is actually down eleven percent today as doubts about their liquidity heighten. Amc is the largest exhibitor in the us and a staple of american life krona cases in the us are up sixty nine percent over the past. Two weeks and deaths are up twenty three percent and in new york. The case fatality rate is two point three one percent if it goes to three percent all public schools are going to go remote as we enter this winter. Profound uncertainty companies are looking to buffer their balance sheet. Whether it's debt or equity they're grasping for as much cash as they can get their hands on. Carnival cruises and american airlines announced plans on tuesday to issue additional equity and speculative grade corporates are tapping the high yield bond markets companies like tarot continental enter vita by the way amc which had issued equity last month is now double dipping offering twenty million additional shares to the market. It makes sense for corporate. Credit spreads have continued to sink both investment grade and high yield with lenders all too happy to oblige companies need cash. It makes sense bill. Ackman's pershing square just announced. He put back on his short of investment grade credit. That should be interesting to watch. Going forward is bill. Ackman someone you want us to interview on vision. Let us know in the comments below by the way all this risk on sentiment over the past week has delta minor blow to the treasury market yields have risen as much as twenty basis points on the end of the curve. Ats like tnt. Are taking their medicine. But hey the money has to come from somewhere right. Meanwhile on the european continent the head of the unit on winding down failing banks is sounding the alarm about non-performing loans. Elke chair of the single resolution board is urging european banks quote be aware that non-performing loans are coming and that the best thing to do is address them early. That is the best thing that we can do for the time being and after that it's steering through the fog. The european central bank has continued to pursue vigorous intervention in the money market funds even after the fed and the j. have wound down those programs whether the has an appetite for supporting up to one point five trillion euros in sour loans will see by the way before we let you go over the next two weeks. We're going to do an interview series. That might change the way you look at. Markets is perhaps the best series of interviews that we've done in the history of real vision. We all know that we're in an uncertain territory. The feet of this virus and how it impacts economic behavior. It's very up in the air fiscal stimulus overdue central banks scrambling paper. Cracks market's at all-time highs. We all know this. You know this but how do you make sense of this. No one knows that so the next two weeks over the next two weeks. We're going to be speaking to the best investors in the world. The brightest financial minds to help. Answer this question for you. And your portfolio. So brent johnson is going to be speaking to russell napier rows talking to real vision favourite. Hugh hendry It's going to be interviewing investing legend. Sam zell mike green talking to the world. Copper short seller. Jim china's jim grant is coming back to speak to william white about the state of central banking. Kyle interviewing a forensic accountant steve klamkin. Who's done a deep dive in the weeds on chinese tech stocks. I mean my god rows talking to timothy polly T i mean what. Even i have trouble believing it i am. I have to pinch myself so it starts next week next monday. Although this friday you might have a little surprise so stay tuned for that and with that. Let's go over to ash. And ed i'm ash bennington host of the real vision daily briefing. Today's episode is sponsored by next year. Are you buffering. Video calls connecting more devices or running. A hand held point of sale device. Do you need a separate guest network or enterprise level security. The world runs on wifi and small businesses and home offices are no exception more than ever before. It's important that your business network delivers the very best performance an unparalleled coverage to keep your teams well-connected whether they're in the office or working from home. Why six is the latest in net gear wi fi technology delivering speed coverage security and capacity for all your business needs net gears wi fi six business solutions including latest wi fi six access points and the new or be pro wi fi. Six try and mesh system are easy to set up and manage so you can keep your guests connected and your data protected from anywhere anytime with wi fi solutions from net gear. You can focus. On your business not your. It visit net gear dot com slash wi fi to learn more. That's net gear dot com slash wifi. Thanks jack welcome back in. Thank you and happy veterans day to you. The real veterans day and happy real veterans day. You thank you for your service said thank you and you know by the way Given the fact that just listened to jack hollywood barley just wanted to Give him a shout-out. Because tomorrow i understand he's going to be the host of this show sitting in your chair if you will sitting in my chair but Fifteen blocks further south. Yes exactly. yeah you know talking jacket some really interesting stories in the intro That i think kind of bring up some of the issues that we've been talking about a little bit more broadly a little bit more. Structurally the eu is urging banks To begin preparing for. Npl's non-performing loans Us companies are continuing to stockpile progressively more cash on. Finally there's a story out today. That bill ackman is talking about too much complacency in markets once again shorting investment grade credits which is very similar to the bat. He made last time. We made two point six billion dollars. I believe earlier in the year On the declines in economic activity from the cova crisis. And you've been thinking about this big picture for very long time. You've been talking about the potential for a double dip. Were you in terms of your framework right now. We spoke to that and there are so many ideas are going through my mind right now after the election because we obviously had that kkob related sell off because what happened in europe in terms of the lockdown. I think that was appropriate. Given the fact that you're such a large contributed to global gdp growth and that they were going and doing the most draconian thing locking down their their economies but the the secondary question is what happens in the us. and i'm definitely firmly of the belief onto two fronts. One that the backward-looking date in the us or good that is is that we're looking at numbers that suggest that the us looks good To be able to power forward it would be good if it weren't for the virus. The fact is that the virus is a big problem. I think that the things that you and i were talking about Maybe two weeks ago have been borne out by reality. That is the numbers in the us. I said are definitely going to rise. They're gonna rise a lot and it's going to be epidemic proportions in what we've seen since that. Time is an absolute know mushrooming in the case. Count the death count is up to fourteen hundred today The highest that we saw was in the two thousand range In the first wave. So i honestly think that we'll get to those levels. I was talking around the fifteen hundred level We're already near that level now. So things are looking really bad in. The question is for the. Us given the fact that we haven't had a locked down yet. Will there be a lockdown. Eventually and what sort of economic outcome can we expect Given that we already expect bad things happen in europe. Yeah you know. Add inspired by your thoughts. Let's do a quick chart store just to give visual form to some of these ideas because they're such incredibly important part of what we're looking at right now so starting out i. This is just the daily trend in the number of covid cases in the us. You can see once again up into the right. there's there are three peaks. the third one is the highest. That's where we are now. Disturbingly here is the daily trends in the number of deaths. Covid you can see there. Looks like there's some periods asian in the data. It looks to me like weekend lull in reporting but the important thing is at the end of this chart you can see. There's a huge leg up in the number of people who were dying and that as a consequence is pushing that moving average. That's the red line. Ever-higher here's a chart that rather map. I should say that. I found to be really unusual. If you look at the highest rates of hospitalization. That's the red areas that you're looking at its montana. South dakota and nebraska. These are places that were not hard hit in the first way and you can see here in new york which obviously was hit very hard in the lowest zone in terms of the number of hospitalizations per million cases. I you know to jump internationally. A to your point about europe. This chart i think very disconcerting. This is europe's covid nineteen resurgence. You can see this. Chart is kind of unusually formed a but it's effectively aggregating together. The global regions were coverted. has hit which is effectively the whole world. And what you can see. Is this huge bulge in the chart on the left. That's the first wave where you have europe and then a little bit later slip shifted slightly to the right north america and now once again europe picking up dramatically precisely to your point and and for me the most disconcerting of all of these charts for americans it's called false surge and here you can see the surge in hospitalization from corona virus cases. Now up to a new daily high number of people admitted to the hospital so the narrative that we'd heard from people who were a little bit more optimistic had basically two main points. The first was that it was an unmasking effect caused by additional testing. That was causing. Those numbers look higher than they were and the second Was that younger healthier. People were getting it in. There was going to be less impact because people are out and about and not in nursing hosts it seems looking at those that last chart hospitalization chart that both of those thoughts are suspect. This looks like a very significant problem. Yeah and i would say one. You're being Diplomatic charitable. They just completely off right Th that blinders on. Because i didn't want to see what was in front of them. Yes it is true that we're testing more than two by the way. Even if you're hospitalized you know the hospitalization rate to the death rate is actually lower as well so the the truth of the matter is is that we're much better at dealing with this but that doesn't mean that we aren't seen an epidemic increase when you see the levels of increase in terms of the actual numbers of cases. You can you don't need. All you need is direction out. You don't really need It's not the actual numbers themselves that matter. It's the direction that they're going. And over what timescale that's happening so when numbers are increasing in terms of the accounts by sixty percent. Eventually you're going to catch up in terms of the death count as well so that that's really what you have to say. We're still continuing to increase in terms of the actual testing numbers You know the number of people were tested positive so you can see the death. Count's will actually with a lag increase continuously. That's really the you know. The whole concept of looking at flow at looking at the trend as opposed to the absolute numbers. Which is why generally tend to do in terms of economic data as well so the big question is is what does that mean in terms of The economy because you know from what i've seen certainly in just in my area. It's been a ghost town at night so there has been a you know a pulp -able change in terms of people's behavior at the margin in terms of certain things. And so it's interesting when you think about the vaccine Coming on board the massive reacting we had to the vaccine. The question is how what are we supposed to make of the price action in markets. You know you have the stay at home stocks and then you have the beaten down value stocks. There's been a rotation trade there might view is. Is that what we definitely seen. Is that the prevailing view that the new normal that we've been living in was continue. It was probably over overplayed that there's a reversion to the mean if you will in terms of how once once the vaccine comes on board. We're going to unwind some of the behaviors that we've been engaged in. But i think that we're not going to unwind them completely so some of the you know the things that i'm already seen in my local area. In terms of you know at night people not going out to bars not going out to restaurants. Those are the kinds of things that i think will continue to go on as long as the the pandemic is still a problem. And probably even after the fact so there's going to be you know a reversion to What we used to have the old normal but it's not gonna go completely in that direction and the question is what happens in the interim in terms of how much damage is it going gonna do to certain parts of the economy. I think that there are parts of the economy. Small businesses leisure Towel and travel. That will get hit. And some of those companies will go bankrupt We already have shut down in europe. So norwegian air is a perfect example of this. This is a company that Required a bailout from the norwegian government. If they don't If things don't improve quickly by the beginning by the spring or sorry the winter two thousand twenty one. They're going to hit the wall. And they'll have to be liquidated. I think you'll see similar types of companies here in the united states as well so much there to dig into You touched on something that i very much wanted to ask you about Which is this rotation encounter rotation. i'll be diplomatic again. That doesn't really seem to have a great deal of direction or cohesion between growth in value. What are your thoughts there. Yeah so i'm thinking about in terms of the reversion to the mean as well. I saw some that kevin your up from the macro tourist what he was writing. He said the monday Rotation trade was the biggest outperformance of valuable regrowth since two thousand and one and we know that two thousand to two thousand and two period was a massive outperformance of of value. After we had the the bubble of the internet which came to a halt. You had people like Julian robertson tiger fund This is something that kevin moore closing down seem similar. Sorts of things are happening now and so his postulating is that even though we're giving back some of this rotation Just because i as. I said you know you have a reversion to the mean in terms of certain things. There is a durable. There is potentially a durable shift here that we were way over our skis in terms of the law. Large cap tack and that eventually you have to have the term and that right this is as good a time to have the turn as any And and we're in the early innings of that of that turn. I mean this is essentially. What j. polaski was saying in the interview. That i had with him on rb db. Yeah for people who haven't seen it. Can you summarize his case. Yeah his case is that the markets are forward looking. You know you buy the rumor. Sell the news. The rumor is is that would have a vaccine very shortly Visor came out with that and the answer. Therefore based upon that is to buy up in a massive way The the names that have underperformed leisure hospitality and travel and then to sell the stay at home stocks the likes of fang And and then once the news hits you know then you can take your profit to that particular juncture. But you know we had such a massive move on In tuesday that were already seen people taking out taking the prophet Does that mean that. That move doesn't have more of ood. I think it does but remember when the middle of a pandemic so some college hit the wall. Going back to jack's thesis about these three different jobs. These three different stores in europe in the united states. I think it's very much the case with bill. Ackman talking about shorting itchy credit yet. There are gonna be some downgrades. Were not out of the woods yet but still nonetheless. I think that rotation does make some sense but it's still very early days in that rotation seems like a good time to read through the closing numbers from the day. Aso dow jones industrial average closes at twenty nine three ninety seven That's off about Zero about point one percent point zero eight percent on the day. I s p five hundred up about three quarters of a percent up to settle at thirty five seventy two. The nasdaq big mover of the day closes at eleven seven. Eighty six up two percent on the day russell. Two thousand almost perfectly flat plus zero point zero zero percent on the day. Yes so a bit of a change their reversal really. You could say. I'm you know i was just gonna say you know what when i look at these. You know. it's i thought it was a great show yesterday. Tony greer and one of the reasons. Why i like having tony on. So much is because he's very much In a world that. I'm not which is the short trading piece Looking at looking at flows looking at an understanding short-term technical indicators. When i look at this i think about this. Obviously more from us. Strategic sam point many ways similar to the way that you look at it and for me like i just feel like if one of your co workers comes in one day and he's wearing like an official mlb from the yankees wearing a yankees hat. And you're like what's going on man he's like. I'm really into the yankees now. You're like all right. That's cool but if he comes in the next day and he's just wearing head to toe mets gear. I'm going to be like is everything. Okay and that's the way i feel about these rotations like i look at this. And i understand that you know traders see short-term opportunity to move in and out of positions but it just seems like there's a huge amount of churn happening in these markets like there's no clear direction And that you know some of the strategic stories that we're talking about the virus ultimately some of the things that i know we're gonna touch on a little later about liquidity in markets. These are much more longer term durable stories. They're not the kind of thing the turn on a week day Were a short term cycle basis. Yeah and so. I think that that you make a lot of sense there. The thing is is that we may be in a shift. I mean if you think about this everyone was saying that from a political perspective We were we called this whole chaos theory too much that actually now. We know what the election outcome is gonna be and everyone who was talking about chaos after the election. They didn't know what they were talking about. you know. They bought all of these These puts and these and these calls on the viks and exactly the opposite is happening because we know more but actually if you look at the the real politics it's we. We are in a position where one person the incumbent president is is saying that he doesn't believe the election and many other people are following along with him. So you know we actually have the outcome that people were talking about a certain level of chaos post-election yet Stocks are up so that does point to Some other factors at play over the long term that shares wanna go people are pushing into the market irrespective of what's happening on the ground at any one particular time right on the economic or rather on the political front. Lemme running by you. Actually that we haven't discussed yet. I thought this was interesting Someone was talking about When people talk about politics the economy One thing that comes out is tax policy. And i saw something on twitter about the tax cuts and jobs act that became law in december. Two thousand seventeen is generally considered a relatively conservative organization. They did a paper modeling you know. What the implications are. Here's here's what they came out with. I thought this was kind of interesting in. They say in the longer run as almost all the individual income tax provisions expire in two thousand and twenty five most households experience tax hike however once we account for the dynamic corporate impacts most households see an increase in after tax incomes with higher income households experiencing significantly larger increases in after-tax income relative to lower income household. Now let me tell you why. I'm thinking about this. I'm thinking about this. Because we're in the middle of a pandemic where we have the so-called k shaped recovery people at the bottom echelon. They've just been crushed. People at the top are doing really well and if we think back to two thousand seventeen with the is basically saying they're saying that number one the tax cuts as they were drafted are regressive more of the gains. Go to the top than the bottom number two. They're saying that actually as drafted those taxes are due to expire or large majority of americans by two thousand twenty five the decreases are going to expire. That that's right. The tax decreases are going to go away right. So you're you affectively have a tax hike right it up to twenty-five relative to the period before that so we're now four four to five years before june four years before that. What is the next administration going to do about this situation. Given the baseline that i just mentioned that pandemic case Cetera to me. That is the elephant in the room. In terms of you know what's going to happen Durably over the longer term. Go to the degree that People were talking about trump yoga. Not going along with the The transition i think the real political issue is actually what happens in the next administration after january twentieth with tax policy and this to me is the most important issue. Hey guys it's ash pennington host of the real vision daily briefing. Today's episode is brought to you by blankets. Blankets is really cool. App for your smartphone that lets you consume books in fifteen minutes or less. How does it work well. Blankets divides the book into a series of blinks each of which is very short summary of a key section or idea in the book you can either read the blanks or listen to it. Like a podcast. It's incredibly cool. And i'm enjoying my experiment with it immensely. I'm obviously very interested in books about entrepreneurship. Finance and business and blinking has a wide selection of all of those topics. Let me tell you about two books. That i listen to blinking. Recently the first is one of the popular bestsellers. Richard branson's the virgin way. I've always been intrigued. By richard branson and the book is filled with brands insights about the world and business. I specially found his thoughts about the culture and thus of great organizations fascinating. The second book is an old favorite of mine from about five years ago. That addresses many of the same issues as branson does but from a very different angle. It's a book by steven press. 'field the title is written on the cover as nobody wants to read your s. h. Asterisk t we all know what he means and we all know. He's right if you want to be a writer. It can seem nearly impossible to get anyone to read your work but the same holds true for would be entrepreneurs for example trying to interest people in their product or service. It's a really great book about what it takes to overcome the resistance of life in the pursuit of excellence and listening to it for fifteen minutes on blankets. Brought the whole message back from me. I'm excited to continue this experiment with blankets. And i'll keep checking in along the way to let you know how it's turning out so in summary with blanket you get unlimited access to read or listen to a massive library of condensed nonfiction books all the books you want and all for one low price right now for a limited time. Blinking has a special offer just for our audience. Good to blink. Dot com slash. Real vision tried for seven days and save twenty five percent off new subscription. That's blankets spelled b. l. i. n. k. I s. t. blinking dot com slash. Real vision to start your seven day free trial and you can also save twenty five percent but only when you sign up at blankets dot com slash vision. Well these are excellent questions. I of course as american enterprise institute not known for being a bastion of socialists. Certainly as you say the bitch the right of center it's probably fair to say You know at listening to you. Talk through that great points and knowing you as well as i do you must be thinking in the back of your mind about the nps implications. This is marginal propensity to save versus the marginal propensity to consume in upper income households versus lower income households and as we remember for macroeconomic textbooks. This has a considerable impact on aggregate demand in economy. The short Explanation for this is that when wealthy households received more income they tend to save or invest that income when lower income households Receive more income. They tend to spend it Or pay down debt which has a similar effect so this is something that has not only political implications but also as exactly as i think you're suggesting there was significant macroeconomic implications. You know i would say to me. There's still some uncertainty in with with politics right now in this country with the structure where government is going to be in two thousand twenty one. I mean i expect. And i don't usually give my opinions but my expectation is that based on everything that i've read being watching politics for as long as i have. This seems like eventually president. Trump is gonna have no choice but to concede because it looks like there's just a very strong numerical case for the fact that he lost the election the electoral college And that there's not going to be a reversal If you look at these stories about About recounts and about when they go and they do these when they do these basically look back and go through these votes you see changes of fifty one hundred one hundred fifty not multiple thousands of votes at and i think that the support if you think about the politics here and this is always a dangerous to speculate because you're thinking about optics but really seems to me like the people in the president's party you know they know their base is very positive for trump There's really not much downside for them to say you know. I support the president Let's let this play out through the courts. He has access to the courts. He has recourse to the courts his right to go through this process but when those moves start going against him. I think that they're going to break very quickly And except joe biden is the next president of the united states. That's not my my political opinion. That's just looking at the math and understanding the way politics generally works in this country. But the thing. That's interesting to me because the thing about this runoff election. I think it's january fifth. Is it in In the state of georgia two senate seats. This could be absolutely crucial fiscal policy. Obviously the concern of congress. So i think there's a lot of indeterminately here uncertainty around whether or not We have mitch. Mcconnell as senate majority leader a for the next term between twenty twenty and twenty twenty two here so i think is aimed a you know. Twenty one and twenty three. I mean in that vein. The question becomes Tax policy at the margin. You if you said. Let's make the tax cuts for the ford normal ordinary. Americans permanent just like we did with the corporate side of things that would mean that's not increasing the size of government but it is going to increase deficits would a republican senate. Go along with that then on the other hand joe biden said. Actually i want to not just do that. I want to you know. Increase the progressively of the tax base. I wanna go back to the tax levels before The trump Tax cuts to afford those more wealthy. Americans is a republican senate. Going to go along with that so when you talk about marginal printed consume and to save. I think that's where we're getting into this whole concept of you know. Who's where's the money coming from. Who's going to get what they're getting. Even if you forget all about any sort of a government spending if you just look at it just from a purely taxational perspective. I think that this two thousand seventeen bill which was aggressive in terms of its impact that it can be undone but will it be undone given the politics. I think that it's highly dubious. So going back to our whole conversation about what. The impact of the pandemic is gonna be on the economy. It's the jury's still out in terms of what the impact is but increasingly as the numbers of kobe cases. Take up all of these issues are gonna come into play and to the degree that It does have a negative impact. You're going to need to have some sort of fiscal response In these are the issues that i think are the most important to think about In regard to that response Going forward yeah extremely well said i should say just in the interest of Obviously we just present one side of the story Some things that i thought were very heartening today Doctors found she was speaking at. I think financial times conference and had some very positive things to say about the pfizer biontech vaccine and said that he expects similar results from another. Us biotech company called madeira Because vaccine is substantively similar to the to the pfizer vaccine in so The potential for more positive data coming out for a second vaccine which obviously is something that all of us are hoping and praying for. Yes so i mean the the the markets should be forward-looking but they can't look too far forward because we're about to hit a wave that will have some disparate companies and i think particularly in those Those sectors of the economy. That people had been rotating into on monday and tuesday. The you know the the next thing on my mind. I think which you foreshadowed before was liquidity because i deserve peace. That's come out tomorrow with michael hal. I spoke to him in basically. He's pretty bullish on two thousand twenty one And the reason he's so both be called because of a global wave of acquitted. We're not talking about just the us but we're talking globally. What he's seen is a massive wave of liquidity relative to You're the previous numbers. So we're seeing we're talking about a fifteen percent increase in liquidity and the concomitant increase in asset. Prices hasn't come until he sees as a prices shooting up in two thousand and twenty one and a let me just take a look at my notes from that that conversation here How said based upon that that He believes that Bitcoin will hit twenty five thousand and that gold will hit twenty five hundred and yields will to percents On the back of inflation as this takes hold in two thousand twenty one so very big calls on his part. I think it's a must watch interview and I think that it's definitely going against the grain of some of the things that i've been talking about at least over the short to medium term. He's thinking two thousand twenty one's going to be positive because the the wall of liquidity will will just overwhelm everything else. Yeah and i'm not even gonna try and hide this one. This is just a shameless plug. It's a great interview. I get to see a portion of it earlier today You did a great job asking these questions. Really digging in michael one of my favorite religion guests. He's been looking at precisely these For thirty years now. I think going back to his his days at salomon brothers and A really deep analytic. Look at you. Walk through with mike. Some numbers that struck me go acquitted up twenty trillion. that's a quarter of global. Gdp central banks have put in six billion so far. An increase their balance sheets by third. That is at the time period. I believe adjust twenty twenty He talks about competitively. Comp- relatively low exposure equity by investors. And then he which is the point that you're talking about now. The potential for upside there but interestingly enough one of the things we talk about on this show so often Is looking at things across different. Time horizons this idea that we are building this liquidity a debt access that has the potential to create a liquidity and debt spiral. He said i thought one of the most ominous raises which was every turn of spiral raises. Credit risks liquidity is papering over the cracks and and debt is wonderful collateral. Until it isn't. Will you know the thing a positive in a way that Bill ackman's not. Because i think the story is. Is he saying two dozen twenty one shaping up to be bullish and those cracks will be papered over so to the degree that you have refinancing risk is which is what he's talking about a he believes that The the powers that be will step in to to fill those holes to fill those gaps. So i g credit. It's not going to be a problem. Maybe you might have some problems. John but he believes that they will step in. You know the way that. I'm looking at it because on the The liquidity side. You're looking at you know Banks and you're looking at central banks pumping money in. That's the the supply then you have the of the assets that they're buying you know we're talking about world assets global assets. You could buy a houses. You could buy Gold you can buy financial assets the whole bit so he's looking at a global system and he's looking at global liquidity and world asset prices. And what he's seeing therefore is because money is fungible and you can go in different places the way to think about it is is if the money is there to buy something Than the more of that that you have the the higher prices will go. That's that's in a nutshell what's happening so if you have over the course of two thousand and twenty Global acquitted going up almost twenty percent. It's almost a guarantee that world asset prices have to go up in concert with that and they have not they've yet to do so thus far and this is his case for why go up in two thousand and twenty one and if you so if you look at it. Just at a micro level. What does that mean that means that have to paper over the cracks that means that when problems come up the central banks will step in and provide that liquidity to get over the cracks and as a result. It'll keep the way moving forward so very very interesting thesis. I'm not sure where i stand on that. How would i believe. But i found very fascinating Interesting and I just found it Something that to put into my register as to how to think about the world yeah. That's a very well contextualized. A vision of very complicated analytic thesis that mike puts forward to your point. It seems as though he certainly more bullish In the short term than say bill ackman is on credit but may actually ultimately be more bearish in the long term with that said. I should probably say it's just way too complex. Nuanced to summarize accurately. It's like an hour long interview. Definitely check it out. This is much c- watching For anyone who is a serious nerd on financial markets ed harrison and michael. So i mean that That in a nutshell is everything that i'm thinking about their one or two other things that are on my mind right now but i think that We have a if i could sum it up in the united states. We have relatively good Lagging to coincident data and we have a torn of corona virus cases coming going forward at the same time we have a monster amount of global acquitted hit The economy which is is waiting there to buy up asset prices whether it be houses whether it be you know financial assets and so. This is a situation where you have a lot of moving parts. That are moving in opposite directions at the same time. So i think that we're at Specifically critical juncture in all of this not just politically but also in terms of You know where the market is headed over the over the medium term so. I don't have a specific view as to how this is going to To play out. I do think that there are more risks to the downside Then there are Upside but Michael house giving you a reason to believe the opposite. Sir take a look at you will enjoy this piece so As as always thank you. And i think that's it for us this week. You're talking row on. Friday will be back at it on monday. Yes sir thank you for joining us so.

Ackman Amc Us europe two weeks thirty three percent twenty one percent five hundred million dollar jack farley nine degrees fahrenheit snowman logistics Bill ackman ninety one percent eleven percent sixty nine percent twenty three percent three one percent three percent goldman sachs Carnival cruises
With Rolling Blackouts, Calif. Power Grids Strained Amid Worst Heat Wave in 70 Years

TIME's Top Stories

03:48 min | 8 months ago

With Rolling Blackouts, Calif. Power Grids Strained Amid Worst Heat Wave in 70 Years

"With Rolling Blackouts California power grids strained amid worst heatwave in seventy years by Brian Case Ullivan. The US west coast is set to have its hottest two weeks and seventy years putting even more strain on power grids after California imposed rolling blackouts for the first time since two thousand one. Excessive heat warnings and watches stretch from the Pacific coast inland to Montana. UTAH. And Arizona according to the National Weather Service Sacramento is forecast to be one hundred, nine degrees. Fahrenheit forty three Celsius by Tuesday Pasadena could hit one await. It doesn't look like it changes through early next week it doesn't look like it changes at all said Bob Oravec a senior branch. Forecaster, with the US weather prediction center, the problem is a large high pressure system that is centered across the great basin that Spans Nevada and other western states. It essentially acts as a lid trapping, an ocean of hot air beneath it, and there aren't any indications it's going to budge soon, such phenomenons sometimes called heat domes are getting worse as the Earth's climate changes. As the planet warms the contrast between the heat at the equator and the cold at the poll decreases that saps the strength of the jet stream, which otherwise would be able to shove the ridges out of the way hence heatwaves get stuck in place for longer. Last month was tied for the world's second hottest July on record and the hottest ever in the northern hemisphere according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration the contiguous US had its third warmest June this year and July was the eleventh hottest in records going back one, hundred, twenty, six years according to the national centers for environmental information. It was the hottest July ever for several states including Connecticut, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Now. It's the West Coast's turn based on population weighted cooling degree days a measure of whether impact on energy demand. The next fifteen days will be the hottest in records going back to nineteen fifty for California. Oregon and Washington according to commercial forecaster. Max Czar the worst of the heat could come Wednesday. It is quite impressive. They're said Bradley Harvey, Lead Meteorologist at maximum SAR from California to Salt Lake, city and point south. Those are all the areas that are pretty steady with the heat going forward. The weather will be some of the most intense since two thousand six when a west coast heatwave killed more than six hundred people put twelve hundred more in the hospital and sent sixteen thousand to emergency rooms according to southwest climate adaption science center at the University of Arizona's website. The event was made worse by high overnight temperatures, which adds stress to people and energy grids because they don't allow for much relief. It's not just heat that a problem drought is also gripping the West with close to seventy seven percent of the region abnormally dry according to the US drought monitor just over half of California is suffering from drought. Dry Land can keep temperatures high. It also boosts threat of wildfires at least eleven. Major fires are already burning across. California I. Think the potential for fire weather is going to be there all week ORAVEC said.

US California West Coast National Oceanic and Atmospher Forecaster Brian Case Ullivan Montana Arizona Bob Oravec UTAH Pacific Sacramento University of Arizona Max Czar Pasadena forecaster Salt Lake Nevada Connecticut ORAVEC
Israel Daily News Podcast, Mon. Nov, 16, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

10:16 min | 5 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast, Mon. Nov, 16, 2020

"Good morning broker. Tobe diaz about claire. This is china. Fold here with israel. Daily news podcast. I'm here to give you the headlines so you can get caught up quickly. You're listening so you're already on top of your game. Survive and thrive people knowledge. Is the best weapon. Today is monday november sixteenth twenty twenty. Now let's get to the news with corona virus numbers still on the rise in israel the israeli army and police are monitoring social media to prevent gatherings. Thousands of soldiers have been put to work under the alone. Command the idea of program for breaking chains of corona virus infections. They tracked social media. Keeping tabs on illegal events planned under cova restrictions as the current regulations. Do not allow large indoor or outdoor gatherings twenty one hundred soldiers are on monitoring duty. Some of them serve in the military intelligence and specialize in tracking social media the intelligence they gather as to the police so that the police can intervene. The method has helped stop do of outdoor raves large weddings big parties. In a few cases social media post helped notify authorities of people who were breaking quarantine as well. The army says that these methods are effective and often used for counterterrorism and have actually reduced the potential spread of the virus however critics say that. This is an issue that could potentially violate privacy and it worries some that. It could be a step toward authoritarianism. Sunday the corona virus cabinet met for seven hours to discuss potential rollbacks and restrictions to keep the virus from soaring in israeli communities but ministers left without any decisions made the measures that were under consideration included restarting in school learnings for grades. Five six eleven and twelve reopening malls and closing businesses starting at seven pm plus imposing a curfew to buck. Rainy ministers will make the first official visit to israel later week to participate in a three way meeting in jerusalem with israeli and us officials. Prime minister netanyahu us secretary of state. Mike pompeo bahraini foreign minister. Abdullatif bin rashid. Al zayani are all expected to be. There is really officials. Are working to finalize an aviation agreement for direct flights between tel aviv. And manama which is the capital of bahrain by wednesday so it can be signed at the meeting. The officials are also expected to discuss opening embassies and assigning ambassadors. How exciting yesterday. The cabinet voted unanimously to ratify the joint communique or official statement on the establishment of diplomatic peaceful and friendly relations between the kingdom of bahrain and israel. Netanyahu says the establishment of peace and normalization with buck rain. The united arab emirates and sudan constitute a major achievement for the state of israel. And that this is the result of a long effort to expand the circle of peace yesterday. Jerusalem's police chief doronin adid band radical she e some rough from the temple mount for six months for inciting violence. I mean we're has a long history of giving controversial sermons that save violence across the islamic community in jerusalem. His sermons have included praise for the islamic state group encouragements of honor killings and a religious inspired war against jews. His reputation proved true this weekend at the mosque while he was praising the terrorist who beheaded a french teacher for talking about caricatures of the islamic prophet muhammad this friday afternoon the prizes of the israeli academy of film and television also known as the fear. Awards in israel were announced on con- eleven's culture. Show the results were announced on tv. Instead of with a usual live audience because of the effects of the corona virus and the danger there director. Ruthie pre bar won the ofer award for best picture. And we'll be israel's representative for this year's best international feature oscar for her film asia. It tells the story of a russian immigrant. Mother played by elena eve and her complicated relationship with her sick daughter played by share hus- who actually won the ofer award for best supporting actress as well as became the first israeli. Actress nominated for an emmy for her role in the netflix series. Unorthodox all right well. That's it for today's show. Today is monday. November sixteenth twenty twenty tel aviv has a low of fifteen degrees celsius and a high of twenty three degrees. That's fifty nine degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to seventy degrees for the high. Don't forget to subscribe to the israeli news. Podcasts on spotify or apple podcasts or wherever you're hearing it from i am everywhere if you think that this show brings value to you if you think it makes you more educated at the dinner table then send over a donation today. S episode number eighty nine. Which means that we are getting close to one hundred episodes and in these last ten episodes i would love to see financial support from my listeners. By the time we make it to one hundred. I will be announcing all the packages that you can send tomorrow because we are going to do a big push in these last ten episodes so that we can keep the israel daily news podcast going. There is a link in the show notes where you can send your support and you can also find me on patriae on. I'll send you off today with if god. Don't follow me by adam road. He's tel aviv. Based musician whose music channels. Flamenco style guitar. A mix of indie folk rock and grunge. He was born in colorado in the united states and says that he's been writing his own music ever since he learned how to operate a pet have a great and productive. Day jane firm. See jane allowed zoo.

israel Tobe diaz Prime minister netanyahu Mike pompeo Abdullatif bin rashid Al zayani jerusalem bahrain israeli army doronin adid tel aviv claire seven hours israeli academy of film and te manama elena eve china share hus Netanyahu temple mount
Can Science Explain Everything?

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

Can Science Explain Everything?

"In Oxford mathematician, this telling the world that science has limits. And that it can't explain everything the Colson center, I'm John Stonestreet. This is breaking fifty years ago when he was a student at Cambridge John Lennox found himself seated next to a Nobel prize winner at a formal dinner Lennox decided to make the most of the opportunity, and so he asked the Nobel laureate if an how his scientific work had shaped his worldview, including his opinion on the existence of God. Well, the conversation didn't go. Well, the gentlemen, made it clear he was not comfortable with Lennox's questions. Not only that he asked to speak with lenox privately where he asked if he really wanted a career in science Lennox replied, yes. Well, then the Nobel winner replied, you must give up this childish faith in God. If you do not it will cripple you intellectually and you'll suffer by comparison with your peers, you simply will not make it and typical British understatement. Lennox called this exchange a remarkable situation while I'm happy to report that both the his credit and for our benefit John Lennox did not follow that advice instead since then. Lennox who's in America's professor of mathematics at Oxford has written dozens of books and engage in countless debates arguing for the compatibility of faith and science the debt. Modern science owes to Christianity and the reasonableness of theism and Christianity in particular, his debate partners are a veritable who's who of the new atheism. Richard dawkins. Michael Shurmur, Lawrence Krauss and the lake Christopher Hitchens to name just a few in this latest book can science explain everything. Lennox makes a compelling case against what's known as scientists and the g that insists that science is or should be the so criterion by which society should know. What is true and good part of scientists concede that Lennox calls out is this idea that scientists objective, and I'm biased whereas things like religion. And art aren't the answer to everything worth knowing is akin to answering. The question does water expand at thirty nine degrees Fahrenheit, simple experiment with a glass of water a marker and a properly functioning refrigerator will confirm the answer is. Yes. But as Lennox explained to his readers. Very few of life's questions can be answered. So simply were definitively more to the point the kind of scientists who argue otherwise do. So from position of what I not Lennox might, call arrogant, ignorance links quotes and other Nobel laureate physicist, Richard Feinman who said outside his or her field. The scientists is just as dumb as the next guy another Nobel laureate. Barron Reese said much the same about his friend, Stephen Hawking's pronouncements on philosophy religion. He wants told the guardian newspaper. I know Stephen hawking well enough to know, he's read little philosophy in less theology. So I don't think his views on those subjects should be taken with any special. Wait. He's are only two examples of Lennox's ability to help ordinary believers in their efforts to go to borrow the title from another of his books against the flow. There's a strong case to be made for why faith and science or more than compatible and in his new book Lennox makes that case and a well written easy to grasp and short way. All of this is why I'm thrilled that John Lennox will join us at the upcoming Wilberforce weekend in may not only that but in a. Special edition of Socrates in the city. The Colson center will feature a special conversation between Eric Metaxas. In John Lennox at the museum of the bible, this will take place. Thursday may sixteenth the night before the Wilberforce weekend begins. I hope you'll think about joining us come to Wilberforce weekend dot com to find out more. And then return this month for your donation to the Colson center, we'll send you John Lennox's latest book can science explain everything, you know, in a strange way, I'm grateful for that attempted bullying of the young John Lennox by that Nobel laureate without it. We may very well have all been deprived of his invaluable contribution to Christian apologetic, please read can science explain everything and benefit from Lennox is fifty years of insight and experience come to breakpoint dot org to make donation and request a copy today, that's breakpoint dot org for breakpoint, I'm John Stonestreet.

John Lennox John Stonestreet Stephen Hawking Colson center Nobel prize Oxford Richard dawkins Cambridge Barron Reese Richard Feinman Christopher Hitchens Oxford Michael Shurmur America professor of mathematics Lawrence Krauss Eric Metaxas lenox physicist fifty years
NPR News: 02-02-2020 5AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 02-02-2020 5AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm trial Snyder. Democratic presidential candidates making their final pitch to Iowa. Voters ahead of tomorrow's Caucuses Mrs. NPR's Barbara Sprint caught up with some of those voters at Bernie Sanders Rally in Warren County. The crowd at Simpson College came from all over Indiana Ohio. Okay Oh Canada even Australia Selena right Brown brought her thirteen year. Old Grandson with her from Arkansas to here Sanders speak has been very interested in politics. And I'm just fascinated with the DACAS fascinated with the candidates and the debates and so what better opportunity to resident Quin. Kelly is an educator and says she likes Sanders Anders Plan for Free College. What would the school be like? Every single kid actually had a true shot at college thinking about it and now that could potentially become a reality is truly exciting for me. She hopes to convince her neighbors to support Sanders on Monday. Barbara Sprint. NPR News India Nola Iowa Democratic candidates fan out across Iowa The des Moines unregistered newspaper has decided not to release its final poll. The papers executive editor made the announcement last night saying the results may have been compromised because because there was a problem with questioning in at least one interview the registers sponsors to pull along with CNN. A state of emergency remains in place for Australia's capital the third straight days. Fires continue to burn a forest near Cambrai. Original Bongino has war. It's been an intense few days of firefighting efforts as FIS. From the name Edgy. National Park Doc. With threatening local towns and campers out of sups camera hit atop temperature of one hundred nine degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday with winds reaching thirty eight miles per hour. Authorities have warned that a Saturday wasn't as devastating as predicted. The most challenging days is still to come with thunderstorms bringing more strong winds as well as lightning equality also remains remains at hazardous levels twenty nine hundred cameras hottest summer on record and it's dry ice when taken thirty seven years. The FIS are expected to continue to win for weeks. Parliament resuming camera on Tuesday after some of races with the Wa foul is being top on the agenda for NPR news. I'm Rachel and Journal in. Melbourne amid Austrailia is devastating bushfire season. The men's final is being played right now at the Australian Open tennis tournament. Defending champion. Novak Djokovic is taking on Austria's areas dominic teen health officials in the Philippines reporting the first known death from New Corona virus. Outside of China and Manila today Philippine Health Secretary Secretary Francisco Duquet said over the past few days. The patient to forty four year old Chinese man had shown signs of improvement but then his condition deteriorated the course of admission. He developed severe Nobel. Yan in the United States. A Boston man has become the eighth confirmed case in the country entry restrictions on foreign travelers. Who have been in China within the past fourteen days are set to go into effect later today? And you're listening to NPR. News locus warms and East Africa are being called. The worst in decades on a government official in Somalia is calling the outbreak a national emergency the the UN is appealing for more than seventy billion dollars in emergency aid. The swarms threaten food supplies. A Japanese worship is on its way to the Gulf of Oman amid tensions between Iran and the United States. The ship left Japan's main naval base near Tokyo today. Most of Japan's oil supply moves through the region. The Prime Minister Russian so obey says it. Japan is prepared to authorize force to protect ships. Despite the country's pacifist constitution. Say Super Sunday. The San Francisco Forty niners niners preparing to play the Kansas City chiefs in the super bowl this evening. This year's game will feature two starting quarterbacks not named Tom Brady Aaron Rodgers or been rothlisberger but as Greg African reports of might be a wave of the future Kansas City chiefs quarterback. Patrick Mahomes is only twenty four years old in his second years starter and guided the DIS- team to the Super Bowl for the first time in fifty years mahomes was the NFL's most valuable player lassie's and based on his play the last two years. It's not unreasonable. To project another trip to the Super Bowl in the future but mahomes says he isn't thinking about that for me. It's just about enjoying the moment taking advantage of it. Obviously I want to be back in my career. But I'm going to take advantage of this opportunity knowing that that it. It's a huge one the quarterback for the San Francisco Forty niners. There's is Jimmy Garoppolo. Who's twenty eight and also in his second season as a starter for N._p._R.? News I'm Gregg Acklin and this is N._p._R..

Bernie Sanders Mrs. NPR NPR Iowa Japan NPR Barbara Sprint Patrick Mahomes Austrailia China Free College United States San Francisco Simpson College Kelly Snyder Washington Warren County Cambrai
Israel Daily News Podcast, Oct. 26, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

13:43 min | 6 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast, Oct. 26, 2020

"Good Morning Booker told, what else do you look air? This is China fold here with the Israel Daily News podcast the only English Daily News podcast coming out of Tel Aviv, although today it is coming out of New York because I have switched up my location temporarily I'm here to give you the headlines so you can get caught up quickly you're listening. So you're already on top of your game survive and thrive people knowledge is the best weapon. Today is Monday October Twenty Sixth Twenty twenty which means I am back in my hood I am back where I was born and raised in New York City still doing the same thing I always do but from a Different location, a temporary location I am usually recording in Tel, Aviv and I am now recording in the US while I visit my family for a much needed trip. Now that you have that update, let's get to the news. Sometimes we eat is worth the wait after many years of boycotts and indignation between the two countries Israeli prime minister. Benjamin. Netanyahu has opened up peace talks with Sudan and denounce Sunday night that he will be sending five million dollars worth of wheat to the country. Domestically Sudan has struggled with corruption in their governments and an enormous increase in inflation the price of bread tripled in two thousand eighteen and triggered protests that aims to remove autocrat Omar. From power, he has since been removed and faces allegations against him in court with the announcement Sunday, Israel plans to help Sudan boost their struggling economy and foreign peace between the nation's soon, and Israeli delegation will meet in Sudan with a Sudanese counterpart in order to discuss cooperation in many fields including migration. That's what Benjamin Netanyahu said at the start of a cabinet meeting. On Sunday, the move to normalize relations has received mixed reviews from Sudanese citizens saying that it will. Help them acclimate to the Western world while some say it's just a way to save their sinking economy. Sunday night Sudan's government released a statement saying the country accepted normalization deal with Israel in return for economic benefits. This was something the country had been denying in the past days as part of this deal Sudan will come off of a blacklist that the US had created of countries that are state sponsors of terrorism. This status was keeping Sudan from getting international funds. School is back in session well, kind of Sunday night the corona virus cabinet voted to reopen schools for kids in first to fourth grade according to the plan first and second graders will be split into two groups that will alternate going to school for three days a week kids in third and fourth grades will be split into pods and go to school five days a week however fifth. Graders and above will continue to learn remotely. Schools were previously closed in mid December due to high infection rates of corona virus. But are now reopening after a cabinet plan was announced on Sunday evening the plan sites the reason drop in corona virus infection rates across Israel as the primary reason to reopen the government plans to gradually open up commerce and allow some small businesses to reopen as well. Eighty percent of asylum seekers in Israel are out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic that's according to the latest figures from not for profits that work to advocate for these minority groups with businesses, closed shops, shuttered, and Israeli society staying in those who do the nation's work behind the scenes are struggling more than ever surveys show seventy percent can't pay their rent. Forty percents have been out of work since the first wave of the pandemic hit in March thirty percent say they need emotional support? which in my opinion is not something to be left to the side asylum-seekers many of which are from Eritrea or Sudan can't get medical help or a corona virus test and their kids can't go to class on zoom because they often don't have computers or Internet at home groups like hotline for Refugees and the African refugee development center in. Israel. Are Calling on the government to distribute food offer financial aid help with rent and extent health insurance to those in need until the crisis comes to end. Eight million tonnes that's the amount of trash thrown into the ocean across the world each year among that nearly three quarters of the trash founders and Israeli waters consist of parts of plastics, plastic bags, and containers. With that being said, volunteers around the country are pinning this coming Friday as a nationwide sand and sea cleanup day thousands of volunteers are expected to help clean up trash. On each of Israel's beaches from Tiberius in the north all the way down to a lot in the south, the Society for the protection of Nature in Israel, the Israel nature and Parks Authority, and the Environmental Protection Ministry are just a few of the local organizations working to clean up along with some global entities like the US embassy and the European Union, these players are trying. To influence decision makers to develop more marines, reserves, band single use plastics on beaches and raise the stakes for litterbugs by ramping up law enforcement and finding people who are throwing their garbage onto the floor. The cleanup will start at eight am and go into the afternoon go to beach cleanup Israel Dot Com for more information. If you don't read Hebrew, that's not an excuse use. Google translate to check out the page and find out how you can help out. All right. Well, that's it. For today's news. Today is Monday October twenty sixth. We have a low of twenty one degrees Celsius at a high of twenty nine degrees in Tel Aviv. That's sixty nine degrees. Fahrenheit. For the low going up to eighty four degrees a lot warmer than where I am. Join me tonight at eight PM Israel time and one PM Eastern Standard Time. I will be hosting the sunset series with Aria Halimi. He'll be talking about the diaspora contribution to Israeli statehood. It should be inspiring to those of us who are trying to contribute to that statehood every day. Thanks for getting caught up with me and don't forget subscribe to the Israel Daily News podcast on spotify or apple podcasts or wherever you're hearing it from I am everywhere I'll send you off with a great song that is called trippy Code Erica crawl. I'm trying to crawl out of my jet lag as we speak and I think a song from this. Is Really. Dj is just what we need to start. Have a great and productive day and a kick ask week everyone make sure that it's better than the last. act. Did. I. This. She makes. This. Eight. I.

Israel Sudan Israel Daily News Tel Aviv Benjamin Netanyahu Sixth Twenty twenty Israel Dot Com US New York City prime minister Booker Aviv China Google Eritrea English Daily News Omar Aria Halimi
Do Footballs Fly Farther in Denver?

BrainStuff

07:08 min | 2 years ago

Do Footballs Fly Farther in Denver?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast how to money, which is not your typical personal finance podcast, the hosts Matin Joel are best friends. Aiming not to lecture you but to make conversations about money. Interesting informative even fun every Wednesday. They cover real life money topics like ways to cut your grocery Bill. Why your house is an awful investment, and how to achieve financial independence, if you kind of second money, or if you just want to learn more about how you can support yourself and your future, you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for how to money. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Bon here. Imagine a fine afternoon in Denver the mile high city behind quarterback Peyton Manning's explosive offensive. The Denver Broncos have amassed attended to record today. They're hosting the Tennessee titans squad. That's lost three of its past four games. The titans. Have put up a good fight over the first half hour of game. Play three seconds before. Halftime. The score is Tennessee Twenty-one Denver seventeen. And her Broncos kicker. Matt Prater trotting out to the Denver forty six yard line. He readies himself for the play of his life. A mighty kick. Sends the ball soaring end over end across the field as a nervous crowd holds its breath. And then the place erupts with ease the ball sails through the yellow crossbar in Tennessee's endzone. It's a longest completed field goal in NFL history. A perfectly made sixty four yard drill. A for metric friends. That's about fifty eight meters perhaps emboldened by prayers heroics. The Broncos go on to crush the titans of the second half, thus clinching a playoff berth. The game. I just described took place on December eighth twenty thirteen today. Prater sixty four yards still holds the all-time distance record. Although his accomplishment has never been bested. Jaw-dropping football kicks are nothing. New in the rocky mountains. Three of the five longest field goals that the NFL has ever seen were made in Denver's mile high stadium. Broncos great Jason Elam nailed a sixty three yarder there in one thousand nine hundred eight a feat that was matched by Sebastian Janikowski when his Oakland Raiders came to town thirteen years later, but to hear some sports fans tell it those three kicks should have Asterix attached the official elevation of Colorado's capital is exactly one mile. That's one thousand six hundred nine meters above sea level. No other NFL cities. It's anywhere close to that. Altitude of the runner up is Glendale Arizona, which is just one thousand feet or three hundred meters. Above sea level Denver's elevation does affect the sporting events up there when football's kicked Broncos home game. It's apt to cover more distance than it would in lower elev-. Nations. And this doesn't just affect three point field goals. Kickoffs tend to go farther as well. There's a book called football physics. The science of the game by one university of Nebraska, professor Timothy gay for it. He ran the numbers on eight different teams from cities that sit more or less at sea level like the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots that played at least one road game in Denver during the two thousand one or two thousand two seasons. He found that in those two years the visiting kickers from low elevation towns. Enjoyed some great numbers when they went to Denver up in Colorado. There kickoffs traveled seventy point one yards. That's sixty four meters on average back in their respective home fields. The average kickoff distance dropped by seven point three yards. That's six point six meters to understand those numbers will need to talk about air density pretend as I'm sure you want to that you have a jet pack, if you were to take off at sea level and travel through earth's atmosphere in a straight line up the density of the air around you would get lower as your altitude. Creased? This is due to a universal law as the distance between two objects grows the gravitational pull they exert on each other lessons and air molecules are not exempt the pole of earth's gravity is more strongly felt by molecules that are closer to the planet's center at or below sea level, gravitational attraction pacts the molecules tightly together and the weight of the molecules sitting higher up in the atmosphere really bears down on the ones occupying low elevations in consequence the air, it self grows, denser, the closer you get to the surface way up in the mile high city, the Air's only about eighty two percent as dense as it is at sea level a ball kicked skyward in Denver will therefore encounter fewer air molecules than it would in Miami. That's important to note because air molecules create drag drag is a force that pushes against solid bodies as they travel through fluids or gases, a punted or kicked football will run headlong into a steady barrage of air molecules their combined drag will slow it down sometimes dramatic. Early. But remember in ludens, the air molecules are fewer and farther between therefore football's can and often do encounter less drag in Denver Denver's altitude impacts baseball as well. A physicist and Red Sox fan. Alan Nathan reports that fly balls at chorus field. Go proximity five percent farther than they do at Fenway park in Boston yet kicking on the Broncos home turf won't guarantee success for kickers or punters altitude reduces air density, and by extension drag but cold weather increases it and boy can Colorado get chilly. A twenty eleven survey of NFL statistical records found that in outdoor games. Played at temperatures of thirty nine degrees Fahrenheit, that's four degrees celsius or lower field goal. Accuracy drops by one point seven percent while the average partly is about one yard shorter than normal. These findings hold true throughout the league. So it's to Matt Prater credit that his record-breaking field goals split the uprights from sixty four yards out. Even though Denver. It's temperature had fallen. Just fourteen degrees Fahrenheit that's negative ten celsius at the time. Whatever the weather kicking specialists need to be on guard against complacency Denver's reputation as the mecca of ultra-long field goals is well established across the league. According to players that mile high mystique can trick visiting kickers into overestimating their abilities. We could say that when in doubt always air on the side of caution. Today's episode was written by Markman Cini produced by Tyler clang for iheartmedia, and how stuff works her more on this and lots of other kick and topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Denver Broncos Matt Prater Denver Broncos NFL football Colorado apple titans Tennessee titans squad Lauren Vogel Tennessee Matin Joel titans Peyton Manning Glendale Harvard Bon Alan Nathan
Israel Daily News Podcast, Tues. Dec 15, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

12:43 min | 4 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast, Tues. Dec 15, 2020

"Good morning booker. To this is shannon folds here with israel. Daily news podcast. I'm here to give you the headlines so you can get caught up quickly. You're listening so you're already on top of your game. Survive and thrive people knowledge. Is the best weapon today. Is tuesday december fifteenth twenty twenty. Which means that we are on our sixth day of hanukkah. Happy hanukkah body. Now let's get to the news. Rumor has it that israel is currently as we speak receiving a delegation of diplomats from an unknown or unnamed muslim country. The news comes out from israel high yomas reporter who says that if he could report which country was making the visit jaws would drop well. This is very exciting. There have been a slew of normalization deals that came out between arab muslim countries that includes the united arab emirates. The kingdom of bach rain sudan and morocco. Who is next. Donald trump told reporters some weeks ago that there would be a dozen arab countries to come out with normalization deals with israel. If i had to guess which jaw dropping arab country was making a visit to israel. Right now i would guess saudi arabia because that would be a big jaw dropper. A delegation of diplomats led by current white house senior adviser. Jared kushner is planning a trip to morocco next week. Following news of normalization between israel and that arab country and israeli delegation of course will be joining the americans and they will be flying in the first ever direct commercial flight from tel aviv to the nation's capital robots last night delegation members from the united arab emirates and bahrain visited the western wall to participate in the candle lighting ceremony. For the fifth of concha. The group was made up of social activists and opinion leaders from the gulf countries. The chief rabbi of the western wall rabbi shmuel rabinovitch calls a hanukkah miracle to see the delegation participating in the candle lighting ceremony on sunday president. Reuven rivlin hosted the delegation at his home in jerusalem. Prime minister netanyahu appoints the next massad agency chief. His name hasn't been publicized yet but he has years of experience in the spy agency as he was the deputy chief and now will become the director because the current government is a unity government with likud and blue and white parties working side by side. The decision was supposed to be taken together. But netanyahu went ahead and made the appointment without defense minister guns approval or knowledge according to the newspapers guns who was supposed to be the next prime minister in the rotation is not happy about the call. A seventy six year old man entered an israeli hospital early today and shot. His wife then turned the gun around and killed himself. The woman had been in venero surgery ward at the asaf haro fit medical center in the center of israel. For a number of ds. She was suffering from a terminal illness while they're reports say the man was a licensed gun owner. The patients in a bedroom on the other side of the wall was lightly injured when the bullet passed through the drywall and skimmed his leg. I'm going to take a moment away from the news to ask you to support this show. You can send over a monthly contribution if you're enjoying this report and if you think it brings you value. There's a link. Lincoln the show where you can send a five or ten dollar monthly contribution to support the work that goes into this show. I really believe that it's a service to the people. The site is anchored dot. Fm backslash israel daily news backslash support. You can also refer this show to to friends or leave a review on it on apple podcasts. That would be great. There are a few reviews there. I would love to see you. Continue to add reviews. The show currently has a five star rating. So i hope we can keep it up. Thank you now. Let's get back to the news. Here's some news for olympic team or new immigrants. Anyone who might be planning to move to israel. According to an international twenty twenty cost of living report israel has ranked seventh out of two hundred eight cities on the list of most expensive cities for ex patriots to live in following closely behind zurich and london other cities that ranked above israel include hong kong tokyo new york and geneva. Interestingly enough the country dropped two places during the pandemic but day to day expenses like groceries rent and transportation are still higher than countless other cities another statistic from this year listed israel as the second most expensive country to buy a home in the cost is upwards of nine thousand seven hundred eighty dollars per square meter around four thirty in the morning. A three point eight magnitude earthquake struck jordan approximately nineteen kilometers or twelve miles outside of lot. The israel jordan border runs along the syrian african rift while israel has seen at least three minor earthquakes in the area within the last year. The last major earthquake occurred in nineteen twenty seven and it was a magnitude of six point. Two killing five hundred people and injuring seven hundred. More residents of the city reported that while buildings shook. Luckily there were no injuries or damage. This time times of israel writer wrote a blog post urging israeli officials to invest even more than they already do into civil engineers who could help this small country prepare for an earthquake which scientists say is inevitable and finally an israeli company called netafim has developed a drip irrigation system for growing rice. That is much more sustainable than traditional methods. This is some will replace. The flooded patties that have supplied the world with rice for generations. But 'cause a lot of damage to the environment. Rice is the staple food for more than half the global population but its cultivation uses around forty percent of the world's fresh water sources and is responsible for ten percents of manmade emissions of methane which is a greenhouse gas decades ago netafim pioneered drip irrigation to grow food and israel's tough dry challenging landscape. Now the company has just finished a pilot using its technology on about two thousand four hundred seventy acres of rice fields in locations throughout europe and southern asia. Demand for rice is expected to rise by twenty five percent by twenty fifty. all right. well that's it for today's news. Today is tuesday december. Fifteen two thousand twenty tel aviv has a low of fifteen degrees celsius and a high of nineteen degrees. That's fifty nine degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to sixty seven degrees for the high. Subscribe to the israel daily news podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Thank you can't cohen. Jack melts and orient fitch for their contributions to the research. Writing and idealization. I'll send you off today with a new song from honan topper. He just released it today and and he came straight to us at the israel daily news podcast and asked us to have a listen. We loved it here's kits avala shawnee or scarlet in english. It's a song about yearning and longing because love is still there but with the understanding that it won't return have a happy hanukkah and a great and productive. Day sure Oh ooh elsa of fema Get a uh oh shit. I can

israel Jared kushner united arab emirates morocco shmuel rabinovitch Reuven rivlin Prime minister netanyahu venero asaf haro fit medical center booker concha massad Donald trump tel aviv shannon likud sudan earthquake
Israel Daily News Podcast, Wed. March 10, 2021

Israel Daily News Podcast

11:56 min | Last month

Israel Daily News Podcast, Wed. March 10, 2021

"Hello and welcome to the israel. Daily news podcast. I'm your host shannon cold. I'm sure to give you the headlines so you can get caught up quickly. You're listening so you're already on top of your game. Survive and thrive people knowledge. Is the best weapon. Today is wednesday march tenth. Twenty twenty one. Now let's get to the news. Israel is opening up and say it's wild to see cafes open and people going to bars after a long never ending locked down due to the coronavirus pandemic. I was on the phone just this morning. With israelis and they tell me it feels so surreal to be walking down the street and see it. It's the first time since. September that restaurants are fully operating the plan for reopening is trickling out and journalists are reporting that soon more guests will be allowed to come to weddings and sports ceremonies adding an additional twenty five percent occupancy for large venues currently no more than three hundred people are allowed in any hotel dining room for example. The plan is to start. You open stadiums for games to those with a green passport or those who've been vaccinated and that is expected to happen in a week and a half so far more than five million people in israel have been vaccinated and just under four million have had both of the two shots that are needed. For full immunization israel has nine million people and three million are under the age of sixteen and therefore cannot receive a shot so that means that nearly the entire state of israel has been vaccinated. Tuesday data showed the virus has a basic reproduction rate of point. Ninety five percent so less than one percent. It seems that the vaccination campaign is working wonders following last month's oil spill. That saw some one thousand tons of tar wash up on israel's coastline. The health ministry announced yesterday that it is okay to consume fish and seafood from the mediterranean. The ban on the sale of fish from the polluted sea began on february twenty fourth and was put in place as a precautionary measure. No definitive evidence of any health dangers has been found when it comes to consuming mediterranean fish additionally the environmental protection ministry deemed another forty beaches safe for the public to visit. After opening. the. I seventeen on sunday. Authorities warn however that large amounts of tar could still wash up on beaches that have been considered clear. A fourteen year old boy was murdered on a twelve year. Old was seriously wounded in a shooting on tuesday night in the arab majority town of jug julia. In central israel. The fourteen year old mohammed. Abed zeke past and is now the twenty-third murder in the arab community. Since january over the past year ninety five arab israelis have been murdered marking the highest rate in the past twenty years. Police say the shooting was the result of a feud between two families however the two boys were not directly connected to it. According to our at since october the police have solved around twenty percent of murders in the arab community. While fifty three percent in the jewish community demonstrators in alpha are protesting violence in the arab community and a few thousand people blocked a nearby highway last friday to continue their advocacy. Hi it's shanna with two ends. I'm feeling great today. The israel daily news podcast is continuing its fundraising drive and we are looking for one hundred paid subscribers so if you are feeling good open up your credit card and send over a contribution especially if you've been enjoying this daily report you can send over a monthly contribution at anchor dot fm backslash israel. Daily news backslash support. We have one central link in the show notes where you can click on it and we will take you to the page where you can put in your credit card details and feel good knowing that you are supporting independent journalism. You can also support us by leaving us a review on apple podcast and sharing the show with a friend and following us on social media at israel daily dot news as well as shanna full. That's s. h. a. n. n. a. f. u. l. d. the political branch of hamas in gaza is at an election stalemate after a new governor of gaza has not been decided on after three rounds of voting kamaz runs its elections mainly in secret as only the three hundred twenty members of comas. Shura council get to cast ballots gaas governor since two thousand seventeen. Cr is being threatened by I will do and established party member. Who was a close. Confidante of hamas founders. Ironically i will do la played a key role in the prisoner exchange of two thousand eleven involving israeli soldier. Gilad shalit that freed from israeli prison. Sin warr spent decades in israeli prison for this for his time. As the longtime kamaz terror chief hamas internal elections usually take place every four years deciding everything from local leaders in gaza and the west bank to the political bureau. Chief the full results of the elections are expected to be released in april last night. The tel aviv international salon hosted a virtual question and answer with prime minister. Benjamin netanyahu moderated by la harka of the top diplomatic relation correspondent from the jerusalem. Post elections are just a couple of weeks away on march twenty third and although the event was short just around the half hour. The prime minister addressed a wide array of topics about defeating the coronavirus revitalizing. Israel's economy neutralizing the threat of a nuclear iran strengthening ties between israel. And the us yet. Everything circled back to the upcoming elections. Are internet news writer. Miles gilbert watched the event and very intentionally recorded his takeaways. I'm going to read them. As an american who's been living in israel for half a year now and choosey. Netanyahu speak just a handful of times my biggest takeaway from last night is how captivating he can be how he presents himself as a strong leader the protector and defender of israel on the world stage. Or at least. That's how he put it multiple times last night. Netanyahu is extremely effective in tying this notion to any issue. He's leading israel to the other side of the covid pandemic he's revitalizing israel's economy with free market reforms and a transformation to renewable energy. He's orchestrating peace deals with israel's arab neighbors. When you paint yourself as a real life iron man who's taking your country to new heights. Why wouldn't your citizens continue to vote for you. Netanyahu's line of the night was who else is going to do it. Only i can. They can't fly the plane of course referring to the other candidates for prime minister. Tony bennett gideon. So are and yet year lead chair of the issue tea party and opposition leader in the israeli knesset. Netanyahu took a multiple shots at yet year. Lupita last night's interview labelling him as the country's worst finance minister in history and his view or any other candidate for that matter wouldn't be able to revitalize israel's post covid economy. Netanyahu took credit for persuading pfizer journal to build manufacturing plants to produce vaccines in israel. Saying they wouldn't pick up the phone for anyone else. Israel is providing a real world example for reopening and netanyahu is banking on israel's success to get him reelected will. Thank you for your insights. Their miles we also have from last night. The final question of the night which came from an audience member it was. What does the prime minister do in his free. Time to unwind well. Netanyahu took the question and admitted that. He's an avid reader reading. Mostly history books and told the story of a college student who wanted to go into politics. And ask netanyahu what he should study. Netanyahu replied three subjects history history and history. Well let's see if history will repeat itself later this month if the israeli public relax the already longest serving prime minister in israel's history all right well. That's it for today's news. Today is wednesday march tenth. Twenty twenty one. Tel-aviv has a low of fifteen degrees celsius and a high of twenty eight degrees. That's fifty nine degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to eighty three degrees for the high. Subscribe to the israelis podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Don't forget a sign up to our israel weekly news rap it's a newsletter with stories coming out of israel from throughout the week you'll also get the cliff notes version of our original stories investigations and interviews. You can sign up by using the link in the show notes. Thank you two miles gilbert. Benny foresta and coby capital for your contributions to the research and writing of today's news. I am sending you off today with a song called are let by your ira on. We played one of her songs. Here on the podcast. And i loved it so much that i asked her to send over more. That's unusual here's one off of her. Latest dp enjoy it and have agree and productive day. How costa skier coal machine of phone machel poor. Merry heat the ski machine. Phone meshu depor. Burma sure let's meet mid home. Jill both off mccain manley costa skis machine. Phone meshu bull. The scale cool meshu deport lita can do to me me me me me. Turn the ship all the he even talk.

israel Netanyahu health ministry environmental protection minis jug julia Abed zeke shanna hamas gaza mediterranean kamaz Sin warr tel aviv international salon la harka shannon
Wireless Charging May Be Bad for Your Battery, Alpha Dog Myths, and Penicillins Full Origins

Curiosity Daily

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Wireless Charging May Be Bad for Your Battery, Alpha Dog Myths, and Penicillins Full Origins

"<music> hi or here from curiosity dot com to help you get smarter in just a few minutes. I'm cody gov and i'm ashley hamer today. Learn about the true history of penicillin wireless wireless charging may be bad for your battery and why the alpha dog is a canine satisfy some curiosity. Do you know the real story of penicillin. Let's get into a little science history myth busting here's what you probably know in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight alexander fleming was growing bacteria in petri dishes in his lab ab when he noticed that one had started growing mold that mold had cleared a spot in the bacteria which suggested that it might have antibacterial properties fleming ming names the mold penicillin and became the world's first antibiotic it cured thousands of previously untreatable infections and spawned a new era of human health. That's the story anyway but while the first part is true the facts get hazy as the story goes on. Here's the problem with flemming's discovery. This strain of penicillin dennis ilia mold that he found camping out in his bacterial colonies was really hard to reproduce fleming and his assistance at saint mary's hospital tried for weeks to grow more of the stuff into isolate pure penicillin from the bacteria killing fluid that seeped out from the mold but they just ended up with a crew solution to work with still that was enough to demonstrate mistreat his findings and in one thousand nine hundred nine fleming published a paper about the molds antibacterial action but in the paper he only made a passing reference to penicillins potential intriguing infections. It was nearly a decade later in nineteen thirty eight when dr howard florey came across fleming's paper when studying the different ways that mold and bacteria can kill each other flurry was director of oxford university school of pathology and he and his colleagues tested small doses of penicillin on mice infected with deadly streptococcus to learn about penicillins healing properties. Most of the mice made full recoveries mice are small though and there was still no way to reliably produce penicillin in large quantities. He's flurry and his team spent years trying to solve this problem testing the contents of soil samples from all over the world but none produced the mold they needed finally they conor break with some help from a bacteria logist named mary hunt. She'd been collecting moldy food. She found it bakeries and grocery stores than isolating the mold and the lab. The moldy winner ended up being a texas cantaloupe. That was perfectly ripe. Save for a small mold growth at its naval hunt even cut up the cantaloupe for the staff to eat and it was reportedly delicious us. The mold turned out to be the fungus penicillin crisis g._m. We're shielded two hundred times the penicillin fleming strain and once the fungus was exposed. I i x rays and later to you. The radiation it's production yields increased even more in one thousand nine forty-five the nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded to alexander zander fleming howard florey and ernst chain who is a biochemist who'd worked with flory on trying to reproduce this stuff. Most of us only remember fleming and that's mostly because of oxford offered universities p._r. Efforts and yes he should certainly be celebrated for his discovery but howard florey ernst chain norman heatley. Mary hunt and countless others were responsible for making penicillin a reliable practical drug that made it the greatest medical advances of the twentieth century very few advances come from only one the individual and this breakthrough was the definition of a team effort. Remember history isn't always as simple as it might seem and neither is science another thing thing that seems so simple but we have some drawbacks wireless charging. I hate to be the bearer of bad news but researchers say that wireless charging technology called inductive zip charging may be bad for your battery as reported by few charity inductive charging leads power source transmits energy across an air gap smartphones taken that energy gene with inductive charging coils. You'll find in newer devices especially in the last couple of years. You don't have to deal with cables when you do this but you do have to deal with potentially damaging heat that had charging pad can generate and that's part of the problem. The power receiving coil is usually close to the back cover of the phone which is usually electrically non-conductive. Thanks to packaging constraints. The phone's battery and power electronics are usually pretty close together so there's not much room to dissipate heat generated in the phone or to shield the phone from he comes from the charger. It's well documented that batteries age more quickly when they're exposed to higher temperatures so researchers researchers decided to conduct some experiments to see how inductive charging might affect a phone especially if it's not lined up correctly on the charging base that's because on a phone is poorly aligned and a wireless charger those inductive charging systems can increase their transmitter power or adjust their operating frequency that basically it means the charges less efficient and you end up generating more heat and it's actually pretty easy to miss a line your phone since the actual position of your phones receiving antenna isn't it's always obvious the researchers found that when a phone charged using a conventional cable the maximum temperature was never higher than twenty seven degrees celsius or eighty point and six degrees fahrenheit when the phone used inductive charging even when it was properly aligned its peak temperature was roughly ten percent higher at thirty point point five degrees celsius or eighty six point nine degrees fahrenheit that temperature didn't get much higher when the phone was misaligned but the peak temperature was reached sooner and and lasted more than twice as long. This isn't all bad news. The researchers noted that using ultra thin coils higher frequencies and making some other improvements could help alleviate this problem as this technology continues to develop for now inductive charging me be convenience but it'll probably reduce the life of your mobile phone battery. If that's the price you willing willing to pay for the convenience then go for it but if you want your phone to live its longest life then maybe stick to the cable. There's something to be said for being old school. Sometimes the alpha dog is a canine myth certain t._v. Dog trainers have made careers out of telling us that dogs will only respect your authority if they see you as the <music> alpha or dominating pack leader but this so-called alpha dog theory just isn't true what you're really needs. According to most animal behaviorists is reinforcement enforcement consistency and love the concept of alpha wolf originated with animal behaviorist rudolph schinkel who spent the nineteen thirties and forties studying studying the social interaction of wolves at the basal zoo in switzerland. His findings showed the group naturally competed for status until a male and female emerged as dominant in the pack but we now know that his entire paper was based on a faulty premise the idea that a bunch of unrelated animals brought together in captivity would behave the same way they would in the wild it would be like trying to learn about average human family dynamics by studying humans in refugee camps according to new research wild wolves actually live even family units that are strikingly similar to those of humans the parents guide the family's activities and split the chores of feeding pup rearing and protection and as the the pups get older their social status is based on birth order with the oldest of the top. This means so-called dominance training to change a dog's behavior is based on faulty science. It's even though they're used by celebrity. Trainers like cesar milan dominance tactics like mild quick smacks on the flank or pending dog on its back using an alpha role are ineffective at best. The american veterinary society of animal behavior has released a statement against the use of punishment modifying. Your pet's behavior and bonnie beaver the former president of the american veterinary medical association told time that they're on record as opposing some of the things cesar milan does instead most experts advise advised training that focuses on positive reinforcement in the end the risk of too. Many treats is much lower than a stressed insecure dog for we wrap up. I want to ask you to do us originally quick favor. It has been like a year since we asked for anybody to rate and review us on your favorite podcast app. It's not a thing that we're going to beg you to do every day but it'd be nice to see a a little boost and reviews once in a while just to help other people know at a glance that we're a good show and then we're worth listening to so if you're enjoying this then please distract us a quick rating in review and maybe we'll read your review on a future episode like this one from depan ville who says imagine hanging out with two youthful co workers or classmates who are excited to share things. They've just learned. I think that's a pretty good description and just last month. Sarah dear wrote. I love this podcast. I listen to it every day on my commute and it's very thought provoking. We are glad to provoke. Your thoughts asserted dear. I'm allowed to say that that's the username listed. It'd be rude. I don't wanna be overly familiar sarah or sara dear however you'd like to be addressed. Sarah darling's darlings. She said it not me. Thank you for writing that and for your feedback and yeah we're always happening here. The people are like in the show anyway now. Let's recap what we learned today today. We learned that we have penicillin. Thanks to more than a decade of research from lots of scientists not just one guy and that wireless charging might hurt your battery marib heating it up too much and the wild wolves actually operate like human families so you shouldn't try to teach dog otherwise but every cat is the alpha cat its own heart. You know how you address a cat right. Oh no you say it's not a dog cats the musical it's it's on tour join us again tomorrow to learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm cody. Gosh i'm ashley hamer. Stay curious on the westwood one podcast network.

penicillin alexander fleming dr howard florey mary hunt ashley hamer cesar milan Sarah darling flemming cody gov nobel prize texas conor switzerland westwood one american veterinary society of depan ville saint mary norman heatley
Nissan Plans to Cut 12,500 Jobs Globally

WSJ What's News

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Nissan Plans to Cut 12,500 Jobs Globally

"Here the extraordinary secrets of how to thrive in disrupted world the old rules of management and already correct anymore so what works making a wise pivot heavy to the future with will I am and Omar Bosch Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts Nissan says it's cutting twelve thousand five hundred jobs from its global workforce. Nissan's problems are twofold right now over relies on sales to rent a car agencies Aziz and at the same time it which too many discounts on cars on the dealer lots so it's not making enough money plus. The federal government is resuming executions for death row inmates. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Anne Marie for totally and New York before we get to those stories. Here are some other top headlines where following today the European Central Bank signals it could cut short term interest rates and restart a bond buying program it would be the first rate cut since 2016 the C._b.. said it would act to prop up inflation rates which have been below its target of just under two percent. The signal could add pressure to other major central banks including the Federal Reserve which meets next week the Fed is also expected to cut rates for the first time in more than a decade southwest airlines. The biggest customer of Boeing's seven thirty seven Max aircraft will no longer fly at New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport as of this fall. The airline says has its decision was accelerated by the impact of the grounding which include rising costs and capacity constraints separately American Airlines said it expects the grounding to reduce its pretax earnings by four hundred million dollars this year that's up from a previous estimate of three hundred fifty million Amazon is looking for office space in New York City after backing off plans to build a campus there earlier this year The Wall Street Journal reports that Amazon is looking at the building that formerly house Lord and Taylor's flagship ship department store on Fifth Avenue Shared Office Space Company. We work bought the twelfth story building earlier this year Amazon had selected northern Virginia and New York City for its second and third headquarters locations but backed out of its plans in New York after. After facing significant backlash from local activists and lawmakers temperatures hit record highs in Europe on Thursday it reached one hundred nine degrees Fahrenheit in Paris one hundred seven in Lincoln Germany and one hundred one in Cambridge England on other summer of low rainfall has prompted water conservation efforts in France water usage has been restricted in more than three quarters of the mainland. The drought has also damaged crops with corn among the hardest hit <music> capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created. E-e-e-e-no the capital one assistant that catches things that might woof wrong with your credit card he no catches over tipping duplicate charges or potential fraud and then sends an alert sheer phone and helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching after your money when we're not capital one. What's in your wallet see capital? One Dot Com for details Nissan has announced. It's cutting nine percent of its workforce. That's about twelve thousand five hundred jobs amid plunging prophets joining me now via skype from Tokyo. Japan is Wall Street Journal reporter Sean mclane Sean Nissan reported weakness in its U._S. business. Can you tell us more about the picture the carmaker painted of what that's like right now. Nissan's problems are twofold right now it's over relies on sales to rental rental car agencies and at the same time it puts too many discounts on cars on the dealer lots so it's not making enough money and is trying to figure out a way to undo that mess they find themselves in the problem is is when they cut back on the rental car sales they lose a volume and when they cut discounts fewer people by the cars so Nissan CEO Euro two psycho says he wants to replace rental car sales with a sales do normal people like you and I unfortunately they're not finding enough of those people where will most of these job cuts be and are there any other changes that the businesses making well. A big chunk of those job cuts coming out of the U._S.. <hes> about fourteen hundred they've. Announced so far more maybe coming. It's not clear but the U._S. is going to be a big part of that Mexico his also going to be hit Asia in India Indonesia about nine hundred Japan and a few hundred in Europe as well. It's really a global effort to cut costs are looking to cut about you know three billion dollars worth of costs as you read. It's been a tumultuous time for Nissan. This year. Saw The arrest of its former chairman airman Carlos gone. How much of factor did that play in? What's happening with Nissan currently well? It's not clear that is impacting sales but certainly management is in turmoil you know the C._e._o.. C._E._O. has admitted that they haven't paid as much attention to the operations as they might otherwise have in the past eight months. He's trying to fix that now but certainly my sources told me that the number one thing on everybody's mind is the internal turmoil within the company. After Carl goes left others been several high level departures of foreigners from the company and it seems like that's GonNa continue for a little while Nissan CEO hero. The cycle is also facing a lot of pressure from his new board of directors. There's a new crop of independent directors who've been asking some tough questions. I'm hearing from sources that the as recently as today they took Mr Psychology the task for not letting them know about these job cuts. There's been a lot of complaints in the board about the corporate governance structure at Nissan and the applying a lot of pressure and <hes> they're telling me that they're giving him about about a year to show some turnaround otherwise going to be looking for changes. Psycho himself has said that he hopes to have a replacement for himself sometime in the near future so it wouldn't come as surprise to him. I imagine if they ask claim to step down and make room for the new Guy Sean the Journal has also been reporting on the global challenges. Many automakers are facing. How much of what Nissan is struggling with is related to the overall challenges at the industry is facing? Well it certainly doesn't help. psychos picked quite a time to essentially turned on its head the entire U._S.. Operations basically restructuring the entire way it sells cars ours and it's proposition two buyer's car buyers are moving to S._U._v.'s and pickup trucks as we all know and Nissan historically relied on sedan sales and a smaller cars to drive volume so it it doesn't help is efforts to draw more people to the car lots to try to do it at a time when more and more Americans are holding onto their cars and putting off those purchases that's Wall Street Journal reporter Sean Mclean joining US via skype from Tokyo with more on me San's Challenges Sean. Thank you so much after a sixteen year hiatus the federal the government plans to resume executions of death row inmates the Wall Street Journal's Sadie Gherman has more on what's behind the change it reflects president trump's own enthusiasm for the death penalty. He has been somebody who has been pushing the dresses to permit to pursue do more cases of capital punishment since he took office and the Attorney General is also a staunch supporter of the death penalty so I think he just finally decided that they should you know retool the rules a little bit and start these up again. There's been a lot of litigation surrounding federal capital punishment and then twenty fourteen the Obama Administration essentially put a moratorium on capital punishment while they reviewed the types of drugs that were used in executions of inmates. There's been a lot of problems with the execution drugs had so that review <hes> essentially put the brakes on the death penalty. The Federal Bureau of Prisons has scheduled executions for five death row inmates. There are five people who are scheduled to be executed over just a six week period in December January which is an unusually short period of time to you know to execute these people after years in which they do this at all but they are people who've been convicted of murder some particularly heinous crimes and the Justice Department says that they have basically exhausted there you know their appeals and they're ready to be put to death that doesn't mean the executions will happen on time but that is when their schedules. The federal government has an executed an inmate since two.

Nissan The Wall Street Journal federal government New York City Europe Anne Marie Federal Reserve Sean Nissan Tokyo Federal Bureau of Prisons skype Omar Bosch CEO Japan Amazon reporter European Central Bank Newark Liberty International A
Israel Daily News Podcast, Mon. Sept. 7, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

13:17 min | 8 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast, Mon. Sept. 7, 2020

"Good morning tove. One Oh, CS Sabella. This is Shannon fold your with the Israel Daily News podcast the only English Daily News podcast coming out of Tel Aviv. I'm here to give you the daily headlines so you can get caught up quickly today is Monday. September seventh twenty twenty, which means it's our fiftieth episode. Woo I. Have a little surprise for you at the end of the show in honor. So let's get to the news. Israel has reached over one thousand deaths due to covid nineteen and rumors of another lockdown specific cities hit the streets within the last few days. However, it seems that politicians are backing down from that after mayors say no last night ministers in Israel decided to scale back the full lockdown plan to a nightly curfew that will be instated between seven PM and five am for cities dealing with concentrated breakouts. Non Essential businesses will be closed during these times and people will be restricted to moving more than five hundred meters from their homes. Schools are expected to be fully closed. The final list of cities with curfews will be released today but I can tell you that the cities that were headed. For. Lockdown included a number of Arab cities including Afam, Thira and Qasim as well as the Orthodox cities of allowed bonaire brock Beta leads and Emmanuel Prime Minister Netanyahu stopped the order for those cities to lockdown after the mayors of four Orthodox cities said Netanyahu was quote turning us into disease vectors and enemies of the people as for arab-israeli mayors they seem to have supported the lockdown with Mayor Samir Muhammad telling Israeli TV channel. Con that quote the numbers speak for themselves there is no escaping lockdown. It hurts me to say it but it's the truth Arab Israelis account for about twenty eight point eight percent of the active cases in Israel despite being only about one fifth of Israel's population. Not only has lockdown been averted, but there's even a new campaign running with an open letter including ninety medical professionals who've said lockdowns are unnecessary Nobel Prize winner Michael Levitt along with emergency word directors have signed on saying a lockdown only delays the virus and doesn't stop it the letters main takeaway is that Israel needs to act like Sweden did with minimal restrictions in. A focus on gaining herd immunity so that a majority of the people builds an immunity to it and the infection rate drops to insignificant levels Dr Amir shocker the head of the emergency wing at Netanyahu's Laniado hospital says his department is handling the outbreak well, and that the mortality rate is not out of the ordinary in comparison to other viral diseases and that the hysteria. is totally unnecessary moving onto some world politics US President Donald Trump got a call from Saudi, Arabian King Solomon WanNa know what it was about. Okay. I'll tell you the call was full of words of praise. He said trump's diplomatic efforts in the region. appreciated. This comes just days after a US delegation including senior White House adviser Jared Kushner went to that nation hoping. To get Saudi Arabia to follow the UAE and established peace and diplomacy with Israel as well. The kingdom says they want to reach a lasting and just solution to the Palestinian. Cause to bring peace, which is their main starting point Saudi Arabia held quiet when the peace plan between the UAE an Israel was announced the two countries both have a common enemy which is Iran. In the meantime. Top Hamas and Hezbollah officials met over the weekend in a historic discussion in Lebanon to discuss the new arab-israeli ties as it affects military developments in Palestine and Lebanon. I have just a quick few stories I WANNA get to briefly before we head over to a very small little special report that I've created for the end of the show in honor of our fiftieth. Anniversary. And Israeli man has been indicted for allegedly shooting and injuring two Palestinians in the West Bank or Judea and Samaria whatever language is comfortable for you. He says, he was defending himself as he was simply taking care of his crops at the DOROTA elite. Near the Palestinian town of Bedia when a group of Palestinian men rolled up in cars forming a lynch mob and investigation found a mosque near by asked its members to stop the farmers and prevent the theft of Palestinian farmland. Palestinians questioned had a very similar story saying they too were peacefully farming when they were approached by Israelis, who were looking for a fight men. The Israel Nature and Parks Authority is responding to the request of the people there making a special hole near the Dead Sea segregated by gender so that religious bathers can each have their time enjoying mother nature. If you don't know Orthodox Jews and Muslims cannot be with the opposite gender because it's considered immodest a big demand from the Orthodox community has given way to special times designated for bathing in a not sukey nature reserve. This reserve hosts a series of shallow pools and one larger one that's better for swimming women will be able to swim comfortably on the seven and fourteenth of the month with men on the tenth and seventeenth of the month. And finally Israeli airline is rare has officially put in their requests for time slots to begin commercial flights from Tel Aviv to Abu Dhabi in the UAE following the mid August announcements of peace and diplomacy between the nation's how exciting. Okay. So now in. The Big Five O. or fiftieth episode of the Israel Daily News podcast I have a story about a breathtaking glassblowing shop. I want to paint the picture for you. I was just there yesterday. Let me take you to the case. Saria. Harbor. It's an ancient city named after Julius Caesar and built by the Romans. If you go there the ruins and mosaics are still present and very much intact the sun is shining over the Mediterranean and you can feel the heat of the September day as you climb the stairs to get up the studio and on the way you run your hand overhead sized glass blown. Decorating the handrails, some are blue. Some are read their smooth in the palm of your hand. You go in and see the open space upstairs with colorful glass pitchers. Glass plates cups in every direction spread about around the center of the room where there's a bar cafe area. Every direction has a window and it's showing the waves crashing onto the shores your at the farthest point in the harbor surrounded by water on both sides. Now, glassblowing is an ancient art form with its first creations coming out of this region they came from Syria and the phone nation people who created this in their harbor cities along the coast of what is today northern, Israel and southern Lebanon I ask some questions to Yellow Kausar, Co owner of Specula- glassblowing studios do those us you'll connected historically sue the people before you did this part of the reason that we decided to be here and not an tel-aviv. Cultural. Center of Israel. is like really being connected to a craft I was making four thousand years ago and three, hundred, thirty, five, hundred years ago and. Fifteen hundred years ago. So for me, it's like a basic thing is to. Reduce something story at the same spot. It's classic I. Mean if both respect for ten Aviv and I love that city and it is a cultural center. For AIDS, it's very, very exciting to be here in Redo it. And also you know glasses man out of San you know so to be on the beaches. Natural. Connect to them to literally like. Okay. Well, that's just a taste of what's to come watch out for a more in-depth peace with visuals. Coming out next week I'll tell you where you can find it and take a look at my instagram for photos and videos from the workshop that we took I'll post them on my instagram today and finally a couple of notes for you all in honor of fiftieth anniversary from two people who listen to the Israel Daily News podcast and our staunch readers of my weekly newsletter I up Avi Sakarov a strong Israeli, journalist known around the world and Co creator of the international hit TV series th Ouda. Hey to all the Israeli news broadcast listeners. This is obvious how The CO creator of father and also Middle East analysts just wanted to say. Shana Tova. Happy New Year for the coming Jewish year, and hope you love listening to this podcast of my friend Shanna fault. And Good luck with everything. So stay safe daycare and the Ella Foutah. We'll also hear note from famous American rabbi Shmuel. E Petya. Congratulations on the fiftieth episode of Israel daily. News. And congratulations to Shawna fold. Israel is the apple of our I. The epicenter of our hearts. To all its Jewish. Evangelical nonaffiliated non-aligned supporters in lovers and friends. Thank you for your. Incredible. Dedication, to the Jewish state. All, right. Well, that's it. For today's news. Today is Monday September seven, twenty twenty we've got a low of twenty six and a high of thirty two degrees Celsius in Tel Aviv that seventy nine degrees Fahrenheit for the low going up to eighty seven degrees in this central city. It is very hot. We're going through a heat wave here in Israel thanks for getting caught up with me and don't forget subscribed to the Israel Daily News podcast on spotify or apple podcasts or wherever you're hearing it from I am everywhere let's hear a new song by Israeli Dj Eric Crawl. It's called disconnection have a great day and a productive we.

Israel Israel Daily News Tel Aviv Israel Nature and Parks Author UAE Saudi Arabia Emmanuel Prime Minister Netany Lebanon twenty twenty Donald Trump US Shannon Laniado hospital Dead Sea Jared Kushner English Daily News Nobel Prize Aviv DOROTA San
Israel Daily News Podcast, Tues. Dec 8, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

11:21 min | 4 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast, Tues. Dec 8, 2020

"Good morning one of the us about this is china folds here with the israel daily news. Podcast i'm here to give you the headlines so you can get caught up quickly. You're listening so you're already on top of your game. Survive and thrive people knowledge. Is the best weapon today. Is tuesday december eighth twenty twenty which means that we are on episode one hundred two here at the israel. Daily news podcast. We are calling on our listeners to offer a sponsorship or contribution which you can send over using the link in the show notes or by visiting anchor. Dot fm backslash israel. Daily news backslash support. Now let's get to the news. Coronavirus cases are getting out of control once again in israel on monday state recorded one thousand eight hundred thirty seven diagnoses. This is the highest number of cases in almost two months with two point. Eight percents test returning positive. Yesterday evening ministers voted to impose a nightly curfew for three weeks beginning the evening before the first night of hanukkah so that means tomorrow night or wednesday night now. This curfew is still pending. Knesset approval and additional details. Haven't been fully fleshed out but the curfew would be between six or seven. Pm five or six am in the morning now. I just want to say that recently news broke that there are a lot of legal issues with being this curfew and it very well may not happen. So people got worked up and nervous in israel but we just have to wait and see what is going to be the final decision here. Senior health officials including corona virus. Czar himself are questioning the effectiveness of a three week curfew. Representatives of the attorney general have said that they would not be able to defend the government's decision against any possible legal challenges because senior health ministry officials were not on board with the plan. The justice officials are concerned that a curfew will force businesses to close during the evening which could increase daytime crowding and could result in the rise of overall morbidity. So like i said everyone is going nuts over this hannukah lockdown or this hanukkah evening curfew which was meant to curtail people from hanukkah celebratations. But it looks like this. Curfew is not going to have enough legs to stand on four palestinian west bank governance will enter a week long lockdown on thursday. The four areas are anomalous. Have run tool karam and bethlehem where around one point. Six million palestinians live travel between all eleven of the west bank. Governance will be forbidden and all stores will be closed except for pharmacies and groceries over the past few weeks. The number of active cases in the west bank has reached record highs hitting twenty four thousand eight hundred fifty seven. Currently according to the palestine ministry but authorities have still decided against a complete and total lockdown given the major stress that is currently happening on the palestinian economy over in gaza. The health ministry announced that its main laboratory for conducting corona virus tests will stop processing them due to a lack of materials and they are waiting for shipments of new kits. Monday a senior world health organization official announced that they acquired twenty eight thousand corona virus testing kits. Which will temporarily resolve the shortage for around seven days on the gaza strip. I'm going to take a moment away from the news to ask you to send over a monthly contribution if you are enjoying this report and if you think it brings you value. There's a link in the show notes where you can send a five or ten dollar monthly contribution. The site is anchor dot. Fm backslash is real. Daily news backslash support listeners to submit a donation of five dollars per month for the year will receive a hand written letter by me. Mail to you with a special note from me and a little poem inside. I actually was up writing one last night. I hope that that listener will enjoy listeners. Who send over a ten dollar monthly donation or more will get access to a one on one q. and a. with me via zoom. So we can talk about politics. We can talk about whatever you're thinking about and you can even ask me if there's anything else that we can do. I am finalizing a mini book about my journey and learnings. The idea is to celebrate one hundred episodes to help other creative minds get started on their own projects to. I'm in the final stages of this book. I'm working on design right now. If you yourself are a creator or you know someone who is and they are looking for some guidance reach out to me. I would value their input and it could have helped me with the angle for this book. So send me a message. I think i can help people that you know with my guide and just giving people the push that they need to make the creative things that they have been thinking about but not actually producing back to the news on monday evening. Several thousand extra orthodox jews broke out in protests in jerusalem which led to twenty five arrests. The community protested plans for a light rail route that would cross directly through their neighborhood. There is currently one rail route that was built in twenty eleven and four. More routes are in the works now this in jerusalem. The demonstrators blocked a main junction in the city and eventually began to knock over construction site fences and set fire to dumpsters and city. Work vehicles. police used water cannons and officers on horses to disperse the crowds. Some of those who were detained were found with knives sticks and pepper spray on their bodies. So this is actually very scary. I've been caught up in this before. While reporting i was actually going back from a job in jerusalem when i was in the middle of a protest like this some time ago and it is very scary because these horses are so big and the officers are on them and actually i was very lucky that a photographer saami step into the street. He swung his arm out and pushed me back. And he said don't move and just after that an officer on a big horse ranch right past me so close to me. Had i been an inch further into the street. I totally would have gotten run over by this big beast and It's it's quite a scene when you get involved in this. My advice is to stay away for the first time in israel's history. An arab woman has announced her intention to run for the role of israel's president. I'll have cousin is a businesswoman from the northern israeli town of beena. She is planning to run against labor leader. Amir peretz former likud member of knesset click and former labor party. Minister shimon shitreet these all all. These people have officially announced their intention to run for the presidency. I will keep you updated on that. And emirati businessman bought about fifty percent of israel's beta jerusalem club soccer team and now he says the door is open to adding arab players. She wits lineup. she had been khalifa. Niane is the son of the united arab emirates president khalifa been on and he purchased a fifty percent stake in beta jerusalem. This club is often called laugh. Amelia and is notorious around israel for being extreme right-wing racist using slurs whenever they can and sometimes even bringing violence to protests and demonstrations. Niane even went so far as publicly. Say that he wanted to set an example for the two nations that jews and muslims can work together saying that the age of that the age of the players seem to be between sixteen and twenty two years. Old making them very impressionable. He says they're currently brainwashed and taking part of the dark side the she says they need to reach out to them and show them the light. I think that's a really really positive message all right well. That's it for today's news. Today is tuesday december. Eighth twenty twenty tel aviv has a low of fifteen degrees celsius and a high of twenty three degrees. That's fifty nine degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to seventy three degrees for the high a little rainy today. Subscribe to the israel daily news podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Thank you can't iskoe inject meltzer or fit lynch and heavier plus for your contributions to research writing. And i'll send you off today with trippy. Code by eric crawl. She's a talented israeli. Dj who uses all types of interesting household items to make music have great and productive day packed and.

health ministry israel ten dollar israel daily news three week Daily news palestine ministry west bank jerusalem karam three weeks two months bethlehem Niane five dollars gaza strip china gaza seven days beena
Israel Daily News Podcast Ep. 26 Mon. July 27, 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

10:17 min | 9 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast Ep. 26 Mon. July 27, 2020

"The Good Morning. Booker tove UENOSKI S Suba Hair. This is John. Unfold here from Tel. Aviv with the Israel Daily News podcast. I'm here to give you the daily headlines. See you can get caught up quickly. Today is Monday July twenty seventh twenty twenty. Let's start it off right. Unless get to the news. All these really papers have been covering the story and with good reason. Do you remember a story I've been covering about Israel banning gay conversion therapy. It's meant to make a gay person straight, and it can have very negative side effects well, the leader of the Arab party in parliament I'm an ODA supported the measure to make conversion therapy illegal, and now his colleagues are questioning his political stance, conservative Arab member of Knesset Wally Ta called Otas support for the ban problematic for the vast majority of the society that elected him. He even said that the phenomenon of gaze is almost non-existent in Arab society, and that if it exists at all, it is of limited dimensions, fierce debate over support for the gay community within Arab society was recently sparked when Arabic Tahina company launched a campaign to make money to the LGBTQ crisis hotline in Israel. Netanyahu Netanyahu. There's always something new with Israel's prime minister. Reports are surfacing that the Prime Minister of Israel is looking for a loophole. He could use in order to push out alternate Prime Minister Benny. Guns guns is set to share the role with Netanyahu following three rounds of frustrating elections that already happened now rumor has it that Netanyahu is looking to destroy the unity government that the Likud party has set up with blue and white, but we'll try to pull in two members of the Derek Eric's party plus. Plus a few more in order to get a majority of sixty one that lawmakers needed for the majority of the one hundred twenty member Knesset, of course, this seems like something that should have been worked out during coalition talks, but nevertheless Israel's channel twelve says this kind of maneuver is on the table. Supporters of the prime minister from the United Torah Judaism party who usually back Netanyahu say he will lose their support if he tries to dissolve the Knesset and bring the country back into another round of elections. I will certainly be following that one Israel now has its own wall of Moms, and if you haven't heard of it yet, it is exactly what it sounds like a group of mothers who come out to protect the youth. Young people have been protesting outside of the prime minister's House night after night, criticizing his handling of the coronavirus and accusing him of committing the acts of bribery and fraud that he is on trial for. The protests get cleared by police routinely at around twelve, thirty or one, A. N., and in order to protect the young people. There's a group of mothers who turns their WHATSAPP group into an assembly. The moms wear yellow vests and make themselves into a protective barrier to cover the young protesters and keep them away from officers. The leader of the MOMS began the group without realizing that there is an identical one that was started in Portland Oregon in the United. States, during the black lives matter protests. She actually learned about the group from her daughter. Who Lives in Connecticut? Haaretz reveals that officers have been shooting water jets at protesters heads within close range, which is against the department's own protocol. A video of a protest are getting shot in the face with strong water, causing him to topple over backwards has been surfacing on the Internet with nearly one hundred thousand views. One protester said he was hit in the ear by the water jet, he fell to the floor. His ear was damaged and his head Split Open. He says he was shot from just one carling away, and that he had been on his way out of the event when it happened, it was the nineteen year olds first demonstration, and he said it felt that rather than trying to disperse the nonviolent protesters. It was a scare tactic to prevent demonstrators from coming back. I'd like to give myself a proper introduction at this point. If you're listening for the first time, I'm channel fold, I live in Tel Aviv Israel, but originally from Queens New, York, but before moving, I completed a bachelor's degree in broadcast journalism in Spanish. Then I became a writer at New York One News Manhattan before moving to Israel where I grew into a field reporter and anchor at I'LL TV in Tel Aviv and Israel now news in Jerusalem I'm also the host of the Senate Series A. A weekly Monday night, happy hour talk series tonight. We're having our event on zoom. With Elliot shot off a political and military analysts specializing in the Middle East conflict and the global war on terrorism. His topic is Iran China and the new threat to Israel after he speaks I'll be holding a question and answer. Please bring a cocktail the screen because I will surely be having one. This is meant to be a happy hour. You can find the details on facebook and in the show notes. The story of a family who can no longer pay their rent. Due to the corona virus, related financial crisis is surfacing around Israeli media. The fear family along with their four small children are currently living in nature while they try to get back on their feet. They say that following Passover. It became clear they would no longer be able to pay the bills in Jerusalem and they moved to live in a spring nearby after a long job search. The father of the family found a job south of Ashkelon near the Gaza border. He moved there with his family, and they're currently living beside the beach while they tried to save money and get reorganized, but authorities say that is not okay. Police approach the family who have been living out of a makeshift tent and told them to pack up and go. The offers say they don't plan to stay for long, but just needed a minute to catch their breath. Well I hope this story means something to you. This last tale is a fun one. An ancient shipwreck is being explored just off Israel's coast of Haifa. The ship is around thirteen hundred years old, and according to archaeologist marks the time between Byzantine and Islamic rule in the area, researchers say the ship was full of cargo, pottery, agricultural products and items with Greek and Arabic inscriptions on it plus the name of God in Arabic as well as a slew of Crosses. The wreck was discovered in two thousand fifteen, but is currently being excavated. Experts say many of the items on board were made in Egypt, and that the ship was designed in a new way as ship construction techniques revolutionized during this very period. That is so interesting. All right well, that's it for today's news. Today is Monday July Twenty, seven twenty twenty. We've got a low of twenty six and a high of thirty one degrees Celsius in Tel Aviv. That's seventy nine degrees Fahrenheit for the low going up to eighty seven degrees in the central city. Thanks for getting caught up with me seawall tonight at eight. PM Israel. Israel time one PM. Eastern Standard Time for the sunset series event via soon and don't forget. Subscribe to the Israel Daily News podcast on spotify or apple podcasts or wherever you're hearing from I am everywhere. Please reach out and let me know who you are and where you're listening from. I want to write with you in mind when I do the news. I'll send you often to the week with subliminal and triple their new songs to meet Dima has six hundred eighteen thousand views, and hundreds of comments on Youtube from Israelis and all people who love their music I will say I just love this song. Have a great ten productive. Be Malone. Your. Full. ORLA. Name usually featured luckily. Old. Tony. On. Pavilion. down. says. He. called. Popcorn. News They. Both Should. BE, Malone! Author.

Israel Israel Daily News prime minister Tel Aviv Netanyahu Netanyahu Aviv Jerusalem Booker tove UENOSKI Arab party Knesset John Likud party Arabic Tahina Ashkelon Portland facebook Middle East Malone Oregon