35 Burst results for "Nine Hundred Eighty Three"

Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 11 months ago

Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

"Hey folks As you know this is the eric metaxas show and as you also know whenever you read one of those websites that always says terms of service. Have you seen that. And i just thought to myself. It's so annoying because it could mean anything. Nobody reads it. And i thought what a great title that would be for a book. But i don't have time to write a whole book. So i thought maybe somebody else would and they did. His name is craig stand fill and the title of the book is terms of service. Craig welcome the program. Thank you eric. Okay this is a great title terms of service. Ominous is this a dystopia novel. It is an extremely dystopia. Novel portrays a future that we might be creating where you've got these huge big tech companies that run everything in your life and of course they're watching everything you do. Add the the final turn of the screw is they've got these a is that are constantly watching over your shoulders and monitoring everything you do and that lets them exert an incredible level of control over your life. Okay this i gotta tell you you've got your phd in artificial intelligence in one thousand nine hundred eighty three before. I think there was artificial intelligence practically so you are at least an expert on this subject. Most of us of course no nothing about artificial intelligence. So why does it seem so scary to you and obviously you put it in the novel terms of service which i hope people get a copy of but what do you see that the rest of us wouldn't have a clue about well first of all there's nothing intrinsically evil about it's sort of at some level just another technology it can be used for good or ill but when you develop a new technology with as wide ranging implications ai. You really need to think about. What are the risks associated with that technology. And what could happen now. The important thing to understand about. Ai is in the context of social media and so forth is that it is a force multiplier as they say as an example facebook has only fifteen thousand content moderators. And they've got something like two billion people use their platform on a monthly basis and do the risk to take can't watch everybody they can all. They can watch almost nobody. So what they do. In order to enforce their rains upon you is they let their is most of the work.

Eric Metaxas Craig Eric Facebook
The Scammer Who Sold America on a Three-Wheeled Car

Past Gas

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Scammer Who Sold America on a Three-Wheeled Car

"Of the past. We generally start with one and where they are born but to give you an idea of just how shrouded in mystery this story is. We can't even provide you that sources. Say that geraldine elizabeth carmichael known as liz was born in nineteen twenty seven or nineteen twenty eight or nineteen thirty seven and a birth certificate. That could clarify. That has never been found. According to liz carmichael herself who will soon find out may or may not be the most reliable source. She was born in indiana. Liz earned a mechanical engineering degree and married a nasa engineer with whom she had five children before he died. And she became a widow by the early nineteen seventies liz. Her kids in lizards sister-in-law. Vivian had made their way out west to los angeles california. Liz was not your average woman. Most notably when it came to her build at six foot one and over two hundred pounds. She towered over. Choose tenacious a fierce matriarch oozed confidence and she valued two things above all else family and money. Religion didn't make the cut and liz his own words quote if you have enough self esteem you don't need god is confidence the only thing the only flattering thing that you lose. I think so that guy. That guy's a nice guy. He uses kindness like it's not it doesn't really work. Oh man this i mean. He was oozing chivalry like his humility was just sitting out of the air. Speaking of wish lists had so much self esteem in fact that in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. She left her marketing job to create a brand new car company. The twentieth century motorcar cooperation. The automotive industry at the time was even more male dominated than this today and liz was determined to be its first and only female ceo. But she

Geraldine Elizabeth Carmichael LIZ Liz Carmichael Vivian Nasa Indiana Los Angeles California
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Throughline

"Side stock appearing in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. This feels like the end of like scarface. Laugh like harry in a room alone with a bunch of cocaine and some big time and it's just not very pace like twenty montagna and scarface. He goes down ugly. First thing he does is he. Starts running ads in newspapers saying. Don't be deceived. don't be deceived. don't be deceived. Housing for colored has become popular says we established black swan records only genuine colored records airy would accuse wight companies of passing black and white photograph. Company is now issuing had jim crow. Catalog of records says uprising. Jim crow annex. Whoa an offsite. The best to lust words. This is desperate measures for desperate times. Harry at this point isn't a bind where he desperately needs to do is to get some kind of black swan product on the market to fight back but the white companies had stolen all his stars. What is he going to do so he decides what he does is he does the exact opposite of what he's known for as he accuses the white labels of passing he himself gets his hands on a bunch of unreleased music by white bands. Gets them through a white lawyer by the way and he changes the names not the music. Just the names. He takes white artists recordings and he passes them off as black mainly jones. For example she was really watching a good alien. Stanley henderson's will construct. That would have been either the merrie melody man or manning's roseland orchestra rudy. We'd offs californians. That's a german name we'd off. They became hanes harlem syncopated. I have to say. I'm i'm really on the fence about the morality of this move. Is this a bad ass. Move or is this just the opposite. What it is is a premonition of things to come make a long story short just a few months after ethel waters records downhome blues and literally lights up the night in a radio address. Hayes basically broke. We are crap now very seriously for cash. We're cutting down to the bone in every way. Although i have personally put in large amounts of money and have used my personal credit borrow more Harry was forced to cut the price of black swans discs. That started off at a dollar. He had to cut them. I eighty five cents. And then to seventy five cents. Eventually he's telling the whole bundle of disks and he's throwing in a free ten cent pack of needles so what phonograph needles lab at a price. That there's.

Harry Stanley henderson jim crow Jim crow ten cent seventy five cents one thousand Hayes eighty five cents ethel waters german First thing harry nine hundred eighty three months californians merrie melody manning twenty montagna harlem
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Pat gray unleashed from beautiful stable genius. We get this tweet. People don't wanna think they would push dangerous drug on the people and what is people. Just don't wanna think period full stop there. You go secretary of pudding oh nice. I'm glad we have one now. It's about time it's about time when asked if i've been vaccinated. I say yeah and nine hundred eighty-three and just walk away leaving them. Dumbfounded awesome foresight. Nineteen eighty-three so like all most forty years before this pandemic happened. Yeah you're getting a booster. I'm afraid of me amy. What's her face is funny. Lefties never consider protecting life when discussing guns. That's for sure. And todd curtis will thank goodness. The it's the government spying on me. I was beginning to wonder why there was always vultures circling over me. Who thought my time was coming No birds doing surveillance of saul. By the way. I wish the birds would intervene. Sometimes you know maybe the government birds could help out once in a while and it's a great point is stop some crimes from happening since the right there. Anyway you know. Seventy four people were shot in chicago over the weekend. Seventy four toughest gun control in the nation and still seventy four. People were shot six killed. She's weekend after weekend. That's which find their triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three. I also love this from a nike. Ceo john donahoe. He jumped in over the weekend to reassure china's communist rulers that his sportswear company is all about working with them. He said nike is a brand. That is of china and four china..

nike chicago Seventy four people Pat Seventy four todd curtis seventy four china one four Ceo john donahoe nine hundred eighty-three triple eight nine hundred thir Lefties six killed Nineteen eighty-three gun forty years ninety three
The Importance of Ownership With Mark Mullen, Co-Founder @ Bonfire Ventures

The Twenty Minute VC

01:46 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Ownership With Mark Mullen, Co-Founder @ Bonfire Ventures

"Malta i've had so many great things. We were introduced six years ago. If you can believe it by the one o'clock boundary hood so many great things from greg. It upfront friday. Usb howard lindsay. Thank you so much joining me. Stay mark great to be here buddy. I wanna start. Though i love he contacts to tell me. How did you make your way in the world of venture and how did you come to co found bonfire over the last few years and he was four years ago will say well really i. When i came out of college. I was already getting into finance. I worked for a bank. And then i became an investment banker. More like a merchant banker because we also made investments for a very famous entrepreneurs name was bill daniels and is currently still known as the father cable. Tv in the us and got a chance to work for hammond of working for the farmer for twenty years he was one of those stories. You don't hear about anymore. Didn't finish highschool lied to get into the navy golden gloves boxing. Champion for two years flew two hundred and fifty missions as a fighter pilot came back to the. Us started selling insurance. Wanted to see a boxing match closer tv and started cable television in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. This is the kind of person. I got to work under. And all the people that worked for him so we had an investment bank about seventy five people that did a in the cable world in. Isp's in towers in broadband wireless etc across the world as well as we owned a bunch of different companies. I ran international. So i got a chance to live in paris and london and so for many years. That's what i did. And we also invested in companies ourselves as well as other funds and so when we sold the firm we sold all the assets have pundits death in two thousand two thousand one then. We had still the investment bank. We sold the investment bank in january. Two thousand seven to rbc capital markets fantastic transactions before the crash happened. I was a senior partner then. And i had to stay three more years. But that's really the taste of investing and got the taste of investing from

Howard Lindsay Bill Daniels Malta Boxing Greg Hammond Navy United States Rbc Capital Paris London
In The Heights and Colorism

In The Thick

02:17 min | 1 year ago

In The Heights and Colorism

"We're gonna talk about colors in latino and latina communities and yes. It's a conversation that was brought to the forefront last week after the release of the film in the heights. It's a movie. Adaptation of the broadway musical of the same name written by yada allegria hueys of politic prize winning playwright and the playwright enactor. Linneman will meet under so in the heights takes place well in washington heights were actually of course alexis joining us from it's predominantly dominican neighborhood. It's predominantly afro latino neighborhood but you know. I actually spent three years in washing deep from one thousand nine hundred eighty three to nineteen eighty six eighty seven. Those were interesting times most. Definitely i mean. I was on one seven one in fort washington and it was very dominican. Mind roommate was dominican but he was also. I was like i mean. Our parties were massive. Highway wait are parties were massive. Oh yeah i was hanging out with like letty. No phd's academics from columbia from city college and refugees and activists so people from inside by from nicaragua from cheer from tina from coup. All of these people were living in washington heights at the time. What i'm saying is that it's a community. What was incredibly vibrant and yes diverse in the sense that lengthy knows were staking their claim. They're predominantly dominicans better. They must felt safe living in that community. It was a latino community predominantly right right and we know even beyond washington heights. The afro latino population in this country is actually pretty significant. According to the pew research center in twenty sixteen when this came out approximately twenty five percent of all. Us latinos identifies afro latino afro-caribbean or of african descent with roots and latin america. So if you think about twenty five percent of sixty million people that's a pretty significant population and in another pew study from two thousand and nineteen five percent of all black. Americans identified as for latino which was a figure that doubled since two thousand

Yada Allegria Linneman Washington Heights Fort Washington Alexis Letty Nicaragua Tina Columbia Washington Pew Research Center Caribbean Latin America United States
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Ju realized that none of the eighteen still alive in the nba playoffs who've won a title since the playoffs expanded to sixteen teams. That was one thousand nine hundred eighty four sixers one in one thousand nine hundred eighty three bucks last one in seventy one. The hawks won in nineteen fifty eight clippers. Jazz nets nuggets sons have never won an nba championship.

sixteen teams one thousand one Ju eighteen nineteen fifty eight clippers seventy one nba hawks one thousand nine hundred eigh nine hundred eighty four sixer
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

"Be the the best way of looking at this. I think that's right. I think well. I think the unisys points about respect is really interesting one because of course you can be respectful to someone you can treat them well as a human being. You can a learn how to be attentive to their needs without ever having sex with them might never entered the sexual realm and the more. Those sorts of behaviors and cultures are established in the more people are given language to challenge when people are being disrespectful. The more the more you change the culture that otherwise ally incidents of misconduct and harassment and violence to to not only to flourish but to go unchecked and kind of have the veil of kind of complexity and shaimaa rise up around them. So yes i think i think that's very true. And now it's time for the hidden history of higher education with mike rackliff. So records do show comes that debt. Filth policy interaction between government and higher education. One of opportunities is when vice-chancellors go to see the prime minister now in the late sixties vice-chancellors was summoned indices the prime minister because the students was voting that the prime minister had to share secret intelligence with them from the security services about the the behavior and get them to to behave themselves. Sadly couldn't find the notes of that meeting. But i did find the notes of the meeting. The ted heath had with group of vice chancellors in one thousand nine hundred eighty three and he'd widened the groups and not needed. He vashon sleazy sought director polytechnics as well. Because i come into being a catheter. Not killed them off in her white paper so they were going strong. The file is lovely because it contains the briefing notes for the minister's involvement of the of the setup and it contains the record of what happened at the meeting. Briefing notes are chevy because they set out for the prime minister. What's going on. the vice. Chancellors are concerned that the government doesn't love them doesn't consider them relevant enough says says the by the briefing note however the polytechnics. I mean goodhart. There have park your patients. They want to have clarification. Or they will with the locality sorted out and that they into Be quite happy with the massive expansion tripling of their student numbers following the white paper. They're up for this polytechnic directors. There won't many notes on the polytechnic directors. But this great section whereby each of the vice chancellor's had a little note on a given to ted heath to explain who they are. What kind of character they have so. It sets out in in some detail so allen. Look who's the vice. Chancellor walks at the time is a distinguished historian amana very much the oxford yorkshireman plainspoken witty and humane the first four year also vice chancellor with the here to serve dr morrison bristol is described as one of the younger vice-chancellors forty eight vigorous and open minded as well as vaguely intelligent. Professor armitage of manchester is very resourceful man with an excellent judgement which he chooses to conceal under a bumbling manner the notes go on explaining what ted can expect from each of the vice chancellor's in front of him and clearly that the evening goes well they have a discussion and it focuses on the key issue of whether universities should be providing thinkers or do us and representatives of the politics argue that the major mistake made by universities was devalued knowledge. for the sake of knowledge. The great majority graduates but their careers. Raise the action not a reflection and this basic fact should be reflected in university entrance requirements and in final examinations. Still waiting for that. At present the universities approach was to scholastic so they set themselves in opposition. They are the relevant institutions providing people with into work and ted heath sums up. And there's a note picking up. The heat is critical of the university. Too often fail to teach their students to think straight to recognize quality and without our trading in the basic intellectual process is the next generation would need to find themselves to compete at. Here's a great example of why we need that to argue the case successfully it for example powers or brussels would call for the highest standards of intellect and ability at the same time the education system at a major part in creating a more flexible social structure in the country so there's ability wherever it might be found could be developed and exploit to the full heath once universities to help us in our new mission to be in europe so not sure how they're to turn out but there we go. That's that's what universe. You should really helping. So he of course doesn't last long but margaret thatcher is the secretary of state and she's She listens to all of this and mosley participate in the discussion. And when you when she gets into a you can see that distinction between the universities and to academic polytechnics who are keen to do the work that the government wants to.

europe mike rackliff margaret thatcher late sixties one thousand forty eight one first four year One dr morrison bristol each nine hundred eighty three manchester mosley armitage secretary prime minister prime heath oxford
What if everyone lived in a castle?

Absurd Hypotheticals

01:51 min | 1 year ago

What if everyone lived in a castle?

"What if everyone lived in a castle because castles are the coolest type of living arrangement but really the first thing that we have to answer is what is a castle versus like a palace or anything out. So what is what is the definition of castle and at the risk of sounding like a school presentation and already valedictorian speech. But this is one of the very very few times. It's appropriate to start like this. dictionary defines the castle as a large building typically of the medieval period fortified against attack with thick walls battlements towers and in many cases a moped which means our criteria are has got to be. A large building has be fortified against attack via thick walls battlements and towers the optional. Bits that start with typically in many cases are being in the medieval period. Which is good which means we can build new ones. And we don't have to worry about using just only the ones that exist and the moat the moat is optional. Which is also handy for figuring things out mode optionals favorite dress code for events. Personally no no service all right so so the first thing. Your defied here is what is a large building what counts as a large building so basically in my head in order for you to be like. Yeah that's a large billionth. Look at it and it has to just be first bigger than average and enough so that you're that's a big building so if you're looking at an individual home the average home size in one thousand nine hundred eighty three one thousand six hundred sixty square feet. This actually increased since then to in two thousand fifteen being two thousand six hundred eighty seven where the average home size has increased by thousand square feet in the last like forty years which is kind of crazy. Actually

Jim Cramer on Bitcoins Performance and Future

The Pomp Podcast

07:49 min | 1 year ago

Jim Cramer on Bitcoins Performance and Future

"Our guys bang bang. I have demand himself. He is back jim. what's going on. Man here's what's going on. You made me a ton of money. I had to keep out the experts there. Because when someone's they'd be as much money as you have. What kind of peppered with the authentic language. I did exactly now. I know you probably hear a lot of people say you know what i did what you told. No i went and called my cfo. All right. and. I said listen. I just talked to this guy and i went tomorrow and i said i want hoping to get trouble. I said i want a half million dollars in this and you can buy over a couple of days but i don't want anyone who's this guy was your. Thank you and i studied before it wasn't just like you know i didn't just off the tournaments but said this guy is compelling i even use and i don't know whether you have any but the brokerage you suggested and i mentioned the money because it's never happened to me before i bought a lot of stocks in my life but i wanna thank you. Some the reason i called is it. Can i please come on your and thank you because it happened. It happened just as you said. It also happened much faster than you said. But i'm very grateful. Grateful mike kits so thank you very. Well listen as as many people who watched our first episode together i think noted The most compelling piece of it was how open minded you were and how intellectually curious you are on. I think that is something that people forget is important in the investing world. So i can yell and scream from the rooftop all. I won't but it takes courage and conviction for you to do something about it. So it doesn't work invoked by the way i mean you can say well i'm sucking up sucking and just a tremendous respect. A lot of what you said to me. I of course told others and is there things that you would say. I mean i always do the door. So limited number. I always knew that there should be protection. And i regard it as an asset class. But i i have for years said that you should have go and i think what i had going for me was the recognition. That what you're saying is what i really searching for with gold. All but gold media goal is that is subject to many vicissitudes is subject to a mining issues. It's frankly are subject to fail in many cases. Where do you think that's what's going to happen. Do you think that people are gonna drop gold by bitcoin. Or what do you think's gonna happen now. If they listen to me going to drop goal. I've been saying kemper senegal since one thousand nine hundred eighty three and now say five percent gold piper centric and. I did not say that before. I talk with you. I had thoroughly research. I was skeptical on our skeptical. Frankly because i said you know what. I thought okay with my goal. This is the dog new tricks thing that i want. I run up against with the web with the wall street. People like they're constantly saying. Oh listen you know. You're old baby boomers forgotten. I guess to do with how young your mind is. And i listened to you a friend of mine go said i heard you pop a cup hops. The smartest damn straight and do what matters is how old you are. It's whether you're young enough in hearing someone who knows more than you and gonna love. What you have to do is accept the fact that someone who's more now we did in school. It's funny you chemistry and you guys were juice chemistry. And you're going to get blown. I walk into a bitcoin class. What do i think more than the bitcoins i. It's different from chemistry class. No different from an engineering class. I will do the progress. M when i got not schooled but talk by i said what am i doing not protecting myself in what i have been saying. That people could be hyperinflation. But even if there's just plain old inflation why not get in and i did. The thing that have is confused about was was this notion that help your currency versus asset class. Because i think that i am. I'm conflicted and i'm conflating. You can help me say what it really is is. I think that there's three things people are using it for right now right so you have people who are using it. As a medium of exchange people are using historic value and people using it as a speculative asset right. Those three things serve different uses for different people. But i think that a currency obviously historic value. It's hard to deny that people are storing value. I think that's pretty. Well accepted the digital whole narrative. And then when you look at like on chain transaction volume right in some days now. It's ten twelve fifteen billion dollars in a single twenty four hour period of transaction volume. That's putting it into trillions of dollars on annualized which know visas. These guys are eight to twelve trillion dollars in annual volume. So you're talking about maybe twenty five to fifty percent of the largest card networks in the world Super using it now. What they're using it for is very hard to determine but they're using some sort of medium of exchange and then i think the third one and probably the one on focuses on is the speculative nature. People are absolutely in some cases buying it because they think it's gonna go up in us terms and they're going to sell it at a profit later. It's i think that what we gotta figure out here is what's the dominant use case or. Most people speculating or most people using it as four value or most people using it needham of change. My guess is when you look at the data. Sixty percent of bitcoin hasn't moved in the last twelve months. So that tells me that the majority is being used as a store of value over everything else today. Now what happens in the future will find out. But that's how i kind of think about from a use case perspective is it. A currency is an asset. will technically. It could be both right right. Well you know for me because of my my here. Something is all dog. I always said the people. Listen if you could ever ever ever be a situation where you can play with the houses money you take what you put in then your blast and you never have to touch it. And that's what. I'm don neurological may have only took. That took out the money put in. But now i've been i'm never going to touch upon. I'm not. I may never because you traced data scenario for those of us who those of you that watch it you chase down scenario. That doesn't stop at one hundred thousand and a lot of people laugh. I didn't it. Was the twelve thousand. And i started thinking i've gotta get in before it got to fifty and i went home and told my wife i said lisa. I'm doing this thing. And she said why described there since fiber talk. You sound mesmerized. I said no. I i sent. Educate these are two different things. It's not been as rush. It was educated and the course that you laid out made me think you know what it isn't just a car. I borders currency. But i realized it was the store value and a better store value i was using and did i have the belief that it could grow up. Go and i did believe that. It could be speculative staying power but more importantly what i realized is ideal with the company square and instead of saying that they arrive this way. I knew that this cash app people kids are buying a little business. Schnitzel is gone. They're buying a slivers of bitcoin. And i said to myself you know what i want to be with them because they represent future but i also recognize they may be doing for whatever reason but i can be part of that way too and not feel that we've is is a boss. It's not was speculation. Not after the way that you late young you laid it out. And i am sure that you can lay it out for just in one minute. You've gotta just lay it out again or capsule probably not fair but why you know exactly what may be portrait.

Kemper Senegal JIM Mike Lisa
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Convictions. Cool she's released from prison. She promises that she will not hold anymore seances. And then she immediately goes back to scotland and begins holding seances but she moved back to scotland and decided to to basically keep it on the down low and be a bit quieter. These are small seances in her home now giant packed halls and she's no longer releasing state secrets in one thousand nine fifty. Six police raided her while she was in the middle of a science one evening because now of course the fraudulent medium act has been established. And she's really truly not supposed to be doing this and she said that she was in a very very deep trout senate and it took her out it. she's very upset and throughout the rest of the day. She keeps complaining that she's really not feeling well and that evening she died. What yep of what. Her followers of course blamed the police raid. Yeah but also eulogized her. The people that fully taryn liked said to the the spirits decided to keep her for their own while she was in a trance. Thought it was very nice The general medical opinion now is that she was in very poor health and just it was bad timing and she just happened to die that evening but either way. That's the end of helen. Duncan wow or is it. She's a medium of course right if anyone's gonna come back. Yeah it should be held in dunkin and she did make a brief appearance. At a seance in the uk in one thousand nine hundred eighty three and i mean a very brief appearance. She appeared to wish happy birthday to another spirit. A nine year old boy who was celebrating his birthday from the other side with his brother's family and various other well wishers. Okay and helen dropped by mainly to encourage all the living attendees to remember folks who are alone on their birthdays. And it would help to papa card through the door of those that we know are alone. Oh we have audio of this to wait. What.

scotland uk helen Six police one thousand nine year old one thousand nine fifty nine hundred eighty three one evening taryn Duncan that
Back in Control; a Chronic Pain Series with David Hanscom, Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Outcomes Rocket

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Back in Control; a Chronic Pain Series with David Hanscom, Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege to host. Dr david hans kohn he is an orthopedic spine surgeon who practice focused on patients with failed back surgeries he quits practice in seattle washington to present his insights into solving chronic pain which evolved from his own battle with it. The second edition of his book back in control surgeons roadmap out of chronic. Pain is just a great read. His website back in control dot com presents. An action plan on how to get rid of chronic pain. How to cure it his new book. Do you really need spine surgery. Take control with the surgeons. Advice was released this fall. Two thousand nineteen. It is intended for healthcare providers and patients alike to make good decisions about undergoing spinal surgery. We're gonna be diving into healthcare costs. The use of medicine the over use of medicine and chronic pain and dr hans com is gonna give us his perspective on it so just such a privilege to happy here david. Thanks for joining us. Thank you very much for having me on your show so before we dive in to what you guys do at back in control dr hans come. I want to better understand what inspires your work in healthcare. He sheriff's with us a little bit about that will. I'm a little bit of a different perspective. Advice spent two years training in internal medicine so sort of like an internist about the whole patient from the beginning finished started despite the orthopedic surgery went into spine surgery and i took sort of research and development into internal medicine and vice versa and around nineteen ninety develop chronic pain. There was extreme notion that whole komo's thirteen years knows one of the surgeons who's been on both sides of the other very certain i trained top ship in minneapolis and i came out on fire to ensure projectors thirty and i felt obligated to do it because people were desperate. There's no the answer. I viewed myself as the end of the line in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty. Three a paper came out in the state of washington showing that the success rate of respond fusion rebecca workers compensated. Washington was twenty two percent and my results better than that but they weren't damaged better. So i just talk a first data. The humidity show. That operation didn't work and then simpson. There's been one research paper in sixty years. The documents that are spinal fusion for backing actually works. And i quit doing back for back pain. I still do quite a survey for deformity and repeat pictured reason in infection stuff but Another paper came thousand six said in a very straightforward patient when he did a back fusion. This is how to scampered beckmann at five hundred. Twelve success rate was twenty three percent so anytime of day about chronic pain went off and abyss so to speak up rings already. Seventeen different physical symptoms. I came out in. two thousand. Three is started showing the to patients in a process evolve. That was self directed called the doc project. Dress your own care and i wrote. The book explained the background to the patients but usually mostly shelter to process. I wash well over. Fifteen hundred patients go to pain free. Which i never thought was possible so i started treating patients systematically with the i caught a surgeon. Approach in on opport- here we dramatically dressing all the literature just dealing with the literature said to do and people started getting better went to pain. Pre is the same time spiny last ten years to become incredibly aggressive instead of doing one into little pieces for backing. The didn't work. We're doing eight. Ten twelve fourteen fusions. That don't work except that. The complication rate is much higher as you well know with larger fusion oshii three to five patients every week having charged on a relatively normal fines that they didn't eat as watching hundred patients go to pain-free with minimal risk in no cost so the difference between became so dramatic to me that in december two thousand eighteen actually quit my practice premature peter my career to pursue this process. Here i three years ago. December two thousand eighteen has been wrought eight months. Okay almost two years man. That's that's just incredible. I mean you know you're at the peak of your career and you decide to make a shift. I mean this this. This was a big deal for you so much so that you decided to change at all while the promise people understand is that people are concerned user last resort. And it's a last resort. It's or something operate on. But for instance it have degenerative disk disease which is actually been documented to be a normal finding as you age is been well documented that it had not a source of pain. No no research paper documents that it works where it almost twenty billion dollars year of his operation. That doesn't work and on top of that with chronic pain way to induced. Depression

Dr David Hans Kohn Dr Hans Com Dr Hans Marquez Washington Komo Seattle Beckmann Minneapolis Rebecca David Simpson Disk Disease Depression
Hacker Folklore

Advent of Computing

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Hacker Folklore

"When it comes to computers the actual hardware and software only account for part of the full story. Now don't get me wrong here. Hardware is a really interesting and important. Part of what i cover. The same thing goes for software. As i always say harbor is actually pretty useless without some kind of code to run on it. But you can't fully explain the history of computing with just blinking lights and stacks of code. That would turn to a pretty dry story pretty quickly. You need to also look the messy part. That's the human element and for me. This is problems usually crop up. You see there's a certain kind of person that's drawn to computers enthusiasts programmers engineers and researchers all seem to have at least somewhat similar motivations. Why do they work with computers. Well computers are just neat by us. Solve problems is fun and finding inventive solutions is rewarding in itself. And how this kind of drive is really great for the discipline at large. It can also make researching the development of technologies. A little bit annoying. Why did can thomas. And dennis ritchie developed a unix. Why did text based adventure game start to show up all over the place sure. They're really good technical reasons but partly it was just for the fun of the project. Once mass produced computers introduced more people into the fold these kinds of traits and motivations they kind of become omnipresent at least to appoint those working on large shared mainframes quickly turned from teams of researchers into groups of friends and once networking starts to link of computers. These groups of friends form into a larger community. So we start to see a large group of people with shared ideals practices beliefs and a common cause at their core. Now that sounds an awful lot like a culture. This is usually called hacker culture and like any other culture. It has its own folklore. Welcome back to advocate of computing. I'm your host sean. Hannity and this is episode forty-six hacker folklore now. This is a project that i've actually had in the works for a while. So i'm especially excited to get to share it with you. All today's episode is going to be a little bit different from my normal fair. I'm not going to be talking a specific computer technology or even really a series of events. Instead we're taking a detour through some fun. And i think pretty funny territory. We're going to be looking at a section of the jargon file in the print edition. It's appendix a hacker folklore. Hopefully you'll excuse me but you're in for a bit of a long preamble here. I put together a mini episode on the jargon file way back in the archive mainly talking about the files origins and its history in short. It's a dictionary of terms used by the more computer savvy folk. The file began in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy s at mit artificial intelligence lab and it spread pretty quickly from their versions moved from coast to coast over the arpanet and nine hundred eighty three. The first print edition was published as the hacker's dictionary. This isn't really a dry treaties. On terms and technical language jar file is a lot closer to really humor. The files mixture of some pretty low brow jokes jabs at corporate employees and actually useful definitions for its creators. The jargon file was fun pastime with an actual purpose it captures a slightly filtered view of the culture around computers in the seventies eighties and the latest version. V four point four point seven up on cat be dot. Org was last updated in two thousand and three. Well it makes the jargon file so important is that it preserves something normally hard to come by. There's been endless. Amounts of ink spilled over big events in the history of computing figures. Like bill gates. Steve jobs have multiple biographies covering their life. Stories to that all the actual hardware and software lying around and it's actually somewhat easy to chronicle all the big events all these things are essentially preserved. So you don't really have to go hunting for that. One scrap of a note. The bill gates wrote in the mid eighties. Instead you can just go grab both the focuses on microsoft in that era when we get below that high level of visibility. We can run into some serious issues sourcing. Computer science as a field wasn't developed by a handful of people it took masses but those masses aren't usually chronicled in the same way as high profile figures. Most researchers donate their notebooks to university. Archives user group minutes were usually just thrown in the recycling bin and online forums and messages. Don't really start being relevant until much more recently. This means that trying to put together less well known stories can get kind of difficult and a lotta. The culture around these stories is either lost or really really difficult to find information on. That's where the jargon file sweeps into saved the day well at least somewhat. It gives a picture of the hacker subculture during a pretty wide span of time. I guess this may be a good time to actually address the terminology here. Hacker didn't originally mean some malicious actor that broke into computers although breaking and entering was sometimes part of it. The jar file has a few different definitions for the term. I think the most relevant here is quote a person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities as opposed to most users who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary r f c one three nine to the internet users. Glossary usefully amplifies this as a person who delights in having an intimate understanding of the internal workings of a system

Dennis Ritchie Mit Artificial Intelligence La Hannity Bill Gates Thomas Sean Steve Jobs Microsoft Hacker
HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:59 min | 2 years ago

HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

"HPV vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer by Giro, lay from the Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Data to inform the relationship between quadrivalent human papillomavirus, HP V. Vaccination, and the subsequent risk of invasive cervical cancer are lacking using nationwide, Swedish demographic and health registers to follow an open population of one, million, six, hundred, seventy, two, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three girls, and women. The investigators assessed the association between HP vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer girls and women were evaluated for cervical cancer. Their thirty. First Birthday. Cervical cancer was diagnosed in nineteen women who had received the quadrivalent HP V. Vaccine, and in five hundred, thirty eight women who had not received the vaccine. The cumulative incidence of cervical cancer was forty seven cases per one hundred thousand persons among women who had been vaccinated and ninety four cases per one hundred, thousand persons among those who had not been vaccinated after adjustment for age follow up the incidence rate ratio for. The comparison of the vaccinated population with the unvaccinated population was zero point five one, the investigators found that the risk of cervical cancer among participants who had initiated vaccination before the age of seventeen years was eighty eight percent lower than among those who had never been vaccinated amongst Swedish girls and women tend to thirty years. Old quadrivalent HPV vaccination was associated with a substantially reduced risk of invasive cervical cancer

Cervical Cancer HP Karolinska Institute Stockholm HPV
Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

"Today we're talking about a trail-blazing political activist and educator. She was the first black woman to be a member of a oral cabinet in New York City and the only woman on the administrative committee for the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. Let's talk about Anna. Arnold. Henchmen. Anna was born in eighteen ninety nine in Marshall Town. Iowa. Her family later moved to a NOCA- where they were the only black family in the community. In Nineteen Eighteen Anna graduated from high school and enrolled in Hamline University. It was there that she heard a lecture by w e boys and was inspired to pursue a career in education. In nineteen twenty two Anna was the first African American to graduate from HER UNIVERSITY After graduation unable to find a teaching job in Saint Paul Public schools because she was black and found a teaching job but historically, black school in Mississippi called Rust College. On her train ride down south to her new job in Mississippi Anna, had her first experience with Jim. Crow segregation laws a train conductor told her that when the train reached Illinois had to sit in the overcrowded colored section and not in the dining car white people sat. Anna spent two years at rust college before turning to Minnesota. Unable to find a teaching job after once again, facing racial discrimination, she switched careers. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and became an executive director of the black. Branch of the Young Women's Christian, association or the YWCA. She continued her executive role for twelve years helping to develop various international programs and education. In nineteen thirty, three Anna married folk musician merit a henchman. In nineteen forty, four Anna was appointed executive director at the F. E. P. C.. The national. Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee. She spearheaded the fight against employment discrimination. From nineteen, fifty, four to nineteen fifty eat anna served in the cabinet of Robert F Wagner Junior then New York mayor. She was the first african-american and first female member of a mayoral cabinet. For the next few years she worked in a variety of roles including as a columnist as well as as a public relations consultant. In one thousand, nine, fifty, three Anna spent three months in India as next leader for the State Department. She also unsuccessfully ran for Congress in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty and for New York City Council president in Nineteen. Sixty five. One of Anna's most famous feats was her role in the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington. We hold these choose to be self-evident. That, all men are created. Was the only woman on the administrative committee working with civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, junior, Bayard Reston. And Eighth Phillip Randolph. Mobilize people to attend to arrange transportation logistics and to organize food and water for attendees fell on Anna's pleat because King Randolph and the other men she wrote for carrying on all of their regular responsibilities and it was difficult to get them to the meetings. Shortly before the march. Anna was angry when she saw that no women were included as speakers instead randolph was planning to briefly mention some black women activists in his speech although Anna strongly urged for women to be included a speakers on the program her calls were largely dismissed. In the end as a compromise, daisy beats was allowed to speak at the end of the march but her allotted speech time was significantly shorter than all the other male speakers. Anna later captured in her autobiography a moment during the March as she sat in front of the steps of the Lincoln. Memorial. I thought of the one, hundred, eighty, thousand Negro soldiers and the twenty nine thousand black seamen who had moved in at the crucial moment to win the war and save the fragile union she wrote. Most of the two hundred and fifty thousand people present could not know of these men for the history books available to Americans have failed to record their story. In the Nineteen Seventies Anna continued her work as an author and lecturer in the US and abroad. She wrote two books about her life's work. The trumpet of sounds in Nineteen, sixty four and the gift of chaos in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven. Anna was honored for her working race relations by various organizations throughout her life and was awarded honorary doctorate degrees from both Howard and Hamline University's. She also received the Pioneer Woman Award in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three from the New York State Conference on Midlife and older women. Anna died in nineteen ninety she was ninety years old.

Anna New York City Hamline University Rust College Executive Director Washington Permanent Fair Employment Prac Arnold New York City Council Mississippi Phillip Randolph Robert F Wagner Junior Iowa Congress New York State Minnesota Marshall Town Illinois Executive United States
What John Thompson Meant To DC

The Lead

08:48 min | 2 years ago

What John Thompson Meant To DC

"What was it like for you to cover John Thompson and the Hoyas as a young reporter? What were your interactions with him like? It was. You know it was an education was twenty, three, twenty, four years old and that was my first beat but John was a handful. As you can imagine, and he controlled everything we control the player access you controlled access to himself and draw the program, and so John was someone that you You had to kind of meet on his terms. Can you describe he was six foot ten? He was just this literally and figuratively massive figure. Can you describe what it? was like to be in his presence well, I mean look any six, ten, three, hundred, pound guy is going to have a certain amount of power to him. You know he wasn't nimble I won't say he was Nimble but he certainly had the meeting of former athlete and you know he had a big loud booming voice nothing had happened by accident I had no intentions of being a basketball court. I. Wanted To be a teacher basically social worker kind of person freelance. Knew. How to use his size and his voice to great effect and I, was not the recipient of John's paint peeling yelling as as the players often were but they will tell you that there was just there was just nothing like it when he really was angry and was coming after you about a mistake, you made a decision you made. He certainly tilted the room when he came in when their buzzer went off and they said it's over. We didn't stay up and down the hallway and talk with people kissing is just so we can get a good article written about us he coach during the glory days of the Big East what do you remember most about his team's and just the style and the way that they played? Well, the frenetic full court pressure was their thing. To set up an impressed. Retract. Very physical teams anybody that came into the pink dot hit, and that's just the way that they had always played. Here. And that leads to a lot of confrontations. A couple of pretty bad fights. But a lot of grabbing and holding things like that. And that's just the way that they had always played in obviously worked for them. David you're born and raised DC. Can you talk about what John? Thomson and the Georgetown Program? Men's to people in DC and in particular to black basketball fans in the city DC was like a lot of cities in the eighties dealing with a lot of different stuff that was that was very difficult. The year is only sixty days old during that time. There have now been ninety-two homicides here in the District of Columbia last year sixty to eighty percent of the murders in the nation's capital, we're listed as drug related. You had the explosion of crack cocaine in DC in in the mid eighties just devastated whole swath of the community and you had Marion Berry who was this incredibly polarizing figure, and this is before his drug problems came to bear. He was polarizing well before then because he insisted that these rich white guys that tended to run the city hire black people all the people who only know Marion Barry through the nasty headlines in the videotape of crack cocaine. Don't know extraordinary work. He did in this in Washington to open up the doors of government to the black people of Washington you're shutout for years decades, and then you have this presidential era of Reagan, where there was a lot of hostility towards cities, there was a lot of cutting a city services. There was a lot of emnity towards people that were on welfare and they've perception that raking perpetuated was that all these people are welfare cheats and they're not in their bums and you're not working for a living perhaps the most insidious effect of welfare is it's usurpation of the role of provider. Public assistance for a single mother can amount to much more than the usual income of a minimum wage job. In other words, it can pay for her to quit work. These competing forces, all kind of colliding with one another in the city in the early eighties in the mid eighties and into that Maelstrom, you have this basketball team. That is good enough to win a national championship in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. Jobs. The I ask championship. And then notice that the team is mostly black eleven of the twelve guys or thirteen or fourteen guys that get your attention in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, or eighty four you know rap videos late eighties is a Lotta Georgetown starter jackets in those videos. was torn concept had long hair and short baby came in national programs to the point where a lot of black people thought. Georgetown was an HP. Come to the. Question to see hundred. So there was this kind of interesting blend. Wall Street types and judges, and fortune five hundred CEO's with the people that cleaned the offices and drove the buses rooting for the same team and it was gonNA. Kinda, cold because it kind of it helped bring the city together in ways that really only the football team had done previously and it brought a lot of pride to the city as as a six. They were proving that black kids from inner city high schools could go to Georgetown and do work. They could do the work and that was a source of immense pride to people in DC Thomson was, of course, the first black basketball coach to win a national championship. But David you've written about how Thompson would bristle when asked about that accomplishment. Why did he? Take exception to that question will John would always say is that the question implied that he was the first black coach who who had the qualifications to win a national championship I'm not interested in being the first and only black do anything because it implies that in Nineteen eighty-four, a black man finally became intelligent enough to win NCAA, title and that's very misleading. And that was John's way of saying you know you need to understand the history of coaching. There was a lot more deferential treatment provided to white coaches for for decades and coaches like Adolph rupp that didn't recruit black players. was hostile toward black players. So that was John's way of saying you know do your homework. In nineteen, eighty nine. He famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCWA rules that he felt disproportionately affected black students. undercurrent NCWA rules students can qualify for athletic scholarships by scoring seven hundred out of a possible sixteen hundred on the College Board Sat test fifteen out of thirty six on the act or with a two point average and certain. Subjects proposition forty two would require athletes to have both. What did he? What did he say about that? John's position was that both the sat scores and your grade point average could be impacted adversely due to the educational disparities present throughout public schools at the time black has weren't being taught the things that were on the sat. He made his point that you know these tests should not be the end all and be all in terms of determining whether or not a kid was smart enough to go into college. Moment existence and I. started into school that I would not been dotted with an opportunity to get a college education myself. He was recruiting kids that play but also kids that can do the work. So it was not as much an issue for him in terms of recruiting it was more the bigger picture of. Are we going to allow these tests to determine whether black kids can get into colleges and then they finally wound up modifying prop forty two as a result of it.

John Thompson Basketball DC Crack Cocaine Georgetown David Hoyas Dc Thomson Marion Barry Washington Reporter Adolph Rupp District Of Columbia Georgetown Program Thomson College Board HP Marion Berry Ncaa
Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

The Big Picture

09:03 min | 2 years ago

Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

"I'm Shawn Fantasy and this. Is the big picture a conversation? Show about Beastie Boys. That's right beastie. Boys made a movie beastie boys story which is directed by Spike Jones and available to watch right now on apple. Tv plus. If you're like me and worship Beastie boys you need to watch this movie later in the show. I'll be talking to add rock. And like diaw Beastie boys about their movie history their favorite fruits. How they're doing in quarantine. The New York Knicks documentaries that they want to see a bunch of other stuff as I tried to keep them focused on our conversation. A really love these guys beastie. Boys are my favorite band ever and it isn't even really close so to talk about them before we get to them. I asked the VIC Ferrari to my Alessandro Allegra. Join me it's Chris Ryan. Hi Chris. I've always seen myself more as a Nathan Wind Guy. I've been waiting my whole life to do this. Podcast so let's go. I'm very glad you're here with me. I can't think of anybody else. I'd WanNa have here other than you. Except maybe Mike the Inadequacy and they're coming later. So when I say beastie boys what's the first thing that pops in your head Chris? Probably the invention of cool so I think one thing that we've talked about a lot over the last twelve to eighteen months. We've had a lot of Quentin Tarantino podcasts. We've we celebrated a lot of his movies on the watchable. We talked about them on. Big Picture Podcast with him and something that comes up. Ally is kind of how he gave us a vocabulary or language to through which to understand culture and understand the world and I think the Beastie boys are equally responsible for that in both of our lives in terms of introducing us to so much music and so much other culture that wound up becoming just part of our like way in which we relate to the rest of the world through these like Kung Fu and exploitation movies through rap Reggae punk rock weird funk like all like it just basically made collectors and fans out of out of us at the risk of stepping on music exists. I wanted to ask you why you think you. And I to some extent to are so interested in figures who are all about basically like recombinant culture. You know who take all the disparate parts of stuff that they love and smash it all together because that is the thing that the movie and then returning to all of this music that I listened to over and over and over and over again in my life that I have thought about is like wow they really just jammed all the stuff they liked together to make something new like. What is it about that? The second part of what you said is the most important thing. Do you think about the people that we really respond to. Wu Tang clan quitting Tarantino. Beastie boys it means we're very basic very and B. It's the most important part is finding the second thing the thing that you're GonNa make out of all this shit. And that's what makes me so excited is when someone uses all these postmodern tools in these reconstructs. All these things out of this of Cultural Ephemera to say something else. Wootten Klan took all those Kung Fu movies and took all those samples but made something that could only have been made in Staten Island. You know back could only have made the music. He made with the experience that he had. And the Beastie boys could only have been the beastie boys by combining bad brains with run DMC. Yeah and I feel like it's not a mistake that so much of what we do at the ringer and so much of what you and I have been trying to do in. Our lives is basically celebrate and be enthusiastic about the things that we care about and I feel like these artists are the same way if you if you think about Beastie boys and you even look at the way they tell their story in the movie. It's just we really liked was the clash and grandmaster flash and Cheech and Chong and we were trying to find a way to make all those things make sense together and I feel the same way about what we do every day I feel about you and I love the NBA and we love Top Gun and we love. I love deb's I don't know how you feel Dad's but You know just trying to find a way to make all those things fit together so I feel like I have aped and tried to copy a lot of what those guys do. And I feel like a kinship to their their mission their creative project. Absolutely I mean like you and I don't mean to make it sound like you. And I are the Beastie boys here but you know. I think that we use the Internet the way other people would use a sampler right and we draw in all these different media. We'd take youtube videos. We take a picture and I think it was probably more the case before we started working professionally together in an editorial capacity but we would have like tumblers and blog spots and you were just kind of like throw a picture Steve McQueen up in an article you were writing about those face and it would have some sort of relationship and I think that that was our way of continuing along this tradition of mixing and matching different pieces of culture to say something about yourself. The thing that you said that I think is probably one of the most important parts of the movie that will nocco very remarked upon because a lot of it is going to be spent talking about. Yok and it should be because this is very much I think an image to him in a real moving tribute to their friend but when Mike D says in the beginning of the movie that he was just this weird kid who found the clash. Not only is that like. That's the origin story for a lot of people. Who like they find that one band? Whether it's the dead or the clash or you know run DMC. Whoever it is that makes them think that they are now. All of not alone in the world the clashes like a really really important. Template for the Beastie boys because they are basically A Crossroads Group A marketplace. At Crossroads Group. It's where all these different cultures are coming. And they're setting up their wares and you can pick and choose off these tables and then you go home and you make something out of it. And that's what the clash did too. I mean you can make a lot of arguments about appropriation. And whether or not the people who the clash were taken from or or paying homage to properly compensated for the work that they did And the same thing could go. For the Beastie boys but I think a lot more people know about Lee Perry. Because of the Beastie boys did not you know and and that's like a really really important act in culture. Everything is about timing too I think about when they hit the scene and who they were working with and on the one hand I guess there's an appropriation question. I think they've moved past that so effectively because they were just literally there with Russell. Simmons and Rick Rubin and run DMC making music together and they were a part of something that was essentially punk at the end of its first true like lightning rod phase at the end of the day and and rapid the Dawn. You know I mean. They weren't there necessarily in in the parks in the south. Bronx but you know one thousand nine hundred. Eighty three played on the radio. Yeah Yes yes. And there's that great moment in the movie where Africa is asked about cookie. Post by one of the members of the Beastie boys and you can see like they're they're they're they're in the moment and they're going to dense area and you know performing for white people introducing them to wrap it away and that couldn't have happened if they if it was just five years earlier five years later. The same is true for the class. You know it's like they arrived at a time when the world was ready to hear rock and try to play reggae. And what that means for the future reggae. There's something also about this specific approach to the world though that jumps out to me. Which is it's not. Just this is what we like. It's this is what we like and I don't care if you don't like it and I don't I actually don't care if you don't get it because when I think about the things that I knew when I first heard the band it was you could fit it inside of a very small box. I just did my cultural reference points. The music that I knew about the the records the comedy everything that they were throwing in. I wouldn't say that I discovered them because they were sampled for three seconds on a on a record on policy boutique but they were a window. You know I had never heard of Sadaharu. Oh until I heard the beastie boys rap about him you know like there's so much in their music the sampling the lyric writing even if it is in their songs are very rarely like high minded. They're not necessarily pursuits of big ideas. But they put big ideas in front of you. Just by dint of what they were interested in and I I liked that kind of take it or leave it quality they bring to it and I feel like that really comes out in the movie too. Don't you think yeah? It's only a couple of people are lucky enough to have other people care about the thing that they care about. You know you can. You can play the game and you can try. Ride the wave of what's popular at any given moment. But it's so weird because what the beastie boys did especially once they move to La. I think wound up having such an incredibly profound formative effect on all the culture that comes after it but it so it winds up being underrated as as to what a zag that was how crazy it was for those guys to be like. Yeah we'RE GONNA LEAVE NEW YORK. We're GONNA leave behind rapper. We're going to go to capitol from Def Jam. And we're GONNA work with these two producers that basically no one's ever heard of an assemble these like really out there incongruous samples to build together a new sound that we're gonNA use to define us for the next couple of decades. The only thing I wanted to talk about because I think is probably also a reason why you and I like them. Much is that and this comes across very much in the movie much

Beastie Boys Chris Ryan Mike D New York Knicks Spike Jones Quentin Tarantino Shawn Fantasy Diaw Apple Steve Mcqueen Ferrari LA Africa Wanna Wootten Klan Wu Tang Bronx Crossroads Group
Can Bitcoin Hold $7,000?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Can Bitcoin Hold $7,000?

"Get everybody. Welcome to come cooped podcasts hut. You've had I Smashing US far and oversee. Which took a Monday? Which is tonight in this one part of the world I am going to enjoy. It just wanted to go through a couple of things with you and discuss what's happened over the weekend so far. There's been some nice opportunities as a matter of fact yesterday to everybody who's in the try to cope community on. Who's following through my youtube channel? you would have seen the video on behalf of F C X Talking about The list that I cried creating that list as a matter of fact I ended up with. Bonnets born has against perpetual ended. Got On the day won't percent it's hit one to once skyler out on that position and things are looking quite good day. The whole market is a you know the market as a whole at the moment this morning is really coming through a bit of pullback and should that be something that I'm concerned about well not really on. Its buys at this at all but a couple of things I do need to be aware of do need you to be aware of as well first things first. If all the tell you about the weekly the weeklies back up into the cradle signed the backup into cradles. Now that doesn't mean it's GonNa full from here and look. It's not the most bearish candles but it's also certainly not bullish if anything. It's a little bit undecided to slightly Berry because of the rejection was an did have a high of seven thousand four hundred seventy seven currently which six thousand nine hundred eighty three we seven thousand we have only got ten minutes a mock right now until this candle close. I'd love to sit close above seven thousand because we haven't seen a close above seven thousand on the way clear for a while now. Is it significant? If we don't close about seven thousand Iman opinion I don't see it as being too significant at all. No I don't see it as being. I A major hurdle full bitcoin but in the same respect I am very much Ivan to looking to save. There are any short trades available at the moment. I can't find anything. There is no need for me to find anything just yet but I will be keeping on that advising not advising all the acting accordingly for my portfolio based on what I say the MOM Long Bonnets. The market does still look relatively strong. We go bitcoin at six thousand. Nine hundred seventy one point two percent on the Diet pullback into that cradles I had a little move from the only reason I didn't get lung. Bitcoin is because the two-day candle is not looking as it needs to be in that cradles on and it's not so from bitcoin. At Sixty nine seventy two at one point two percent. We moved to the theory of a theory. I'm also looking at an awesome shots up point nine three percent sitting at one hundred and sixty dollars on the nose right now to be interesting to see how that plays out once again a pretty good looking Talk of really beyond that. On a theory on excel we do have a four L. higher low and high high sign a theory and many of the top ten to be fair. It's up one percent rotten out nineteen cents. Bitcoin cash is up point. Eight percent right now. A guy that bright the high of yes. Today's Daily Candle. And Look it's it's it's one of the few in the top two that doesn't have a four hour. Optronics go to low low in a high and looking a little bit. Unsettled there on Bitcoin. Cash the moment I to go via one of the top performers in the top ten again. We've got one ninety three dollars and thirty cents. Three point five percent right now again. It'll pull Buckingham that cradle side accordance. It'll pop higher over the last twenty four hours. It's just giving a little bit of rain back now. Once again many having had a good push up a lot of that moves coming back in the form of a pullback now this could represent trading opportunities as well so definitely not not jumping on the bearish bandwagon at this stage is keeping an eye on. What's going on? I am long bonds. Do have my prophet locked. It will at least of brave and tried. And it's just a matter of watching how the rest of it evolves over the rest of the coming die on the log on the one on the top ten that is comedy down. It's down half of Senate forty two dollars and thirty seven cents one. That's none of my right off for any trades thus far today it does have a four hour high low and high hostile that could change later on if it does push on higher once again a offsides thing that God is not very much. He's up to two dollars and fifty one cents to the daily does look quite nas a break from yesterday but it's still got some work to do in. That work needs to be done today. Opinion unless we ought to console it if we do see markets. Go into a consolidation. Well it would be. It would be anyone's guess as to what happens Bonnet while I managed to pick the best move out of the top ten On that try day. It's actually three point. Seven four percents of quantum above everything else other than bs. Vade four dollars and thirty five cents. Daily looks very strong. This as a cradle tried on the sixteen hour. Am I got my one to one once again? Very happy with that. No risk on that trade now. Salaam sitting court pretty to the long side. No shorts on Marcus Look Long. Molin look short for the time. Being on the Donna. Its up point. Eight of a percent. A three point three cents. It's not representing too much of the story fully. We back into an old level of Brazil. She's GonNa get rid of that. Level is nothing really there anymore. It's it's so old that mothballed it did break out throw high of a candle and once again what point four percent rotten and nothing really work with their theory of classic another one. That doesn't look all that great. Four hours in an uptrend but August brought high and it doesn't look all that strong of the moment. It's not one percent at five dollars and thirty four instagram out. The top ten. We're GONNA try at one point two cents. It's up to four percent and it has pulled back and let me just check that level. There is a level that level is sitting bang on the noise of one point two. I sense four hours trend looking really really nice there and look at the level that has held for a little while. I will be watching Point and saying if I can't say oh sorry can't

Point First Things First Senate Skyler Iman Berry Ivan Optronics Buckingham Bonnet Brazil Donna
Re-Thinking Church Missions

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Re-Thinking Church Missions

"All through the history of the Church of Christ. There has been a ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth that is a quote from Alan McRae Twentieth Century Presbyterian Churchmen and Biblical scholar. He learned that quote firsthand. He was with J Gresham Machen as a student at Princeton Seminary in the late nineteen twenty s and when Mason left Princeton in one across the Delaware River over to Philadelphia to found Westminster Theological Seminary. Mcrae went along with them and a few years later in one thousand nine thirty six when Mason. Who was ousted from the Presbyterian church U S and he formed a new church the Orthodox Presbyterian church well McRae went along with him again. So what was the issue in the Nineteen Thirties and specifically in nineteen thirty six mccray is about this ceaseless struggle to maintain the truth. Will broadly speaking. The issue was liberalism and cultural progressivism This had been at work in the Presbyterian Church USA and many other denominations as well at the time from the eighteen nineties on through the roaring twenties. Mason battled it at Princeton and he was battling it. Within the denomination narrowly. Speaking the issue was missions in nineteen thirty to the fall of nineteen thirty two. A report was issued entitled Rethinking Missions. This report was then published fully in nineteen thirty three no fewer than seven volumes published by Harper again under the title rethinking missions. This project was all funded by John. D Rockefeller it had representatives from seven key positions on mission boards. In seven denominations participated. This document had two major parts. One was based on a fact finding mission and just spoke of the state of missions and the conditions of places three places in particular China and India. Japan were studied the second part raised new ways. That mission should be done and challenge the old ways that missions was being done in a nutshell. What this document wanted to promote was to advance spiritual idealism social brotherhood Economic Welfare and Cultural Unity. The rethinking part means that to think of missions as simply the Great Commission the Proclamation of the Gospel to every tribe to every nation that is too narrow and in fact has been wrong headed we need a different mission. Different approach that represents the realities of the twentieth century so missions needs to be rethought well. This deeply troubled J. Gresham mation. He saw in this and denial of the Gospel and he couldn't believe that not only did his own mission board of the Presbyterian Church U s not only did it not refute this document but it had key representatives. Who are part of it and were promoting it. This was also the time of the missionary. Pearl Buck in nineteen thirty two. She had just won the Pulitzer Prize. She was a very significant figure in American culture and she was a Presbyterian missionary. Who denied the Atonement of Christ the Deity of Christ the authority of Scripture and all of this just perplexed Mason and so he challenged his denomination. He wrote a one hundred and ten page pamphlet to go along with an overture that he introduced in his presbytery and he wanted the Presbyterian Church to refute this document. They didn't and so. In one thousand nine hundred thirty three he formed the independent board of Presbyterian foreign missions that eventually led to his ouster from his denomination and so in Nineteen ninety-six once he was defrocked he just formed a new denomination the Orthodox Presbyterian church six months later January one nineteen thirty seven. Mason died but his commitment to the church and his commitment to the Gospel was evident there in that action of standing against the tide of his denomination and standing for the Gospel. He did not want to rethink missions but rather in the twentieth century he wanted to reaffirm the mission of the Church and the Great Commission. Well that was mentioned in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. And I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for joining us. For Five minutes purchased

Alan Mcrae Twentieth Century P Mason Nineteen Thirties Presbyterian Church U Orthodox Presbyterian Church Presbyterian Church Usa Presbyterian Church Gospel Church Of Christ J Gresham Machen Princeton Princeton Seminary Westminster Theological Semina Brotherhood Economic Welfare A Mcrae Pearl Buck Delaware River Great Commission J. Gresham Mation Steve Nichols
Dear Sugars Presents: As Me

Dear Sugars

07:04 min | 2 years ago

Dear Sugars Presents: As Me

"This week on as me with Sinead I have somebody who do I would generally describe as one of my heroes and they say don't meet your heroes which is probably the reason why we're doing this through studios in New York and Los Angeles. This person has I think shaped a generation of people to view their own narratives within popular culture. In a way that's not not tainted by the biases that exist within the real world but give us the freedom to dream who we wish to be in any and all spaces it is of course Jon Levy the actor Creator noar of all things the hills on MTV but most importantly the person who has given US Shits Creek. John Welcome to the show. Are you wanting me to cry before this interview. Even Start and guess pays that's pretty good for writing a lovely introduction. Oh my goodness me Thank you for having me. This is such a treat. I mean I have been very fortunate to irritate you. Mercilessly through the medium of instagram. Dm for quite some in time now between discussing IT IS A. We're in this together. I feel yes well between suggesting what you should wear to. Red Carpets. My Lane yes. I participate The first question I wanted to ask is how do you describe yourself personally and professionally. I think in both cases I would probably describe myself as someone who is trying to do their best I and be as well intentioned and helpful as I possibly can and I'm also you know I've I've from a very young age. I've always been a a people pleaser in an overachiever. So I have a very high standard for myself and And others which which can be problematic at times. I'M NOT GONNA lie. What's your sign? I'm a Leo. Oh yeah that's the reaction. I got a lot. That's a good thing though. I'm surrounded by Leo's we know what we want and often times were were ambitious enough to get it. I enjoy that. I'm a virgo. Which means that notion of being critical of oneself whilst also being deeply deeply ambitious is something that's ingrained personality and will probably never go away? Have you ever read It's called something like the Great Book of Birthdays or the truth of your birthday or something you okay. How many more there is a big coffee table book that I will send you when this is done and maybe you can read it and if you like it then share it but it is a book that has every single day of the year in it and you find your birthday and it will give you an analysis of who you are and and at first I thought to myself? There's been a lot of APPS and websites and things that you can sort of plug in your astral information and you get some sort of version one of what everyone has sort of described your star sign as this book has the most scarily intensely Accurate at least in my case description of who I am August ninth nine thousand nine hundred eighty three. I want to say I think the biggest revelation relation for me in reading it. It was like your headstrong and often know what you want. You're very clear in your vision. And then it'll talk about some of the shortcomings of people born on the day and mind mind was you are often looking out for people even when they don't need it or want it in by it. I mean like your advice on how they should live their lives or how to go about protecting themselves and I thought to myself that has been the the key to so many disagreements that I've gotten in with friends where I care about them so much that I feel like I have to express how I feel and oftentimes people might not want your opinion on their situation. Maybe they're not ready for it. Maybe they want to figure it out for themselves. It was a huge revelation to me and and I've had that same situation with friends. Come over to my house will open up the book and find their birthday and half of them halfway through the analysis will wanNA stop. Because it's too truthful and I did did it on a date once and I can tell you. Don't ever do that on a date. That is ways to real way too soon But this book is Magic Hajek. It's like the secret book of Birthdays or something. That's incredible that idea of caring for your friends. Perhaps too much. Why do you think that came from crowd? I don't know I think I've been a very loyal person for my whole life and I guess if I were to like think about I think when you're single too and you don't necessarily have have someone in your life every day to sort of take time and distract you from focusing on other things you know as a single guy. I've been single for a long time. You you have a lot more bandwidth to spend thinking about your friends and caring about your friends and your family and you know I think is a result. It's you know it's also coupled with with clearly some sort of astrological issue that I can't really control clearly. I mean it's not your fault it's the universe. Don't take any of this responsibility on yourself town. I'M GONNA blame it on the stars. Yeah so I don't know I think it's just in my nature. I'm very stubborn. And and if I feel something I I've always felt the desire or the impulse to like get it out into the world and and a lot of times people don't want to here it which is fun nurtured within you? I don't know where it came from. I think my mom is very is very similar to me. In the sense that she's very clear about how she feels and and is incredibly straightforward. So I'm sure it came from her. And how do you deliver that particularly advice that you know somebody is going to be uncomfortable. Uncomfortable hearing how do you decorate that advice. I think because I as a person am so comfortable in honesty you like I really thrive. When everything is on the table I get very unsettled when I feel like people? I'm communicating with or holding information. Back or tiptoeing around something so I think my world that I live in. I'm very comfortable with extreme honesty and I think sometimes when you get comfortable comfortable in your own way of doing things you sometimes forget or overlook the fact that everybody's different and everybody processes information differently and and you can't sort of impose your own way of life onto other people so now having really sort of come to terms with that I do find that I will will ask people if they want my opinion and by people I mean my dear dear friends so the stakes aren't very high. They love you anyway. Exactly but I I will sort of suit a flare and say okay. Do you want my opinion on this or should we just let it play out. And maybe we'll circle back a little bit later and I feel like that's really helped

Jon Levy MTV Sinead I Shits Creek John New York LEO Los Angeles
Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In Black America

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

"Is in black. America came to be known as the blood. It is possible that the pre spend leave. I looked over that man on the ground and one of the robbers were still around as possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking acting like he had been robbed and in ought to seize them over their love and bath quick and he's deceased so the first question that the priests ad the first question that the lead by squalls. If I stopped the help this man what will happen to me. But then the Good Samaritan and came out and he reversed a question. If I do not stop to help this man. What will happen to him? That's the question before you tonight. Not at past stuff to help the sanitation worker. What will happen to my job? Mount Stopping the help the sanitation workers. What will happen to all of Iowa's spending my office every day and every week as a pathway jeff question is not if I stuff to help this man and need what will happen to me? The question miss if I do not stop to help. The sanitation work of will happen to them. That's the question reverend. Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior would have been ninety one this year. Had He lived out a dream for racial equality in this country. He was a man walking down the oppressed and for a man who question unfair laws and went to jail rather than submit to them. King was passionate fighting for civil rights and although he died by violence his life and teachings were dedicated Kennedy to a deep disrespectful violence and its consequence he won a Nobel Prize for peace. His lectures and dialogues stirred the conscience of the nation. Doc in November one thousand nine hundred eighty three legislation was signed creating Martin Luther King Junior day making it only the third National Holiday born in the twentieth century in Fall Nineteen ninety-one National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis Tennessee. Sasser made it was dedicated to his remembers on October sixteenth. Twenty eleven the MLK memorial dedicated on the National

Martin Luther King National Civil Rights Museum Dr Martin Luther Mount Stopping America Mlk Memorial Sasser Nobel Prize Kennedy Memphis Iowa Tennessee
Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

"The fall of the Berlin Wall in November nine thousand nine hundred nine was reported almost universally as a good news story. This was fair enough. If the the ending of the imprisonment of half of Europe wasn't good news it's hard to imagine won't ease however for Eastern Europeans it marked the end of life As they knew it and all of the world as they understood it. This was doubtless a relief in many respects the iron curtain had after all been built to stop eastern Europeans from fleeing the system of dismal incompetent and oppressive police states which had been imposed upon them in this episode of the Foreign Oren disc series looking at Eastern Europe. Thirty years on we recall life behind the Iron Curtain. The personality cults of the leaders the snooping of the secret police and the rebellious subculture which deafened the neighbors and baffled. The style see this is the foreign desk. Schoolteacher would say did the the news reader have a red jacket on or blue decorate on last night in our house and that was the way of checking whether the parents in that household had been watching Western television which was illegally. Everybody was being turned by fear. Inform on other people. Many many people were very scared of saying anything in public. Were doing anything public. This is why when my father protested on ten March one thousand nine hundred eighty three most of the people in the village that he was absolutely saying that he had the courage but they thought it must have been something wrong with his head to do that because it was so dangerous they couldn't record do couldn't play live except in churches. The male wasn't secure. She couldn't send the fliers. The phones want security. Couldn't call say do the GIG so all had to be done through what they call the whisper network person to person we're doing a GIG and he told deferent- and Ephron told another friend but by eighty-three they were getting concerts in the thousands and that's really crackdown Even by the standards of Eastern Europe behind the Iron Curtain Romania under the long dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu was was a remarkably paranoid police. State our first guest. Common beauge grew up in Romania in the nineteen seventies in one thousand nine hundred eighty s a period she recalls Kohl's in her memoir burying the typewriter the title refers to the nightly ritual performed by her dissident father trying to keep his writing secret. Kurt from the security. I grew up in a very small village which was quite it is located from Eucharist. In general was actually quite isolated from the political situation. Most people lived in small houses. They were raising animals. They were growing their own gardens. So things were quiet self sufficient for the memo what people were self sufficient Shen in the small towns. We saw that there were big lines. Four bread for sugar or flour and things got worse worse. I think at the end that seventies and in the early eighties when I was very young. Of course I didn't notice much of the hardship because I was very young child. Doc who grew up on a farm with the grandparents life was very idyllic and very beautiful but by the time I started going to school and we started noticing the lines signs and started hearing people talk about the lack of food and then we also started experiencing longer electricity cuts. You need the The electricity would just go off so we would have to do. Homework by candlelight in the kitchen and the whole family will sort of heavily in one place where we had the candles and then candles were becoming harder to get so people would go to church on Sundays and come back with their candles rather than leaving them there. For The for the data dad the altar but nineteen eighty S. Things began to be very tough. I mean they're even for us

Iron Curtain Romania Eastern Europe Iron Curtain Shen Europe Berlin Wall Nicolae Ceausescu Kurt Kohl Deferent Ephron Thirty Years
Harvey Weinstein Is Back in Court on Another Indictment

5 Things

01:02 min | 3 years ago

Harvey Weinstein Is Back in Court on Another Indictment

"Harvey weinstein will be back in court on monday. Weinstein is facing an additional arraignment announced last week. The arraignment is a repeat of earlier indictments with the a former movie producer charged with five sex crimes involving two women in two thousand six two thousand thirteen but it comes with testimony from actress annabella shoora that may strengthen then current accusations. The former soprano star says weinstein raped her in new york in the winter of one thousand nine hundred eighty three to nineteen ninety-four mandir allegations are too old to prosecute secure under the statute of limitations but prosecutors are hoping to present her as a third witness at weinstein's trial which begins on september ninth she did not testify before earlier earlier grand juries so her testimony was originally barred from being introduced at the trial meanwhile the 67-year-old weinstein has been free on one million dollar bail and pleaded not guilty not the sex crime charges against him. He denies all allegations of nonconsensual sex. Weinstein's court appearance monday comes on the same day that a new york appeals court is expected acted to rule on his lawyers motion to move trial out of new york

Harvey Weinstein New York Annabella Shoora Producer One Million Dollar 67-Year
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

We Need To Talk About Ghosts

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

"To this story. Do you look and go it's. It's it's Mary she's wearing she's not trucks as I go from nine hundred eighty three pure, though, the shoes Shushi go from WalMart. It's definitely Mary. Anyway, back to the weeds. No, you wouldn't anyway. She recognized the clothes. She was wearing nothing ninety. She was actually wearing hospital, but some of the ordinary clothes a few days after this. My auntie was also visited by my mother in her house, and once again was able to get very clear view of before the image disappeared as before by moma's just standing beside her apparent to take an interest in what my auntie was doing. Typically, I was one of the few people who never saw this ghostly image of my mother, but she did visit me in other ways after visiting her in hospital. I would come home to find the TV twits, Tom. I definitely switched to before leaving the house, and it will be busily changing channels by itself. It would also have the annoying habit of Whitting channels in the middle of something watching. That is scary to be fair. Did you know interest? In fact, that can be some that you batteries, low new remote, you're saying a few days after the visions mentioned above my other half was relaxing in the bathroom evening win subtly. He had an overwhelming urge to get out and stand in the middle of the bathroom. Hello. He did. This was rewarded with the sound of a loud growed, which who. Wow. Which he was sure came from my mother, but lots just the most bizarre paragraph. I've had ever read. He told me he felt as though she wanted to tell him things that Sherry she wanted to tell him the things that changed, and she was going to be okay. We later found out that it was about this time that may mother suddenly stopped getting Wes within a few days. She even begun to get better, and is now made a full recovery. She has no memory of various apparitions, but says that the morphine produced many, hallucinations bizarre dreams as soon as she regained full consciousness, the problems the problems with TV stopped and have never happened. Since did you change the batteries around the time, it seems strange that someone can appear as a ghost still living. No, it's called Doppler ganger. But I feel that the severity of my out dickhead of me was there. No, it's called the Doppler Gungor think five e eight, but I feel a severity of my mother's illness and the huge amounts of morphine. She was given the hospital gave her extra doses in the expectation that she was not going to pull through what what's a lovely hospital combined to allow her to leave her body in spirit, and for an form and visit those closest to have this has however left my boyfriend with the worrying compression that where my mother does. Finally, shook off the mall coil. Neither of us will get a moment's peace while I am not surprised you feel that given that he was compelled to stand naked in the middle of the ground. And was rewarded rewarded your words? Not mine with a grown. That's why I do these days. I don't get out of bed for less than sign grown. Wow. That's a good story, isn't it? Wow. Yes. It certainly was anyway next week. We're going to have more of your listeners stories, if you listen to story included, it's very important that you Email across to talk about ghosts are hotmail dot com. Bob, bob. I know you're out there. You sent me an amazing story, and I'm going to read it to next week show. Okay. This is prerecord, obviously. So that by the way, that's been rob my house beg on my house because you know, that I'm away Budapest because Rebecca Stella and believe you me, she's violent. She's not far. That's horrible things. Is that Bob you story will get right out next week. And if you've got a story, you want read now do Email in this week to talk about goes, hotmail dot com to get you can get us on the twit machine at talk about ghosts. And you can also head over the patriot. If you so wish to improve the show, God knows it needs a which is patriot dot com slash we need to talk about ghosts. Okay. Guys. I love you. I adore you. Now, planks out is a musician. I've known for awhile it's called he's called me. And it's a song in the style of Morrissey. We have another song of mine for a while. I'm become doing prerecord. I've had so much coffee. I think it will be fun to do it. And I apologize. If you think why just plugging his own song? I'm not I'm just in a bit of a weird mood. So by all means if you don't wanna listen to me sing. Bizarre sentence. Got what we? But if you don't want that and I completely appreciate it. Then stop now. And I will see you next week. You lovely lovely people by. Okay. So that's all the fake funds gone. I'm joking. I'm joking. Okay. So if you're still yet, this is a song of mine called chance would be a fine thing, which I read last week writ wrote. I don't know who the devil my enemies attacked in Budapest. Why would you say that I will see usual next week? You lovely lovely people Jau. And.

Mary Tom Bob Morrissey Budapest Wes morphine Sherry moma Shushi WalMart Jau Rebecca Stella
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Is more details have come out about former. Arizona's Representative David stringer. Who resigned right before the ethics committee? Had the goods on basically was going to kick them out. It seems we are finding that some of the accusations the charges against them. I would argue are pretty damn serious. Yeah. Okay. The types of things that if it happened today. There's absolutely no chick. I just don't believe. I don't want to believe that there is a chance. That this could be kept quiet, and and that you'd be able to plead to some sort of a lesser charge. Jeff Munn is in for Pamela us today, and Jeff we're finding out that. Representative stringer. Was arrested by the Baltimore police department in one thousand nine hundred eighty three and at the time accused of paying two boys. Described as younger than fifteen one of them who had a mental disability to perform sexual acts and allegedly molested the boys multiple times. That is what he was arrested and accused of now it is not what he was convicted of right because there was a plea deal. And as part of the plea deal his records became sealed and his case was expunged. Until the Phoenix new times got a copy of it recently thirty five years later, and here we are today. Now, it was sent to them by a person, obviously in Maryland who had access to the record, which I don't even know how that works. I don't either. And I thought expunged meant it sealed. You can't get to it. I it brings up an awful lot of comments and questions and one of them is nine thousand nine hundred eighty three km three when this happened. And it seems as if and I don't. I mean that was what thirty six years ago, and they seem to take a very in comparison light approach to say such a charge to say, the least we actually asked our KTAR legal analyst Monica Lindstrom about how do you? How do you kind of get away with this in one thousand nine hundred three it was definitely a different time because of those happened today, and if it happened in Arizona, there is no way that the courts or the prosecutor would allow an expansion of charges like this. The only thing I can think of is that the times for different like you mentioned, Bruce perhaps statutes for a little bit different and not a stringent as they are now. Well, and and would they in today's day age if you were accused of sexual acts with children under the age of fifteen multiple times, would you be allowed to plead with lesser charge. I realized the facts of the case and evidence and testimony are a part of this. I will acknowledge. Bali that here's another question. Why do prosecutorial bodies? Why does a county attorney? Whoever's bringing these charges what's their incentive for seeking a plea deal. Interesting. On a on a charge like this. Now, some the families of these boys and young boys not advocates for their children going men into. No, we're not gonna accept a plea. An example, of course, is when somebody who may be involved in some sort of crime ring is arrested and the prosecutors will say look if you identify some people for us. We'll go easy. Okay. That's one incentive for a prosecutor to offer a plea deal. But it sounds to me in this case, obviously, there was nobody else involved. So what is other than we don't? I can't see a prosecutor saying we don't want this case to go to trial. If you don't think you can win it. Why'd you bring the charges, and he was he was arrested by the Baltimore police. They felt they had enough to go and make an arrest show Haas accusers worked out. Yeah. It does seem odd. And again, you know, when you when you think about it why. And the whole thing applying because what Representative former Representative stringer is saying is I was never convicted of this. I listened. He says it never happened. He says he pled to a lesser charge of possession of pornography. He said he pled to the lesser charges. Just so he could make this all go away. Do do people really do that do people..

Representative David stringer prosecutor Representative former Represen Arizona Baltimore Jeff Munn Representative Phoenix Maryland KTAR Monica Lindstrom Bruce Haas attorney analyst Pamela nine thousand nine hundred eig thirty five years thirty six years
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That you nominate each month for a one thousand dollars. Fantastic teacher. Dow's. Does pay tribute to a teacher text teacher to four one one nine hundred eighty three now. Your family at brands at checkout. The goodguys tenth spring nationals giant car show March fifteenth to the seventeenth and Westworld of Scottsdale over twenty five hundred a baddest Raj customs classics muscle cars and trucks are rolling into discuss. He'll bring it although horsepower you can handle shop. The swap meet vendor exhibits and rock out to live music happening March fifteenth to this epide- that Westworld of Scottsdale, we're the good guys. Cool cars. Cool. People time. Details at good. Josh guys dot com. Partial, it's Dhamma Benezzi pizzeria. We love providing great food for family, gatherings parties, even work meetings. And we make it simple. That's right at the Nancy as we know how busy life can be. So we make catering easy. You can check out the full Venezia's catering menu online. Then just let us know how we can help Email us at catering Valencia's dot com that catering at the nets has dot com. We'd love to bring Venezia's to your next party. Venezia's pizzeria, a family tradition. March madness from a variety of friends. It's not just about basketball anymore. Even though seventy two percent of managers, say college basketball playoff. Hi there. Good evening. Welcome to the Jim Bohannon show from Westwood One radio. Route one eight six six five zero JIMBO one eight six six five zero five four six two six fighters at jimbohannonshow dot com..

Dhamma Benezzi pizzeria Venezia Scottsdale basketball Jim Bohannon nets Westwood One Valencia Raj Josh Nancy one thousand dollars seventy two percent
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One thousand nine hundred eighty three from his new record median age wasteland joined by Todd Lumley looming piano house. He come over and say, Hello. A really beautiful record. I've gotten to listen to a top to bottom, and it's it's really spectacular. How you doing? Excellent. I was really looking forward to this. I was looking forward to this terrible looking forward to it. For awhile me to do you think that being nostalgic is a is a function of getting older? I know that might seem like a silly question. But do you think it's do you think you're looking more fondly back though? I couldn't quite tell whether that's on whether you're looking at decade fondly. Well, you know, I think in the music business we spent a couple of decades pushing a rock up a hill, and you judge your life by the accomplishments and the relative disappointments of the team that around you shares when things don't work as they ought to over that they spend a lot of money on this thing and info through like, there's a there's a measure stick out in the music business kind of life. And I think. You wake up when you're trying to feel like a human. And it's like, wow. Is this life? Only about the memories that we keep like is this life only about the the accumulated memories that we get to sit when we're when we're less able and a chair and go. Yeah. That was a great moment. And that was a great moment because the times that I have measured my life with a ruler of disappointment. I can look back now. And thank God. It actually was quite spectacular. I mean that show might not have been what it ought to have been. But it was still in Paris. And I still went out and had an incredible bottle of wine after the show, and I still stayed up all night, and it was still a party. And so, you know in hindsight there was beautiful stuff. But yeah, I feel like I'm I rage less than crime more. There's something happened into my physiology. You know, my metabolism is changing, my inner workings are changing. And there's new there's new information traveling through my body. It does sound like you're being critical also of of nostalgia as well. 'cause it can be a kind of a toxic thing. It can be a challenging thing. I mean, he look make America great again tend to look back at their earlier years of childhood as he's Rosie times without realizing some of the heart stuff that was happening. I heard you knowledge some of that in that song, I can tell that's on your mind as well. Well, yeah, I mean in battlefields, which I'm gonna play later was the song where it felt like I struck the I think the nicest balance between that loving remembrance of those good old days, but also growing up in where I did in the rurals. So we were bussed into school and something incredible happens at school where things are democratized, and we're told. All the same, but you can feel there's other kids who've come from other. You know homes that weren't like my home. My dad had a good job, my mom had a hair salon in the basement. And you know, I knew that. Yes, we were all the same. But there was eight and there was a there was life happening behind closed doors that even as a kid you could smell it out. Even though you were kind of buying the line that yes, we were all the same. And I think that shows up a lot in these songs, these maybe even of subtle references to to some of the violence, and poverty that was also. Happening in ways that were to acute for a young kid to maybe get a get a real grasp on how that affect was playing into your social life at school. Do you think that it's better? Now, I mean, there's so much to be there's so much. Talk from folks like you who were in the industry in the late nineteen nineties early two thousands. I was he there was a time where people are still buying a lot of records CDs. I don't wanna get into the weeds too much on the side of things now. But I've heard people say that it's never been a better time to be a weirdo because you don't need a gatekeeper anymore. You can just be a weirdo and find your own audience. Is there is there? A part of you the wishes you were starting over again. Now as a as a young puckish kid for. Crosswalk. Oh, no. No, absolutely not. I wouldn't wanna start now at all. The the elemental aspects of the music business that I dreamed of as a kid when I would sit with my Michael Jackson record and look longingly into that album cover at that little baby tiger as he sort of was kind of lean back in a somewhat lurid way with that tiger. And. Everything that the music business stood for was something. I was fascinated by and mythologised in my own way. Even when I was a kid. So I was ready to enter the business in the way that I saw my heroes into the business with records and posters and touring. And that that data accoutrements which basically was the business for several decades. And so I don't know how kids do it now to be honest with you, it doesn't make any sense to me at all. I love this new record so much. I feel I wrote this to you when you sent me the record in advance, which is very kind of you. And I I said, I don't know if you remember. But I said it reminds me of the feeling you would get when you hear a little brother curse because this particular song, I don't have any younger siblings. My siblings are all older than me. Maybe they had this experience with me. But I had a friend of mine say his his heart never broke so much as many heard a little brother curse for the first Elvis NASA that innocence has gone, and I think what I hear on this record. And I don't want to put words in your mouth is nor curse words in your mouth? Is that we think fondly. On this innocent time that we realized maybe it wasn't that innocent and all at one point at one point in this dreaming established. There comes the time where we lose that innocence. I think too like I feel like I was really really really lucky to grow up at a time in pop culture that was still so expressive and unique and Thomas expression still happen in a far more natural way in the eighties. I look back again and think too it was my favorite time in pop music writing. I think it was the last time that there was real, courage and pop music. I mean to hear a song like take on me or culture club's karma community. These to me feel like pop songs that still live in outer reaches of what's acceptable. And like I said earlier. We didn't. We also didn't know that a digital the true modernity was just around the corner. Twenty years later we were living in the eighties. As if we had arrived with our Walkmans, and our pacman games and are three channel universe in the woods that we were living at a time when they could only be seen as the absolute future. And then twenty years later that late twentieth. Century would kind of look so feeble as the real future would kind of enter the scene and surprise us all with its. It's it's lack of memory and sort of relentless desire to move into the future. I'm excited to have you here. I'm excited you're gonna play a song. Again. This is my favorite song on the on the new record. Because I after I heard the song for the first time I walked around my house, saying NutraSweet and a Fresca to the cat over and over again. You'll know what I mean by that. When you hear the song this Hawksley workman performing battlefields on.

Todd Lumley Paris Michael Jackson America Elvis NASA Thomas Twenty years twenty years
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Stevie Wonder Diana Ross, all the names you'd imagine. But a lot of people upset, and I think they're right. Motown sixty. You're gonna leave Michael Jackson out of this. They basically cut him out of the special. Now, you remember Michael Jackson, the Jackson Five very very big. But then there was that TV special Motown twenty when would that have been by nineteen Eighty-three or something like that eighty three? Remember, he was already a big success. Michael Jackson, and he had a lotta hit records people loved them. And here this new song, Billie. Jean was nine hundred eighty three that's the special where he came out and did Billie Jean and he did that incredible dance. He did the moonwalk that transformed everything that a member still nine hundred Eighty-three everybody, watch network television. Now like today on a big network TV special the whole nation. Saw you and that night made Michael Jackson a superstar. That's all everybody was talking about the next day that Billie Jean. That's when he he had the hat and the the short pants with the White Sox, by the way, copied from Al Jolson. Really? Yeah. I asked him that once he used to watch tons and tons of Jolson video and some of those dance moves copied from Jolson and a lot of them copied from Bob Fosse. In fact, if you go on YouTube, you can see there's a lot of Bob Fosse dances where he took all the moves. But that's okay. All dancers did that. And but anyway, was that Motown twenty-five special where he became a God? After that. So it was probably the biggest television moment Motown ever had or ever will have. So how could you cut him out of this new special Motown sixty how could you not show that whole segment it's terrible based on his reputation. I guess. The Nobel prize. It's the music business. It's the music business. I don't know a lot of these people smokey Robinson seems like a nice guy. Stevie Wonder seems like a nice guy. But I'm sure if you went to any record company and took all their top artists. God knows what you'd find in there. I see this guy that was outed this metoo guy. Who's a record producer who Ryan Adams? Is this the guy? Yeah, they singer. No. Who's the guy yesterday music producer, Adam something? That's right atoms. Yeah. He's always. Yeah. But what? Pupa producer in the music business. Oh instead of record producer now. Susannah here that what are you picture? Yeah. If I said. Daughter came home and said, I'm dating you guys are record producer. What are you picturing? He might be taking her a museum or something. Not a very honest guy. So again, I understand what you're saying. But it's it's the music business. Put the Michael Jackson clip back in. It's your biggest moment ever. Let's go to John and parameter John. How you doing you? I don't know much about police work at all. But maybe you know, you're involved with them and stuff like that. Is it normal procedure to have like eight policemen shoot at one guy. I mean, it seems that there was like everybody was shooting everywhere. Just after one guy. Well. That's something for police experts to see if and it was the right procedure they're trained for that. But if a guy comes out shooting. I don't think this time to turn to each other and say who's going to shoot him shoot him. All right. You shoot him. No, no, no. You take it. I think y'all have to start. It's a terrible thing. I thought maybe. I'm the control it might might might have had a different outcome. That's all. I mean. Eight guys they get a terrible situation. But if a guy comes charging out of a place with a gun, I think you gotta act. You're right. You're all they're all gonna shoot. And they're all gonna shoot out. You're right. I don't think it's time to have a meeting and decide who will shoot. I was just wondering if that's like no, well, listen, you're not wrong with the question. You gotta wonder first of all I don't quite understand. How weren't they all in the same place firing in the same direction? No. That's part of the problem. There were some police officers on one side of the suspect in some on the other. So they were kind of firing toward each other. Yeah. That's kind of the problem. Listen, they're very good in the police department at the evaluating what went wrong if it's just a terrible terrible tragedy is a fired forty two shots. Only eight hit the suspect him. That's okay. That's okay. No seriously. I don't when when they say why they have to fire forty two. Once you make the decision to fire fire, everything you've got, you know, they they used to sometimes they'd say, well, why did they have to shoot them? Killing Mike in the shoot him in the leg. First thing you're trained in the police say, no, I understand all right for the center of the easiest thing. And and in fairness, the guy was waving the gun at them looked like he was gonna fire. It was a fake gun. But who who they didn't know that? Now, you said you can't you know, people like to second guess what they did. Okay. You go get that guy out when he comes with a gun you stop them. Let's see what happens. Let's go to Mitch in Pennsylvania. Hey, Mitch always enjoying the show, Mark. Thank you. For the sake of historical accuracy. Michael Jackson left. Motown in seventy six to record his first solo album with in Philadelphia. Under the Philadelphia. Label. International imprint are you trying to put the audience to sleep. Listen. There's people in cars listening to could drive right up the road. Michael Jackson fans very much into this. And there are a lot of them out there. And it sounds like you missed the point of the story. Sounds like you weren't following. I think you got what we were saying it's terrible. And it's awful that Motown would cut that out Motown. Do you? Remember that night? Motown twenty five not nineteen eighty. I've seen I've seen. We're watching a Mets games with a big TV. If you haven't seen it, especially younger people go watch that clip Motown twenty-five, Michael Jackson doing Billie Jean. It is phenomenal. You've never seen anything like it. I know that Fred Astaire who is still alive. The greatest answer ever had that on back. Then was VHS believe it or not. And he would play that when people came over to his house. He when people currently, I I gotta show you something he'd say this kid is the greatest answer everything would play that clip from Motown twenty five that that segment. Well, what's it gonna be remembered for his dancing on the other stuff? It's the music business. One more call Lou in New Jersey, which say Lou. Yeah. Somali. Just wanted a change the topic for a moment of this sex scandal going on with these priests in New Jersey, the archdiocese of Newark, they just published their pictures and their names. I mean, why is this going to what are they going to put these priests in jail incarcerated where they belong. Yeah. The Catholic church not exactly the swiftest. They make Mullah quick at swift at taking care in fairness. Most of these guys that they named are dead. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, this is from the past, but they have taken great steps. Many of the churches have a great system when they catch this. They immediately send them to another church, and that's what they used to do. They can't do that. Well, anyway, when we come back Joe Caccia, look what a nice guy he is. He was a regular guest, and he got his own big show. And he still agreed to come back. And he is a good guy. Yeah. So we'll talk to him in a moment on seven ten W O R. Let's get all the latest news. Here's Joe Barton. Okay. Mark detective Brian Simonson will be remembered as a cop's cop and someone who gave his life for New York City. That's what they're saying today. Growing memorial outside the one hundred second precinct in queens, where he spent nineteen years in the NYPD was killed Tuesday in a friendly fire shooting during a robbery former acting FBI director, Andrew McCabe says they consider taking. Action to remove President Trump from office. Tell Sivas news. The Justice department talked about getting the cabinet to vote on whether to invoke the twenty fifth amendment to remove Trump. President Trump tweeted that became a disgrace to the FBI and the country house votes today on that bipartisan plan to avert a government shutdown tomorrow and includes one point four billion for fifty five miles of fencing far less than the five point seven billion the president wanted for wall the president despite that is expected to sign the measure, but keep pushing for the wall next update at eleven breaking news at one start your day with Len Berman and Michael.

Michael Jackson Motown Billie Jean Stevie Wonder Al Jolson producer White Sox Bob Fosse Nobel prize President Trump smokey Robinson Joe Caccia YouTube Diana Ross FBI Justice department Fred Astaire New Jersey Mitch
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Three seventy nine hundred eighty three WIBC mobile news, all the level on the go. How the shutdown may have caused permanent losses. I'm staying Lear. Here's what's trending at four thirty expect severe wind chills tonight and tomorrow, the government shutdown cost the US economy three billion dollars. The nonpartisan congressional budget. Office says eleven billion was laws, but eight billion will likely be recovered. The CBO says the shutdown is also reduced first-quarter economic growth. The White House is not optimistic about border security negotiations. Here's FOX's John decker at the White House. White House spokeswoman Mercedes slap telling Fox News that the president is hopeful that Democrats and Republicans can compromise on a border security plan over the next three weeks. You have these conferees coming together this Wednesday. They need are going to be meeting with experts to talk about what resources are border patrol agents. Need the president telling the Wall Street Journal that he sees the odds of a border deal at less than fifty fifty the president also saying he doubted that he would accept less than. Five point seven billion dollars for a southern border wall in the next round of negotiations at the White House, Jon decker, Fox News. The former councilman had hidden cameras installed at his lake home court documents indicate one of his employees and his insurance office in Greenwood told police, she found images of herself and other women undressing stored on a computer at the agency which was owned by Brett Corey August. When he also resigned as a councilman now, he faces a charge of voyeurism for the second time this month graffiti, calling for the deaths of Jews has been fouled at Bloomington north high school. Ashley Fowler reports. In a hateful messages written in black ink were found Friday in a stall in a men's restroom similar? Graffiti was found in a school bathroom January ninth Bloomington. Police are investigating Ashley Fowler Ninety-three WIBC mobile news, Indiana Pacers can't.

White House John decker WIBC Ashley Fowler president Fox News Brett Corey August FOX CBO Wall Street Journal US Jon decker Bloomington Bloomington north high school Indiana Pacers Greenwood Mercedes seven billion dollars three billion dollars
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"The road. Follow Armstrong and Getty tomorrow morning, five till ten. AM seven sixties. Solutions drink less coffee. Don't miss a spin class finish. All my thank you cards star in the reality series by my new Honda CR v. At least you can check one New Year's resolution off your list because your San Diego Honda dealers are celebrating the new year with incredible deals plus special financing and lease offers happy new Honda from your San Diego Honda dealers. Business needs fast, secure networks to be efficient and profitable detail. Can help you keeping your data secure your business. Safe and connected. We've been helping San Diego businesses since one thousand nine hundred eighty three day jail can provide expert solutions for networks voice over IP, wireless and video security. We can help you make the right choices for your business. Call detail at eight five eight five seven one thirty one hundred whether you're networking four or four hundred systems. We have the solutions the answers in knowledge to make it happen. We have expert IT consultants have experienced in helping local business schools state and government with experts solutions, such as voice over IP systems Francisco WI fi insecure professional video surveillance solutions using top quality components detail is here thirty five year strong. We have the experience to do it. Right. And we would love the opportunity to help you and provide you with the right solutions. Give us a call and talk to corporate sales consultants today. Eight five eight five seven one thirty one hundred or Email is a business at. Details dot com. D A T E L S Y S dot com. Nobody beats alcohol and Ford and nobody treats you better. Hey, Tony Gwynn said it for years, so does Tony junior. Now, you're part.

Honda San Diego Armstrong Tony Gwynn Getty Tony junior Ford one thousand nine hundred eigh thirty five year
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"We're not allowed to talk about it. And it's in our face. There was a book written by professor Stephen Norwood. So brilliant, man. Called anti-semitism and the American far left. We know all about the alright. And the fascists. And that's bad enough. It's horrific. But what about the socialists, what about the communists? What about the new left? What about the modern democratic socialists? Alexandria, Cossio cortex has said many. Outrageous things on this subject. She's never pressed on it. We're told you better watch out she's really appealing to millennials. With all the media coverage. She has received. She's never been pressed on this Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders is quick to issue press releases and condemnation. When the Jewish state is trying to protect itself against the HAMAs terrorists among others. Because Bernie Sanders is a Marxist. And that's what they believe Karl Marx himself born a Jew. Was a self hating Jew an anti Semite, and there are many of them. How many times have I gotten behind this microphone and talked about the New York Times? Now, little chattering class and the media. They kind of pick up on this stuff. And that's good. Be nice. If they from time to time did some original thinking and research, but they're incapable of it. I get it. Shows burger. In the thirties and forties. Did you? Jewish. Was also a progressive. And he wasn't the only one. To conceal what was taking place in Europe. Was it? The only one there are many. In the United States Senate today there are several. Who voted with Obama on the Iran deal? The government of Israel told us, this is an existential threat, you're going to be effectively allowing Iran, which is slaughtering American soldiers which backs Hezbollah which one thousand nine hundred eighty three blow up that Narine barracks. And almost two hundred of our fellow Americans. Who's responsible for the slaughter? More of our soldiers in Iraq than anybody else. A terrorist organization. Backing Hezbollah as its militia wing. And despite their objections, and despite the obvious threat it poses for us. Can you imagine ICBM's would nuclear warheads with these throwbacks threatening Los Angeles and San Francisco, then Chicago and Detroit, ultimately, New York and Washington. Mail us. Can you imagine? And yet. The prior administration lied through its teeth about the Iran deal. Lied to the American people. Remember that Ben Rhodes piece proud of how they manipulated the media..

Bernie Sanders Iran Hezbollah Karl Marx New York Times Stephen Norwood professor Ben Rhodes HAMAs United States Senate New York Europe Obama Alexandria Iraq ICBM Narine barracks Israel Los Angeles
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Burger. In the thirties and forties. Is it you. Jewish. Was also a progressive. And he wasn't the only one. To conceal what was taking place in Europe. Was it? The only one there are many. In the United States Senate today there are several. Who voted with Obama on the Iran deal? The government of Israel told us, this is an existential threat, you're going to be effectively allowing Iran, which is slaughtering American soldiers which backs Hezbollah which one thousand nine hundred eighty three blew up that marine barracks. And almost two hundred of our fellow Americans. Who's responsible for the slaughter? More of our soldiers in Iraq than anybody else. A terrorist organization. Backing Hezbollah as its militia wing. And despite their objections, and despite the obvious threat it poses for us. Can you imagine ICBM's would nuclear warheads with these throwbacks threatening Los Angeles and San Francisco, then Chicago and Detroit, ultimately, New York and Washington. Complex mail.

Hezbollah Iran United States Senate Burger. marine barracks Obama ICBM Iraq Europe Los Angeles Israel New York San Francisco Washington Detroit Chicago
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Whether you know, the fees, you're paying or more importantly, the hidden fees. So what typically Jim most people think when they come off. So we ask him how much you pay them fees. What do they normally respond either? They look at you kind of dumbfounded, and they have no idea that's one answer or they look at each other. They go back and forth. They said, I think I'm paying about one percent and fees. That sounds good. Yeah. Sound good? But both those answers, they're not sure on their unsure on and even when we look at this client statements, very. Difficult often define what the client is paying in fees because it visor has an opportunity either to check the box or not check the box on your statement. So if he doesn't check the box to show your feet, you don't know what your fees are. You're just guessing that your fees and fees are super important understand our firm cannot get out of fees. I'm we're all in the business world, there's fees that we just don't have any control over, but we can make you understand your current fees. We can make you understand how to reduce those fees. We can put everything in writing for you. So that you now become a smart investor, and, you know, the impact of how those fees are going to deteriorate your portfolio, if you're not careful over a period of many many years. Here's a good example, Jim we just finished again a bunch of research that we're going to be writing in our new book with Jack canfield, who's the co creator of chicken soup for the soul books series new books. Gonna be called mama's secret recipe for retirement success. Awesome book, and we didn't analysis from two thousand two thousand eighteen into December thirty first if you had a million dollars in the S and P five hundred you earn? Two point eight five percent, compounded increase. You would have been had a one million dollar portfolio grow to one point seven million and five thousand dollars. Okay. So it grew. But that's only a two point two five if you would have paid three percent in fees, both direct and indirect that we know on average we see most people paying three percent. Their million dollars would have actually decreased to nine hundred eighty three thousand dollars in when we say hidden fees. A lot of people don't understand this. There are what we call visible fees, social the fees at your pain your adviser. But if that advisor has you and mutual funds which ninety five percent of the people listening today are in mutual funds. Those mutual fund companies do not work for free the fees. They charge are internal. They do not show up on your statement. They come out of your rate of return. Those mutual fund managers do not maintain the same portfolio through the course of the year, they buy and sell stocks in bonds inside of those portfolios again that it's an internal trading costs that does not happen for free. There's a trader on Wall Street. They have a family and they make money for what they do. So those fees come out of your portfolio. You may only see one percent on your statement. But indeed, you could be paying three three and a half four or up.

Jim Jack canfield advisor million dollars three percent one percent nine hundred eighty three thou five thousand dollars ninety five percent eight five percent one million dollar
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Whether you know, the fees, you're paying or more importantly, the hidden fees. So what typically Jim the most people think when they come off. So we ask him how much you pay them fees. What do they normally respond either? They look at you kind of dumbfounded, and they have no idea that's one answer or they look at each other. They go back and forth. They said I think I'm paying about one percent and fees because that sounds good. Sounds good. But both those answers, they're not sure on their unsure on and even when we look at this client statements, very. Difficult often defined what the client is paying in fees because it visor has an opportunity either to check the box or not check the box on your statement. So if he doesn't check the box to show your fees. You don't know what your fees are? You just cutting guessing that your fees and fees are super important understand our firm cannot get out of fees. I'm we're all, you know, in the business world, there's fees that we just don't have any control over, but we can make you understand your current fees. We can make you understand how to reduce those fees. We can put everything in writing for you. So that you now become a smart investor, and, you know, the impact of how those fees are going to deteriorate your portfolio, if you're not careful over a period of many many years. Here's a good example, Jim we just finished again a bunch of research that we're going to be writing in our new book with Jack canfield, who's the co creator of chicken soup for the soul books series. New books can be called mama's secret recipe for retirement success. Awesome book, and we did analysis from two thousand two thousand eighteen ended December thirty first if you had a million dollars in the S and P five hundred you earn? Two point eight five percent, compounded increase. You would have been had a one million dollar portfolio grow to one point seven million and five thousand dollars. Okay. So it grew. But that's only a two point eight five if you would have paid three percent in fees, both direct and indirect that we know on average we see most people Bank three percent. Their million dollars would have actually decreased to nine hundred eighty three thousand dollars, and when we say hidden fees, a lot of people don't understand this. There are what we call visible fees, the fees at your pain your adviser. But if that advisor has you and mutual funds which ninety five percent of the people listening today are in mutual funds. Those mutual fund companies do not work for free the fees. They charge are internal. They do not show up on your statement. They come out of your rate of return. Those mutual fund managers do not maintain the same portfolio through the course of the year. They buy instill stocks in bonds inside of those portfolios again that it's an internal trading costs that does not happen for free. There's a trader on Wall Street. They have a family and they make money for what they do. So those fees come out of your portfolio. You may only see one percent on your statement. But indeed, you could be paying three three and a half four.

Jim Jack canfield advisor million dollars three percent one percent nine hundred eighty three thou five thousand dollars ninety five percent eight five percent one million dollar
"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nine hundred eighty three" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Mac and Gaydos, pay tribute to a teacher text t-shirt to four one one nine hundred eighty three. Now, it's Gaydos, and my friends at the painting company always go the extra mile for their customers. Start twenty nineteen with nineteen percent off your residential paint project through January thirty first financing available on approved credit if you wanna fresh makeover for your interior and exterior paint. Now is the time to do it. Schedule by January thirty first to get this amazing offer Gaydos, approve Rosie on the house, certified one eight hundred painting one eight hundred painting for more detail sent to your phone text the word paint to four one one nine two three. It's MAC Watson for an auto glass in Mesa when you need your windshield replaced. Call Andy auto glass, I not your insurance company and take advantage of this. Great offer for every insurance replaced windshield. You'll receive one hundred and forty dollars cash and a gift card for dinner at Rhodesia grill. The Brazilian steakhouse in Mesa all you can eat four eight zero two two eight fifty three ninety four eight hundred. Two two eight fifty three ninety go with the best go with a an auto glass in Mesa valley-wide service premium grade glass with a lifetime warranty online at a Ashi autoglass dot com. KTAR? We were Aaron Jonas first radio station. Beginning our journey with an AM broadcast nearly one hundred years ago. Fast forward to present day and KTAR the radio station. It's not just a radio station. It's a news talk and information resource that you can connect with from the dashboard of your car from an app on your phone..

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