35 Burst results for "Nine Times"

Milky Mama's Krystal Duhaney Busts Some Breastfeeding Myths

Babes and Babies

06:44 min | 4 d ago

Milky Mama's Krystal Duhaney Busts Some Breastfeeding Myths

"I. Have Crystal Do Haney here. She's a registered nurse International Board certified lactation consultant in a breastfeeding mom. She's been on a journey with it, which made her passionate in how we know her is through Milky Mama. So we're so glad that you are here with us so much for coming on. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. Yeah. I'd love for you to tell us how you got into all of this. So. Yeah. I struggled to Breastfeed Monnaie first child my son, and I, realized that there were very few resources. There wasn't really a place that I go for help I asked my. Pediatrician in. He said Wall. You can always give formula which is fantastic. Of course, lots of months fleet, formula. I was formula Fed, but that's not what I wanted for my journey. So I was a little discouraged but determined to make it work. So I began researching for myself to help have a more successful journey. and. We struggled our way to a through breastfeeding, but we made it to breastfeeding for over two years and then went became pregnant with my daughter. I was determined to have a much better experience I started from the get go from pregnancy on educating myself trying to find ways to support my milk production especially, returning work as a registered nurse on a busy medical Fulbari. It was difficult to find time to pomp and to maintain my supply is I, wanted to find a way. To do out a delicious cookie recipe. That helped to increase my supply I started with my friends and they loved it. Then I started selling it to local mothers and from there. We just continue to grow very rapidly, and now we've shipped out over a million orders across the world to Moms, everywhere. Wow. That's so amazing. I wrote that down I was like, how did you come up with this amazing cookie recipe? because. That's definitely something I'm I'm going to have to look into here very soon, but that you had like a love for baking as well. I get. Even, as a kid I've always loved baking I've always just loved being in the kitchen. So it kind of came natural. I just figured I could bake something I love to Bake I love cookies. Kind of you know was was easy solution for me We've expanded our product offerings now to wow, we offer brownies, we offer herbal supplements for those that don't want to eat cookies brownies. Day We offer beverage mixes, eliminates tons of stuff but what's most important is our network of breastfeeding support that is really the backbone of our company. We provide dictation consultations both virtual and in percent one for not in the middle of a pandemic. We also provide flange consultations, lot of pumping MOMS have no idea what slam site is to use in really impact up production. We have an amazing support group were very active on social media. With our social media, using our social media feeds to educate and empower about breastfeeding as well. So it's really more than a treat company. It's really told little sisterhood I like to call it of breastfeeding in pumping. Mama's just supporting each other. Yeah. Yeah. For sure. I know I was checking now. All of your guys is Info and although you do have amazing products is the support. It is the being able to. Find a consultants or even hop on the phone with somebody who can help you through your journey and know that. I mean, we're going dive into some of the myths that breastfeeding isn't always easy for everyone and it doesn't always come naturally and I. Love that you guys talk about that. So I'd love to dive into some of those myths and I know one of them is that. Your baby latch on and it should be easy and it should be natural. That's a very common myth and I experienced the same thing you know you look at, maybe you might see a mom, which is a whole other issue that it's very rare that you'll see on breastfeeding in a magazine because breastfeeding unfortunately is still not completely normalized, but we're getting there. Right. So let's say you see an advertisement of a mom breastfeeding nine times out of ten. She's smiling and like this is the greatest thing ever, and this is fantastic in it so easy and so when I saw those as a pregnant mom, I was like Oh like you just latched the baby, the baby's good to go. But my experience wasn't Mike that my first latch was painful My baby didn't have a deep latch and no one told me otherwise like everyone said Oh. It's okay. It gets better your Nipples, oh bleed, but they'll get better. And no one told me that that's not okay. My Nipple, should it be falling off and I'm trying to latch I? Think that it's really important to have and to set realistic expectations for parents so that they know, hey, it's normal to be sentenced to test some tenderness and soreness. It's normal to be a little sore and latching although it's natural breastfeeding is considered natural. It's still a skill that. That you and your baby needs to learn. So don't expect things to just happen. Perfectly, you know seek help is nothing wrong with seeking help There's nothing wrong with with checking in with the lactation consultant before leaving the hospital I, think that's really important. Make sure you get checked before leave muscle so that you can explain okay before you get home. Yeah. For sure. Will I feel like though? I've heard. Be Opposite I've heard. It shouldn't be painful at all. It should be easy and. Basically. If there is any pain than your baby's not latched right or there's a problem, but I know that they're still gonNA probably be some soreness either way. You know and I always use this analogy, and I apologize because I'm like the Queen of terrible analogies. But I just think things that are inappropriate. But this is the only way that my brain thinks about it like or you had a baby, I can guarantee that there wasn't another human sucking on your breasts. Every two hours if that was your life before I'm jealous but. That wasn't the case. So it's very normal with the simulation that you're gonNA have some tenderness and soreness, and it's very also really important to distinguish between soreness and tenderness and pain that toe curling teeth grinding painting that a lot of US associate with with latching. That's very different sort tenderness that goes away after the latches established and babies. Drinking's is normal pain that lasts the duration of the nursing action is not normal

Consultant Milky Mama Haney United States FED Monnaie Fulbari Mama Wall Mike
Eisenhower Matrix and When You Should Launch Your Show

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

05:47 min | Last week

Eisenhower Matrix and When You Should Launch Your Show

"What is going on a friend today I want to share with you a question that I got recently about whether you should launch right now during a pandemic, and while this world is just really a crazy place. We've had riots. We've had the pandemic. Of course you'd have tons of other things that are just really odd for near normal midway checkpoint through the year so I got this question the other day that was a good one, because sure a lot of people who haven't launched it, or maybe they're thinking about launching, or maybe they know that they WANNA launch. Launch. They need help with a strategy or the need. Help some of the technical aspects, and they're letting that be an excuse to get them going and get the moving the right direction when they know this is the podcast is something they want to do. They know it's GonNa make sense for them. They know it makes sense for their business. They know they get a lot of value out of out of it, and they know they can give a lot of value more importantly to the world doesn't make sense to launch a podcast during this pandemic during this. Time of economic corrections. What a lot of people I guess the politically correct term it according to Internet experts. Honestly, I think yes, and it's not just because I'm a producer and yeah I. Make my living off of helping people with podcast. Doubt about it, but it's yes, because my question to you is what are you going to be doing where you're GonNa? Be when this is all over, and are you going to be further along, or are you going to be kind of in the same spot with the same platforms or the same place? You feel like you are right now. Your Business personally for me, I've taken this as a way as place to grow my knowledge in other places that week at such as facebook. Advertising platforms like spotify ads. A lot talk, allow learning and testing that space in honestly, this is the time for people who are smart to actually grow and continue to expand where you can in a podcasting is one of those things I don't want you to be stuck on the fence. Who you think launching there are during a pandemic doesn't make sense if you have the ability to grow and expand right now, and you're leading the pandemic excuse, or maybe even just like I. Don't have time for it. Stop you. I think that's really really ignorant. I think that's really really not the best thing for you. If you look long term in your life or in your business so. So! I had a coach teach me. Something recently shot to Greg Hickman from the all agencies and amazing guy and slowly I've learned from Greg. Is something called? The Eisenhower Matrix, and the Eisenhower made is consistent, consists of like four boxes right on the top. You have urgent and not urgent, and then on the left hand side. You have to think of a four part boxer Google Eisenhower Matrix. You have important, not important. podcasting falls into the important, but not urgent bucket for a lot of people. It's something that they know they should do. They know they want to do the. No, it makes sense, but they don't have. They know there's no timeframe on. Any pushing you to podcast with. There's really only really urgency comes from is from yourself internally nine times out of ten from what I've seen, so you don't want to let those needle moving tasks or needle moving objectives fall to the wayside and doing this personally my own business until Greg called me out on it and I credit him for that 'cause. I couldn't see with my own eyes so if you're being me. And being stubborn about and focusing on things that are urgent and important, or maybe urgent, not important right now. If that's where a lot of your time is, then I would challenge you to go and take a look at the Eisenhower Matrix and go and see if you really want to do a podcast. What makes sense with you for you and you are saying you don't have the time for it. Flat out all of the things you're doing and put them on one of those four buckets. You have urgent, not important but urgent. That's like. Email and things like that. You have urgent and important. Those are like creating content every week. That's like fulfilment for your clients. That's you know things like that. Those are the main two for me, and then you have -portant, but not urgent. That's like. Maybe ads campaign or building a Webinar or launching a podcast or launch a YouTube channel or going to this event. Maybe one Kobe's over the pandemics over, so we got important, not urgent urgent. Important not important, but urgent, and then not important, not urgent, which should not be on your list to do it all

Greg Hickman Eisenhower Facebook Spotify Youtube Producer Google Kobe
US breaks daily record for Covid-19 cases 9 times in 1 month

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

US breaks daily record for Covid-19 cases 9 times in 1 month

"The state of our Union is also this morning terrified because there are more than three point, seven million corona virus cases in the United States in more than one hundred forty thousand Americans dead, and there is no friendly way to say this. This crisis is spiraling out of control with no indication. The president trump is going to try to do anything different to try to stop it in the last month the. The US beat its own daily record for new cases at least nine times and hospitals in states across the country are reaching capacity. Nothing would make me happier than to report to you this morning that president, trump and his administration are devoting every resource possible to defeating this pandemic, but not only is that not the case on Saturday? CNN learned that the White House is objecting to a Senate Republican. Push for more money for testing and contact tracing for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Donald Trump United States President Trump Centers For Disease Control An CNN Senate White House
Philadelphia city officials say Eagles won't be allowed to have fans in stands this season

Get Up!

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Philadelphia city officials say Eagles won't be allowed to have fans in stands this season

"NFL eagles reuniting with nine time pro. Bowler Jason Peters on a one year deal. Notably, he'll be moving to guard in an effort to help. Replace Brandon Brooks who suffered a season ending Achilles injury. He was a terrific tackle. Throughout his career and in Philadelphia where city officials announced yesterday they will be no fans in the stands at Lincoln Financial Field for Eagles Games in two thousand twenty citing safety concerns amid pandemic fans will not be allowed at phillies games this year.

Brandon Brooks Jason Peters Lincoln Financial Field NFL Phillies Philadelphia
In Boston, rallies continue to protest police brutality, systemic racism

WBZ Midday News

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

In Boston, rallies continue to protest police brutality, systemic racism

"Two last night more demonstrations in Boston calling for racial equity and denouncing police brutality WBZ's James Rowe Haas has more on one of those events in Jamaica plain the intersection of center and south streets was jam packed with people from all around to honor George Floyd first church rang its bell nine times to symbolize the eight minutes and forty six seconds that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of Floyd this protester response to riots we've recently seen you know black of city should be doing something because the writing is not helping organizations like the N. double ACP peacefully protesting the systemic bigotry and still here we are today at this time and no sign of a slowdown for these

Boston James Rowe Haas Jamaica Officer George Floyd Minneapolis
Women In Prison

Mentally Yours

04:25 min | 2 months ago

Women In Prison

"Today chatting to classrooms. He's the managing editor of the magazine, a new magazine that publishes poetry and articles by women in prison today. We're going to be chatting to her. About what life is like for women in Britain's prisons. How them into health is affected by being in prisons, and what life is like at the moment during the covert epidemic. So my interest is like mice, people, you know they're all mental health. Issues in my family have an aunt. WHO's diagnosed bipolar, so we sort of grew up with that. And then. I went to school with Ended up just in a lot of trouble with the criminal justice system and when she was released from. Last time she asked. If I would help and get involved with the which when I look at it I was just delighted to. Because it's really important, it's it's not just for women in prison for women who've got any contact with the criminal justice system, so they could be women on in the community all they could be The partners of men they could be NGOs or other people involved in the criminal justice system went lawyers. Judges actually subscribed to twos. Quite it's quite a broad abroad with limited reach. This is kind of broad question, but what is it is particularly about women how to how women specifically affected by being in the prison system coming out of the issues that they face specifically so I think when you look at. The. Number of women who all incarcerated who we send to present. You have mental health issues vomited vaguely report, but he are half ago and Init- initial justice admits that over eighty percent of women have mental health issues on those mental health issues not treated in women's Prisons Stats men's prisons. They're much lower and then women things. I and depression is compounded, because only one percent of children actually stay in the family home. If mother is sent to prison, I mean that's an alarming statistic, and we need to think about being Zion, if not knowing what's happening to your child in your home and everything. In a while you're in prison where it's remind is usually you know nine times out of ten, a mother, or assist O or upon who can pick up the pieces in the Gulf to the children, but for women very often. They don't have those networks especially when it comes to child care. And women have also leads upon leads of trauma an emotional abuse. Again enormous report that was commissioned by Theresa May. He says that over fifty percent of women. have been the victims of abuse. Emotional or sexual or domestic abuse? In their lives, and of course, imprisoning them white disc, compacting that trauma and adding Les- Upon it, and what about the mental? They received. We'll maybe don't receive. When are actually in prison will? What's really frightening? Is that judges put women in prison thinking that they will get mental health support because you know, there are these massive I mean really enormous mental health contracts over six hundred million pounds. A year is spent on health and mental health. They called the justice health contracts, so these are given to provide his including. National Health Service, foundation trust and private providers like. A and Really. Women just cannot access them they. For example at Drake Hotel which is the prison? In the Midlands is meant to be a fulltime psychologists in the time psychiatrist, I'm case paid to provide that service, but actually that has not been a full time. Psychiatrists death of a two years. They've just not been able to fill the role. And they'll get in training. US is or nasty to on. Day contracts who don't have any commitment to being in that position and that she looking off the the patient doodle is just it's just a job, so we are really concerned about mental health and women's specific health services like menopause connect like. A. Logical problems PAP, Smit's things like that and just not being done for him in prison

National Health Service Managing Editor United States Smit Britain Theresa May Gulf Zion Drake Hotel O
Four Minneapolis policemen fired after death of unarmed black man

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Four Minneapolis policemen fired after death of unarmed black man

"Police fired tear gas in the US city of Minneapolis as demonstrators protested over the death on Monday often unarmed black man in police custody video taken by a witness shows an officer holding George Floyd's down with a knee on his neck four police officers involved have been fired the executive director of the American civil liberties union of Minnesota John Gordon is one of the video of the incident as appalling and sickening you can see him begging for his life you can see him saying I can't breathe I can't breathe more than nine times over a baking don't kill me and you can see on the video that he loses consciousness you can literally see the lights go out of them mayor Jacob Frey said it was clear that the death was unjustified

Minneapolis Officer George Floyd Executive Director John Gordon Jacob Frey United States Minnesota
With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

Business Wars Daily

03:49 min | 3 months ago

With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

"How does a little holiday in the Scottish highlands sound lovely? Even during this lockdown plenty of people thought so and reserve properties for rent on the global travel website booking dot com in fact so many tourists continue to putter about the Scottish countryside that it alarmed the locals like rural residents all over they feared travelers might bring Kobe. Nineteen with them at overwhelmed. Small hospitals and so in Blackford. The areas presumably exasperated member of parliament asked booking dot com to quit offering reservations for the bucolic countryside. Finally last week the giant travel company complied. Now you can't get a reservation at a cottage in the Scottish highlands until may ninth or later at least not on booking dot com so reports the Scottish newspaper the National. So why am I telling you this? Little story well because it offers a small taste of the big problems facing the travel industry like so many other industries. Covert nineteen is upended everyone in the travel business from tiny. Bnb's to the largest players that's especially true of booking dot coms biggest rival expedia travel and its parent company. Expedia group in addition to owning. Its namesake reservation site. Expedia group owns other household. Names including travelocity ORBITZ HOTELS DOT COM B. R. B. O. And home away just to name a few the multibillion dollar travel conglomerate however is far less steady than it had appeared to be back in December it ousted. Ceo REPORTEDLY DUE TO DISAGREEMENTS WITH CHAIRMAN. Buried diller and the board over Corporate Strategy Diller who also runs entertainment giant. I A C took over day to day responsibilities along with board vice-chair Peter Kern in February prior to the couvert nineteen onslaught in the US. The company announced what it called disappointing twenty nineteen earnings. It announced plans to lay off three thousand people or about twelve percent of its workforce at the time diller called the company's Sclerotic in bloated sclerotic by the way means rigid or slow to change. Not exactly a compliment. He planned to streamline the business which he believed had become too large and complex by the end of February. The company had put plans in place to save three hundred to five hundred million expenses annually and then the virus which had already been wreaking havoc globally hit the US hard. The effect on the travel industry is beyond devastating the US Travel Association estimates losses of more than five hundred billion dollars in direct travel spending. That's nine times worse than the impact on the travel industry after nine eleven according to Forbes sadly the travel association predicts more than eight million. Us travel industry workers will have lost their jobs by the end of this month. And if the pandemic is devastating most businesses those with fragile foundations like expedia are scrambling to ensure they'll survive last week. Expedia received a promise of a rescue package to private equity firms Apollo global management and silverlake are buying a stake in the company for one point. Two billion dollars that alone however may not be enough to help it withstand the travel slump. So expedia is also borrowing another two billion dollars to give it more liquidity. The company says along with announcing the deal expedia also named Peter Kern as CEO observers say. Kern who has roots in private equity will be well suited to the moment meaning. He'll be comfortable cutting jobs and expenses. The big question of course is not just who will survive. But who will thrive after the pandemic crisis abates and investment in a travel business? Even at CEO prices could be seen as a positive sign. Long-term read Raymond a partner at Apollo Management said in a statement. Expedient is a world class company with an unparalleled collection of online travel brands. He added that the firm which will take a seat on expedience. Board looks forward to collaborating on expedia growth and innovation

Expedia Us Travel Association Peter Kern Diller CEO United States Blackford Corporate Strategy Diller Apollo Global Management Kobe BNB Orbitz Raymond Vice-Chair Chairman Partner Forbes
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 3 months ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

Voice First Health

07:40 min | 4 months ago

Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

"Have. I have a question here that was asked in the chat. And I love to get your take on it From a Bob Obser- retire dock and he says I'll just read it to hear. I think when all the data is in will find that the case fatality rate of Kobe. Nineteen will be similar to that of the seasonal flu. I believe the main problem. Is that both of these? Infectious DISEASES HAVE HIT THE WORLD. That about the same time. What are your thoughts on this hypothesis can can? You Monitor People's vital signs to predict the These situations earlier absolutely at Bob's creek question Terry. Great Question With with the proper human telemetry and I'm not saying we need to invent anything new. I'm not saying any of this is expensive. It's minor costs. You know the temperature sensors and you know gas sensors Terry. The these are all very expensive. I mean there's this just reading the gas emissions from somebody. I'm not talking what some people think. I'm talking about You can actually wind up figuring out the health of that person now. These are not in of themselves. The only clear sign of somebody being under a particular virus. But we can tell if they're ill or not ill certainly terry. I'm sure when you see somebody when you walk into a room the very first thing. I think you've been taught. Is How does a person present? What do they look like And and a lot of folks who are not in medicine. Don't really know this. They don't it's not necessarily in their wheelhouse of understanding so there's a physical present present moment of that person I have. Ai that can pretty much determine that a voice for a stay. I asleep with cameras that can determine that you present like you're sick not like you a hard night with the with the guy's a gal that you really are sick and there are things that we can look for. I'm not going to pretend to say what all these symptoms are. But you as a doctor know what they are The next thing is you know if we know through a biosensor that somebody is having temperature. Changes night sweats Not Sleeping. There's some illness. There's something taking place then through a process of elimination which is all this really is. All medicine is a process of elimination. And the best. Guess you're practicing medicine right so at some point you reach a determination. I mean even unfortunately scare anybody but even the Kobe nineteen aren't necessarily one hundred percent telling you that you have it or had it or we'll get it. It's just it's a it's a guess and I'm not trying to scare people I'm just saying there is no absolute anywhere in the world if he needed to take your test. Take a test right. But if you don't need to take tests don't take one because it's wasting everybody's time and effort So if we can electronially modern monitor people again hyper private hyper local shared with Dr. Only with permission you now have an early warning sign. Which if there is hopefully never but if there is another type of pandemic you're now being able to discover the illness gradients and and the Matrix distribution of a particular illness far greater Far Far higher in accuracy and for Greater and able to respond there is no reason. There's no reason for somebody to go out for example Self Quarantine for for example. There's a reason for somebody go out. Is If the last seventy two hours they they may not notice. I'm sure Terry you go and ask somebody have you had problems sleeping No not really get night sweats. No not really You know you feel like you have a temperature. No not I mean you get all these no not really because people may not be great observers of their own physical condition. Sometimes you're hyper observers. In a imagine things we know both spectrums but with a system of telemetry on these Biometric points you can know for a fact he can say well Bob. He looks like you've had problems sleeping. Looks like you were up nine times last night. Looks like you know you really got you know Six and a half minutes rem sleep you know and it looks like you've been really fluctuating wildly with your core temperature. I think you might have something. You know And now now you. That isn't that better. Terry than having somebody come in and present like. There's nothing wrong or Kim. The data's the answer right the data dancer and what you're describing is just as being able to collect all this data and having it being voice I I mean that's yeah because a patient could ask the voice for voice first device. Hey How am I doing you know I I mean I can literally do that right now. I'm working in a garage with a piggy bank. I can pretty much ask my assistant House my health today it can tell me what I ate what I didn't more or less when a modest You know it can certainly tell me most of my biometrics Through the telemetry It's not invasive. It's not on the Internet. Hack away you're never gonNA get to it because there's no connection. There's no Wifi but it can tell me about things that I may not have observed see. Empirical observation is the only tool humans have. It's the only real tool we have. You know and and that tool has allowed us to build everything you see around us. It's called science. It's called technology. We build it through empirical observation. Humans are great observers but not on everything all moments if you built systems that are incredible empirical observers. They will pick up points that we can not have the bandwidth to notice like no. I didn't sleep really well last night. Now that you mention it yeah. You're ready to toss and turn you right. Didn't get very much water. You're right. I am blinking a lot. More right Yeah I is a little pink. It feels like a little like sandpaper. Now look if before I even got into a car to go to an emergency room. You might ask me to do something else. There might be a biosensor for example in my bathroom. You might say hey. Brian hit the biosensor for me. You know Ame Ame really good. And hopefully there's no video on that and then you get now. What have you done to the medical system? You've taken the power of a doctor and you've now multiplied the power of a doctor to focus on. The one thing that they want to do is practice medicine and not practice filling out paperwork not practice putting on a bubble suit right now if you need to put a bubble suit on of course you're going to do that. But a lot of cases you don't really need to that person that just activated that sensor in a bathroom can now tell you if he does come in or she does come in that they don't have covert nineteen that they have something else and you don't have to be in a bubble suit they can come into a different door and they are not a potential vector for spread. See these are things that we are going to change one way or the other because the mindset of the

Terry Bob Obser Ame Ame Kobe Diseases Greater Brian KIM
Pleas to stop panic buying in Britain

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Pleas to stop panic buying in Britain

"You can rhyme and secretary George used as much of the public to shop responsibly there is enough food to go around adult food supply chain is able to expand production to cope with the increased amount and exhausted nurse who works for the UK's National Health Service posted an emotional plea on Facebook urging people to stop panic buying she was unable to find basic items following a forty eight hour shift they were looking I don't see it hello is just to open it ladies the government has the news and the limits on delivery drivers hours and lifted the nine time delivery curfews so stores can restock more quickly zero Shockley London

UK Facebook Shockley London Secretary George National Health Service
Italian doctor estimates 60% of Bergamo population has coronavirus

Chris Krok

01:09 min | 5 months ago

Italian doctor estimates 60% of Bergamo population has coronavirus

"Also are one of the doctors are in the in in Italy that's in the middle of this that was talking the Wall Street journal he's seen all sorts of disasters in Haiti Chad Kurdistan Ivory Coast and he's in Bergen which is one of most was his wealthiest area nicest newest hospitals there he estimates that around sixty percent or more of the population of Birkenau has coronavirus sixty percent of Bergen he estimates has coronavirus what in god's name are you not understanding about this the death notices in the Bergen echo which is the paper there normally take up over a page just over a page on Monday they filled nine pages so nine times the death notice and by the way I did see the the contagious contagion whatever rate and it it literally is like approximately two times the contagious contagious nis America board of that than the than the regular flu it is two times more contagious than the

Italy Wall Street Journal Chad Kurdistan Ivory Coast Bergen Birkenau Haiti America FLU
Maintaining A Sense of Humor

WCRI Flash Brief

02:05 min | 5 months ago

Maintaining A Sense of Humor

"Hey Show Ken Russell. Well Country Museum Today maintaining humor this is going to be working for you on two different levels volume. Is that you're going to be dealing with a lot of high stress situation in the more stretchy bill. That's weren't angry. Get were frustrated. You are less healthy in general. I mean straight up. I assume we're looking at your psychology as measure for your physiology but sometimes when you're undergoing last dress Bodies doing and because that your body sends basically suffer for it. This means a house to maintain some level of decorum some love mental stability in order to maintain a certain level. Help humorous definitely gonNA play a major role in that because you real. Sometimes you can't get away to go after that punching bags times situations you say. Wait where you're out. You can't go to your missile unhappy clay. You know that place basically go out and just simply Rica's much havoc on things is possible just sometime unique beginning right where you're at nuclear way to get through it. Humorous definitely GONNA help first off. I recommend watching. Sitcoms GRA hobbies teams tracking on Youtube. All the funny stuff heck recommend keeping track in means something funny flash back on. You're you're speaking hard time. Those jokes are going to help. Extend your patients and a little bit of leeway when it comes young people unless get real going feeble major source of conflict in another it self at the same time. You should definitely be developing some sort of sense of sarcasm because at sarcasm is going to help you nine times out of ten. Sometimes you need to look at any going small doses and letting go with a stick burn is definitely a great way to get rid of it on top of that you can get a little bit of support from people around you and that support also helps to ameliorate whatever Time WHEN IT COMES DOWN TO GO OUT. Memorize all those jokes Keith. Amman Pas and using whatever you need to also developed sarcasm have a little bit of fun with it especially in crowd straight up keeping Mateen. Ask to humor then. You're going to be funny. You're being a lot healthier than you were. Previously

Ken Russell Well Country Museum Amman Pas Rica Keith Mateen
Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

American Fashion Podcast

11:04 min | 5 months ago

Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

"The Workforce Development Institute is a nonprofit organization headquartered out of Albany and troy but we cover ten regions of New York. State So I I cover. The New York City region are broad mission is to help. New Yorkers obtaining keep good jobs So we do that in a number of ways. We're a convener for a great conversations that help of Industry Job Seekers We connect Entities to one another for sources of technical assistance and funding We're we provide grants in some cases to both manufacturers and Don Profit organizations that train job seekers As well as supporting unions so In my role as the New York City regional director in my in the piece of my work that focuses on supporting manufacturing I kind of naturally focused on the apparel manufacturing sector because there were many many needs Facing those companies but really we help Manufacturers across the board and get involved in lots of different workforce initiatives. Your question about what is Workforce Development For for the Fashion Business was workforce development. Sure will I think we're I think it applies to generally as well as for the fashion. Business really workforce development is looking at both the skill needs of employers to be able to remain competitive and You know produce. In the case of manufacturing produce their product sufficiently and it's also the need for skill development for job seekers and training programs that address those needs and allows people to earn a living wage and have a good quality job. So it's really both both those things in the apparel manufacturing sector there are lots of challenges around that A lot of that related to the store. Ecole offshoring of the industry And then some such subsequent growth in some reassuring but really different challenges and needs a major real estate crisis here in New York City and so I think a lot of apparel manufacturers are in what I would call survival mode They're not really able to focus much on training their incumbent workforce as they probably would like to. They're wearing so many hats they're juggling so many things they're dealing with a rising rents many of them have to move multiple times because they're Leeson's and they try to fund a new lease so they're just many many pain points for Apparel Manufacturers in particular and that's an area where I've tried to focus on providing some assistance to those companies. Now is it normal for a state to provide this? Is this something. That's in all fifty. It's actually really unusual and when I meet with people in other states there especially manufacturers. They're kind of jealous that. Wd exists in New York state. So the way our funding works is that we We're funded by the state Senate and so- senators Put Our budget request into the state budget every year and hopefully Nine Times edits ahead and we. We don't get cut at all and the GOVERNOR OKAYS OUR BUDGET. And so that's that's how that works but we are an independent nonprofit but we do rely on The state legislature who CNN. For the work that we do and so have continued to push for that support for us. We're grateful for that. So many of our listeners are from other states. Would it be possible for another state to also fund your organization and and get your resources into their? I mean we are very much near state. Focus but certainly We DO GET INVOLVED. Nationally in some initiatives so we we look at Look workforce strategies and we some of our staff do attend conferences and other states and kind of share our lessons learned here in New York. Stay so we're Very happy to share expertise and You Know Lease Organization of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Was at their conference in Pittsburgh a year and a half ago. And so I you know we. We do kind of collaborate with folks in other states that are doing related work and try and share best practice and this may be pretty obvious question but why does the fashion business need workforce development. What's why do people need to be trained for for new jobs in the fashion business? Well for anybody sure. Why don't someone else someone else can weigh in? And I can jump in after that. I think when we talk about made in. Us initiatives in this country You know trade union professionals manufacturers all talk about the bottleneck being just a labor shortage in general and I think very simply put. That's because a lot of people don't WANNA working garment factories. They they have the vision of that as like Norma. Rae Standing on top of the you know the the spinning machine. And it's not that anymore so I think that's one problem and I think the second problem is that there's new equipment coming into factories and that requires people to have different skill sets than they might have had being a traditional sewing machine operator or cutter on a factory floor. The other thing I would add is much of the sustained job losses that were faced by the manufacturing sector came from a parallel textile. And still there are families that over generations watch watched opportunities get washed out So that's I think fueling in part the perception gap that there aren't opportunities Associated with the sewn trades and then additionally when you have job losses of those Of that magnitude You have a workforce apparatus that gets dismantled and so we have a lot of rebuilding to do as a city And really this is true of cities. Nationally To reinvigorate Not only the hearts and minds of people thinking about opportunities in this own trades but also the underlying workforce infrastructure that supports those firms. And I think also we're seeing right. Now is a resurgence of small lot production which is really where. New York City thrives. We've ton of small factories can get quick production into the market. And what we're faced with right now is a generational gap. We have sores. Were aging out of the workforce. And nobody's coming up behind them so if we're going to continue to be able to keep up with the demand of small production we do need to be looking forward. The people who are going to be retiring and replacing them in the workforce. And if somebody goes into this as their job if they get the training is it going to be a good paying job for a long time? Because I think that would be a question most people would have. I won't I'm going to be trained to be a professional sewer that is is that a career absolutely. It's a great job and the sewers. I mean at me mill so me Mills. I work within the Millennium Mills Office in Sunset Park so we are kind of a for profit nonprofit partnership and our soldiers have been with us for fifteen years and they're amazing they get paid well and they get benefits and I think that's increasingly becoming the norm. I feel as if there needs to be new value or renewed value. Put on sewing pattern making and just the trade in general. So what made you was it? What made you identify this need and start to train. And how did you? How did you even start the training? Can I call it a school or kind of all came about when we moved out to sunset park and you know I had been working in a garment production factory before this bridal and then moved over to handling Molina's production and I really wanted to open my own factory and I I couldn't find people to so and I was trying to navigate this very complex way of word of mouth trying to find through our sewers and other sewer who might know someone who might know somebody else who needed a job for a week you know. It's this really really cumbersome process and what I realized was the people who were hiring were in their sixties and they WANNA and worked for two days a week and that's not really what we needed. We needed a full-time sour and we need multiple fulltime sewers. So I came up with this program I it's built in modules and it's in three languages currently so I can train in Spanish Mandarin and English in part. Because of the millennials team We Have Cantonese Mandarin and Spanish speakers on staff so they really helped me a ton and it's been incredibly gratifying to see how people take to selling and the confidence that comes with it and how factories where we play students are responding to it. I think people are really excited to get new people in and help them and foster their development and I just like to add that so. Wd I funded Course of trade. Because we saw that I mean I've been visiting garment factories for the last four years and I'm consistently hearing about a need for skilled sewers In my kind of investigations into this Really students aren't learning those industrial skills anymore. And even at the C. T. E. Highschool secured at technical education high schools. Students are learning some of those skills. But they're really really. They're all choosing to go into a career as a fashion designer for the most part so there hasn't been that emphasis on those industrial skills as much as there was in the past. So there's been a real lack of training programs. I spent a couple years trying to look into. What are the training programs How could we put something together? Is there a factory that would loan their space in the evening or could we do it at the high school? Fit's labs are so oversubscribed. It's very difficult to schedule. Training programs they are for adult learners. So got introduced to Libyan heard about the training that she had developed and we were really excited to put some funding toward that to be able so so that she could train more people and fill more of those open roles. Lisa helped us get sixteen new machines which is

New York City Workforce Development New York Workforce Development Institut Fashion Business Apparel Manufacturers Don Profit United States CNN Senate Albany Regional Director Troy Leeson Ecole Offshoring Nine Times Sunset Park Lease Organization Pittsburgh
Q&A: Coronavirus expert speaks about the spread of COVID-19 Pandemic

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

12:05 min | 5 months ago

Q&A: Coronavirus expert speaks about the spread of COVID-19 Pandemic

"So I'm really confused as to what the difference between a pandemic an epidemic is regardless of. Whatever you call it. People are starting to panic us. Everyone just going to be working remotely and avoiding travel for the foreseeable future. So just how serious is the corona virus situation really for you personally? There's no question. There is not really a sector of our society that has not been impacted by what has happened over. The last several weeks having covered a lot of these outbreaks over the last twenty years. I knew that the economy would be affected. But I don't think anyone could have predicted. Just how badly corona virus fears coupled with an oil price war with tank the markets. What is clear? Is that investors parents. Just about everyone is getting spooked. Look some of it is warranted in. Some of it is not and today. We're GONNA explain why I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Let's start at the beginning or at least as close to the beginning as possible. In December of last year a novel or New Virus started circulating in China and over the last three months virus spread to nearly one hundred countries in regions around the world. More than one hundred thousand people have been infected and around. Four thousand have died when you hear. The global fatality rate is around four percent. Now you have a rough idea of where they get those numbers. Let's also define some terms that are increasingly being used by public? Health officials and I will preface by saying sometimes they sound scarier than they are for example. You may have noticed that. Cnn shifted its terminology yesterday and started calling the ongoing corona virus situation. A pandemic truth is many public. Officials have been telling us that it meets the criteria for a pandemic for some time and I will share those criteria with you in a moment but still we thought long and hard about using this word. This is not a decision. We take lightly. We don't WANNA cause panic. We simply want everyone to be prepared. Individuals hospital systems cities and the country. So let me get some of your questions question. One first things first. What is a pandemic honestly? There isn't a universally agreed upon definition which was surprising to me. Many will describe it. Generally speaking as an outbreak that has spread to several countries incontinence. It typically affects a large number of people. Harvard epidemiologist Mark Lipstick. Says it helps to call a a horse a horse. I think it helps clarify that. It's not a series of locally contained outbreaks and when we see more cases it's not because necessarily those cases just appeared. It's finally testing them. I think the reporting to some extent has been that there are a few hundred cases at most the United States and that you know every day the number goes up a little bit when in fact there may be quite a number of more cases. Testing is critical here and with increased testing. We will certainly have increased numbers of those diagnosed with the infection but that is good news and bad news. The bad news is that the numbers will go up. The good news. Is that many of the people who test positive may not be that ill. And that will bring down that fatality ratio. Remember those numbers. We discussed earlier say that instead of four thousand people dying out of one hundred thousand which is a four percent fatality rate. Say instead it was four thousand people dying out of two hundred thousand. That would be two percent fatality rate. You get it. So it's more people test positive. It may bring that fatality ratio down. Also another important thing about a pandemic is that it does not necessarily mean. The symptoms of an illness are more serious or that the disease is more deadly. The three general criteria for a pandemic are a virus that can cause illness or death sustained person to person transmission of that virus and evidence of spread throughout the world. And that's what we're seeing with the novel Corona Virus. Right now question too. So why is CNN calling this pandemic now? Well words matter on Monday morning we made the decision that many epidemiologists and public health experts had already made to call the novel. Chronic virus pandemic essentially. We checked the final box. We already knew the virus was out there and we recently learned there was community spread after carefully evaluating the global picture. It is now clear. There is spread around the world in one day last week. The number of new cases outside of China was nearly nine times higher than the number of new cases in China. This virus has found a foothold on every continent except for Antarctica and in several countries the number of cases continues to climb again just to reiterate calling it. A pandemic doesn't necessarily mean it's more deadly. It's just more widespread so here. Cnn We knew using the word pandemic was a big decision. But we think it was the right one. Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Thinks the focus should be on what we do going. Forward people call that a pandemic is. Cnn would call a pandemic whol quo pin them. It's not GonNa make any difference with what we do. That's the point instead of people getting all bent out of shape about what you call it. It's a serious situation for sure. Question three so how does calling this a pandemic change things in terms of our response when something is considered a pandemic? It means that we've moved beyond this idea that we can simply contain the virus and now all the focus is on slowing the spread as much as possible. So that would be switching gears from containment to mitigation. Us Surgeon General. Dr Jerome Atoms explained this in an appearance on CNN state of the Union. This past Sunday. Initially we had a posture of containment. So that we could give people time to prepare for where we are right now. Now we're shifting into a mitigation faith which means that we're helping communities understand you're going to see more cases unfortunately you're going to see more deaths but that doesn't mean that we should panic but again it does mean that it is time to start preparing some countries around the world are taking drastic measures some of the largest quarantines ever recorded in history have taken place over the last few months. I in China and now in Italy where the entire country is in a state of lockdown could be recommended in the United States schools might be closed and mass gatherings cancelled in your town. It might mean changes at work or how you work as in working from home it might mean putting off a family vacation or catching up over the phone instead of getting together question for do we have the infrastructure to support this pandemic doctor. I think of the medical infrastructure first nurses doctors hospital beds. Icu beds and I am a little worried about that. For example if lots of medical staff get exposed to the virus and need to be quarantined. We could start to quickly have a shortfall at. Cnn's corona virus townhall last week. I asked Ron Clean about this clean. Was the Ebola response coordinator. Under PRESIDENT OBAMA GETTING OUR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM. Ready for this influx of cases is something we should be doing now. We saw China they. They built temporary hospitals. They really flexed up their capacity. And I think this is the point. We all need to think about the possible impact on our healthcare system is something we should be using this time. We'll cases ramp up to really get ready for the US Department of Health and Human Services is estimating that if this becomes even a moderate pandemic at least two hundred thousand people in the United States could need intensive care. Problem is at the moment. Are Hospitals have fewer than one hundred thousand beds in intensive care units and many of them are being used because we are in the middle of flu season and will need more equipment on hand as well like breathing machines again estimates are that we would need around sixty five thousand breathing machines and we have just barely enough with again? Many being currently used this is all a fundamental part of pandemic preparedness. And we need to be working to address these deficiencies and plan ahead question. Five should the elderly be afraid so many listeners have reached out to ask about their parents and their grandparents. And you know what? I've been speaking to my own parents every day down in Florida. Older people are worried understandably. We've been talking about the elderly in general terms as an at risk population. But I WANNA be clear about who that means when the CDC talks about older adults. They're really referring to anyone sixty years or older. Starting at age sixty there is increasing risk of disease and the risk increases with age the highest risk of serious illness and death people older than eighty years. That's Dr Nancy Mess and the Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and respiratory disease. She was speaking in a teleconference on Monday. People who are at greatest risk are those who are older and you also have serious long term. Health conditions like diabetes heart disease or lung disease. You might not feel old if you're in your sixties but you do need to take precautions. Dr Anthony FAUCI warned. Even younger people need to think about the safety of older adults they interact with eighty percent of people will do well if they don't have any underlying conditions but you may get infected and then come home and infect your grandmother or grandfather who does have an underlying condition so each family unit each individual has the look about not only the risk for themselves but what risks will they putting the people around them in but just because you're older or have an underlying condition that doesn't mean it's fatal or that you'll even get seriously sick. It means you need to be prepared and take precautions. Use Good Judgment. Stay home as much as possible. Avoid crowded areas especially now and for the next several weeks. Stay away from sick people even if it is a granddaughter or grandson who you haven't seen in a while and if you do get sick you need to get tested and you need to seek treatment. The World Health Organization's Director General Pedro Adam gave races offered some optimistic words yesterday. Now that the virus has a foothold in so many countries that threat of abundance has become very real but it would be the first fund music in history that could be controlled. The bottom line is we are not at the mercy of the virus. The bottom line is humanity has overcome pandemics before in this globally connected world. We may be asked to add more social distance between one another but that doesn't mean we still can't collectively come together as a nation and as a world we'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening.

CNN China United States Dr Anthony Fauci Director Dr Sanjay Gupta Us Department Of Health And Hu National Institute Of Allergy World Health Organization Harvard CDC First Things First FLU Dr Jerome Atoms Antarctica
YouTube TV: drop all sports channels please

Talking Tech

02:13 min | 5 months ago

YouTube TV: drop all sports channels please

"We're here to talk pocketbook stuff today on talking tech that you've heard me say over the last few months how concerned I am with both the rising cost of cable and streaming youtube. Tv cost thirty five dollars monthly in twenty nineteen. Now it's fifty dollars monthly. The reason all those sports fees that. I don't WanNA participate in so I found it rather bittersweet this week when Youtube announced it was dumping some forty two regional teams from its network due to excess pricing demands from Sinclair Broadcast Group. Which owns the streaming rights to games from the New York Yankees in La Kings for example? Good Move Youtube. But where does this leave us? I got some ideas. I'm Jefferson Graham. And you're listening to talking Tech Youtube. Tv is one of a handful of cable. Tv alternatives aimed at streaming fans. Who want to pay less for fewer channels than cable. I'm a youtube subscriber and the last I look. I'm still paying fifty dollars monthly for the service which as good as it is is still drastically overpriced. I liked it. I get the broadcast networks and the news channels but there are so many channels. I will never watch from cozy and Smithsonian to TNT TBS and especially the sports channels. I don't know where they are. I've never turn them on. Don't kill me but there's some of us who just aren't interested in sports and happened. Feel strongly that they shouldn't have to pay for it if they don't watch that's why I like Filo td a streaming service aimed at non sports fans with sells for twenty dollars monthly. How do they do it? No sports fees. Well that's all well and good but there's no news channels either and I need that so scratch. Filo Youtube decision to stand firm against the rising costs of sports is a good one but because it didn't lower the monthly fee doesn't help me so. I have an idea. Get rid of all the sports all of it. Put It on a separate here for the fan. Who wants the programming? Let me subscribe to Youtube for what I want. I'll be happy and not subject to the endless contract battles which nine times out of ten seemed to involve sports fees. I know I'm dreaming here. But it's my dream and I'm entitled to

Filo Youtube Youtube Filo New York Yankees Sinclair Broadcast Group Jefferson Graham La Kings
I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

The Breakdown with Shaun King

09:57 min | 6 months ago

I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

"I don't say this from a place of privilege is quite the opposite. It comes from a real place of pain but Mike Bloomberg is the line that I simply will not cross. I can't here's what you may not know and if you are a supporter of Mike Bloomberg. I'm assuming you don't know this Mike. Bloomberg directly caused real pain real trauma in harm to people that I know personally people that I love and call my friend. That's not rhetoric. I'm telling you that. His decisions his policies his personal directives ruined the actual lives of countless men. Women boys girls and families all over New York City in many of them will never recover. Here's the thing. Because social media did not exist on the scale that it exists today during most of his time as mayor of New York from two thousand and two until two thousand thirteen with his final year in office being the literal year before the Black Lives Matter Movement began. Bloomberg narrowly escaped the nationwide public accountability and scrutiny. But he no doubt would have received in any subsequent year after he left office and as a result. New Yorkers particularly black and Brown New Yorkers have something akin to a collective P. T. S. D. over the harmony cost and. I don't want what I'm about to tell you to be a twenty reasons not to vote for Bloomberg type of peace. Those things out there. I just need you to understand the size scope scale in vile nature of the twelve years where Bloomberg personally oversaw in turbo charged a citywide stop and Frisk policy. Let me break down Britain epic. Bring it bears. What Mike Bloomberg did in his twelve years in office as mayor of New York City was the closest thing the United States has got to Jim Crow Apartheid South Africa in our lifetime. Now Bloomberg will tell you that. Hey everything I did. Existed before him that would be like saying prisons existed before the explosion of mass incarceration from nineteen seventy five until today yeah. Prisons existed but on a scale that was on par with the rest of the developed. Worl see from eighteen. Seventy to nineteen seventy the United States consistently incarcerated fewer than two hundred fifty thousand people per year. Today we incarcerate over two point five million people on any given day and over ten million people per year it's exploded so yes prisons existed before nineteen seventy yes a policy of stop and Frisk existed before Bloomberg took office. But he exploded. That's what he did. When he became mayor he grew it and expanded exponentially. Just give me a minute to explain it to you. In the twelve years Bloomberg was in office he ordered the NYPD. I need you to understand these figures. He ordered the NYPD to stop and Frisk people almost exclusively black and brown people a staggering five million eighty one thousand six hundred eighty nine times. Are you listening to me? And those are just stops. That police officers actually documented. Some people believe the actual numbers could be twice as high completely innocent. People were strip searched. Punched kicked slammed beaten groped. Tasers choked in shot in these stops drugs were planted. People were framed in tens of thousands of people. Every single year or arrested sent to rikers for crimes. They did not commit then eventually released without ever even going to court. Some people spent days in jail where they lost their jobs. Single parents lost custody of their kids. Others they did and spend days in rikers but they spend weeks months and even years for crimes they didn't commit. And while they were there in rikers like a young man a teenage boy named Khalif browder. They were beaten and tortured by both guards and inmates alike forced into solitary confinement for years on end then simply released without even an explanation. When Khalif Browder was released he was broken and took his own life. Experts say tens of thousands of other innocent men women and children were either cokes by prosecutors and police enter taking plea deals so that they could simply be released for time served or just chose to take the deals simply so that they could escape the madness of the jail only to be released from rikers back into Bloomberg's New York where they were routinely stopped and frisked again and again and again some individuals were stopped and frisked by the NYPD. Over a hundred different times. Can you imagine now when I say over a hundred times? I'm not using that number one hundred as a euphemism for a lot. I mean they were literally in stopped literally searched and stopped by the NYPD over one hundred times as parents and activists and organizers and preachers in mental health experts in justice reform advocates in constitutional lawyers all begged and pleaded with Bloomberg to stop. He were a few people met with him personally demanding that he stop begging that he stopped. They marched and protested in New York dozens of times. They interrupted his events in some of the smartest most persistent legal groups in the nation sued the Bloomberg Administration over and over and over again to stop these unlawful practices in a federal judge that Dean Bloomberg's stop and Frisk policies that deemed that they were indeed a modern day apartheid for black and Brown New Yorkers. She found that countless constitutional violations existed as she ordered an immediate halt to what he had done for nearly twelve years and even then he fought back against it and refuse to immediately implement the charges and changes rather that she demanded now when Bloomberg left office and his stop and Frisk was no longer a policy. Crime actually plummeted year after year after year. His racist policies that he said he had in place to make New York. Safer didn't make New York safer at all. New York got safer after stop and Frisk ended. All he had done was caused real terror to millions and millions of people and after this man Left Office. Bloomberg bragged about the policy and defended it with all his might. That's why in Twenty fifteen. He asked the staff at the SNOOTY Aspen Institute to turn off the cameras when he spoke there in bragged about how police withrow black and brown boys against the walls. All in the name of making New York City safer. He knew what he was saying was ugly. Have you heard that audio? Those kids that he's talking about and their mothers and fathers and siblings were not just humiliated by such an awful practice it shattered many of them and Bloomberg literally defended all of this after the policy had stopped after it was ruled unconstitutional. He defended it deep into twenty nineteen right up until he decided to run for president. And here's the thing. I have dedicated my life to fighting back against Donald Trump and his policies. I have campaign to oust horrible politicians and have helped elect bold promising new ones all over the country. I've endangered my family in pursuit of tracking down and bringing White Supremacist Neo Nazis. To justice so yes. Donald Trump is our mortal enemy and I work directly with the people in communities that his evil has impacted the most he must be defeated and he can be. I will not support one oppressor to another one. I want to

Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg New York City Bloomberg Administration Nypd Khalif Browder United States Donald Trump President Trump Britain Snooty Aspen Institute Withrow Black T. S. D. Jim Crow South Africa
Oscars 2020: who will have the biggest night?

John Williams

09:44 min | 6 months ago

Oscars 2020: who will have the biggest night?

"Are the Oscars are this weekend who are you rooting for anybody on your list I like once upon a time in Hollywood I just thought that was a great film I love the cast awesome stuff several nominations for that film bills worker is joining us now long time energy reporter for the sun times still with five Chicago is a contributor and bill has followed many many many Oscars lot but you know I always loved about you bill you you follow the local entertainment scene so well and always told us such interesting nuggets about what was going on here well that's true I've always loved you know I mean I think that's important I think it as we all know how they moved in this world of of the current the twenty first century media I think local local local is the way to cope in general because I think that's what people really want to get because they can get you know the national stories from other outlets but but this is an interesting year at all well it's always interesting with the Academy Awards although I do think in certain categories is here there's there's some things that are pretty well said but I know we think of course they're going to go again this year without it without a without a whole list which I don't think it's a terrible thing I think you know well I'll tell you why I think so often unless you get somebody like Billy crystal who's always knocks the you know the ball out of the park I think over the years I think will be colder did a good job we recently had our critic's guide Bible to the critics choice awards which of the broadcast broadcast critics and you know we had two days he did a wonderful job and I think because he didn't try to overdo it you know came out was charming and didn't you know try to be too cute but I think sometimes I think people want to see who's going to win they want to see the presenters I don't think they want a lot of big production numbers and all those give me some wonderful musical numbers at the Oscars you know your health Elton John performing in and you know it's gonna be really quite quite wonderful in the court system the result of a few people who really are talented musically but it's gonna be interesting to see what happens on Sunday I can say I disagree too but I'd like the host I guess you're right but what okay what is a good host was a good house because right some of the host I kind of remember the Anne Hathaway that was a disaster and as much as I loved you know but she yeah I do too but she what that wasn't right for her at all and James Franco I think the the combo wasn't right and that yeah then they tried to do so many acts that an already long ceremony got longer and longer right letterman was not successful either you know so I mean and and I love him but I mean I just it's just a very tough job I will say that so I think sometimes a safe way to go is with out the host and we'll see how it goes David Letterman wasn't wanted the Oprah uma uma Oprah right rumors were rolling their eyes he's like I got to go and I got a key thing is we we didn't work we actually have some audio here from Billy crystal because he was just on Jimmy Kimmel okay crystal has hosted the Oscars I think nine times total nine times jingle himself is hosted the Oscars twice yes yeah he did a good job he did so the two of them had thoughts about the hostess Oscars here's here's what they had to say I always loved being out there I I loved the guess the trusts you know that the movie academy had a made to to get me out that I always I felt like there was a great honor to do it and I think that when you have a show that's as long as it is is going to happen and I think the problem with the no hosting perhaps is that there's not somebody out there to capitalize on that moment ledge view had when the wrong Best Picture right who could forget that the one that's right but he does make a good point there he does make a good point that you can can bring it into the moment and and capitalize on it that is a very good point I hadn't thought of that someone says something that you can sort of have fun with right that just sort of right out there and then they bring it back and make everybody sort of laugher connect over that moment we just had a listener say six three oh what about the la la land fiasco that would be weird without a host because sort of look at each other like what that would that would have been terrible and and then on a lighter note I mean it's great when you have somebody you know when when Jack Palance remember that the one arm push up you know on the sages many years ago and of course and you know Billy came out and made a great joke about it because you know those are the things that you love love to see happen yeah my favorite also I think was on my list of favorites I should say Ellen DeGeneres remember that a normal than the selfie she took and then when she was busting Steven Spielberg around a telephone tell take the picture you know when I could change my point of view you're either going to go maybe on your side your honor but you know I heard you it coming in when you talk about once upon a time in Hollywood that really was one of my favorite favorite movies of the year I see like bill if this one is sort of got a little bit of an unfair advantage because it seems like one of those movies that people in the industry natural sort of are drawn to because it has history of historical factor I know it's sort of a bag I would love to see it with but it's it's one of my favorite but I think all of the momentum seems to be from the directors guild of the producers guild all of the different wards have been happened sounds like it's going to be nineteen seventeen which I liked very much but technically it had some incredible you know incredible beautiful moments but my favorite if I was going to pick one it would be once upon a time in Hollywood or parasite which of course is going to win trust me it's gonna win best foreign film the people that are further further Oscar parties if they want to fill out there if you get if you get some of those lesser known categories right you can win the Oscar Poole I've no I bet it's true that's a good strategy that's true yes I have eight one five Oscars praying for no politics I need a break yeah what do you think we all do I think we all do and I think that will be that's one thing that I hope we do have because I think after what we've all gone through in this country in the last few weeks I think yes no politics is a very good suggestion but it's interesting because in terms of all the acting categories I think they're pretty well locked into a whole I think it is going to win and I think most people do what do you think what you got for best supporting actress I think well that's what the one category where there could be a surprise in the usually is a surprise the one category excuse me would be best supporting actress because even though most people think it's gonna be Laura Dern was terrific as a divorce lawyer in marriage story you know who could possibly slip in there because he has won a few things as far as people from little women who played one of the daughters and that's one category but I do think it's gonna be Laura Dern for best Supporting Actor it's Brad Pitt as one everything is beloved by many people in Hollywood you know it's sort of his his year in his time and I think that's a pretty much of a lock in for Best Actress it's it's I think pretty much going to be Renee Zellweger for Judy plank Judy Garland and although I would look I would be disappointed if there was a real real upset here in Jersey ronin from little women one because I think she's terrific but they're all these categories have great nominees and of course for Best Actor again it's probably going to be Joaquin Phoenix because again he won everything so far incredible performance I didn't see G. R. A. Renee Zellweger in Judy but I didn't know that that was not universally loved by critics no it was not what happened there was everybody pretty much loved her I mean I agree with this the movie itself was just sort of you know just so so I think the reason she's basically the nominee the only nominee for that movie there may be a cost and it might be a minor on the minor categories I shouldn't call minor but one of the most popular categories but the movie itself was not great she was what made the movie yeah I you know I I didn't see that because of sort of the reviews the main one that would be worth revisiting because I loved her and that was the online series where she was the rich woman who is trying to convince people a little comes of age is he was a recent series streaming and she was phenomenal and I just remember and she sings herself I mean the fact that she you know somebody's like a voice like garland which everybody knows so well the fact that you do your own singing I think is also a major push any and there's so many scenes in this movie you look and you think it's actually Judy Garland on stage and screen excuse me so I think it's and that's pretty much of a lock but there again you know you never that's pictures that that was one I mean I think it's probably going to be nineteen seventeen but I would be happy with virtually any of those you know that are up there there's nine nominees you know because they changed the rules a few years ago but you know a lot of talk this year the parasite which definitely is gonna win best foreign film it might be the first year that the best foreign film also wins Best Picture that would be somewhat of an upset but that would be a fascinating thing to see what is the Netflix series that Renee Zellweger was and I was trying to remember to remember bill out we only have a minute here but if you if you are going to the movies this weekend as I know some people do when they try to say Hey I'm gonna catch up on some of these Oscar nominated films what what was one of the films you would suggest the probably not many people have gone to I think I don't know I think first of all I think you know probably nineteen seventeen I think it's it's a kind of a tough movie to watch many ways but I think that that that seems to be the front runner for Best Picture if you haven't seen once upon a time in Hollywood definitely catch that and I'll tell you a parasite is be the third one because that is such it's got a real twist to it I can't tell you much and I would give it away but it that would be the film that is probably the one most unique dark comedy that come down the pike in a long time okay you got my attention on that I'm gonna check that one out bills record thank you so much for checking in with us at any time good to hear your voice same

Hollywood Reporter Chicago Bill
"nine times" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"nine times" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Eighteen ninety nine time again for KCBS traffic and we check that Thursday get away and this update by the way is sponsored by the cross the mattress company let's check back with him we'll go to the five eighty right we have a couple of the problems that in Pleasanton actually counter commute westbound five eighty after hacienda there's a crash of blocking the right lane also westbound five eighty after foothill San Ramon we have an accident blocking the second lane from the left east bound to pass that to say both of those accidents was already heavy so it's slowing at traffic down further in that both directions anti Castro valley on five eighty eastbound a stalled car after eating canyon road second lane from the left the children autobody collision camp tracking troubles in the South Bay with Jonathan this is been a really bad day for highway eighty five south on your union Avenue an accident clearing out of the right lane it's been there for an hour traffic through the West Valley pretty much back to ball the way an amount to be on to the Bayshore freeway to eighty south on another really bad day stop and go Los Altos hills into downtown San Jose I'm going problems in Palo alto on the bay shore an accident slow to clear north down one one between San Antonio road in the organ expressway there were three cars there and that's why traffic stand up jammed up still in both directions and north bound to so from two thirty seven south bend also heavy from about marsh road your next update five fifty eight on the traffic leader KCBS means any sleep world six day forecast we're gonna check it out with KPIX five severe impact okay it's going to be cold Friday morning temperatures are gonna bottom out down in the low and mid thirties if you are in line we.

Pleasanton San Ramon Castro valley South Bay West Valley San Jose Palo alto KCBS Los Altos hills San Antonio
"nine times" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 8 months ago

"nine times" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Nine times nine times we go back thirty three for problem from an inmate Fuhrman the sausage king of Chicago I'd like to get through to the washroom Gail was someplace else the restaurant not an alley Hey maybe we want to be free is to be go to church and a male ski Adamson here Adler yeah Anderson Anderson here dealer Bueller Bueller Bueller it is a whole lot of money you pretty black and saying you you get to pay for what to arrest comes to me maybe because we don't look like tell me they're okay two ninety one seventy two hundred we love from here to here from you tonight and why you think Ferris are clearly how I should move on in studio tonight the rep for Ferris Bueller's day off sometimes film critic and all around movie celebrity Richard Roeper Richard thanks for being here Dustin so happy to be here to talk about Ferris Bueller's day off for the.

Chicago Gail Adamson Ferris Bueller Dustin Fuhrman Adler Anderson Anderson Richard Roeper Richard
"nine times" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Widows and nine times the rate of couples who stay married so here's my financial tip if your marriage is struggling get financial counseling get marital counseling because the financial effects of divorce are truly staggering so this is interesting the share of poverty in people age sixty three an older twenty six point nine percent are great divorced women eleven point four percent or gray divorced men eighteen percent our early divorced women timbres an early version only three point four percent of those who were continuously married a three point one percent remarried after early divorce three point three percent remarried after gray divorce so even the most successful people can be thrown off by divorce a twenty sixteen paper in the journal of financial economics found that both splitting up and getting married hurt the performance of hedge fund managers marriage and divorce deeply are deeply personal events to distract from injures their investment duties managers underperform by four point three percent a year in the six months around to break up and continue to lag behind two point three percent annually for up to two years after the war so if you're looking for a mutual fund here's an interesting kept from Bloomberg make sure your fund manager stays married presumably divorces could also.

bloomberg
"nine times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Cops dirty nine times out of ten partners to speak my language. Till nine everybody. The nine nine nine or in there. We from walking talking. So often have this idea to drive in the car pool lane or to make myself able to drive in the carpool lane. How do you do that? Why not put a mannequin in that passenger city because it's a legal illegal legal Spiegel. What? This guy was this guy was cited. Yes, I didn't know that that was a legal in Arizona department of public safety actually tweeted a picture of the guy who was pulled over on state route to two for having a dummy in the passenger seat like a mannequin dressed up as a person in the passenger see while driving into carpool you've done this with a fake baby. Well, no that wasn't a fake. But it was no actually there was a bassinet a car seat. I don't know you can call that never get your kids. Back your lane. You drive by a cop, and you reach back as to tend to the baby not in said bassinet will the state patrolman in Washington. He was standing on the side of the road. It was one of those exits HOV only so there's nobody in that lane of traffic that should be alone. And I was one hundred percent alone. But I did have the car seat in the back. So I reached over and grabbed a toy that was on the floor of the the floor of the back seat. And I held it over like I was trying to entertain the kids we buy and as I drove by he could see it in the back window that there was no baby in the seat. But he just applauded.

Arizona Washington one hundred percent
"nine times" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

"Brewed with home grown. It's a lot of beers. That is a lot of beers beers nine times. But there's a lot. He's busy cranking. It safe to say they're going for a farm people or hard working people. Yes. But I think in front of us. We got a nice variety of colors. We get a nice variety of flavors really wears clear summer hazy summer, they call it in the cool ship. I don't. Wow, weird phrasing. Descriptions Davis is. Maybe. How to spell Kip ski? Mayb skips. King poughkeepsie. Skipped us. We will be we'll get to the beers in just a minute. Welcome back. Everyone. Taste like amazing. It is amazing. We're talking about some beers. Well, we're going to get some beers. We're doing very takeover from plan b farm brewery in poughkeepsie, New York, and in the essence of time. I think everyone who is listened to us before knows what our ratings are essentially, we're going from one to five five being stellar and one being not still one is Tim five is Dave sh-. Remember that? Yes. Okay. Confuse the listener anymore. Today. But sitter. Very very bitter. These four we get to the beer though, ladies and gents is going to be time again for the masturbaters himself could avoid Caperton who brings us the news or the codes report. Welcome. Today's report, folks. Today's report is more good news from the front lines. The fight against the green minutes, we so flippantly referred to that word flippant referred to as kudzu requires many different different avenues of attack. That's for sure. Okay. Goats pasts defoliants shovels are all enlisted in the battle, folks. But a young scientists in Georgia and area deeply affected. I might say by the slow motion green Sonam -i has developed a new approach to abatement and termination of the green scourge scourge Jacob Schindler and bow Dosta Georgia again this fight while an elementary school. He still a young fella. I might add. He first became interested in ways to introduce plant life back to Mars notice us that back tomorrow. And he thought kudzu would be a good candidate for the re greening. I don't know where the kid he was off the. Yeah, it was off the but in at any rate at any rate during this experiment. He began exposing the green devil to various gasses present in the Martian atmosphere during which he discovered that helium is. I right here is definitely lethal and not legal lethal to our green fo that discovery. One him multiple statewide science fairs is because it makes the heat. A lot of helium. I guess in Mars, and I speak. She worked the kid was working it out, and he discovered that helium absolutely put the plant down it works with small children too. That discovery like I said won him several sides fairs, and he kept working on it. He next experimented with helium and other plants to see if maybe, you know, kill those plants as well. Nope. Guess what didn't do it didn't do it? Just the green scourge. This discovery won him first place in several statewide science fairs was Georgia. Right. The first one he only won second place. I don't know Georgia anyway. Yeah, we won't we won't go into that. So for his eighth grade science fair. That's right. He's only up to the eighth grade if he's already made to pretty significant discoveries. Men's developing special offers to.

Georgia poughkeepsie Jacob Schindler Davis Caperton Sonam Tim New York Dave sh
"nine times" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Ninth time of the Brady Bill check area era, and they're looking for championship. Number six asks for the Rams are going to their fourth Super Bowl in franchise history. Second as the LA Rams and looking for their second franchise championship. Last night at NFL honors chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes was named the Associated Press NFL MVP. He was also named the offensive player of the year Rams defensive end. Aaron Donald was named defensive player of the year for the second straight season colts quarterback Andrew luck named NFL comeback player of the year. NFL coach of the year the bears Matt Nagy also from NFL honors last night. Giants running back saquon Barkley named the offensive rookie of the year and colts linebacker Darius. Leonard was named defensive rookie of the year. The pro football hall of fame class of two thousand nineteen was revealed yesterday. Eight new members go onto Ken Adri champ alley Tyler totally Gonzales, Kevin Milwaukee. Gil Brandt, Pat, bolan and Johnny Robinson. The eagles reportedly expected to pick up the twenty million dollar option on quarterback, Nick foles. NBA scoreboard from last night. Klay Thompson twenty eight points. The warriors over the Lakers. One fifteen one zero one was the kings over the Sixers won fifteen one zero eight rockets twenty-five jazz ninety eight. James harden, forty three points at twenty six straight games for the beard with at least thirty the hawks over the signs one eighteen one twelve Spurs one thirteen pelicans nuggets over the T wolves one zero seven one zero six. Pacers beat the heat ninety five eighty eight Mavericks won eleven Cavaliers ninety eight the bucks over the wizards won thirty-one one fifteen clippers won eleven pistons one oh one Hornets one twenty-five bulls. One eighteen the magic over the nets one zero to eighty nine college basketball, number one, Tennessee beat Texas. Am ninety three to seventy six in the NHL the Maple Leafs over the penguins. Three two. Lightening over the Rangers three two in overtime, sharks three coyotes. Two islanders four kings to the jets over the ducks nine the three. I'm Peter Schwartz. Get your opinion out there. So all of America can hear you. Call us toll free eight five five two one two four CBS. That's eight five five two one two four CBS..

NFL LA Rams Patrick Mahomes colts Rams CBS Klay Thompson Matt Nagy Gil Brandt Barkley Aaron Donald Andrew luck Lakers Nick foles James harden NBA Giants eagles
"nine times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This case is when this originally happened. This was a kid named CONNER Zion twenty one and there was an altercation where Connor Zion did stab another deputy twice in the arm. And he was screaming I'll kill you stabbed him. So this deputy gets out of his car shoots him nine times. Kind of from a distance. Connor Zion goes down. Nobody really says those first nine shots were a problem. Right. Then he walks over to this kid who's now on the ground nine more shot. Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. Stomps him on the head walks away comes back stomps him on the head walks away comes back a third stop. Yeah. The sheriff's department investigation. Not only cleared him of wrongdoing. He got a medal of valor for saving his partner's saving his partner's life. It's now the civil jury found to be a different situation come on stomping on the head. I mean once he's down. And I assume the knife is kicked away. And I don't know whether or not I mean, nine shots is difficult to get up from then the threat ceased at that point the stomping, I mean, obviously, excessive if I'm on the jury I'm gonna say the same thing based on what I hear and certainly the second go round of nine additional shots. Incidentally, the jury awarded him or his family three hundred and sixty thousand dollars which is a drop in the bucket. For Orange County. I mean, they spend more than that on coffee for their meetings today. And take a break. We'll take a break and come down. And there's news about that. LA appellate Justice who was groping women doing the breast Hong says he says, no he says no to some of that. That's correct. Although I don't think he. Oh, no. Squeezing not he's not not the hauntingly denies the squeezing. Okay. We'll be back. Jennifer europe..

Connor Zion CONNER Zion partner Jennifer europe Orange County Hong LA sixty thousand dollars
"nine times" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on 710 WOR

"But you go nine times nine times during the week one week at nine weeks in a row rather one night a week that kind of thing and the coordinators are the ones that put that together. And there's tens of thousands of them around America. Bob guarantee is one of them in Atlanta, Georgia the alpha ETA, Georgia area. Hey, bob. How are you? Great, thanks for having me on. Absolutely thanks for being on on giving Tuesday. And so what made you decide to be a financial peace university coordinator to be giving in that way. As a volunteer. I think it goes back to my wife, and I you'll having experienced financial problems of our own. You know, got ourselves into seventy five thousand dollars in debt, and really were pretty pretty hopeless. So in finding out about you. I think I mentioned that we saw you happen to see you on sixty minutes back in two thousand and four hours. We heard of you. I heard of you, and we happen to go to an event or a couple of three week later that just happened to be at our area church. How you live and from there. We took financial peace ourselves. Yeah. We were really excited about that. And we were able to within a year and a half after class knock out or seventy five thousand dollars of debt. And we just were so pumped about that. I just felt like I have to carry this on and take it to my church. So that other people can have hope word whether or not having hope today. One of the interesting things about giving. I think it's especially true volunteering. It's also true. When you give money when you do it on personal level, not a check through the mail to somebody. You never meet. But when you do giving of some kind on a personal level is you end up the paradox says you end up getting more out of it than you give in like, you get to you got a front row seat to watch him people change their lives, and it it, you know, it's like people say, well, you work, so hard, Dave. I'm I don't work, man. I'm down here. Helping people in every day is fun because I get a front row seat. Like, you have there to watch them people change their lives. I would imagine. How many how many clashes have you lead? Bob. Thirty four. So my gosh. Well, you've definitely got some stories then of lives changed, right? Oh, yes. Definitely. Dave. This this last class. I mean, I can tell you even by the tenor of it started out as a I don't like oh my gosh. Everyone so tense, right? You know, some people definitely got drug there, and we're very dervish about the whole situation. But you could even just see just even how people related to each other how couples were relating to each other as the class went on. You could tell that they were communicating. And improving and whatnot. So that you get that sort of thing just right during the class, but I do have people come back to me afterwards. And interestingly one of the most common things people come back from the especially this was happening during the meltdown. Two years ago. People come up to me and shake my hand and say, you know, I really appreciate your coordinating because lost my job. And because we had a fully funded emergency fund here able to get through without really any stress. And we we really appreciate that. So I always think that was kind of an interesting one where people really felt appreciative. But that's one of the examples. I had. Yeah. Absolutely. But you do get more back out of it than you give in don't you? Well, absolutely. I mean, you know, for for some of it is, you know, how deeply that people do well, and they lecture know-how doing you can see people have hope right out of hopelessness, and that's very rewarding. And you get a little bit of a clash yourself because he constantly enforcement for you to that. You know, this is this is the way to stay on the train and keep keep going forward. You know forever. So. Both sides. You get you get the benefit of seeing people change and also keeping yourself on track. Thirty four classes since two thousand four. Wow. That's right. So what keeps you coming back? Well, my wife, and I would talk about this the other night Sherry cockpit about this last night. When I was doing it. I was thinking about you know, kind of in terms of getting it going on not really looking at it as a long term thing. But you know, a couple of things are out there. And you know, obviously, one of them is really passionate about it. And even if I'm really tired when I go to class just you just energizes me. The end there and talking to people about this stuff. But the other thing is I started to learn about spiritual gifts, you know, going through my Christian walk and. You know, I realized along the way that, you know, you're God wants us to do the things that help out in ways that I would write things were good. New York are fun and energizing for us. They don't want us to do. Awful stuff. And I realized that this is a spiritual gift that I had to give back. And so that kind of made me realize this is something I'm going to continue doing it as long as I possibly can. Well, we appreciate you. We really do. Bob guarantee financial peace university coordinator extraordinaire in the alphabet, Georgia area. Mount pigs United Methodist Church when are you currently in the middle of a class? Well, we just finished what up, but we have another one who scheduled to start at the mid January perfect. We're we're getting ready for that. Perfect. Well, you've seen a lot of versions of Dave over the years. We have already for the next one coming out to good times are all no way. Man. Good times. I'm telling you. Hey, man. Thank you so much for leading financial peace university. We really really appreciate it. It is giving Tuesday. And so we thought we would spotlight a coordinator extraordinaire,.

bob coordinator Dave Georgia America Atlanta Sherry Mount pigs United Methodist Ch New York seventy five thousand dollars sixty minutes four hours nine weeks three week Two years one week
"nine times" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"nine times" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"But you go nine times nine times during the week one week at nine weeks in a row rather one night a week that kind of thing and the coordinators are the ones that put that together. And there's tens of thousands of them around America. Bob guarantee is one of them in Atlanta, Georgia, the Alfa Reta Georgia area. Hey, bob. How are ya? Great day. Thanks for having me on. Absolutely thanks for being on on giving Tuesday. And so what made you decide to be a financial peace university coordinator to be giving in that way. As a volunteer. I think it goes back to my wife, and I you'll having experienced financial problems of our own got ourselves into seventy five thousand dollars in debt, and really were pretty pretty hopeless. So in finding out about you, I mentioned that we saw you happen to see you on sixty minutes back in two thousand and four. Wow. We heard of you. I heard of you. And we happen to go to an event or a couple of free week later that just happened to be at our area or clean church. Try you live and from there. We took financial peace ourselves. Yeah. We were really excited about that. And we were able to within a year and a half after the class knock out or seventy five thousand dollars a day. And we just so so pumped about that. I just felt like I have to. Could carry this on and take it to my church. So that other people can have hope where whether or not having hope today. You know, one of the interesting things about giving I and I think it's especially true volunteering. It's also true when you give money when you do personal level not a check through the mail to somebody. You never meet. But when you do giving of some kind on a personal level is you end up the paradox says you end up getting more out of it than you give in like, you get to you got a front row seat to watch him people change their lives, and it, you know, it's like people say, well, you work, so hard, Dave. I'm I don't work, man. I'm down here. Helping people in every day is fun because I get a front row seat. Like you have there to watch him people change their lives. I would imagine. How many how many clashes have you lead? Bob. Thirty four. So for my gosh. Well, you've definitely got some stories then of lives changed, right? Oh, yes. Definitely. Dave. This this last class. I mean, I can just tell you even by the tenor of it. It started out as a I don't like oh my gosh. Everyone went so tense. Right. You know, some people definitely got drug there. And we're very dirty about the whole situation. But you could even just see just even how people related to each other how couples were relating to each other as the class went on. You could tell that they were communicating. And improving and whatnot. So that you know, you get that sort of thing just right during the class. But you know, I do have people come back to me afterwards. And interestingly one of the most common things people come back, especially this was happening during the meltdown a few years ago. If people come up to me, and you wanna shake my hand and say, you know, I really appreciate your coordinating because I lost my job. And because we had a fully funded emergency fund. We're able to get through without really any stress. And we we really appreciate that. So I always think that was kind of an interesting one where people really felt appreciative. But that's one of the examples. I had. Yeah. Absolutely. But you do get more back out of it than you give in don't you? Well, absolutely. I mean, you know for for some of it. I mean, it is you know, obviously that people do well, and they lecture know-how while they're doing you can see people have hope right out of hopelessness, and that's very rewarding. And it gets a little bit of the class yourself because it's constantly enforcement for you to that. You know, this is this is the way to to stay on the stay on the train and keep keep going forward. You know forever. So I mean, I think both sides you get you get the benefit of seeing people change and also keeping yourself on track. Thirty four classes since two thousand four. Wow. That's right. So what keeps you coming back? Well, my wife, and I were talking about this the other night Shmulik, Sherry, and I would talk about this last night. You know when I was doing it. I was thinking about, you know, kind of in terms of getting it going, and, you know, not really looking at it as a long term thing. But a couple of things out, then, you know, obviously, one of them is really passionate about it. And even if I'm really tired when I go to class. It's just you just energizes me the end there and and talking to people about this stuff. But the other thing is I started to learn about spiritual gifts, you know. You know, going through my Christian walk and. You know, I realized along the way that, you know, God wants to do the things that help out in ways that I would good at things were good. You are are fun and energizing for us. They don't want us to do. Awful stuff. And I realized that this is a spiritual gift that I had to give back. And so that kind of made me realize this is something I'm gonna continue doing it as long as I possibly can. But we appreciate you. We really do. Bob Getty financial peace university, coordinator extraordinaire in the Alfred Georgia area. Mount pigs United Methodist Church when are you currently in the middle of a class? Well, we just finished what up, but we have another one who scheduled to start at the mid January. We're we're getting ready for that. Perfect. Well, you've seen a lot of versions of Dave over the years. We have already for the next one coming out. Good times are all no way. Man. Good times. I'm telling you. Hey, man. Thank you so much for leading financial peace university. We really really appreciate it. It is giving Tuesday. And so we thought we would spotlight a coordinator extraordinaire, I mean,.

Bob Getty Dave coordinator Alfa Reta Georgia area America Atlanta Georgia Mount pigs United Methodist Ch Shmulik Sherry Alfred Georgia seventy five thousand dollars sixty minutes nine weeks one week
"nine times" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"And he's got his keys to the game. Good morning Merrill. What's it gonna take the birds to win this weekend? Dave. Here's the way it goes. Number one pick up the Vikings split. Carson wentz. Nine times starts the eagles. Simply can't allow that to continue. Give them ample time, and he can't be stopped number two. Don't allow Minnesota's dormant running game the spring back to light. They are thirty second running round game. And they are facing the eagles. Number one ranked run defense force them to pass the ball and can get after her cousins and number three win the turnover battle and win the game right now the eagles are binders three. That means they've given it up more times than they've taken it away. They're much better than that last year. They were plus will that was an important key to their success, and those your when eagles went Merrill, you mentioned the Minnesota passing game. And I got a big concern about this matchup. So I see Adam theline and Stephan digs who are. Lighting it up for Minnesota. And then I see the birds secondary. That's getting beat by everybody. How concerned are you about that match up? The eagles secondary against Minnesota's potent wide receivers. Well, people keep focusing on the secondary. The secondary play is dictated by the pass rush. If the eagles put ample pressure with the front for and occasional blitz. The secondary will be fun down. Good Merrill, looking forward to your broadcast with Mike quicken Howard Eskin enjoy the weekend and enjoy the game. We'll talk next week. The voice of the eagles Merrill Reese, sponsored by Dunkin donuts. Hey goes fans he'll up for the.

eagles Merrill Reese Minnesota Dunkin donuts Carson wentz Vikings Dave Howard Eskin Mike quicken Adam theline Stephan thirty second
"nine times" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"And made decisions that cost lives and shot nine times on the third floor news time seven thirty central americans who traveled in a caravan through mexico to the border with san diego began turning themselves into us authorities to seek asylum in a challenge to the trump administration the migrants began applying for protection at the nation's busiest border crossing yesterday after immigration officials said the facility did not have space to accommodate the group true or false assisted living facilities can reject you if you use a wheelchair many of them are doing it and telling people that if they have a wheelchair they've got to go to a nursing home instead the new york times says the fair housing justice center is investigating whether assisted living facilities are discriminating illegally against people in wheelchairs and whether it's legal to say sorry no wheelchairs they attorneys believe it's against the fair housing act americans with disabilities act and other federal laws though some common foods are found contained traces of we'd kill miller cbs news correspondent jim chenevey reports starting to a report in the guardian us government scientists have detected residues of glyphosate a weedkiller linked to cancer in a wide array of commonly consumed foods including wheat crackers granola cereal and cornmeal report says the fda's been testing food samples for this compound for two years but has not yet released any official results one fda chemist reportedly wrote to colleagues that broccoli was the only food he had on hand that he found to be life oh sate free jim chenevey cbs they are called the punk rockers of gardening and england they're breaking all the rules and they say you should too that story's ahead traffic and weather together next wgn news time seven thirty six how did forty with zillow you're not just looking for a house looking for the pool that will turn your kids fingers into prunes the living room or your dad will explain the nuances of football to you yet.

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"nine times" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"In grand back hits 23 before the hour i'm john trout you're listening to america in the morning a huge win for team usa vs canada a report from pyongyang chang still to come that the debate that is over gun control is reaching a fevered pitch as parents and students are pleading for change president trump is listening as we're here from terry more andrew pollock's daughter meadow was killed in last week's assault at a high school in south florida my daughter has no voice he was martyr lastly hassles take it from us shot nine times on the third floor you said the problem of school shootings should not exist it doesn't make sense fix it should have been one school shooting and we should and because my door i'm not going to see president trump vowed that something will be done about deadly school shootings he suggested some teachers who are adept at firearms be allowed to carry guns at school you'd have a lot of people that be armed it'd be ready they're professionals they may be marines that left the marines left the army left the air force and they're very adept at doing that trump said it's time to get to work and also highlighted stronger background checks and mental health issues he will continue the discussion about gun violence today when he hosts the white house meeting with state and local officials including those in law enforcement i am terry more in washington at the age of ninety nine evangelist billy graham has died he succumb to both cancer and pneumonia as he passed away yesterday at twenty two before the hour.

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"nine times" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on WDRC

"The line they bob welcome to the program what's on your mind lars thanks for taking my call uh i just want to make a couple of comments about the shooting in florida and responsibilities when you hear a lot about the fbi and everybody kind if through a lot of blame around here but you know the fact that this guy was kicked out of three two or three different schools in a word responsibility for the principles and the people of the school not only that but the students all the students knew that this guy was bad news bait now they're sitting back and they they claiming no responsibility the police have been out to his house twenty nine time to thirty nine time that should never happen two times and you should be getting help or thrown in jail after a few dozen date then you can finally get to the uh the fbi and then that's another fiasco i guess mike quite years there's a lot of people here who are sitting back find the blame one organization a one group there are all to blame bob and there are there are two things one is one is knowledge and the other is the ability to act so let's say 'yes a lot of his classmates said this guy's weird and he's trouble what what a what ability does the average teenager and a high school have to act on that in any meaningful way prensa and makes them feel lighter lands the french laureano hold on the principle already knew about it he knew that they had caught the kid with a backpack with bullets in it they had forbidden him to wear a backpack to school and then they finally kicked him out of the school she wouldn't be telling the principal anything he doesn't already know but the kid doesn't have an ability to act and when you say it's up to the school the schools authority ends at the school house lawn so when you kick the get out whose problem is he he's the problem for local law enforcement or in this case the fbi the.

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"nine times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The reason i'm i'm even bring this up facebook suspended but then reinstated and islamic extremists account nine times so they suspended reinstated suspended reinstated suspended reinstated suspend reinstating suspended reinstated suspend reinstated spender is that it's been reinstated suspended reinstated after he warned the company would have to answer to all of the all merciful now i don't sucker berg he may have gone into the call i don't know i i dunno sucker berg may have a coupon beer donors nipples you could be on a rug right now with a gold leaf koran someplace i also on telegraph reports last week that facebook suspended somebody with a muslim they might can't i'll give it a shot abdul rahman all car body oil i got arrive abdurrahman occur bodies our account nine times after posting a sickening islamic state propaganda videos lake they call it aycell here that's the obama terminology for the islamic state for the for the the the caliphate that is straight up out of the crime that a straight up one hundred percent the nature of islam to the core that a straight up muhammed 101 islamic state obama always called it aycell the islamic state some what is it islamic syria something they all stands for levant and what levant is portions of syria jordan there's no israel anyway propaganda videos but reinstated it each time when he complained until it was finally shut down permanently last march now why is this important well i think without going into further her i'm betting it's hateful stuff around uh terrorism um yeah islamic state in iraq and levant that's with cents for the following a series of angry emails to facebook including one which he said you will stand in front of the creator olive all merciful and you will have to answer for your during the.

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"nine times" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on WWL

"Legendary nine time nb a allstar and basketball hall of famer dominique wilkins to talk about his life with diabetes and abby about how he is actually managing it very very successfully first of all dominique thank you for being with us today no problem for you all right so of course one you have a personal experience to speak i'm very important to you tell us about the first time you've really found out that you are diabetic were humira emir lou who predicted a short version fear for rome there have been in rear ahead episode after a game where much sugar level got too low and i couldn't stand out with shake and then we need something to get my sugar lovely backed up and i kind of ignored it in all my brother told me and say hey man you'll kale like i like no i'm i'm okay and uh he said the it's not normal and so i again i ignored it for another year and it was a year to that date i went to a doctor he said to me i got good news in bed good news is unite diet bad news you a diabetic but you need to have a lifestyle change right now and so i remember what my grandfather of our father went through who both diet food type one diabetes so i decided not let the disease due to me why did father grandfather so this is totally he was on suspecting that you could be diabetic even though it's in your family your it'll uh gone was of great shape me i've always thought that you know that i would never have any chronic disease or anything like that you know because out this such great shape but diabetes is a hereditary diseases well in so unfortunately i was the one who got diabetes but i look at it kinda like a blessing and of course i look at it because the mix we look at my my health alive differently so uh i do things that i probably wouldn't done when i was young and so when i go to store i i make sure that i i get food products that doesn't have more than six ramsey sugaring in seoul uh the my selection with suit world food is a lot different you lost you also mentioned a.

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"nine times" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The forty nine time this year the dow setzer records technology stocks overcome a slump in insurance companies and hospitals to power the dow to an alltime high adding nearly fifty points nasdaq also in record territory the sp 500 just misses the federal reserve sharpening its pencils at advance of another interest rate hike but it can't seem to figure out why inflation won't hitch the heat the benchmark of two percent still boston fed president eric had run tells bloomberg is optimistic that wages is going to rise labor markets tight low flag you'll start seeing wager pros brochures overtime of the fed meets again at the end of the month the irs is suspending at seven billion dollar deal with ecuador facts over that companies recent databreach ford is recalling more than a billion explorer suvs following complaints of exhaust fumes in the passenger cabin sears canada going up a judge o case the deal that will put 12000 out of work and booties analytics says boston does make amazon spinal list for a second headquarters bought it feels it will likely not be the pick the big deadline for submitting bids is next thursday that's the wbz market wrap jeff brown wbz newsradio 1030 wctc news time five forty much of it hasn't been heard in years but now the boston public library is cataloguing and digitizing its expansive audio collection now some of these recordings actually date back to the late 1800s novelty bbc's leonard jones says the plan is to make an all double online laura earn shirt chief of collectibles that they be p l says if they're sending at hundreds of thousands of recordings to the internet archive to curate the collection and put it on the web at him at any down you could think of barron pacfic jazz opera rock pop spoken word children youth back the process could take years more beginning the prophet of hacking them to carry out there currently chart here at the country laprairie and we're going to pack them and kept on tv and an archive market invasion that one of their the audio will ultimately be available on great 78 archive dot org landed jones wbz newsradio 1030 state.

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"nine times" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nine times" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Yes and radio sports heavenward to this morning at wimbledon venus williams at thirty seven years old she rates that wimbledon final on the women side for the ninth time in saturday morning for her sixth wimbledon title she added straightset win this morning in the semi finals in which is now ninety one all time now they got on saturday feel thank god to be the ruth but was also a straightset winner in the semi finals various goes for title number six saturday morning he could watch it on espn television beginning at 900 am eastern time now they got tomorrow morning breakfast at wimbledon sam career remarrying show with roger federer thomas birdied they will vie to get to the men's final eight am eastern time moral morning on espn television caviar soon on espn news night number three day number three of the wonderful this that is lloyd money mayweather anc conor mcgregor speaking the other or at least uttering some words like this right conner that will yesterday you want more tactic arctic tonight on espn news they're getting underway for the farc way center shortly they numbered three of their world promo toward this afternoon the cubs in the chicago white sox made a deal together fill chicago white sox said jose tana allnight handed starting pitcher through the cubs zilic thing for four minor leaguers including the best.

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