28 Burst results for "Nine Ten Years"

Unifying your will with the will of Allah

TMV Podcast

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Unifying your will with the will of Allah

"Blessed to be joined by a very good friend of mine said Sane Machi-. He's an Islamic lecturer he's been studying in. Beirut for some years now. Just an all-round quite and. Inspiring and Kind of God centric Guy I think. So. We've been wanting to do content together and we wanted him through some something with the Muslim viable years now but he's always out studying, and then when he comes, he's kind of like lecturing for a few days and then he's back out. But we were able to find some time. and. We. So. Obviously, you hear the conversation that we have but why I really wanted to get him on is that I think there's like a very unique way in which he talks about God and religion. And it's quite an empowering thing. So like even I remember when we were having the conversation I was thinking back to some lecture gave last year I think when he was in London and I had the same kind of thing where it's also simple and it's all just anchored around God I'm so I so I called them up and I said you know, let's let's your podcast and I want you to kind of talk about some of these things and some things you mentioned your lecture series and whatever else and we had like twenty minutes half we mapped out what we're going to discuss. Item we go into go into record. A couple of days AIDS like over a week weeknights and then he's like I was like, oh, she would just recap what we discussed. It acknowledged freestyler. So he kind of just thought at the conversation and and just saw when I loved it to be honest I'm. Always enjoy his company and conversations with him. And that's that's it really If you did actually, if you do enjoy this podcast there is potential opportunity for us to. Record more with a sane so Why as in like message email will ever ask postal social media tiger us. Last No, and let me know and I will be sure to me because in London for a while very short time I'm going to try and. Getting back in if there is a a decent response from people, so please do. Everything without further ado. Here's my conversation with Hossein. Monkey. Saddam Hussein. Thank you very much for for coming on the podcast I I. Think It's worth people nine the background that you me. Quite a few favours now because a few few years ago I was out in in. Lebanon. Yes, and we would you to meet. It's about three years ago and but three to two or three three years ago and you you flopped I mean I had a car accident. This is the second. Comes on an important. Was that and then you've come to London Tovia from London reason you've come to the under every an we've had like brief moments of being able to meet up and chat and whatever but we haven't sat down like this. longtime common. Yeah. It's quite exciting to be honest So. What, begin wherever you want my i. I think social talk about is in the we've allowed to catch up. But let's specify those part that to one side right. So I think for me when when you said Yes to podcast I thought it'd be interesting to talk about quite a few things. So recent you've been talking about you did an election series into what the Prophets yes and stories from the Koran what was was really interesting and and the stuff that she would we wanna do, oh, we're going to be doing more of, but the year before that you were in London and you delivered ten lectures and it was all kind of shaped around the love of God. Yes. And what was quite striking for me personally was that there was something in because I know you personally as well and I I've known you for for a long time before you were studying and everything else, and maybe we'll do another a whole podcast on on the whole journey has been about nine years almost nine ten years. It's been a long time but but there's there's there was something there is something in the way that you when you talk about God and when you're talking about all of these notions of loving God and really embracing. The spirit of Islam and everything else that this is a a really deeper kind of passion. And belief and almost serenity as well in the way that you kind of talks I wanted to I think if we start with that like. What Okay we approach allies a concept and a as a as a topic as you know our. Creator Moss and everything else What is allow mean to you? That's a big I'm sorry for. Jumping from the great question. So I think. Yes. I do use love as the launchpad to talk about a loss upon down and talk to a law SUPERNOVA. But I think that when a human beings especially in young is. When they think of God or the concept of God even in when it comes to parents for example, because when we're young, we don't fully understand the concept of God, but we see in

London Sane Machi Saddam Hussein London Tovia Beirut Lebanon Hossein
Pleasure, Sex, and Body Acceptance with Dawn Serra

Food Psych

04:55 min | 2 months ago

Pleasure, Sex, and Body Acceptance with Dawn Serra

"Sarah. So. Tell me about your relationship with food growing up. Looking back. It feels much different than when I was in it. I remember for a while food was something that I didn't really have to think about, but there was a point when I was around ten years old I think maybe. Around that age when I noticed that. My body was starting to get compared to my little sisters and I started getting monitored for how much I was eating. And questions like should you really be eating that you're still hungry? I think you've had enough and it just kind of became normal for that monitoring, and I think that was also around the time when I started realizing like if I wanna eat the foods that I'm interested in eating I have to do it when no one can see. Because those were the foods that were policed. You were your police for eating, right? Yeah, and it was also interesting because like my mom is very much a a meat and potatoes, kind of person, her parents were to from the Midwest and and so growing up, we had very few fresh vegetables in the house very few and fruit every once in a while, but it was very like meat and potatoes, and then like convenience foods because both of my parents worked a lot in. So cereals and chips and all that kind of stuff, and it was interesting because there just came a point when I noticed that my sister was allowed to eat whatever she wanted and I wasn't. Yeah, and we're so that came from body comparisons. It sounds like, yeah, and the other message that I got just kind of around the body was that my sister had the same body as my mom, which was they were just naturally, very, very slender and that I had my dad's body, and while the message is about my body weren't specific to me I, did hear lots of stories around how sad and unhappy and unpopular and isolated. My Dad was because he was chunky. And you know in the same breath, it's like you've got your father's body and so that definitely also made an impression of like my sister looks like my mom and I look like my dad and my mom had the super popular lots of friends experience in the seventies, and my dad was like really lonely and hated being chunky. That was the word that they would use and I was like him. God what a message to get. Yes It's like, yeah, I feel like parents don't recognize, and this is one aspect of the fat phobia that's so pervasive in our culture. Right? Is like that sort of message. This is not even questioned. That's not even considered like that message might be harmful to you, right. Yeah exactly, and I didn't really even have words for it until fairly recently, it was just my normal and then when I really started thinking, where did some of these feelings come from and where did some of these stories and wended start? Kind of like Oh remembering the policing and the comments and the and the restriction and all that stuff That's interesting. So you said that was around what age? Like nine, ten years old. Yeah. So right before puberty, right? The sort of tween years. Yep. Exactly. And how did it evolve from there? I have this very. Crystal clear memory of going shopping for clothes for the sixth grade. And so is going to be at a brand new middle school was going to be new with all the graders and I was super excited to go shopping at this really popular clothing store. and. We picked out. It was my both my parents were with me and we picked all these things that I was excited to try on and I got into the fitting room and the size that we had didn't fit. And so I just kind of was like, Hey, I need a bigger size. And what I heard from inside the dressing, room was my dad screaming Jesus, Christ? She's that's that s oh, God and I. Don't think he knows that I heard that. But in that moment, like every part of me, that was excited about getting closed died and you know words like Oh. You're an early developer. You're the first in your class to need a Bra. You know all that kind of stuff and what's really interesting to me is looking back. When I look at pictures of myself. Now, when I was fifth sixth Seventh Eighth Grade I was certainly larger than my classmates, but there was no part of me whatsoever. That was even remotely close to what I would label fat as a distributor. And that makes me sad to think about that that the messages were that I was. Terrible and so much bigger than everybody else. But when I look at the pictures now,

Sarah. Midwest New Middle School Developer
7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:35 min | 4 months ago

7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

"What's going on welcome back or welcome to the show for the first time? I'm musty as your host, you'd help you. Launch and grow a successful podcast helps you grow your business. Build your personal brand and become more successful and better known whether your goal is more impact or income or all of the above. This is the show for you. When you want to use a podcast to do just that now today. We're GONNA. Be talking about something that trips up a lot of entrepreneurs and business owners when they start their podcasts, and is why it becomes such a chore, and then they eventually fail and give up and to be. Debbie. Downer or someone who's really negative, but I'm going to share with you today. Seven myths slash pitfalls about launching your podcasts at I've coached a lot of people through have helped a lot of clients through and I've seen this happen over and over again even if you're a year into the podcasting game or your year to growing your podcast, and you're like my shows is. Is kind of idle like it's. It's not growing anymore. I'm not getting any leads from it. I'm not getting any new customers from it I'm not getting anything from his just another thing for me to do on my to do this. Well are some flaws are some things you're doing? That are causing you to think like that could help you reshift. Reposition your exact your mindset. Mindset around this in this training Oh this episode so before get into this one. Definitely just circle back had a share something. That's for me kind of illustrated. This point in in real life got a client who's done amazing job for their their podcast. They're up to about twenty thousand downloads month. They're doing great. They get all of media the interviews they are able to reach big. Big Equal, but they often compare themselves to people who have been doing undoing podcasting eight nine ten years, and they're only about a year or two in the game, and that's a big issue that really is that truly is one of the biggest things you can was taken over one I would say is, is this and this? Is this whole conversation that we had with? This client recently was all about this. It's about comparing your niche. PODCASTS was show. That's much much much broader. Here's the deal. If you have a niche podcast meaning, you're talking to a very specific market, and you compare yourself to Joe Rogan or a very much a bunch of punch broader podcast that has reached because they bring on guys like ee. Lan Muss. It's hard to compare really look at your podcast success. Getting to twenty thousand dollars for most people is is isn't hard or sorry is easy and the fact that they've done in less than a lesson. Two years is pretty remarkable so especially in this world now. Now, maybe in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fifteen much easier, nowadays, not so much a lot more competition out there, so I'm happy for them, but they're comparing themselves to a lot of people have been doing this for eight nine years I mean. If you've been doing this for eight nine years, you should expect to have a way bigger show especially consistently the way they're who they're comparing themselves to. If you go back and look at those shows a near year twos I. Bet you. They weren't doing the numbers they're doing now and they're still doing the same numbers. They probably wouldn't be doing for this long. I can guarantee. GUARANTEE THAT SO NUMBER ONE! Don't compare your niche podcast. Show to someone who's doing something much broader Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss you name it like those those guys are in a broader market. They have experienced They were mainstream before they got into podcasting so yesterday some anomalies. There's Louis Houses who've been doing this for years again. That's START OUT PODCASTING, but no, it's time it takes time trees on grover night. Why would you podcast overnight? So that's number. One number two is comparing your launch to somebody who's way bigger than you so listen. If you have a small audience, you can expect to demand hundred thousands of downloads. Downloads out the gate. I've only seen. That's probably a handful of times where someone is able to do that and every single time it's it's from somebody who already has a large of a name in their in their space. They may not be like Oprah, Winfrey big, but they have the in their space carved out a name for themselves. So if you're coming in doesn't have a name for themselves. You can expect your podcast. Be This game changer? It's a reflection of you, your podcasts and your content of reflection of you, so a big mistake. People make is comparing their launch to someone WHO's ten times bigger than them. You're trying to go into battle with someone who has way more firepower than you compare your launch or or that you're more of your podcasts. That is a mistake. Big Big mistake that I see people

Downer Joe Rogan Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss Lan Muss Debbie Grover Night Louis Houses Oprah Winfrey
The Magick of Sound with Tanya Clark

Subtle Medicine

05:20 min | 5 months ago

The Magick of Sound with Tanya Clark

"My dear dear presist her Tanya. I am so honored that you're here and that we get to dive into this conversation together. So thank you thank you. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me. It's an honor literally. Okay so I just WanNa start right off the bat kinds of lists. What drew you to sound and sound as a as hewing. Transformational modalities specifically. When did this journey really began for you? Yeah that's such a great question so I I really think that it began as a little girl because I grew up. My father was able architect so like not IMI but like he designed boats and yachts for living so he was a designer and but he always had a band on the side and so that was kind of like I think that if he could have made that his absolute career he would have And so I remember as a little girl just always being around music And my father used to play at all of the VFW's and the Moose lodges an off of those places and so every weekend we were going we were getting dragged to some event or something that was going on and and I think that it was always such Like it was such a a sense of in that moment with music. I could process emotions that I didn't have words for. I could all of a sudden here a song I would be like. Wow someone understands how I feel. You know like with the lyrics of the words and so it was always such a huge part of my life and I remember the first time that I had asked my parents if I could take dance classes. I must've been like nine ten years old or something like that because a lot of my friends were in dance classes and I always loved movement and I remember my father was like. That's so silly. Why would you wanNA dance when you can learn to play the music that people are dancing to and it was just kind of like an okay? You know so. I ended up playing the flute in junior high Like our garage was turned into a music room. And so and I just remember like my father I mean. There are being an organ and piano and drums and a trumpet. And all of the stuff that I just used to look forward to those moments of being able to just like slip in there and my dad would practice with me with my flute. How to really awesome band teacher? Who would bring in and like sheet music of the Eagles and different things like that and so then it was fast forward through my college years. I started taking dance so I didn't start my formal dance training until I was seventeen and then I never turned back still and that just became. I think that dancing music for me. We're really my first forms of meditation. They were my first forms of you know really being able to like. I said earlier process things that I didn't have words for and and then with the crystal bowls in the sound healing it. Just kind of naturally came about through my movement practice and working with the nervous system In different modalities and then I remember the first time being in a yoga class where the teacher played a crystal bowl and I was just like Whoa and then I think within a couple of months I bought one ball and then that started everything and so that was maybe like five years ago and then now it has really. It's kind of the basis of what I do and the movement and the meditation is just kind of a part of the sounds work. Yeah so it's been a really beautiful journey on Kaido following those threads of music with myself. Yeah Oh my gosh. Thank for sharing that. It's such a beautiful journey and it's a lifelong journey. Truly this is just like you never knew a life without music. You just. It's part of your entire upbringing and really to play in all of the different realms of it the different instruments and moving your body to the music and also creating the music of being on both sides and I think it's interesting that your father said that like Oh play the instruments that people are dancing to you because I I feel like many people does. I've had many friends over the years who were musicians or dancers. It's it's been my experience that I had friends were known people that were like danced no pun intended in both sides of that. So you really. That's an intimate relationship with sound. Very beautiful yeah. It really is and I I really. I feel like that kind of was always the backdrop for everything else that I did in the sense of whenever I couldn't find a way to process something it would I would go to music or the dance studio and then all of a sudden it's like things just processed without having to use my mental capacities

Eagles VFW Kaido
The Magick of Sound with Tanya Clark

Subtle Medicine

05:25 min | 5 months ago

The Magick of Sound with Tanya Clark

"My dear dear presist her Tanya. I am so honored that you're here and that we get to dive into this conversation together. So thank you thank you. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me. It's an honor literally. Okay so I just WanNa start right off the bat kinds of lists. What drew you to sound and sound as a as hewing. Transformational modalities specifically. When did this journey really began for you? Yeah that's such a great question so I I really think that it began as a little girl because I grew up. My father was able architect so like not IMI but like he designed boats and yachts for living so he was a designer and but he always had a band on the side and so that was kind of like I think that if he could have made that his absolute career he would have And so I remember as a little girl just always being around music And my father used to play at all of the VFW's and the Moose lodges an off of those places and so every weekend we were going we were getting dragged to some event or something that was going on and and I think that it was always such Like it was such a a sense of in that moment with music. I could process emotions that I didn't have words for. I could all of a sudden here a song I would be like. Wow someone understands how I feel. You know like with the lyrics of the words and so it was always such a huge part of my life and I remember the first time that I had asked my parents if I could take dance classes. I must've been like nine ten years old or something like that because a lot of my friends were in dance classes and I always loved movement and I remember my father was like. That's so silly. Why would you wanNA dance when you can learn to play the music that people are dancing to and it was just kind of like an okay? You know so. I ended up playing the flute in junior high Like our garage was turned into a music room. And so and I just remember like my father I mean. There are being an organ and piano and drums and a trumpet. And all of the stuff that I just used to look forward to those moments of being able to just like slip in there and my dad would practice with me with my flute. How to really awesome band teacher? Who would bring in and like sheet music of the Eagles and different things like that and so then it was fast forward through my college years. I started taking dance so I didn't start my formal dance training until I was seventeen and then I never turned back still and that just became. I think that dancing music for me. We're really my first forms of meditation. They were my first forms of you know really being able to like. I said earlier process things that I didn't have words for and and then with the crystal bowls in the sound healing it. Just kind of naturally came about through my movement practice and working with the nervous system In different modalities and then I remember the first time being in a yoga class where the teacher played a crystal bowl and I was just like Whoa and then I think within a couple of months I bought one ball and then that started everything and so that was maybe like five years ago and then now it has really. It's kind of the basis of what I do and the movement and the meditation is just kind of a part of the sounds work. Yeah so it's been a really beautiful journey on Kaido following those threads of music with myself. Yeah Oh my gosh. Thank for sharing that. It's such a beautiful journey and it's a lifelong journey. Truly this is just like you never knew a life without music. You just. It's part of your entire upbringing and really to play in all of the different realms of it the different instruments and moving your body to the music and also creating the music of being on both sides and I think it's interesting that your father said that like Oh play the instruments that people are dancing to you because I I feel like many people does. I've had many friends over the years who were musicians or dancers. It's it's been my experience that I had friends were known people that were like danced no pun intended in both sides of that. So you really. That's an intimate relationship with sound. Very beautiful yeah. It really is and I I really. I feel like that kind of was always the backdrop for everything else that I did in the sense of whenever I couldn't find a way to process something it would I would go to music or the dance studio and then all of a sudden it's like things just processed without having to use my mental capacities Very soothing for me so yeah we. We've talked about that a

Eagles VFW Kaido
Selling During a Pandemic with Steli Efti

Startups For the Rest of Us

10:51 min | 5 months ago

Selling During a Pandemic with Steli Efti

"Still. Fd thanks so much for joining me on startups for the rest of us for your third appearance so much way back yeah man. It's always good to to chat with you. I think we talked. Maybe seven or eight months ago and obviously heard your intro. They know you're you've just been steeped in sales startup sales for what eight nine ten years ten years fan. We're getting we're getting older. I think today I want to into some stuff that that is related to the current crisis of sales is one thing but sales during a pandemic and Quarantine Kelsey uncertainty imagining. It has to change during this time and so I think this kickoff. I'd love to hear your thoughts on how you've seen that change how you can help people kind of adjust to this mindset and then. I think we'll dive into a little bit about how can companies position themselves? We will have a post corona virus world. And how do we position ourselves to really be in a good position there? Everything is global pandemic as it turns out finding totally paper. Hang out with your family. So sales isn't different in that in that sense. You know what's funny? The biggest thing that I've noticed. Is that the good. And the bad just gets amplified during a time like this. When you rent the level to ten the weaknesses are just like amplified so much and I think the sensibilities and sensitivities of people are just like massively increased so she too big campaign level trend will. I'm sure we're going to dig deeper and deeper go to the nitty gritty and the details on the technical suffer people but this two big things that I've seen so far. One is kind of a counter steering to even more selfishness in aggressiveness. So sales people entrepreneurs business people because they exactly up so much. Kind of the worst sight came out in. They're like I don't care I need money right now. I need to hustle any to push. I need to be more aggressive than usual any to be more selfish than usual. So you'd get these emails. That are like so weird like I'll give you an example like a person that I've known for ten years now right a business person that I've known continues. We helped each other out. Here's a couple of businesses is a couple of like does a lot of content. And we've always been friendly of always supported him with the stuff and he supported us with with stuff and then we had an email exchange recently about being on the podcast and he was like well. I it was a personal exchange. Is All about like yeah. Don't worry about me. Steady life is good. Business is good like I'm doing fine. But then he was communicating. Somebody on my marketing team was saying well. If Stella once on the podcast we have to charge ten fifteen km for that because we have to survive and that was forwarded to me and it was such a weird thing to do like. Tell me directly. Hey everything is fine but then tell somebody on my marketing team. I'm GonNa Charge fifteen thousand and then sell it can be on my pocket no word about what's in it for us. What is the benefit. What is the value? I'm going to get. It's such a selfish common. I'm going to charge ten thousand because I need to survive. I mean we all need to survive. But that's good southern really compelling selling proposition for me and then it was also a weird because to me the statement was the world is perfect and then to another personal. My team statement was I needed to charge ten K. Of the world is ending and that even worse when I said let's politely decline. Let's say thanks. But no thanks. When the market person responded. Hey it's going to be outside our budget but we wish you best of luck. Hopefully everything's GonNa be fine. He Okay just for you guys nine K. But you have to take this week or something like that though. Lead his thing her. What is this a special offer again? This week feels really count got it feels so selfish so tone deaf so sleazy and really this is. It only takes a moment to ruin your reputation. It really changed how I think and feel about this individual right I was like wow. I never want to deal with this person again. This is so weird and to me. This is desperation and fear manifesting itself in the ugliest form possible and. I don't think that's a way to succeed. I don't think that's the way for you to make your business succeed in. That's compelling like I don't think he he balked tons and tons of guests who paid ten K. Because I pay attention and there's no guests on this podcast recently just and so to me. That's one way to go like people being super selfish. Those are rare to be honest most entrepreneurs and more sales people that have become uber aggressive. But there's a lot of tone deafness in the world right these kind of emails. You've gotten them. I've gotten them people that listen to us right now. Gotten where it's like. Don't you know what's going on in the world wide? Are you sent me this email? It seems like so kind of disconnected from board is happening in the world. So that's one thing the other trend that I see more off though and I think this is going to be the problem with the people that are listening to us now. Which is the overreaction. The different in the opposite direction. Which is people in sales people and founders having such high anxiety and fear to upset anybody that they'd just stopped communicating stopped selling stop operating because the thought was well. How could I ever try to do business during a time like this people are going to get upset with me if I send them an email or if I give them a call if I tried to close a deal that so I can't do that right now? People are hurting and I think that's a really bad idea as well. I've told this to more people than ever before I've had so many one on one conversations and please always the same listen number one. The will is not going to become a better place. All of stopping work. Like if I stopped selling rob. My future is less secure. Might families futures less secure. My employs futures less secure. Nobody benefits from me stopping to work. Because things tough out there like. I'm not helping anybody really. So it's not the time to dig a hole and be like I'm GonNa just lane here late low and wait to all of this because the truth is that this might take a really long time to be quote unquote over. Whatever the hell that means right we all know and every day where you don't do business you're making the problem big impossible you make the economic slow the economy less secure your making your family at Your Business Security. Nobody's been helped by this. So my big ask to people has been especially during a crisis you have to keep selling. But you don't do it in a tone deaf way and I'm sure we're going to go into more detail like my basic philosophy is. I'M GONNA send a sales email. I'M GONNA make a sales call. I'm going to try to close a deal I am done in. We'll talk about this me shifted close and we're asking. We had one record month after the other this year from January up until May of pre pace right every month. We've had more prepaid than ever before in the company's history because we made that a focus will be started. I didn't know if this would work. I was like who wants to prepay for year. Two time like this probably. Nobody turned out quite a lot of our customers. Wanted to and we can talk about how we did it in wide worked. But you'd be surprised people were still buying and selling in. You have to keep selling of the way to do it in a thing in a respectful way is not to be overly aggressive and be like selfish. I we need to increase our price because we have to survive. Here's the contract. You have two hours to cloak to sign it but also not an overly apologetic way. I know everything is bad for you. You hurting your frayed. I'm afraid you read the bad news this morning. Nobody wants to hear that like people already have enough exerting their life. They don't need you to. Ino them with ten links about world politics. That are terrible. How is that helping them? That isn't helping them and that isn't making. You look like a good person either so my approach has always been during this crisis. You want to be honest. Not fake positive. Not fake optimistic honest. Hey is everything all right. Are you good all right? How are things going right now? Are you continue to do business? Are you stopping everything? Tell me about your world. Tell me about your forecast of the world like do you think that things have been pick up again in a month in two months any lake signs that you looking for before you kind of step in to put the pedal to the metal and do more things purchase things so investing more things will decide how to move forward like. I'll ask some of these questions but always will ask them with what I would call high energy. I I want to talk to people not with taken to not with fake positive but with energy. Because there's a funny thing during these times when everybody we're talking to is exiled any written and depressed and fearful and pissed and all the news. We reading our full of like overwhelming facts. The last thing we need is one more person that talks does that makes us feel even more about the world or that seems low energy or apologetic or fearful. Let's not the kind of energy will on us or on US House with but if you can talk to somebody today that even during these crazy times is honest and frank and straightforward with you but seems to have energy seems to have the ability to make decisions to do. It makes people feel better. It makes people feel like yeah. I mean I can have a conversation. I can make a decision. I can take action right even during these times. And there's this old quote from her name is Angela or something people can can Google and find it is. The people won't remember your name. People remember the place but people will never forget how you made them feel and I think that especially during times where we're also anxious and afraid overwhelmed when we interact with people that make us feel calm and confident. Make US feel a little bit more energized than before. Those are the type of people that we will want to gravitate towards and talk more to. We will remember that these people stand out. So That's how we've been selling clothes and how I approached reaching out to people like us. The frank don't be fake but don't be meek. Don't be like the whisper. Don't be apologetic. The Zeino the tons of hard. Sorry that I'm talking to you right now. Nobody needs that. Nobody being helped by that attitude and energy that you bring to the table. So that's the biggest thing. Don't be afraid to sell selling good for you. Good for your family selling good for your prospects. He just telling them something. That's that could provide value. We could talk a lot more about it but that's kind of my big by big spiel around this. Don't be so afraid because there is a way to do it. That won't piss off. That won't make you a bad person but it will make the world kind of turn and economist move forward in Your Business still operate even during times weights harder to talk to prospects employs deals.

United States Frank Kelsey Stella Google Angela
"nine ten years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:40 min | 8 months ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Isn't out about nine ten years old my mom and dad introduced me to you and just a huge fan thanks for taking my call and hope you don't think I'm crazy right away with this theory here but getting back to the corona virus you know men are gonna probably think there's a conspiracy but you know what I wholeheartedly believe that the check comes put this out you had mentioned earlier that was affecting only the elderly and it kind of made me think about it and you know once this put up with the Chinese arms and engineered to hurt the elderly the non working class citizens in order to scare the overall general population off the streets you know the thousands of of freedom protesters that were out there if the child comes want them off the streets and was this engineered to attack the of the elderly the non working class citizens and not necessarily hurt the the overall general working class citizens you know might be kind of crazy but well they can if they if that was the purpose so you have sent a lost control of it right right right yeah well yeah they were they would be obviously some collateral damage around the world affecting you know the I'll tell you I'll tell you why because there's video in wool hand of try calm a pharmacy is storming into people's apartments and just wrapping them up and taking them out of their young people not elderly if your theory the bad news is awaiting you know read the elderly keep the young from going out in public I know that.

"nine ten years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on WJR 760

"Isn't out about nine ten years old my mom and dad introduced me to you and just a huge fan thanks for taking my call and hope you don't think I'm crazy right away with this theory here but getting back to the corona virus you know men are gonna probably think there's a conspiracy but you know what I wholeheartedly believe that the check comes put this out you had mentioned earlier that was affecting only the elderly and it kind of made me think about it and you know once this put up with a charter arms and engineered to hurt the elderly the non working class citizens in order to scare the overall general population off the streets you know the thousands of of freedom protesters that were out there the check comes want them off the streets and was engineered to to attack the of the elderly the non working class citizens and not necessarily hurt the the overall general working class citizens you know my team kind of crazy but well they lost and if the if that was the purpose so you have sent a lost control of it right right right yeah well yeah they were they would be you know obviously some collateral damage around the world affecting you know the I'll tell you I'll tell you why because there's video in wool hand of try calm a pharmacy is storming into people's apartments and just wrapping them up and taking them out of their young people not elderly if your theory is it's a waving the red the elderly keep the young from going out in public hello there they.

T-Mobile's $26.5 billion Sprint merger approved by judge

Charlie Parker

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

T-Mobile's $26.5 billion Sprint merger approved by judge

"News about to team mobile the federal judge who plays team mobiles merger with sprint says a group of states attorneys general did not persuade him that deal would have disastrous consequences for competition in the wireless industry the state's lawsuit was the last major hurdle to the deal after it was approved by regulators of the FCC and the justice department stocks are higher Dow up forty four nasdaq up twenty three points of the S. and P. is up nine ten year treasuries one point five seven

Sprint FCC
Fiat Chrysler U.S. auto sales fall 2% in fourth quarter

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

Fiat Chrysler U.S. auto sales fall 2% in fourth quarter

"God still trading lower today Mike after the U. S. airstrike the Dow is down to thirty two given up twenty one points the nasdaq composite is down almost sixty two General Motors reports deliveries in the fourth quarter fell six point three percent matching the expectation of analysts V. R. Chrysler's fourth quarter US auto sales down two point three percent Toyota reporting auto sales for December that missed the average analyst estimate shares a border down twenty cents now at nine twenty one fiat Chrysler down fifty one cents that's down three point four percent at GM down ninety eight cents a share a little more than two and a half percent lower now at thirty six thirty nine ten year treasuries one point eight percent right now the Dow is down to thirty five nasdaq is lower by sixty three

Mike General Motors Toyota Chrysler GM R. Chrysler United States Analyst Fiat
Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

How I Built This

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

"If you're already business idea in Haiku form it would go something like this. It solves problem. Super Easy to explain people will use it and back in the early days of the worldwide web. There were a lot of problems that were right for solving including paper or rather other how to use less of it about the last time you wrote a letter on paper though that a registration form with a pen or filed a physical document into way metal filing cabinet right for the most part e mail and electronic documents have replaced paper same with invitations. Most of the invites I get and I'm pretty sure you get common an email and for that simple convenience you can thank you salina. Tobacco Allah because back in the late. Nineteen Ninety S Selena and her friend Alid wrote the code that would power the first online invitation business eve and for a time was a darling Ling of the DOT COM bubble within two years of its founding it was valued at around a hundred and fifty million dollars of course when the bubble burst in in two thousand so did E. value but unlike other dot com era companies such as COSMO or pets.com Lycos or G. who cities eviter hung in there. And it's still around today. In fact invitations from eviter reach more than one hundred million people eight year company is now owned owned by Liberty Media and while it has tons of competitors eve. I is still one of the biggest players and online and -tations as for Selena Tobacco Allah. She still an important name Silicon Valley. She's become a kind of role model for women and girls who want to get into tack in fact back. When she was a kid she she loved computer? She was obsessed with them. She grew up in Ramsey New Jersey. The daughter of two emigrants from India's for my parents perspective. If you ask who I was I mean I was always that person like waving my hand in the air with the answer class which I think annoyed a lot of my teachers. Most of the time I love to read. I am A terrible athlete. I'm but I always love team sports and it was something that was important to me. I actually was voted basketball captain of Ramsey high school basketball team but not because my athletic ability but only because I built a stats program in high school to help the other players shoot better. Wow using like built a statue program on your home computer I did. It was on the army pro database and I used to come home after every game in like database who shot from wear and then a printout sheet the next day and give it to the good players and they eventually decided that they wanted me to be there captain which was very funny because I only play the last two minutes of the game either if we were really upper really behind. How did you get into computers as a kid? So is really from influence of my dad. He started off as a punch card programmer for a company called. EDS and he was there for. I think about twenty five years and he rose from being this punch-card programmer to a a multimedia president couples away from the CEO of this huge organization. Her and he always exposed us to technology when he would take us to work work every so often we would see that entire you know. It was a huge mainframes and servers. And you'd walk in and you see all the computers and the technology and it was just always exciting to me and so he brought computer home. I'm probably when I was eight nine ten years old and I got excited Abou- coding and starting to build things and then my mom Schlep me summer coaching camps in all different places across New Jersey. To expose me to it more. I mean this is before like now of course every parents like I want my kid to learn how to code but like in the early mid eighties. That was not the thing. What were you learning? What was the code? I'm so pretty sure. It was logo and basic at the time. I I and then I do remember learning Pascal when I was in middle school. Were you often one of the only girls in those classes definitely and if I look back now now I think about that you know I remember I took the AP Computer Science Class of my high school. And I'm pretty sure I was the only girl in class but it never occurred to me at the time. Do you remember Birlik even as a teenager thinking like when you ask a teenager would. He won't be when he grew up. You know some of them have an answer and some of them might say the president and some might you know say businessman-rebel Dan rea billionaire like would you say I want to do something in computers right from high school. I wanted to do something in computers. That was what I got excited about. That's what I wanted to study Eddie. And when I was looking at colleges I was only focused on okay. What are the best colleges for computer science and that was my criteria? And so you decide to go oh to to the west coast to Stanford. Yeah this is like the beginning of the DOT com boom come one point. Oh did you get that feeling. England was that was that energy present on campus nineteen ninety-four so that energy of starting a company and the company starting around you in that dot com boom. I mean that was all around you especially by nineteen ninety six one thousand nine hundred seven. I mean there was excited. There was Yahoo. There was so many different companies in that the idea that you were computer scientists and you could go start a company with absolutely in the air one thousand nine hundred hundred important year at the year. Netscape and Netscape Browser. Comes out for mass use. Do you remember using the web for the first time and I don't remember the exact moment I use the web for the first time but I remember burn my year. One thousand nine hundred four freshman year was the first year everybody had email all my high school friends that e mail and it just changed everything like that time. In in computer technology technology was just this mash shift to introducing that consumer to all of this content and communications that nobody had access to prior. I guess like in your first year you met somebody who was who go on to be an important business co founder and partner Later on again in Aleve Aleve mad at you as you meet them so I lived in off freshman dorm compromiser and two doors down for me was the sky. I'll he was from Wisconsin. He was a swimmer but he loved computers and he was always building stuff. And this will. This will age US we worked on the first yearbook that was going to be digital instead of physical he put it on a multimedia CD distributed to all the freshmen and it was just photos. And you put the CD in there's your yearbook. Yeah exactly so you know like you work on this yearbook and then did you just continue to kind of talk about ideas or so I had a little blip. which was I took a computer science class in my freshman year there and I didn't do that well and I got a little nervous? which is is this the right field for me and that summer I got a job Bob? which was what I thought was going to be database activity in the mall and it turned out? I was the mall greeter where I would literally stand there and say welcome to Paramus Park and and I was complaining about it to my friend's dad he ran the IT Department for an Investment Bank Warburg pincus and he said quit your mall job. Come intern for me. And I had the most amazing summer experience I helped build one of the first websites for this investment bank. We built this application called morning meeting notes to help them. You know Record all their Monday meetings and I fell back in love with computer science and it was really then my sophomore year that I went full steam ahead on CS CBS. It was once I saw using computer science in the real world and I saw I was I reaffirmed that I was good at it. You know when you walk into Stanford and and all of a sudden you know. You have been the Valedictorian and you've been the best student in your class and then you walk in and all of a sudden your average and it makes you question in the sense of like. Oh Am I going to be good at this when I get out into the real world and having that summer experience I saw I can do

Selena Ap Computer Science Class Ramsey High School President Trump Programmer Salina Paramus Park Pets.Com Lycos Liberty Media Netscape Ramsey New Jersey India Stanford Basketball Silicon Valley New Jersey Investment Bank Warburg Pincus
"nine ten years" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

94WIP Sports Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

"One these contracts meaning nine ten year deals don't work out name me the contracts that were signed they didn't work out by twenty six year old because I can name you the ones that didn't work out Alex Rodriguez is a regional ten year deal go look at his numbers in those ten years you know contracts don't work out the one thousand pools twenty thirty one Manny Machado Bryce Harper twenty six years old six PM to two. radio ninety four. I agree. Phillies thing that we can do let's go from here. probably like that and there. because we like a cheese steak home like you just say. before you say your price zero. and I usually call a man. Greece six times sportsradio ninety four W. E.. hello good Johnny and the W. I. and the morning show. the final word in this organization if those guys do not get it done now it's a. the same way is called J. it's our own breath and I am seeing absolutely. it tells me he knows what to do when the games get imports. the W. I. B. morning show thirty two. W. I. E.. hello good Johnny and the W. I. and the morning show ended the. and the second day of my diet. your bio. because Alex trying to talk me out of the dot any I'd say it does it what you deserve it a tracking device but you know what he said what show got one after you're done..

Alex Rodriguez Manny Machado Bryce Harper Phillies Johnny Greece twenty six years twenty six year nine ten year ninety four W ten years ten year
What to expect from this year's G20 summit

FT World Weekly

14:18 min | 1 year ago

What to expect from this year's G20 summit

"But as the Japanese presidency seeks to steer the world's most powerful economies away from confrontation over trade questions have also been raised over Tokyo's apparent move to bow to US pressure by watering down its draft G twenty communicate on tackling climate change. Joining me in the studio to enlighten us about these issues off. Chris Giles the FTC economics editor and Leslie hook our environment. Correspondent Kris, why don't we start with you? There is a trade war going on. We know that how bad is it? How worried should we be? Well, I think there's two ways of looking at this one is if you look at the big. Brewed aggregates how much has the world grown in the in recent quarters. And what are the big forecast look like any counc- this trade war in those numbers really at all? But then if you look at what's bubbling under particularly manufacturing and trade is mostly still in manufacturing goods related. You see that in confidence indicators, the latest pay my for example, went below fifty for the first time since twenty twelve's of his loss of loss of confidence. You see the trade numbers, the trade volume flows have been falling recently, and you see that where the trade war has been most definitive between US and China. You see some very large drops in trade. So since October last year Chinese imports of US goods has fallen by about twelve percent. That's an a remarkable in a short time, say, sounds like you saying, we could be like that cartoon character that hasn't quite realized yet he's. Ron over a cliff if that's the case, what should we hope for from this g twenty meeting? I think that is exactly the case in the worry isn't what directly tariffs will do to trade flows. It's more the, the confidence impact of it is like, if you're a company wanting to invest somewhere and you think, well, this investment might be literally worthless, if something happens in global trade, which means that I can't export do the things I wanted to do with that investment that I'm not going to go ahead. I'm going to wait. And so that's the, the worry, what do we expect? But we're not expecting a resolution we're not expecting the tariffs that have been put on particularly by the US on two hundred billion dollars worth of imports from China at twenty five percent. We're not expecting those to disappear. The Treasury Secretary to the US Steve Mnuchin said that he reckoned that we were ninety percent of the way to deal without actually means essentially zero present the ways deal. There's always easy to do. I. Ninety percent last ten percent is always the difficult based, and this is exactly the rhetoric that was being used in April before the trade talks break down. So I don't think we're expecting a huge amount. If you could get something along the lines of talk, starting again at a detailed officials level and President Trump may be withdrawing the threat to expand the two hundred billion goods, which are subject to tears to five hundred billion, which is what the coun- threat is that at least you could diffuse some of the tensions, and we could get into maybe a world where we might have some point later in the year, see a resolution but I think that's about it from the G twenty this weekend. Let's, let's turn to the other issue. I mentioned at the start the trade war might be the short-term biggest threat to the world economy, the long term threat to the economy and maybe human civilization is climate change. And you have some bad news on that front. That's right. So the draft communicate prepared by Japan which could still change a lot on depending on the outcome of meeting as very weak language on climate change. It doesn't vow to cut emissions or make any grand statements about how the Paris agreement is irreversible or anything like that, which wasn't previous communicates. But this reflects a very sad reality or difficult reality, which is at the g twenty nations don't agree on climate change. The US plans to pull out of the Paris climate agreement. Saudi Arabia has also been very much dragging its heels when it comes to emissions cuts and what we're seeing now is global emissions hit a record high last year and the science. The modeling makes it more and more clear. What the impacts of climate change already are in terms of heat waves extreme weather rising sea levels, but the gap between what we know we should be doing versus what's actually happening in the world is just growing bigger, and bigger and the evidence suggests that the G twenty is not going to be able to do much about that, at least not this meeting if the draft communicate that you have seen is what comes into the final, Tex is that a deterioration from what we've seen before because it's been it's been a while. Now since Trump pulled out of the Paris agreement is there anything new here, or is it just a continuation of bad news for the last two years? The climate portion of the communicate has been what we call a g nineteen plus one. So basically, nineteen major economies agree on language about climate change. And then the US had its own paragraph where it says, actually, we the United States think this. So there has not been consensus among the twenty countries and. And what we've seen from Japan is, they're trying to go for the lowest common denominator and right of very watered down draft that everyone will agree to in this version climate change is just one of a list of environment concerns, along with marine pollution, biodiversity loss and resource scarcity, so they're positioning, it as just one of the many challenges that were working on rather than the challenge now in the past, the G twenty used to have much more consensus on climate change. In fact, in two thousand and nine ten years ago, there was a consensus statement on the need to phase out subsidies for fossil fuels in all the G twenty countries agreed to reduce their subsidies, or fossil fuels in the medium term, and that has not really happened. So what we've seen is even when the twenty does agree on something. It might not translate into reality. Even then. So does that mean we should expect unless you expect some positive surprise from from this weekend? Summit should we expect different parts of the world to go. Oh. Off their own separate ways on whether and how much they tried to combat climate change. Well, this year is quite a crucial year for the global climate commitment, because countries that signed the Paris agreement, including the US, because they haven't formally withdrawn, just that they plan to withdraw countries signed the Paris climate agreement have to come up with new tougher targets by twenty twenty. So we're expecting to see entries up. The ante we've seen the US. We've seen the UK, adopt an zero legislation in the EU has had very serious discussions about adopting an zero goal. So this year is seen as being quite critical for determining that direction. But I think we won't see the twenty influence the shape of that. Whereas in the past that g twenty was a place where there were key negotiations and deliberations that really set the tone for the rest of the climate talks. That's no longer the case. I want to come to a point where it seems to be that the trade agenda, and the climate agenda come together or maybe clash. Because if different parts of the world, Golez separate ways on climate change policy, then that conflicts with trying to keep the world trading system. Open doesn't it because countries that don't make an effort on climate change will be more competitive in terms of exports and can out compete the countries that do put in place, stricter carbon rules. And then the pollution is just going to move to different countries. Some economists have called full tariffs carbon border taxes tariffs on the border to penalize stop trade limit trade with countries that don't pull their part of the Boden is that something Leslie, you see happening at all as countries get very serious about their zero emission skulls, and we're expecting France and also Germany to consider adopting these goals than having some type of carbon border adjustment. Does become a crucial part of that because you can't take the emissions of your own economy, two zero without implementing some type of? Tariff on steel, and cement, and all the goods that are getting getting shipped in. But we haven't seen a lot of political movement in the short term on this issue of the carbon border adjustment. I think given what Chris just said about the global trade war. The trade frictions, there's so much tension already that I think, politicians are reluctant to add one more item to the agenda, when it comes to trade talks, which you think Chris will climate change worries come to interfere with trade discussions, not immediately. I fully agree with Liz as dot something for now. But it is something people being talking about, in fact, for for a long time because theoretically, it makes a huge mental sense to have a border adjustment. Because if the UK goes to zero but just imports all its carbon essentially from China, then that doesn't help the world because global warming is global and so is traditionally been a French concern border, carbon border adjustments. And I'm so slightly surprised micro hasn't been making. All of this, because it's a it's a natural. I mean not, not just natural for FRANZ, but it's actually theoretically natural that you would, if you were wanting to have a competent tanks to make you as a route to going to Sierra missions, you want that on your consumers so you want you'll consumers, ultimately, to be paying for the call when they use weather. It comes in something that's produced in your country or whether it comes from something even ported. They don't want to make imports more favorable now. This is always been very difficult in the trading system, because it could contravenes WTO rules to do this will people think it contravenes WTO as nobody's. No one's done it. So no one knows. But it probably does contravene the retail rules. Although we gotta remember that. The WTO is a particularly weak body at the moment, and the US, ironically has, has essentially new to the power of its dispute resolution settlement body. So whether these rules would ever, be enforceable is, is quite a visit quite big question. But in lots of ways this is this is a subject that wants countries have gotten zero target that will be a lot more pressure, particularly from that domestic manufacturing sectors to think about this. And I think it won't go away will come up. It's not something for this year, but it will definitively come up, particularly if there are countries that are producing quite a lot but not having a very competent oil company emission standards in the same way that other countries won't to be forward, looking and apart from the legal issue. This suggests that politically at least if the US and China don't vanish to resolve their. Trait differences. It will sort of open up the goal will politics to other countries to stop to respect trade rules, an intimate less, perhaps for this reason, but this opens up a sort of scenario way, global cooperation in global tombstones on Raveling, and you end up having regional locks, issuing regional interests me, if we go down that route. Do you think that the g twenty is no longer fit for purpose in your field, and then more mental field Leslie? What do you think? Well, it's interesting, one of the campaigners that I interviewed a couple of days ago, made the point that the D twenty has always been born out of crises various types of crisis financial crisis. Let's respond to a crisis. But when it comes to the climate crisis hasn't really been able to respond in a meaningful way. And I think that's because there simply isn't consensus between the G twenty countries about what to do and. Amount of summits, can sort of paper over that fact if individual countries take extremely ambitious goals to cut their own emissions to net zero, for example, that only really works. If other countries are doing similar things, and I think this tension between what an individual country can do. And then what's the impact on the whole global system is going to become more and more parent over the next years and decades, we have to remember that the g twenty is not global government. It cannot take decisions in that sense. It's not something that has any enforcement mechanism it can only do things if literally all the members agreed to do it. So where it's always come on stuck is where there's disagreement and safe has a fundamental disagreement as Leslie, it's been outlining on what the climate change, whether global warming is happening than the G twenty is notable that will they've ever been able to deal with it. It works as a very useful forum for leaders to actually thrash out some of these. Issues. But if they still disagree at the end of that discussions in that bilateral meetings, etc. Then you're living in cloud-cuckoo-land, if you think the g twenty's going to resolve something, and it sounds like this is happening on trade as well as on climate is happening on trade. So we used to have sort of boilerplate language in every communique saying, we would never as the G Tweety, no g twenty country would ever impose tariffs or any other trade restrictions on each other. And this, this health through the whole crisis, where people will very worried. It wouldn't hold but it's not held a tool since since Donald Trump has been elected US presidents. So it's a good vehicle for agreement so long as people already agree. Yes. Well that's a bit of a somber note to end on end. We must that's it for this week. My thanks to Crisanto Leslie, thank you very much. And thanks everyone for listening till next week goodbye. Here's a few words from Dame. Helen Mirren telling us what she's a fan of. I'm a fan of platform heels on a fan of Fellini and Antonio ni. I'm a fan of Anaman Yanni for me the greatest actors of all. I'm a fan of being bad. Ass on a fan of dressing up and glamorous outfits. I'm a fan of luxury. I'm a fan of Mandarin. Oriental.

United States Crisanto Leslie Paris President Trump China Chris Giles WTO Japan UK Kris Tokyo Helen Mirren Editor FTC RON Saudi Arabia Anaman Yanni
196,000 jobs added in latest report from the Fed

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:23 min | 1 year ago

196,000 jobs added in latest report from the Fed

"Paul lenghty of economic news to kick around from big time jobs numbers today to the president's ongoing criticism of the fed and his shall we say idiosyncratic nominations to that body. Let's do it over with Linda Lopez from business insider and Dion rebellion markets editor at axios. Hi there. Hey. Let's start. I think before we dive into this fed situation. Let's start with the jobs numbers broadly. I guess more of the same especially in terms of wages Dion. I'm gonna start with you, food and housing still cost a lot. So at what point to these stuck wages really start to hurt the economy? That's a really good question because they have actually moving in the right direction. But now, they're kind of stuck in might be moving back down the thing about this jobs report today was it didn't really tell us anything new about the economy. Everything was kind of on trend along the same trend that we've been going on really since the end of the recession in the beginning of the recovery in two thousand nine so you got back to one hundred ninety six thousand jobs added that's about along trend that we've seen really for the past nine ten years wage growth kind of moving back towards its trend. And we're really this is just kind of return to the normal that we've seen over the past ten years. So didn't really tell us anything new about the economy, except, you know, the new boss same as the old boss, right and Lynette our reporters say three point two percent is okay. As far as wage growth goes. But we'd need three point five percent. Two four for a sustained period for workers to gain back this ground and getting to the fed. It seems like that wouldn't be that likely if inflation hawks start saying it's time to raise interest. Rates that fair that's fair. But here's the thing. I'm one of those people who believes that the American worker hasn't really gotten a sufficient raised since the nineteen sixties. So when I look at these three point two numbers four percent numbers. It compares to, you know, compare. It does not compare to you know, the lack of ground that the American worker has has has not made. I mean, the American workers purchasing power has basically stayed steady for the last forty years. And this is why we've seen such massive inequality. So when I see a report like this, and we start quibbling over three point two percent. Four percent. I'm like, okay. I mean find right, but we can quote, it's not gonna change of when what is you know, an inherent structural problem with our economy right now. Well, then let's move onto the structure, and it's not good. It's writ large. That's what it does. You know? She just she comes and drops. I want one. I mean, we keep calling ya. So it's on us. Dionne broadly. Let's talk about the fed. You have these proposed nominations in Stephen Moore, and now Herman Cain. And I think what we should ask with all of this pressure. And these kind of weird nominations is can the fed do its job. Yeah. No. Of course, the fed can do its job, and it is important to point out that these are just two of nominations of. I think it's twelve board seats. You've also got the chair the vice chair you've got a number of fed regional presidents all of whom everyone on the fed currently very qualified including the previous people that President Trump has nominated.

FED President Trump Paul Lenghty Dion Linda Lopez Axios Markets Editor Vice Chair Lynette Stephen Moore Dionne Herman Cain Donald Trump Two Percent Nine Ten Years Four Percent Five Percent Forty Years
"nine ten years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Jeopardy host Alex trebek's revealed that he has stage four pancreatic cancer stage four, but in a YouTube message, he talked to jeopardy fans, he's seventy eight and he said he intends to beat this disease. He's not going to give up. He's not going to stop working truth told I have to because under the terms of my contract. I have to host jeopardy for. Three more years me come on. He you know, he's being lighthearted he's tongue in cheek there. A little bit about the reason that he has to work through pancreatic cancer. But it's obvious to me that that's just a good attitude. And so how do you work with people and work with those select families that come into the office to prepare for some of those challenges that you might not see coming in it. Maybe it's not anything like the earthquake in Indonesia or Armenia or even Alex for back with, you know, with stage four cancer, but there's always going to be some kind of curveball. You don't see common? That's for sure especially when you've been doing this as long as we have a made up Antuna since nineteen ninety five so it's twenty four years, and it does remind me of a one of our families gentleman. I've been working for just about a decade since two thousand and ten who's only seventy one years old and passed away from a massive heart attack right in his home with his wife. He was carrying for her. And I had just seen him a week and a half before that and an event that we had for our families. And you know, these things happen. The good news was we had done a lot of due diligence in terms of who wasn't in great health, and we had set up stuff. So, you know, the family was going to be taken care of. And we're continuing to kind of go through that. But all the things that we had done prior to that we had set the family up for that. And you know, he left his family in great shape. It was obviously, you know, too soon. And you know, this guy was a great great ambassador, or, you know, for for our firm he had introduced me to several several people, and which were we're gonna miss him. But he was somebody who really was a family oriented guy. He he the planning that he got done with us prior to him passing away things that we put into motion nine ten years ago. Is paying dividends. Now pay dividends for him while he was alive bus really paying dividends for his wife and his children and. This. It's easy aren't things that you liked to plan for or that are fun to plan for. But you know, he was very realistic about his life and his dad passed away young. And and so there were some things that he wanted to make sure that we're taking care of. And you know, there's always challenges where people may be forced to retire earlier than they planned in terms of based on help, they're based on companies just hunting changes. Yeah. I'm trying to think of the word when they strike down. There. Downsizing is the word. I'm looking. Yeah. There's always companies downsizing and people consolidating and mergers and acquisitions, and we another gentleman come in a couple of weeks ago that same type of thing, you know, he was sixty years old and did a great job for his company. But for no reason other than they were just downsizing losses position. And now, it's like, okay. I've got a step back. I was planning on working a few more years. What if some of the things we need to look at it? Gotta be. Efficient my taxes. You know, the biggest thing we always hear is do I have enough. He's six years old. And I said, hey, I'm healthy. I'm active. Do I have enough money to make it through to eighty five or ninety years old? And what do I need to do to make sure that happens? How can you guys help me do that? And I think that's the thing that we do really well tug. I always tell our select families in our listeners. We don't try to be all things to all people. We really focus on those people that are retirees or that retirement red zone, you know, three to five five to seven years out. But we wanna make sure it never run out of income. We wanna make sure where being very tax efficient as we do that. And we want to make sure that your lifestyle doesn't get down sized in retirement. Right. We're cut back in retirement. And I think that's something that a lot of folks worry about they said, well, yeah, I I know I could probably retire. But I'm going to have to. To step back. I'm can we still go out to dinner? Can we still take vacations? Can we still do all those things? And that's where we're really a great resource for people. We've got some great software. We've got a lot of experience. We've got four advisors in our office would over sixty years of experience in helping retirees make sure they never run out of money. Make sure they're not paying too much in fees. Make sure they're not paying too much in taxes. So obviously, Alex trebek's has had a blast life. He's seventy eight years old. He's still working jeopardy and doing that. And you know, I really hope he beats it pancreatic cancer is not one of those good ones. But I think you know, everybody has challenges and everybody has things that we can't really prepare for something like pancreatic cancer being in state four, but you can make sure you have things set up. So if something does happen to you that your wishes are carried out that your family is going to be taken care of. And those are things that we can really help people with because. There's always going to be health challenges. We always like to say that, you know, getting old is not for the faint of heart hits tough. And there's going to be challenges. And I think one of the things that's really key tug is having a plan that fluid having a plan that takes into consideration these types of things and not that you can have everything planned for. But when you know, this is our primary focus working with retirees while emotionally, it's upsetting to us. Most of the time we've kind of covered those basis in terms of major health changes in terms of, you know, a disability in terms of, you know, maybe our work careers getting cut short in terms of maybe something happening with one of our children. What do we do now to help, you know, from a financial stamp NAN? And we want to get those things covered because for the families that we serve that's one of the most important things to them. And you know, it does. Take a little bit of time, and you really want to work with somebody who's got a lot of experience in that arena. And that's looking at all. All of these potential scenarios or situations that could really have a significant impact on you or your family. Yes, you're absolutely right. And that is what a second opinion service. Does it examines all of those aspects and make sure that you know, you're headed in the right direction that what you're doing. And what you've done puts you in the best situation possible to be successful in retirement and not have to take a step backwards as Brian mentioned and not have to change your lifestyle. Then second opinion services, a nine hundred ninety five dollar value is going to be made complimentary for seven listeners to the show because we always try to reward people on the weekend because we know your time's valuable, and we want you to be able to act on something that we've talked about on the show if it pertains to you, and if it makes sense for you. That's what a second opinion service does. And that's what it is if you'd like to take advantage of. You've save seven hundred fifty thousand dollars or more for retirement and then calls on the show at nine one nine eight five to twelve fifteen nine one nine eight five two one two one five the second opinion service does one of three things Brian. I'm going to do the cliffs notes, and you can correct me if I'm wrong, but it's going to tell you you're doing a great job be you're doing good. But you could be doing better or see. There's some real red flags ahead in. That's exactly right, tugging in one little disclaimer. And you know, our listeners and our select families know this, and when we sat down most of the time from saving standpoint and an income standpoint, most of the time our families have done a really good job tug. But we're we're able to really bring some value is efficiency. And what I mean by that we can help get better returns. Maybe then they're getting on cash, maybe we can reduce their risk. We help with their taxes. We help them with setting up some better income streams at lower cost. So those types of things most of the people that come to us. They're pretty. Good shape in terms of what they done from a saving standpoint. But it's just not all put together in terms of where are we going to draw our money from how? And when do we take our social security? What's the best strategy for that was the best way to reduce our taxes? What's the best way to make sure that our teeth across in our eyes are dotted? How do we do that Brian because we've done a really good job of saving? How can you and your team help us kind of get across the finish line? And do it, you know, more effectively and more efficiently, and I had one gentleman who had talked about who had recently retired, and he was very conscious very feet conscious. And he said, Brian, I think I'm going to be okay. And I can do this by myself. And I said, you know, what you absolutely can. But it's gonna cost you thousands and thousands of dollars. And he said, well, what do you mean by that? If I hire you guys I've got to pay a fee. I said, well, if you're getting two percent on your own in what you're doing, and we can get you four percent just on net and the numbers are bigger than this. But I'm just going to do this for our listeners, really simplistic and his portfolio was bigger than two million dollars. I said you're gonna come out forty thousand dollars ahead every single year over ten years that's four hundred thousand dollars difference. I said how much have we cost you? He said, you have a cost me anything and the numbers were better. The numbers were better was closer three to five to six percent on larger sum of money. But it was close to a million dollars difference over the next ten years without taking on more risk in. So there really was no additional fees. This was net money that we are going to be able to bring back to him and his family, but it was strategies that he just wasn't aware of any surprised. I never looked at. At it that way. Maybe we do need your help. Yeah. And that's the thing. Because oftentimes as we've said on this show probably a million times. You don't know what you don't know. So there was no way for him to know about the strategies you're using or we're talking about him because he's never heard of it. It's not the field that he works in. Just don't know. What you don't know? Any look this guy was incredibly smart, incredibly smart. Several degrees of very very successful career. Like a lot of the folks that we work with. And I said, yeah, you can do this on your own you really have to mess it up. But he said, I don't think I need you. I said, I don't think you need us either. But you might want us. Here's why let me show you this this and this. Wow. Nobody ever showed me that. I wasn't even aware that something like this existed. Yes. Okay. So I think that's the biggest thing for our folks at this is what we do talk this five days a week eight to ten hours a day, you know, me and my team. These are the things that we really are passionate about and kind of shepherding retirees into retirement, making sure they don't run out of income making sure their tax efficient, making sure we're accounting for inflation and taxes and long-term care things. All of these things are things that we deal with on a daily basis. What are select families? That's what we offer up that second opinion service the same one. That's Brian does offer to those select families that he works with that. Most of them have probably used in the past. You can do that too. It'll be complementary for you nine hundred ninety five dollar value made complimentary for seven listeners on the show you save seven hundred fifty thousand dollars or more for retirement that number nine one nine eight five to twelve fifteen nine one nine eight.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Could you share you broke into leadership and your path to becoming a CMO? Absolutely. And thanks for having me on the podcast as well. So my Pathan leadership is an interesting one t- backup before the marketing experience I've been in in marketing proper for by nine ten years. Now, I actually spent my first five or so years in sales. So I was an account executive, and then I became a sales manager. And I think that's probably why I have tended towards B to B marketing and enrolls since I walked to the other side of the fence at work from there actually spent a couple of years at business school. So I had had some management experience in sales to set it. I wanted to double dine on that and potentially switch careers. So went to business school at tuck Dartmouth came out of that in management consulting, which also teaches you different set of leadership skills and pretty soon. You're you're managing small teams of of analysts and associate consultants as we call them. And so by the time, I got linked tune in early twenty ten I had some leadership slash people management experience, but it was really my first proper marketing job. So I came into Lynton is a the first product marketer for Lincoln talent solutions, which was their largest fastest growing business and kind of jumped on that rocket ship. And when I joined the company was about five hundred employees. He's when I left four and a half years later, it was six and a half thousand and when you're when you have that sort of career opportunity that's rose up all sorts of leadership opportunities for you as well as opportunities to grow within your discipline. And so I stayed in marketing for the four and a half years, but I had a different succession of different roles. Basically that helped me to see more do more around the marketing stack as it were. So by the time, I left linked to move to open table for year and a half in restaurant marketing, I had amassed enough breadth of experience take on senior role, and it's sort of gone from there. It's funny. It's like. We chatted to a lot of Simos or diff- marking Gators strikes me kind of like this sort of diagram of sales experience consulting experience and marketing experience and see him on the middle. It's pretty incredible just to see sorta patterns of the people we talked to definitely, and I think product marketing particular a great entry point for consultants because an MBA as well as that strategic skill set. It's the a lot of what you do in product marketing around messaging and positioning pricing lot of strategy and thinking about competitive competition and so forth. And so I find that the the skillset that was actually tr- directly. Transferable course yet. So today, we specifically want to talk to you kind of customer feedback. And I know you have been talking to everyone saucer bettas on just wondering like a very high level for listeners like why should customer feedback be such priority for for marketers into the nineteen. Well, how they sad statistic share with each so sorry monkey we we're quite fond of research as you can imagine. And we ran some research last year and find that sixty three percent of people think that. Marketers are selling them things that they do not need to. That tells me that we as marketing profession or not doing a good enough job of listening of really understanding the pain points the challenges the opportunities for us to add value to our customers..

tuck Dartmouth sales manager account executive Lincoln sixty three percent nine ten years
"nine ten years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on KTOK

"And sober was addicted to crack cocaine at the worst part of your addiction. How much how many hits a crack? We're doing a day. Oh, I was doing daily, you know, a couple of hundred dollars a day easy. It got to the point that drug dealers was up for fourteen days, and and they'd stage the center bench, and I was downtown Minneapolis. And I and I go what are you guys doing? We're cutting you off you've been up fourteen days, I probably out strong winds asleep. I went down to the streets of Minneapolis and two o'clock in the morning, and nobody would sell me crack came back upstairs, and they at one guy sitting up. He says, you know, what he says give me that phone? I'm gonna take your picture. He said you've been promised for your promising us for years just pillow is just a platform for God. And you're gonna come back someday. And help us all get out of this addiction, and you're gonna quit near he says, we're not gonna let you die on us. And that guy works me for me to this to this day, your former drug dealer works for you. Two of them. Do how did you it? When did you make a decision, and how did you get off this because a lot of people can't get off the stuff? Yeah. It was mine. It was January sixteenth two thousand nine ten years ago today. I I knew if I waited one more day they this. My calling would be gone. I my purpose that God had planned for me. And I and I prayed that I would wake up in the morning and never had the desire again. And I did I woke up the next morning, never, you know, the desire was gone. But then a couple of months later, I actually went to a faith based outpatient at my sister's church, and I walked in there. I've been in different treatment centers throughout the eighties nineties, but I walked in there, and it was different. So we're not here to talk about how much she did. We want to talk about your childhood. We want to talk about you know, what I said I have a fine childhood and this and I said, well, I was divorced. And they said, let's talk about. Cuts in things happen in childhood from follow. This does divorce trauma like veterans come back, and they've been traumatized people they manifest into addictions, and and that we'll pick it up right there. We'll go you over a couple of minutes on the other side. And and maybe some people that are struggling even today that are listening to this program. There is plenty of help out.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Five minutes. What the democrat party's been doing why they flipped? How they put their power ahead of the nation's security and well-being. How they lie about the economic consequences of unskilled labor. Labor pouring across our border and the effect on poor particularly minorities in our country. All self censorship. By the free press the propaganda press. They contradictory positions by Democrats as recently as eight nine ten years ago. Our Bernie Sanders as recently as a few years ago. They don't play them. They don't talk about them. They don't explain this flip what took place why for the reasons I keep saying the media in this country. Collectively is the mouthpiece of the democrat party. They are in sync on policy. They are in sync on ideology. The democrat party where to swing the other way today just as quickly that media would be right there carrying their banners. I'll be right back. Mm-hmm. With a look at the roads. Here's Andy Kaye from the one zero one five seven twenty AM traffic center traffic sponsored by the estrogen temporal scanner thermometer. Are you or.

democrat party Bernie Sanders Andy Kaye eight nine ten years Five minutes
"nine ten years" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Welcome back. If you're just tuning in, you miss Larry Jacobson, director of instructor development and top instructor at Online Trading Academy shed, some light on consistency in the markets. We're talking about generating more money. We're talking about generating more income whether the market's going up down or sideways, we were talking about how much the market had dropped a little bit ago. You know, it's been about a week or so since we had the big drop in the markets. But when you look at those opportunities, they are they are that they are opportunities to generate to generate more income and essentially give yourself a raise, and it really is important to remember that the money is made on the way down just like the money is made on the way up. And so really we wiped out number one we wiped out three months worth of gains on this last market drop. If we didn't know how to make money as the markets were falling if you do know how to make money as the marks were going down. If you have that skill. You're able to generate as much money in a week as over the last three months combined, and so it ends up being these great opportunities. It's one of the reasons why whenever we have a market crash. There's a new wave of billionaires that come out of it. Yes. Billion with a B? Right billion with a B come out of it. And a lot of times they're looked at as a as not. So they're looked at with not such a pleasant light. We could say because when they made all that money. A lot of people were losing money. Now a lot of people were losing money in there. And those are individuals though, who look at a down market as a bad thing. Now, these individuals that were turning themselves in from millionaires and billionaires they were looking at a down market has an opportunity. They had that skill set. They had that knowledge they knew how to approach that downmarket. So think about a job if you had a job where you got laid off one third of the time that wouldn't be a very consistent stream of income. But a lot of times what the bullish bias with only making money is the markets are going up. That's kind of the situation. Our income in retirement accounts are in if we're reliant on just one simple direction, the markets, go up down or sideways, and if we only make money when the market goes up. Well, there's two thirds of the time two thirds of the direction where we're essentially laid off or we're not allowed to go to work. And so that's one of the reasons why it's very difficult to follow kind of that. Classic. Just simple. Bias and have consistent growth. You look over the last nine ten years. We've had this great bullish move. But how much opportunity has been lost on those down opportunities. How much opportunity was given back in two thousand eight when the market crashed. And if we don't have that skill set going forward this could be the beginning of this next big downturn where we could give back fifty or sixty percent of our retirement account. How about instead of that instead of going through that process, again, how about we understand how to make money at the are going down we start doubling up on the stuff. No, absolutely. You know, it's funny because one of the things that most pulled understand they start trading on their own and they make mistakes all the time. And here's why the number one mistake. Most people make in their lives when it comes to trading is they want to try it on their own first. And then maybe get some education a little bit later on. Well, here's the problem that most people understand five percent of the wealth. Right now is being shared by ninety five percent of the population. Where ninety five percent of the wealth is shared by five percent of the people. So that means there's five percent of us who have understood the right way to trade. How to? Make money and what's really scary right now. And I talked to a lot of students is I asked him a simple question. Do you work for more money or does money work for you? And most people are working for more money. They always believe that they're going to get ahead if they're gonna find their freedom, and let's face it people who start trading or people looking for multiple streams of income and most millionaires we discussed this Ryan have on an average five income streams they're doing so not because they're working harder. They're working smarter. They're figuring out how to work, right? And what that simply means is if there's a way to learn how to generate income without having to put more effort, that's the best way to do it. And most of the time people don't understand that trading system. What's the system? It stands for save yourself stress time, energy and money. If you learn how from professionals to do things the right way. There's no reason why you can't be generating income as well. Most people either don't know how to do this or are afraid to do this. And honestly, they keep. Going out there in thinking that they're going to attain freedom by working more and more. Well, most people I talked to my students give you an example MC MC used to work in the workplace. He quit. He wanted to work for himself. He wanted more time with his family. Well, if you can learn a skill that will allow you to make money the same way, the banks do.

Online Trading Academy instructor Larry Jacobson MC MC director Ryan five percent ninety five percent three months nine ten years sixty percent
"nine ten years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

07:07 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"There. What's the context? Yeah. Panini america. I've been doing this for four years dance. Really cool. They every year they do it Super Bowl kid reporter initiative, so kids go out and buy their trading cards all over the country, some of the cards have a coat on the back you enter that code. If you win you get to go to the Super Bowl media night with me. I coach them out ask questions they go around to the boost they get front of line and get to ask these players really cool questions. It's been it's been a thrill for me to watch the joy in these kids faces are they've been able to do it. But the surprising thing that's come out of it is you've been immediate night. A million times these players are. Kinda kinda done with it. You know what? I mean, there's two hundred people at their booth. There's all these weird questions when they see the kid. They light up they love engaging with the kid the kid out some great questions the player loves the kid loves it. It's been one of the coolest things I've been able to do in my post career with anaemia America. And I just love the initiative, and I love doing it every year you can go to Panini kid reporter dot com. For more details. I'll leave you with this Trent because I know you're involved in these seven on seven and eleven on eleven and all these camps there and these kids coming out of high school going into college. They're ready to play right away in these five star recruits. We just saw this with Clemson where you got Trevor Lawrence who's coming in and Kelly, Bryan who's been you know, a decorated starter at Clemson as a senior. He's transferring now the I guess the ability for these kids to comprehend what they need to learn in college at that early of an age. And now we're looking at juniors and seniors where you might be expendable that position DC. This is a new wave where the five stars are coming in and for two years or three years, maybe. And then after that you got another five star coming in. And he might be expendable. Yes. I do think it's going to be a trend quarterbacks are just getting better every year. Think of it this way globally now, this is the really kids. Now, it's been the first time in the history of football were these kids when they were eight nine ten years old could find as much quarterback information as you could possibly ever walked out there between private quarterback coaches watching Amazon prime Tom Brady or Jared Goff in the Rams or everything we do at the wheel eleven your eight nine ten eleven years old you have access to every bit of quarterback information you could ever possibly want. Then you're throwing the football. You're playing in seven on seven year playing in the fall, you're being trained privately. You're you're you're learning curve has been exceleron so much. Well, now you at all the talent. Now, you're adding also the biggest strong toughest kid now playing court most athletic kids playing quarterback. It's kind of the perfect storm wherever you go around the country and we evaluate about. Seven hundred fifty thousand quarterbacks and we see now, we call it the elaborate, and we do twenty four guys goes to twelve but we see fifty guys every year, either seventy five guys that are so much better than I ever or that Tony Romo ever was or because we have all these quarterbacks come out and join us on the tour, and they go, are you kidding me? These kids are so much better than I was. And these are pro guys that played twelve fifteen years the NFL so you're just seen waves of quarterbacks in high school. I live in Texas. Now, I go to high school football game Friday night and every week. I go to a game. And I see a quarterback that was better than me. I mean, it's crazy. How many good quarterbacks are? So you're going to see every year these colleges get somebody that has a chance to be really really good. But who is playing now that you saw in high school where you went. He's got star written all over or I'm surprised that he's got starving all over. Oh, gosh. I can go down. I mean, eighty five percent of the power five quarterbacks are lead eleven guys are twenty to the NFL or eleven guys. I mean, I remember seeing Sam darnold play high school basketball. That's how we found a high school basketball tape because he broke his ankle junior year we had about a cap, and he might have thrown thirty balls. I looked over my personal assistant. And I looked at Jordan Palmer. I said that kid's gonna play in the NFL. I mean, we see Trevor Lawrence first time we saw when he was a freshman high school where like that kid's gonna play the NFL Justin feels the first time. We saw him back is going to play in the NFL. Josh rosen. Oh, gosh. Josh Rosen when we saw him as a tenth grader back is gonna play in the NFL. We see these kids at tenth eleventh grade. And sometimes you just know I mean, there's no doubt be one. They're going to go to a great school get coached well, play good people. They're going to be highly recruited. They're going to go to good place in college. A long leash. Meaning they're going to give it there. Are going to be given a chance to fail. Learn from their failure comeback to succeed. I would say are hit rates really really high just because we get to see them relative to all the other quarterbacks in the country. But is there going to be room for all these quarterbacks in the NFL? That's that's a great. This is going to be the most interesting draft. You can start this conversation right now because you have Herbert lock Greer mix. Sorely who am I forgetting I've forgetting somebody all these kids are big time NFL quarterback cows. But there's no place for them to go and this year's drought. So to stay in school this Herbert stay in school. Because if it's lock and mcsorely and Greer coming out only as more a room for more than three old Finley at North Carolina State. I mean, there's a lot of guys are really really talented, and they're just may not be enough seats for them to play in the NFL. And all the good thing is some of them may get drafted later than they should you know, two years ago, you might have been a top six pick. Now, you're going mid to late first round you get an opportunity to sit for a couple of years. I still think that's the best formula. If you're able to step for a little while and watch and learn like, Patrick Mahomes. So there's gotta be situations. Like that too. I'll say this. If you're. Doc Prescott and Dallas. Start playing better start playing better. There's a lot of guy better start playing better. Because there's guys coming up that you take their jobs in a heartbeat. Just like you're seen in college football great to visit with you Trent always appreciate your insights. And for more information on what Trent was talking about where you can win a trip to Super Bowl media day. Panini kid, reporter dot com. Thank you Trent. Are going to be at the Dan. Thanks, buddy. We'll come back play of the day instead of the day as well. Dan, Patrick show. If you love football, you love yelling at the TV screen with friends in wearing clothing with somebody else's name on it. There's no better place to watch football with friends then Buffalo Wild Wings. Enjoy the football food football beverages..

NFL football reporter Panini Trent Trevor Lawrence Josh Rosen Herbert lock Greer Patrick Mahomes Tony Romo basketball Texas America Clemson Amazon Jordan Palmer Sam darnold Dallas Tom Brady
"nine ten years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fervent thanks Bobby knowing Chicken anymore but they did you know. Six seven eight nine. Ten years ago Man oh. Man in and as I said we wouldn't start playing it would do it if people are. Begging you for it and. You. Don't act like you? Don't, wanna play it you know. You have course yeah what are you go yeah that's right, because you're there you're there to serve the public before I gotta ask you what would, be the songs that you, would, ban, if, it, was your wedding I. Wouldn't ban any song because I my whole life is making, the majority of the people happy so I don't care about me being happy All my favorite CDs or you know at home so if it's a party I, want the, majority of the people to be happy interesting well let's that. Shows why you continue, to do this for, so. Long. Ago we, played you know, twist and show come in on the lists that was here it is. Number ten c. shout Eisley brothers Yep yeah I mean. There's a factual the crowd that's like. The parents and even the kids like. It too we'll, tax the crowd like in deep into the wedding they'll love to hear like a beat we'll put a whole Beatles set, together starting with twisted showed up, sick of twist and shout Gump's sick of in the mood when they want to hear a swing to evolve. We know is in. The mood, but, you, know how we're gonna play it with like it's. The first time we ever. Played any of these that's that's your, job I understand twist twist and shout and in the mood. Pretty pretty doubtful I was like the chicken Clucking, version of in the mood I don't know if. You've ever heard that one That's not going to be worked for a wedding. Necessarily that's the one that always appealed to me Yeah. That's not on the, list because I don't I think you're as you're. Right that's very, specialized yeah and then you know sometimes the facts of. The crowd wants the air so Frank Sinatra Yeah A versatile band that plays weddings can do all those things very. Well Yep you gotta do you gotta? Be able to to be able to do a little bit of everything Yeah a. Little, bit of everything so that people go that everyone leaves, got their music you know that's the secret well before I finish. Off, the night. In a few minutes I'm going to go through a number of songs on the list Oh A little bit of everything actually made some surprise me and some surprise me because they're not as highly ranked as hateful as I would have, thought but we'll we'll get to that little. Delayed. Eight, Bobby thanks for the. Call appreciate the kind. Words All right thanks, bye our last break of the evening slash. Warning. And, then back the conversation. It's WBZ NewsRadio everybody.

Bobby Frank Sinatra Gump c. Ten years
"nine ten years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"It was just a very brief what eight nine ten years ago obama's president and our side is upset right our side was every bit as upset right when obama got elected as the other side is now with trump and if you don't believe that you're not being honest because i believe that i know that i was beside myself went obama golic i did not accept barack obama as president i did not want barack obama to succeed because i believed it barat barack obama's succeeded in doing what he wanted to do to america that would be bad for america i didn't want obama to do well so when there are democrats who say now they don't want trump to succeed i get it i said the same thing about obama but when obama was in power and when the democrats were in power the media the democrat media said the same thing about us then oh republicans aren't very patriotic republicans hate too much too many haters among republicans and conservatives they hate america because they don't like obama so many people the democrats and their helpers in the media said that about me and so many other people when obama was president were haters and we hate america because we won't accept a bomb and we don't want obama to succeed i see too many people on our side making that same mistake now democrats hate america i'm seeing over and over and over i think that it is a cheap thing to say i think it is an offensive thing to say and i think it's wrong i just think it's dead wrong look when they accused me and a bunch of other conservatives eight years ago of hating america because we didn't like obama they were wrong i loved america that's why i didn't like obama because i love america so much they were wrong back then when they said that about us and we're wrong today anybody on our side who says the same thing about democrats that they hate america can we of grow up and get beyond that they don't hate america they just believe in a different america than you and i do democrats today don't hate america because they hate trump i'll tell you what democrats don't like and don't want the america that our founding fathers gave us i know that we know that that's for sure they don't want the america our founders gave us they don't like that america they don't want that america hates hates a really strong word all i'll say is the democrats the left they don't believe in the america our founding fathers gave us in america with a people free men and women free and responsible for their own lives and a government that stayed generally the hell out of our lives that's the america we were given democrats don't want that america they don't believe in that america i still do plenty of you do in america were were free and responsible in government stays out of our lives that's the america we were given that's the america i believe in today's democrats and by the way too many republicans don't believe in that america that's that's the fight that's the truth it's it's not that democrats hate america they just believe in a different america than you and i do i believe that and so we have a fight and we have a debate about what kind of in america we're going to live in that's all but you can't have that fight and you can't have that debate right when when you when you throw something like that out there joe walsh and all these tea party people they hate america look at the way they're talking about intriguing barack obama that's no way to start a debate same thing today democrats hate america that's wrong that is simply wrong and it's a lazy thing to say so lazy thing to say they believe in the different america that's why we're divided don't you see that that's why this country is divided you've got half of the country that either doesn't understand or doesn't believe in the country that our founding fathers gave us they want an america with a big government that does everything for everybody that's not the america we were given.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"In the next eight nine ten years when you give it a shot i have a heart attack you'll think back now you'll be old you'll be forty yeah i mean basically will be in in in silence i do like like circuit training like just like i'll do like like i'll ron do sprints and then i'll lift a little weights a lot of body resistance stuff and the painter i have had a trainer but you know i kind of adopted my own shit now you learn some of and you know i also i like doing it and i you know i like to sweat and i like to i like to spend an hour not checking my phone just you know what i mean so yeah plus i wish i liked but but you don't like it until you get okay how long did it take you till you liked it and how was it grueling up until that point it's fucking hard in the beginning men also have you have you ever been a guy who exercises i've gone probably at most maybe like six months of being like real so i i was there because if you've never done it it's like really fucking thing i did was swim yard yeah yeah yeah it's i don't know man i just like it i like to sweat and be off my self fuck you do more of the next time you know well being healthy and looking good as fucking that also and also it's like if i'm going to be on camera it's my job i tell myself that to eat a hamburger every fucking time hamburgers or the best do you have a problem with food like do you like now that you're excising is diet something you think about i do yeah i i'm basically like really good all day and then at night is like where i'm like let it go and i try to i try to forgive forgive myself about i try to not be like 'cause i don't want to be some as look here's here's what i want to be if you guys get a pizza i don't wanna be the guys like nah can slice do your nestle if you're like to fuck him part of the pizza yeah you know so you know your dislikes skipper no i agree with like the don't be such an extreme to like ruined party exactly yeah okay like the vegetarian theory of like i won't fuck in touch it i'll turns and when my brighter went vegetarian if my mom still cooked something in the pot which you can but let's say there's been but it's like okay so you're asking her to cook a whole that becomes a problem god damn fuck so that's when i'm like well just i wish you i wish you nailed me more no it's not maybe i don't know what she what she enabled me we ate a breakfast burrito.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"You to two hundred miles when you're a mechanic or lack of like i am you know you need that extra hundred ninety five miles in the rest you get like that five mile tow kt needs the old two hundred miles just in case in between phoenix and vegas things go wrong but boy one thing to another guy comes over helps me get my battery out so then i'm good i go to autozone surely my five year warranty is in play with my gold durra luster whatever no sorry mr times when we did not have that under your phone number i'm thinking like well what number did i give i'm giving out numbers from nine ten years ago this happened like a year and a half ago couldn't find it so got to shell out a buck eighty air it is hundred eighty get the new battery put it in couldn't get it rolling call my buddy johnny again got it towed down there he got it rolling as mechanic one of these guys that can take a car apart in a day put it back together no problem he take a car part you put it in my garage you come back two years later it's exactly the way you left it i'm not touching anything i have no clue my dad's like asking me for a three s i'm giving them the pliers you know why some listening to the game because he left the door cracked open games coming down you know he's asking me for the players given him a screwdriver it is what it is you know kind of like chuck from happy days member chuck don't bounce a ball in the house okay dead starts bouncing it again that's chuck kt if it bounced i was on it it was something to be mechanically inclined i was not on itself without further do i welcome in somebody that probably he's changed his own oil he's done all these things i guarantee is guy fourtime division one athletic director one of the best one of my favorite guests and because he has so much in common with bottom of the hour guest brian panish panish perspective had to get you in livengood backing studio not only at my request but panish banish he comes out he's like thompson when he get live and getting again i mean last time jim you guys hit it off you knew probably seven to ten people right away from the college world of sport can it's it's great to be with you again as robin i'm really looking forward to talking with brian absolutely but you know that when you get this stage in life and agents on hey it's all about friends it's all about those com contacts and so on and and your day is going to be great and tomorrow wednesday is going to be a beautiful day for kt i i just know that well here's the thing so you know kathy livia does a great camp and i know that marvin menzies doing one and i mean they do all these great summer camp and they helped the kids they get him into a nice cool cox arena there and gals are working with both boys and girls as far as basketball camp so dropping jordan christina's youngest often cheese not even eleven yet and she's already five four i mean this girl's got long legs her dad is is i think like six five six six and christie's five ten five eleven so i'm looking at another della don that i'm going to be able to get some type of retirement from so i'm making sure she goes to cathy olivier's camp in well done job so i thought it started at eight thirty but it didn't start at nine for the kids so i dropped off jordan christie they run up and i'm sitting there and i'm waiting and a you know what i'll go back and say hi to cathy i saw yesterday but i wanted to talk to her so i pull over in the other latin out the blackclad jim but i pull over in the other lot under the trees to make sure the shade the car christine and i dropped her off we go back to the car back out a krino christine is nice optima of senate here crunch that's not good what was that good sound how especially when you're in the white scarf you're in your old car it's not as bad you can kinda okay pretending here and go on and get home and check assess the damage but right away i was.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"And and it was four inches and made it harder on me and i had to overcome that with the extra strength that i had so now if i know it i only need to move two inches i'm only going to go to inches in it's going to be an effective movement and you can do that without all of that extra stuff that's my favorite one of my favorite parts of sports is when they get into the economy of movement and like you know big basketball guy there's all this sports science stuff on how steve nash was a lesser athlete but never wasted a particular motion and the efficiency of his motion allowed him to be an athlete at a higher level than he was and i guess i hadn't thought about it in conjunction with the things that you guys do in the trenches we always say that with offensive and defensive line but those are very narrow margins there exactly you know you think about that there's so many big collisions there and it's all just a big wrestling match in there but there's so much technique in fundamental in that particular motion that you have no time to waste i in fact i think one of the best examples of this and this is no knock on his athleticism but doug free was the master of this right he was just such a veteran of the game that he understood exactly what needed to happen and it wasn't always pretty and people would get on him but he was always getting the job done and that's that's exactly what you need when you become a eight nine ten year player all right man well can you stick around for another segment i be happy to solve round from sound like then that i'm ecstatic that's fantastic i coming up next more with travis frederick he's got something really cool going on with tango tab as well as with some of his other teammates we're going to talk to him about that and some other things coming up next on the.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Nineteen 75 as opposed to twenty nine this before and here's something if that's not startling enough by the way that's an average of thirty nine mass shootings every decade and if that's not startling enough in the forty three years since nineteen 75 there have only been six years where there wasn't a mass shooting prior to that we would go eight years seven eight nine ten years without a shooting but since nineteen 75 there only been six years when there was not a mass shooting in this country now you tell me there's not a correlation and people gone because when i started hitting did this and was talk about earlier before i'd actually did the research into the column people were all budget your uganova reservation and now people reading gone oh my gosh it's like somebody literally lit the fuse on the mass shootings and nineteen 75 i've got links to this when you go to the blah you can see the research and i went through every one of these because not all of them in my mind qualified as a mass shooting again you know we're talking about like of the pulse nightclub thing i didn't include that because that was a terrorist attack i think there was one of the mountain the amount the fort hood shooting i did count because the government did not classified as a terrorist attack the san bernardino you remember that that couple i didn't count that one that was considered a terrorist attacks one of course i didn't count nine eleven i'm trying to get at crazy not things that i have a motive gangrelated shootings even though they kill twenty or so and again that there been those remember the motorcycle gangs that got into it does not there have been long ago i didn't tell that one because he's or motorcycle gangs drunk start shooting each other i mean that's that's not the same thing we wanna know why random crazy folks walk into random places and start killing people well i think we know now it's because of the supreme court ruling that says we can't lock craig zia so what does he answered i know i'm getting pushback from crazy and i mean you big crazy out there is is having a field day say all you just want to start lockett everybody no i don't wanna just start locking everybody does that mean you think i'm crazy but there there.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Well we've said this um without any argument probably for i don't know eight nine ten years now that the democrats don't want business to succeed they don't want a manufacturing rights nobody argues with us we don't get it on email nobody everybody understands that's their policy they they believed that everything causes pollution therefore we can't have industry and business at spry businesses evil bank surrey volker industries pollute right and of course and they never get to the point of well then how you run everything plenty of finance everything how do you how do you get things done where's that wealth expansion true wealth expel it it's it's the same thing you know we need to get rid of all the coal generation plants we need to get rid of all the nuclear plants to get rid of all the ba hydroelectric dams a dead that uh hurt mother nature and we need to have windmills and solar panels athra can't work doesn't matter whether it can't work we need to do it the reality the science of those things don't seem to matter yeah like no uh but uh you know that some that's what we're doing it makes it an ita it makes it interesting to be a talk show host because whilst you know we're shaker fat v i was thinking about this on vacation last week uh because you know millennials will support that kind of rhetoric right that kind of political rhetoric they will go out and support you know we can do this naturally okay i like locallygrown things okay how about we do this how 'bout you plant of vegetable garden maintain it successfully for one year and then we'll talk.

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"nine ten years" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nine ten years" Discussed on WCHS

"Well we've said this um without any argument probably for i don't know eight nine ten years now that the democrats don't want business to succeed they don't want a manufacturing race nobody argues with us we don't even get it on email nobody everybody understands that's their policy name they believe that everything causes pollution therefore we can't have industry in business spray businesses evil bank surrey volker industries pollutes right and of course and they never get to the point of well then how do you run everything attia a finance everything how do you how do you get things done where is that wealth expansion true wealth expel it it's it's the same thing you know we need to get rid of all the coal generation plants we need to get rid of all the nuclear plants ready to get rid of all the the hydroelectric dams had the that hurt mother nature and we need to have windmills and solar panels effort can't work doesn't matter whether it can't work we need to do it and the reality the science of those things don't seek the matter yeah like uh but uh you know that some that's what would it makes it in a day it makes it interesting to be a talk show host because whilst you know we're his head to me i was thinking about this on vacation last week uh because you know millennials will support that kind of rhetoric right that kind of political rhetoric they will go out and support you know we can do this naturally okay i like locally grown things okay how about we do this how 'bout you plant of vegetable garden maintain it successfully for one year and then we'll talk.

nuclear plants surrey volker industries solar panels eight nine ten years one year