35 Burst results for "Nina Totenberg"

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:15 min | 4 months ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Athletes, saying they can receive some forms of payment will ask what today's ruling means for the ongoing fight with the also Republicans are trying to downplay the events of January 6th, claiming the capital riot wasn't an insurrection. But by trying to say it's not an insurrection by using some for semantic argument. You're also trying to say this wasn't a very big deal. And author decks. Devlin Ross has a message delivered with love for his white male friends. The way we talk about race in America tends to focus explicitly on how racism impacts and influences the lives of people of color. But I really wanted my friends to recognize that it impacts into the news is first. Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Lakshmi, saying the U. S. Supreme Court is siding with college student athletes who have been fighting the N C double limits on compensation. The long term. Today's unanimous ruling to uphold the lower court decision could be a game changer for college sports, NPR's Nina Totenberg explains. It could mean that the individual conferences each established their own limits on educational compensation, And that could mean that there would be competition among the conferences. So the athlete who doesn't like the benefits in in one conference that are offered might sign up with the school in a different conference. The conference could include academic scholarships, graduate scholarships to graduate school. They might eliminate caps on disability insurance, so that injured athletes are guaranteed income in the future. If they suffer a career ending injury before being able to play professionally, there are wide swath of things that are not available now that could conceivably be in the future. NPR's Nina Totenberg reporting negotiations on President Biden's massive infrastructure proposal are picking back up this week after talks broke down between the White House and congressional Republicans earlier this month. NPR's Windsor. Johnston has details. The White House is rejecting a proposal to raise the nation's gas tax to offset the cost of the legislation. White House press secretary Jen Psaki says President Biden has proposed a range of ways to pay for the package that would not violate the red lines that Republicans have put forward. One of them is ensuring the highest wealthiest individuals in this country pay what they're supposed to pay as it relates to taxes, additional tax enforcement, which would raise a great deal more Buy multiples of what the gas tax would raise increasing the gas tax has received pushback from both sides of the aisle. Republicans argue it would give a pass to electric vehicle owners, Democrats say would place a financial burden on lower income households. Windsor Johnston NPR news Advisors to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention meet Wednesday, NPR's Ping Wang reports, They'll discuss rare cases of heart inflammation associated with getting covid 19 vaccines that require two doses. The conditions called myocarditis and pericarditis appear to be a temporary immune response that some teens and young adults have had after getting the Moderna or Pfizer covid vaccines, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky says around 300 cases have been reported out of more than 20 million young people who've been vaccinated. These cases are rare and the vast majority have fully resolved with rest and supportive care. The CDC's vaccine Safety committee has been monitoring these reports. So far, there's still recommending the vaccines to almost everyone, 12 years and older because the health risks of getting covid or worse. Ping Wang NPR news You're listening to NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dillon. Two Major Bay Area Hospital systems have announced plans to lay off staff in recent months kinds of predominant a cut about 200 jobs back in April. Now Sutter Health says it's cutting 400 jobs after it lost a billion dollars last year. It hasn't said what kind of positions or at which of its 23 Northern California hospitals Joanne spent as a health care economists who directs the Institute for Health Policy Studies at UC San Francisco. She says the pandemic was hard on hospitals. Visits went virtual, but many patients delayed or avoided elective care and preventative visits. People skipped their regular appointments, or, you know their annual checkups. They didn't get their moles check. They delayed their mammograms. Spence predicts hospitals might regret laying off trained in patients staff because patients might end up sicker and need more care once they finally do come in for checkups. The Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors will vote tomorrow on a project to bring more steelhead trout to North Richmond's wild Kratt Creek. The project would retrofit the existing fish ladder at the Wildcat Creek Flood control facility and replace it with a better designed to improve fish passage. Fish ladders allow migrating fish to pass through waterways modified by humans to control floods still ahead, migrate from the ocean upstream to spawn and then return to the ocean. The current fish ladder was built by the U. S. Car Mary Corps of Engineers.

Raquel Maria Dillon Devlin Ross Nina Totenberg 400 jobs Joanne Wednesday Institute for Health Policy St America January 6th White House NPR North Richmond Ping Wang Rochelle Walensky U. S. Supreme Court U. S. Car Mary Corps of Engine Lakshmi last year Democrats Today
US Supreme Court Takes Major Case on Carrying Concealed Handguns

Q

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

US Supreme Court Takes Major Case on Carrying Concealed Handguns

"Time in more than a decade, the U. S Supreme Court is headed for a major decision on gun rights. Court today, agreeing to take up a case testing how far a state may go in regulating whether an individual may carry a gun outside the home more from NPR's Nina Totenberg, 2000 and eight and 2010 the Supreme Court ruled for the first time that the Second Amendment right to bear arms guarantees the right to own a gun in one's home for self defense. But after that it was crickets on the subject of how far states may go in regulating guns now, with three trump appointees on the court and a new 6 to 3 conservative majority Long accepted gun regulations could be in real jeopardy For the first time. The case that the court has now granted will not be heard until the fall it tests in New York law that limits permits to carry a concealed gun outside the home. To those going hunting or to target practice and those who need protection like a bank messenger carrying cash

U. S Supreme Court Nina Totenberg NPR Supreme Court New York
Democrats to Introduce Bill to Expand Supreme Court From 9 to 13 Justices

NPR News Now

01:03 min | 6 months ago

Democrats to Introduce Bill to Expand Supreme Court From 9 to 13 Justices

"Has introduced a bill to expand the number of supreme court justices from nine to thirteen as npr's nina totenberg reports. The of justice has already been changed seven times but not since the civil war era. Progressive groups remain enraged at what they see as republican manipulation of the supreme court nomination process in order to give president trump to appointments to the court. I by blocking president obama's nominee to the supreme court for nearly a year and then by rushing through amy coney barrett's nomination just over a month after ruth bader ginsburg staff now faced with a six to three conservative majority on the court. Some liberal democrats are proposing a bill that would expand the court from nine to thirteen members but it has no chance of passage. Indeed house speaker. Nancy pelosi said she would not bring it up for a vote. She said she supports president. Biden's appointment of a commission to study the question nina totenberg. Npr news washington. This is npr news.

Nina Totenberg Supreme Court Amy Coney Barrett NPR Ruth Bader Ginsburg Barack Obama Nancy Pelosi Biden Washington
Biden judicial nominees represent diverse professional backgrounds, identities

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Biden judicial nominees represent diverse professional backgrounds, identities

"Announced his first slate of judicial nominees, making clear he intends to fulfill his campaign pledge Ray more diverse federal bench. NPR's Nina Totenberg explains. Nine of the 11 nominees are women and nine are people of color. The nominees are also far more diverse in their professional experience, their public defenders as well as prosecutors with long experience in both civil and criminal law practice here in Washington, the president named Catan, G. Brown, Jackson and African American Trial Court Judge You feel the appeals court seat vacated by Attorney General Merrick Garland. She was on President Obama short list for the Supreme Court in 2016 and is often mentioned now as a contender should a vacancy occur. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington Less than a

Nina Totenberg NPR African American Trial Court RAY G. Brown Attorney General Merrick Garla Catan Washington Jackson President Obama Supreme Court
Supreme Court Set To Hear Case Pitting Unions Against Agricultural Business

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 7 months ago

Supreme Court Set To Hear Case Pitting Unions Against Agricultural Business

"U. S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case that pits the rights of farm workers and labor unions against large agricultural employers in California. As NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. At issue was a state law enacted nearly half a century ago that allows union organizer's some limited access to farms to seek support for unionizing the workers. The growers who are challenging the law, contend that by giving union organizer's a limited right of access to workers on site during break times, The state is authorizing an unconscious tutu Schimmel trespass on the growers private property. This is not the first time the California law has reached the Supreme Court in 1976. After the state Supreme Court rejected a similar claim from the growers. The U. S Supreme Court declined to take up the case. But now, with a far more conservative high court in place, the growers are trying again, and it's significant that the justices have agreed to hear the case. Nina Totenberg, NPR NEWS Washington This

U. S. Supreme Court Nina Totenberg Tutu Schimmel NPR California Supreme Court U. S Supreme Court Washington
Supreme Court won't stop grand jury from getting Trump's tax returns

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

Supreme Court won't stop grand jury from getting Trump's tax returns

"At the Supreme Court today when Justice is in a one sentence order. Often places Syria's of grand jury subpoenas for his business and financial records, including 10. Years of tax returns more from NPR's Nina Totenberg in 2019. The New York D A. Convened a grand jury in Manhattan to investigate allegations that Trump paid off porn stars Stormy Daniels and other women to keep them quiet. During the 2016 presidential campaign, but the investigation soon morphed into much more a probe of Trump's personal and business finances. Now, for the second time, the Supreme Court has rebuffed Trump's effort to block the investigation. Courts. One sentence order means Trump will have to produce a wide swath of information that could lead to criminal or civil charges he blasted. The court's action is a continuation of what he called the greatest political witch hunt in the country's history. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS

Nina Totenberg Donald Trump Supreme Court Stormy Daniels Syria NPR Manhattan New York Npr News
Trump and 17 states back Texas bid to undo his election loss

WNYC Programming

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Trump and 17 states back Texas bid to undo his election loss

"President Donald Trump is asking the Supreme Court to let him join a widely scorned Texas election lawsuit that is seeking to throw out millions of votes in four states. Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania in Wisconsin, more from NPR's Nina Totenberg. When Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed his lawsuit directly in the Supreme Court seeking to prevent presidential electors from finalizing Joe Biden's electoral college victory. Officials from those four states. Both Republicans and Democrats derided it as nothing more than an unfounded publicity stunt. But now President Trump is seeking to join the lawsuit. Election experts say it's highly unlikely the court will come to the president's aide when lower courts have consistently thrown out his claims as baseless. As election law expert. Richard hasn't put it. This is a press release masquerading

President Donald Trump Nina Totenberg Attorney General Ken Paxton Supreme Court Texas NPR President Trump Wisconsin Pennsylvania Joe Biden Georgia Michigan Richard
Wisconsin high court won't let Trump campaign bypass lower court

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Wisconsin high court won't let Trump campaign bypass lower court

"Court has thrown out a lower court decision that upheld California's limits on the number of people who can attend religious services during the pandemic. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports, the high court has instructed the lower court to reexamine these limits. In previous cases from California. The court had upheld the state's rules. But that changed with the arrival of new Justice Amy Cockney Barrett, who tipped the court majority in the other direction. So now, the justices have told the lower courts to reexamine the rules limiting the number of congregants that indoor services in California religious groups complained that they're the victims of discrimination because the limits on the number of people permitted at worship services are more severe than they are for grocery stores and warehouses. The state counters that there's a far greater danger of covert spread at places where people sing, chant and gather for longer periods of time. Nina

Nina Totenberg Amy Cockney Barrett California NPR Nina
Supreme Court set to hear arguments on Trump plan to exclude undocumented immigrants from census

Raul Campos

01:05 min | 11 months ago

Supreme Court set to hear arguments on Trump plan to exclude undocumented immigrants from census

"Undocumented immigrants from the U. S census. He doesn't want them counted for the purposes of drawing new congressional District's next year. So far, three lower courts of blocked his attempt as NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. Now it's up to the high court. The Constitution requires that there be a count of the quote whole number of persons in the country every 10 years and that congressional districts be apportioned based on that population count. In July, President Trump issued a memorandum ordering the Census Bureau for the first time to send him two sets of numbers. One delineating the whole number of persons in each state and the other for apportioning congressional district was to subtract all undocumented immigrants from that count. 22 States challenged the Trump order in court, contending that it violates the Constitution, the census statute or both. Now the cases before the Supreme Court. Nina Totenberg NPR NEWS Washington Turkey is condemning the killing of Iran's top nuclear scientist, NPR's Peter

Nina Totenberg President Trump NPR U. Census Bureau Supreme Court Turkey Washington Iran Peter
The Affordable Care Act Faces Yet Another Supreme Court Test

BBC World Service

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

The Affordable Care Act Faces Yet Another Supreme Court Test

"Washington that the U. S. Supreme Court Tuesday the Trump Administration and the state of Texas will lead arguments that Obama care should be struck down in its entirety. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. It'll be the third attempt to invalidate the law since it was enacted a decade ago. Faced with earlier challenges to the law of the high Court upheld it. Buy votes of 5 to 4 and 6 to 3. But many of the lawyers who originally challenged the law in 2012 now say that the legal landscape has changed so much since then, that they think this challenge is a stretch. And many of the groups including major business groups that supported the original challenge are missing from the challenge. Now that said the court is far more conservative today than it was when previous challenges were brought. Among the three trump appointees. Now on the court is New Justice Amy Cockney Barrett, who's been highly critical of the court's previous decisions upholding

U. S. Supreme Court Trump Administration Nina Totenberg NPR Washington High Court Texas Barack Obama Amy Cockney Barrett
"nina totenberg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington Wall Street stocks rallied Monday on news that drugmaker Pfizer may have a potential Corona virus vaccine that Al Jones industrial soared 834 points. The NASDAQ fell 181 points. This is NPR. President Trump says he's fired Defense Secretary Mark Esper. He made the announcement in a tweet. Jesper was Trump's second defence secretary, succeeding Jim Mattis, who resigned in 2018, the president says Christopher Miller, who is the director of the National Counter Terrorism Center, will serve as acting secretary of defense. Trump administration is imposing sanctions on four additional Chinese officials as NPR's John Rule, which reports the sanctions target people involved in implementing a controversial national security law in Hong Kong this past summer. On the list to two senior members of the Hong Kong Police force, including the head of the newly formed National Security division to mainland officials involved in Hong Kong affairs were also sanctioned. The State Department says they will be barred from traveling to the United States and any assets they have in the U. S will be blocked. They joined several other officials from China and Hong Kong already sanctioned by the U. S over the law trying to impose the national security law in Hong Kong in June, with almost no consultation. Beijing says it was necessary to restore order. The State Department and other critics say the law is being used to erode Hong Kong's autonomy and freedoms and to silence dissent. John Druitt. NPR NEWS Peru's president Martin Skaara says he will not challenge a congressional vote to remove him from office. The impeachment vote came amid corruption allegations and anger over his handling of the pandemic. Congressional leader Manuel Marino from the minority Popular Action Party, is expected to assume the presidency on Tuesday. Marino would remain in office and through July 2021. I'm Shae Stevens. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the size Simms Foundation. Since 1985 supporting advances in science, education and the arts towards a fairer, more just society. More information is available at size Simms foundation dot or GE. In his victory speech, Joe Biden faint black voters for helping him to win the presidency. But.

Hong Kong NPR Hong Kong Police force President Trump State Department president Nina Totenberg Al Jones Manuel Marino size Simms Foundation Mark Esper Shae Stevens Pfizer National Security division National Counter Terrorism Cen
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And it was when Democrat Dick Durbin asked her if she'd watched the video of the death of George Florida in Minneapolis, And she said it had been particularly painful for her and her Children, two of whom were adopted from Haiti and her black And she said she wept with her oldest daughter. My Children to this point in their lives had had the benefit of growing up in a cocoon where they have not yet experienced. Hatred or violence on DH for Vivian. You know, toe understand that there would be a risk to her brother or the son she might have one day. Of that kind of brutality. Has been an ongoing conversation. It's a difficult one for us like it is for Americans all over the country. So a rare personal insight from the nominee. Nina, can you tell us what's next? In this process? This was only day two. Well tomorrow it's going to go along. It's going to go late tonight. It'll go late tomorrow night in all probability, and the Republicans have scheduled a voting committee as I understand it for Thursday. Even though all of the answers to the written questions won't even be in. This is Ana warp speed trajectory to get her confirmed before Election Day. That's NPR's Nina Totenberg on Day two of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett's confirmation hearings. Thank you for your reporting. Now let's turn to Ohio. It's a state that President Trump won easily in 2016, and it is in tossup territory. This year, the closure of an auto plant there is looming large NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith visited the site of the former plant. When President Trump talks about how amazing the economy was before the pandemic, there is a glaring exception. One. He's come back to over the course of his presidency, as he did in May, 2019 I was the only thing they could say about our whole economy. Lordstown. They kept saying Lords down Lord staff, the GM Lordstown plant, which most recently had been making the Chevy Cruze shutdown in March, 2019. And no amount of angry tweets berating GM management and the union could make it re open over the course of a few years. It went from employing 4500 people to essentially none. Hi. My name is Bill Jannik. I was there. 17 years and he was one of the last to go if you saw the sign that said the last cruise I made it not hung it on the car for John Alexander, who also worked at GM Lordstown. It's been a nightmare plan on retiring this plant. I literally had Money savings put aside to get a home and property in Lordstown, Ohio. Instead. If he wanted to stay with GM, he had to relocate to Michigan factory rat. I'm a dumb auto worker. I have to follow GM, his ex wife and kids didn't make the move, and the whole experience has left him broken. Jannik, who is a mechanical engineer, has since found another job in a different industry. His wife, who also worked at GM. Lordstown took a transfer to a plant in Indiana. But making the long drive home on weekends for a few hours with their kids wasn't working. In 2016 support for Trump surged in the counties around Lordstown voters there liked his message on trade and boosting manufacturing. But there's something he said at a rally in nearby Youngstown in 2017 after he was already president. Everyone seems.

President Trump GM GM Lordstown Lordstown Nina Totenberg Bill Jannik John Alexander Dick Durbin Ohio Haiti Vivian NPR White House NPR Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Tamara Keith George Florida Minneapolis Indiana tossup
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KCRW

"Joining us now is NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Nina Welcome back high when Judge Barrettes nomination was announced in the Rose Garden just over two weeks ago, she pointed proudly to this clerkship for conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. Today, Barrett seem to be putting some distance between herself and Scalia. Can you talk about that? Yes, you know, over and over again. She was asked whether she agreed with Scalia's opinions. His fervent sense, for instance, supposing abortion rights, gay rights, his dissenting opinion, saying that in his view, Obama care should have been struck down and here's what she said every time she was asked that kind of a question. But I want to be careful to say that if I'm confirmed you would not be getting justice Scalia you would be getting justice Barritt. And we said the question of whether Barrett would recuse herself from any possible case involving this year's presidential election was also an issue. Yeah, audience particular. She was repeatedly asked whether she would recuse herself from any case involving the upcoming election in view of President Trump's statements and tweet, saying that he wanted her on the court by Election Day for that very reason, but she never really answered the question of recusal. I have had no conversation with the president or any of his staff on how I might rule. In that case. It would be a gross violation of judicial independence for me to make any such commitment or for me to be asked about that case and how I would rule Um, I also think it would be a complete violation of the independence of the judiciary for anyone to put a justice on the court as a means of obtaining a particular result. There. It was. Asked a lot of questions about abortion rights, Same sex marriage, the Affordable Care act, even a decision that she wrote on gun rights. Did the committee get any real insight into her view on whether she would adhere to those presidents or not? Truthfully, not really, as she like previous nominees that it would be inappropriate to commit to following particular precedents. But I do think it's fair to say that barrette in her scholarly writing has taken a narrower view of precedents that have to be followed. Then most previous nominees, she wrote A lot of U T U Law Review article about this and listed only six Supreme Court precedents as what she called super precedents that should not be overruled. Six And three of them were in the 18 hundreds. Was there any moment of of really surprise? Yes. And it was when Democrat Dick Durbin asked her if she'd watched the video of the death of George Florida in Minneapolis, And she said it had been particularly painful for her and her Children, two of whom were adopted from Haiti and are black. And she said she wept with her oldest daughter. My Children to this point in their lives had had the benefit of growing up in a cocoon where they have not yet experienced. Hatred or violence on DH for Vivian. You know, toe understand that there would be a risk to her brother or the son she might have one day. Of that kind of brutality. Has been an ongoing conversation. It's a difficult one for us like it is for Americans all over the country. So a rare personal insight from the nominee. Nina, can you tell us what's next? In this process? This was only day two. Well tomorrow it's going to go along. It's going to go late tonight. It'll go late tomorrow night in all probability, and the Republicans have scheduled a voting committee as I understand it for Thursday. Even though all of the answers to the written questions won't even be in. This is Ana warp speed trajectory to get her confirmed before Election Day. That's NPR's Nina Totenberg on Day two of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett's confirmation hearings. Thank you for your reporting. Now let's turn to Ohio. It's a state that President Trump won easily in 2016, and it is in tossup territory. This year, the closure of an auto plant there is looming large NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith visited the site of the former plant. When President Trump talks about how amazing the economy was before the pandemic, there is a glaring exception. One. He's come back to over the course of his presidency, as he did in May, 2019. That was the only thing they could say about our whole economy. Lordstown. They kept saying Lord stand Lord Stan, the GM Lordstown plant, which most recently had been making the Chevy Cruze shutdown in March. 2019. And no amount of angry tweets berating GM management and the union could make it re open over the course of a few years. It went from employing 4500 people to essentially none. Hi. My name is Bill Jannik. I was there. 17 years and he was one of the last to go if you saw the sign that said the last cruise I made it not hung it on the car for John Alexander, who also worked at GM Lordstown. It's been a nightmare plan on retiring this plant. I literally had Money savings put aside to get a home and property in Lordstown, Ohio. Instead. If he wanted to stay with GM, he had to relocate to Michigan factory rat. I'm a dumb auto worker. I have to follow GM, His ex wife and kids didn't make the move, and the whole experience has left him broken. Jannik, who is a mechanical engineer, has since found another job in a different industry. His wife, who also worked at GM, Lordstown took a transfer to a plant in Indiana. But making the long drive home on weekends for a few hours with their kids wasn't working in 2016 support for Trump surged in the counties around Lordstown, voters there liked his message on trade and boosting manufacturing. There's something he said at a rally in nearby Youngstown in 2017, after he was already president, that everyone seems to bring up..

President Trump Justice Antonin Scalia Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Nina Totenberg GM president GM Lordstown NPR Ohio Lordstown Obama Bill Jannik Supreme Court Rose Garden Dick Durbin NPR White House Haiti
The Affordable Care Act is on the line at court

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

The Affordable Care Act is on the line at court

"News. I'm Korver Coleman. This is the second day of confirmation hearings for Amy Cockney Barrett, President Trump's U S Supreme Court nominee. It's also the first day that senators can question her directly. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports, Democrats will play offense and Republicans will be playing defense. Even the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Lindsey Graham, acknowledged yesterday that the outcome of these hearings is a foregone conclusion. Republicans have a majority in the Senate and the votes to confirm Barrett. But the Democrats are walking in unusually disciplined lock step on their messaging. Barrett. This is potentially the deciding vote to strike down the affordable care act, known as Obama care if she's confirmed this month, as planned a week after the election bear it will be hearing a case seeking for a third time

Amy Cockney Barrett Democrats Korver Coleman Lindsey Graham Nina Totenberg Judiciary Committee Donald Trump NPR Barack Obama Senate Chairman President Trump
Amy Coney Barrett: Trump nominee testifies in Supreme Court hearing

BBC World Service

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Amy Coney Barrett: Trump nominee testifies in Supreme Court hearing

"Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett is said to begin taking questions in the morning after only playing a bit part Monday when her confirmation hearings began. There was silent as members of the Senate Judiciary Committee made opening statements for five hours. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports When it was time for Barrett to speak. She again said her judicial philosophy was modeled after the late Justice Anton's Clia. Scalia was a conservative icon known for his fervent dissenting opinions when the Supreme Court upheld abortion rights, gay rights and obamacare But Barrett, in her opening statement, said courts are not designed to solve every problem or right every wrong the policy decisions and value judgments of government. Must be made by the political branches elected by an accountable to the people. The public should not expect courts to do so. And courts should not try. That sounds easy. But as judges of all ideological stripes recognize one person's policy choice is another's UN constitutional law.

Barrett Nina Totenberg Amy Cockney Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Scalia Justice Anton UN NPR Obamacare
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Without legal status. A three judge federal court prevented him from doing that now. The case is before the Supreme Court. In addition, there are numerous cases directly involving the upcoming election that air being teed up in the wings cases that could determine who is the next president. Gornstein is director of the Supreme Court Institute at the Georgetown University Law Center lurking in the back room. Is the possibility that this could become the most tumultuous and divisive terms since the Supreme Court decided Bush v. Gore, and that's just the beginning. There is, for instance, a case that pits the rights of religious groups against state and federal laws that bar discrimination in this case, the city of Philadelphia contracts with a wide variety of groups that it pays to screen and certified couples for foster care. The city, however, cut off Catholic social services because the group refused on religious grounds to certify same sex couples in violation of the city's non discrimination law. The lower courts upheld the city's decision, citing the Supreme Court's 1990 decision, declaring that religious groups are not entitled to exemptions from neutral, generally applicable laws. The decision was written by conservative icon Antonin Scalia. Nonetheless, four of the court's current conservatives have expressed an interest in overturning that decision. And with the addition of Judge Barrett, there may well be a majority. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington Thanks for listening to your public radio station. Which brings you morning Edition. You can get the latest news this afternoon on all things considered and follow us any time on social media. You confined all your morning edition hosts on Twitter if you'd like. I'm NPR Inskeep. There's NPR green. That's David Green. Rachel Martin is Rachel NPR and Noel King is No King. This is NPR.

Supreme Court Supreme Court Institute NPR Rachel NPR Antonin Scalia Rachel Martin Judge Barrett David Green Nina Totenberg Philadelphia Georgetown University Law Cent Noel King Gore Twitter president Gornstein
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here's NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. The court is an institution built on tradition, and the traditional opening day of the term is Thiss won the first Monday in October. This time, though, there will be just eight justices and because of covert 19. Once again, the justices will gather by telephone hookup. You hear the lawyers make their arguments because they will not be together. There will be none of the usual freewheeling debate. Instead, the justices will question in order of seniority for just a few minutes each, and once again, the public will be able to listen in. A lot has changed since July, when the court concluded a tumultuous term surprising many with lopsided decisions involving LGBT rights and a repudiation of President Trump's claim of total immunity from both grand jury and congressional subpoenas. In other more closely divided rulings, Chief Justice John Roberts occasionally broke with fellow conservatives to cast the fifth and deciding vote with the court's liberals. But as University of Michigan law professor Nicholas Bagley observes Although Roberts has an institutionalist streak, he may have lost his leverage with Ginsberg's death and the likely confirmation of the very conservative Baron. The chief justice is no longer going to be the center vote here. Just how far right the court will move could become quickly a parent in a case to be argued Ah, weak after the election. It's the third challenge to the Affordable Care Act, which in the past was upheld by votes of 5 to 4 and 6 to 3. This time, the Trump Administration and a coalition of Red States are arguing that because the Republican Congress three years ago zeroed out the monetary penalty for those not covered by insurance. The whole law is now void. If the administration were to prevail, there would no longer be protections for those with pre existing conditions and Obama care health insurance for some 22 million people would likewise be gone. Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee, Judge Barrett has been highly critical of chief Justice Roberts reasoning in the previous OBAMACARE cases. But even Paul Clement, who led the initial legal challenge to the thinks this case is a stretch. It's just hard for me to say that the mandate was central when it doesn't have any teeth. Indeed, sources say that top Justice Department officials tried and failed to talk Trump out of bringing this case. The Obama care case is just one of many controversies flashing red on the docket this term. Many of them political. Some cases are already being expedited. One involves how many seats each state gets in the House of Representatives. The Constitution requires the quote whole number of persons in each state. To be included for apportionment purposes. But President Trump maintains he has discretion to determine the numbers and has said he intends to exclude non citizens without legal status. A three judge Federal court prevented him from doing that now. The case is before the Supreme Court. In addition, there are numerous cases directly involving the upcoming election that air being teed up in the wings cases that could determine who is the next president. Gornstein is director of the Supreme Court Institute at the Georgetown University Law Center lurking in the back room. Is the possibility that this could become the most tumultuous and divisive terms since the Supreme Court decided Bush v. Gore, and that's just the beginning. There is, for instance, a case that pits the rights of religious groups against state and federal laws that bar discrimination in this case, the city of Philadelphia contracts with a wide variety of groups that it pays to screen and certified couples for foster care. The city, however, cut off Catholic social services because the group refused on religious grounds to certify same sex couples in violation of the city's nondiscrimination law. The lower courts upheld the city's decision, citing the Supreme Court's 1990 decision, declaring that religious groups are not entitled to exemptions from neutral, generally applicable laws. The decision was written by conservative icon Antonin Scalia. Nonetheless, four of the court's current conservatives have expressed an interest in overturning that decision. And with the addition of Judge Barrett, there may well be a majority. Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington Hey, Thanks for listening to your public radio station. Which brings you morning edition. You can get the latest news this afternoon on all things considered. And follow us any time on social media. You confined all your morning edition us on Twitter. If you'd like. I'm NPR Inskeep. There's NPR green. That's David Green. Rachel Martin is Rachel NPR and Noel King is No. Okay. This is NPR news live from the.

Supreme Court President Trump NPR Trump Administration Chief Justice John Roberts Federal court Supreme Court Institute Obama Judge Barrett president Nina Totenberg Paul Clement Thiss David Green Justice Roberts Antonin Scalia Justice Department
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It does, And I think it is sad that we're having this conversation as it relates to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement because, of course, Justice Ginsburg was someone who believed in institutions and thought that procedures and norms and institutions would save us if we would just adhere to those rules. And we have seen this president with the blessing of the Senate bulldoze through so many norms that have governed how our government works today whether it is not releasing tax returns, not having hearings on major bills. Having acting officials serve as heads of agencies and suppressing scientific information about the pandemic, and now they are turning their focus. To the Supreme Court, where they are also bulldozing through the norms that have surrounded confirmations and the rules that they themselves created for no other purpose, then Just to expand their power and to solidify the conservative majority on the court that will be implementing their agenda for decades to come. Robert. We mentioned Senator Susan Collins of Maine and Senator Lisa Murkowski. Alaska has two Republicans. You say they wait until after the election. To vote on a nominee who also you watching on the Senate right now. Well, you played a clip from Senator Grassley, who was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and who said that he would not entertain a nominee. In an election season, so I think he'll be important. I don't think we've heard from him again since then on DH. Certainly Senator Romney, I think will be important in this. And also, I think some of the Republican senators who are running for reelection, you know this might become an issue in in there close racist, too. And so there's a lot of politics that will be played out about what the sun it should do. And I want to make sure we're being specific about language because saying you're going to wait until after the election to vote on the nominee is not the same as saying You're going to wait until after The inauguration to vote on the nominee. That's exactly right, so and that's what they that's what what happened. That's what McConnell was able to engineer With the Garland nomination. There was no hearing. For something very close to 10 months on, and then Only after President Trump was Installed in office inaugurated did he was he able to make the nomination? Of Neil Gorsuch, and that is exactly what Republicans had planned and there were Republicans in Senate Republicans who really had concerns about the way this was done, and that this was norm, breaking And But every one of them who sort of for a moment suggested that he wasn't particularly happy with this, and that actually included Grassley back then. They got sat on very quickly, and I know in one case A senator was told, said, I'll get you a primary opponent if you don't back me up, So the senator retreated is and This is this is very hard ball politics. As I said, this is it is going to be hand to hand combat. But in the last analysis McConnell has a lot of tools at his disposal. He controls a great deal of campaign money and who gets it He controls who has plum committee assignments and What kind of power they have on their committees. It's a it's a Democrats. You know, everybody in the Democrats have Always there For one moment. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? We're talking to legal affairs correspondent with NPR. Nina Totenberg law professor Leah Lippman of the University of Michigan and Robert Barnes of the Washington Post. You know, go ahead and pick up what you were talking about Democrats and that's It's this really inside baseball. But the Democrats pick their committee chairs or their rank their ranking members. Everything is done by seniority. It's automatic who is the chairman of the ranking member. That is not true with her On the Republican side. They have limited terms as chairs and and therefore the leader has a great deal, more power and how to maneuver around. Things. In addition to as I said, campaign, cash and a whole bunch of other things, so this is there is no more filibuster. There are all kinds of sort of many procedures that used to be possible. For the opposition party to slow things down a bit. None of that exists anymore with judges and the Democrats actually started that by getting rid of the filibuster rule for lower court judges. Thie pretty much close to the end of the Obama administration in the last two years when they couldn't get anybody confirmed, and we're just seeing their judges blocked every way. So they got rid of the filibuster rule, and I don't know whether they rue it now, of course. McConnell then got rid of the filibuster rules. For Supreme Court nominees. Once the Republicans had trump in office, Democrats all voted against it, and And what I would not talk about. I want to move on to something. You alluded to a little earlier, Nina. And and that's the possibility of packing the court of the Judiciary Act of 18 69 is something that I have a feeling many people were Googling. But Leah, how difficult would it be to change the size of the court? So Legislatively. It's not that difficult. The number of justices is set by statute, not the Constitution, And so therefore all that's required to change the number of justice is to pass another federal statute. I think that the difficulty, however, comes from the sense that Well, we have nine justices. We've had them for a while. And FDR in particular, even though he wanted to expand. The number of justices on the Supreme Court never actually did so in part because of pushback from his own party, and otherwise that the number of Supreme Court justices should not be expanded. However, it's also the case that the number of Supreme Court justices has changed. It was during the tenure of President Andrew Johnson and most recently that Congress changed the number of justices on the Supreme Court. And that was in part because a president who was hostile to the project of reconstruction and equality and freedom for new slaves. I was interfering in the process of reconstruction. And so Congress knew that if they did not expand the Supreme Court that the Supreme Court would be a barrier to reconstruction, and so that was what they did in response to that Congress has more recently expanded the number of lower federal court judges in 1990. Then before that, With President Jimmy Carter. But the perceived sense that they would be violating some institutional norm is what is holding the Democrats back. Not any more formal rules. And I think the pig question is whether They will feel constrained by that, when obviously the Republicans do not feel so constrained by any shared institutional norms. That's professor Leah Littman. She teaches at the University of Michigan Law School and his co host of strict scrutiny. Ah, podcast about the Supreme Court. Nina Totenberg was also with US. NPR, NPR's legal affairs correspondent and Robert Barnes, who covers the Supreme Court for The Washington Post. Thanks to you all and I want to wrap on a couple of tweets here, Mary Kate says. One of the highlights of my life was watching. Nina Totenberg interview RBG last year, It felt like two friends chatting in the living room after dinner. It was magical, inspirational and heartwarming. Kathleen Tweets to me, RBG represented possibilities, strength and courage. She sits on a pedestal of women's rights icons like the suffragettes, Gloria Steinem, Maya Angelou and so many others. It's disheartening that we cannot take a moment to grieve..

Supreme Court president Nina Totenberg Senate McConnell Senator Grassley Robert Barnes Senator Susan Collins Senator Lisa Murkowski Justice Ginsburg NPR Senator Romney chairman senator Alaska Senate Judiciary Committee The Washington Post professor Maine Leah
RIP Ruth Bader Ginsberg - A life lived for her community

The Nicole Sandler Show

01:50 min | 1 year ago

RIP Ruth Bader Ginsberg - A life lived for her community

"I was born. Under, very bright's stone. Solemnly. Swear that I will support and defend. The constitution of the United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday. She was eighty seven the second woman ever appointed to the Supreme Court she was known for her fiery dissents often in cases involving civil rights or equal protections. GINSBURG was appointed to the court in Nineteen. Ninety three and was well known for Championing Gender Equality Abortion rights, affirmative action, and other progressive causes in our final years. Thanks to those dissents and well everything about her she earned the nickname, the notorious RPG and to put. An other worldly stamp on it sundown Friday marked the start of Russia Shana. One of the Jewish High Holy Days according to Jewish tradition a person who dies on Rosh Hashanah is a sad dijk, a person of great righteousness NPR reporter Nina Totenberg explained the tradition on twitter writing a Jewish teaching says those who died just before the Jewish new year are the ones God has held back until the last moment because they were needed most and where the most righteous if you wanted to be a true professional. You will do something outside yourself. Something to make life. A. Little better. So people less fortunate. than. You. A meaningful life. Is. One lives not test for oneself but for once community just days before her death Ginsburg said to her granddaughter. My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg United States Supreme Court Ginsburg Nina Totenberg Nineteen Shana Dijk NPR Russia Twitter
In nod to conservatives, Trump reveals new list of potential Supreme Court picks

Forum

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

In nod to conservatives, Trump reveals new list of potential Supreme Court picks

"Supreme Court nominees. Using the tool that served him well and energized in the conservative base and the 2016 election campaign. NPR's Nina Totenberg has more on that story. Trump blasted Joe Biden for failing to issue a comparable list and issued a dark warning for the future if the Democrat is elected and has an opportunity to pick one or more justices Courts. Five conservative justices are all in good health on Ly One. Justice is fighting serious health problems. Liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being treated for a serious about with 1/5 cancer, her second cancer in less than two years. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington A

Nina Totenberg Ruth Bader Ginsburg NPR Supreme Court Ly One Joe Biden Donald Trump Washington
Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if reelected

Morning Edition

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if reelected

"All right. Amid the uproar over the president's pandemic response, A new item appeared on the White House schedule yesterday, and it was very clearly a change of subject. I am announcing 20 additions to my original list. Of candidates for the United States Supreme Court That list served him well and energizing conservatives. Back in 2016, NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports on what he is offering in 2020. Administration insiders, Khun See that this list of 20 names is a validly more political. While the previous three lists included just one elected politician and no administration officials, this one includes three U. S. Senators all fire breathing conservative Republicans, Arkansas's Tom Cotton. Ted Cruz of Texas and Missouri's Josh Holly. All three have directly or indirectly criticized Chief Justice John Roberts for not being conservative enough, and all three have presidential ambitions. Indeed, Holly tweeted that he's not really interested in a seat on the court. Also on the list are a top White House lawyer and to top officials from the Trump Justice Department, including former solicitor General Noel Francisco who've carried Trump's legal banner in the courts. Perhaps the most interesting name on the list is Paul Clement, who served as solicitor general in the George W. Bush administration and is considered perhaps the best legal advocate among the very able lawyers who practice regularly before the Supreme Court. Clement has an added value. He's represented a variety of conservative interests before the court from gun rights advocates to religious groups to groups opposed to Obama care. As for federal judges on the list, they're all trump appointees with records hostel through abortion, voting rights legislation, LGBT rights and regulation of business and the environment. According to sources involved in compiling the list. The White House counsel, as is usual, presided over the process. But White House chief of staff Mark Meadows was aggressively involved and even the president's son in law. Jared Kushner, got into the act, as did some conservative senators like Holly, who pushed back against including Federal appeals court judge Naomi Row because of some of her writings prior to becoming a judge, But as a judge, she's written some of the lower court decisions most supportive of Trump. With the latest list of 20 new names now added to the 45 names on his previous lists. Trump on Wednesday blasted Democrat Joe Biden for failing to release a comparable list and the president issued a dark warning about the future. If Biden is elected and has an opportunity to pick one or more justices, radical justices will erase the Second Amendment. Silence political speech and require taxpayers to fund extremely term abortion. In fact, the courts five conservative justices are all in good health and two of them. Trump appointees Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh are the youngest members of the court at 53 55, respectively. The only ailing justices 87 year old Ruth Bader Ginsburg, leader of the court's liberal wing, who's being treated for 1/5 bout with cancer, her second cancer in less than two years. Should she leave the court. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has said that the GOP would fill the sea even though McConnell four years ago refused for nearly a year. To allow hearings on President Obama's nominee to fill the seat of Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly in February of 2016. McConnell's justification for blocking the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland was that the voters have a right to make their views known in the presidential election. A rationale that GOP leader is not embracing this year. Nina Totenberg NPR NEWS Washington

Supreme Court President Trump White House Josh Holly Donald Trump Paul Clement Nina Totenberg Trump Justice Department Joe Biden Chief Justice John Roberts Barack Obama Mitch Mcconnell Judge Merrick Garland GOP Justice Antonin Scalia NPR Khun See Ruth Bader Ginsburg Tom Cotton
Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if reelected

All Of It

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if reelected

"President Trump has issued another list of potential Supreme Court nominees, his fourth since his 2016 presidential campaign. But as NPR's Nina Totenberg reports, this list is a bit different. Today's list of 20 is avowedly more political. While the previous three lists included just one elected politician. Today's includes three senators all fire breathing conservative Republicans. Missouri's Josh Holly, Arkansas's Tom Cotton and Texas Senator Ted Cruz. All have been highly critical of Chief Justice John Roberts for not being conservative enough. Also on the list are to current or former Trump Administration Justice Department officials who have been carrying Trump's legal banner in the courts. And Paul Clement, who served as solicitor general in the George W. Bush administration and is considered perhaps the best legal advocate among the very able lawyers who practice regularly before the Supreme Court.

President Trump Trump Administration Justice D Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts Senator Ted Cruz Nina Totenberg Paul Clement NPR Josh Holly George W. Bush Tom Cotton Missouri Arkansas Texas
Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if re-elected

WNYC Programming

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Trump unveils list of possible Supreme Court picks if re-elected

"Has issued another list of potential Supreme Court nominees, his fourth since he started issuing the list during the 2016 presidential campaign is to subsequent appointees came from those lists. But as NPR's Nina Totenberg reports, this list is a little different. Today's list of 20 is avowedly more political. While the previous three lists included just one elected politician. Today's includes three senators all fire breathing conservative Republicans. Missouri's Josh Holly, Arkansas's Tom Cotton and Texas Senator Ted Cruz. All have been highly critical of Chief Justice John Roberts for not being conservative enough. Also on the list are to current or former Trump Administration Justice Department officials who have been carrying Trump's legal banner in the courts. And Paul Clement, who served as solicitor general in the George W. Bush administration and is considered perhaps the best legal advocate among the very able lawyers who practice regularly before the Supreme Court. Nina

Supreme Court Nina Totenberg Trump Administration Justice D Chief Justice John Roberts Senator Ted Cruz Donald Trump Paul Clement NPR George W. Bush Josh Holly Tom Cotton Missouri Texas Arkansas
Supreme Court rules against 'faithless electors'

Q

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Supreme Court rules against 'faithless electors'

"Today. A unanimous decision on rogue electoral college delegates is NPR's Nina Totenberg reports the court without dissent. World states have the power to remove electoral college delegates who refuse to cast their votes for the popular vote winner in their states. In 2016 7 Electoral college delegates went rogue, casting their ballots for someone other than Hillary Clinton, the candidate. They were pledged to support in Colorado. The so called faithless electors were removed and replaced on the spot and in Washington state. They were fined. The delegates challenge the state laws in court, contending that under the constitution, they have discretion in casting their votes. But now the Supreme Court has unanimously disagreed. Justice Elena Kagan writing for the court. Declare that neither the text of the Constitution nor history is on the road. Delegates side Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Nina Totenberg Justice Elena Kagan Hillary Clinton Washington State NPR Colorado
Louisiana Abortion Law Struck Down by Supreme Court

All Things Considered

04:49 min | 1 year ago

Louisiana Abortion Law Struck Down by Supreme Court

"US Supreme Court has delivered a major defeat to abortion opponents by a 5 to 4 vote, the court struck down in Louisiana law that was virtually identical to a Texas law invalidated by the court four years ago. As NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. The fifth and decisive vote was cast by Chief Justice John Roberts. Four years ago. The chief justice was among the dissenters when the court struck down a Texas law that required doctors performing clinic abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. But today he voted with the courts for liberal justices in striking down a nearly identical law in Louisiana. He wrote for himself alone, however, and said he was joining the Liberals on the outcome because of the doctrine of starry decisis. Which is the legal term for standing by the court's precedents. It instructs us to treat like cases alike, he said, and the Louisiana law burdens women seeking pre viability abortions to the same extent as the Texas law did four years ago. The value of following precedent, he added, is that it promotes the evenhanded, predictable and consistent development of legal principles. Foster's reliance on judicial principles and contributes to the actual and perceived integrity of the judicial process. While president is not an inexorable demand, he said, Simple disagreement with a previous decision is not enough to justify reversing course in this case. Not only is the Louisiana law issue virtually identical to the one struck down four years ago. But the District Court judge who held an extensive trial in the case found that if the law were to go into effect at minimum, two of the three abortion clinics in the state would be forced to close women would have to wait longer and drive further for abortions, and only one doctor would likely be left to fill the demand for 10,000 women seeking abortions in the state each year. Abortion providers and defenders were to say the least relieved. Here's Kathleen Pittman, administrator of the Hope medical group that runs a clinic in Shreveport, Louisiana. To say we're related hardly begins to come close to what? Where you're failing. I'm celebrating today, but I'm still worried about our future. And Nancy, north of president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, echoed that sentiment. Well, we are taking the Supreme Court cases one victory at a time. We are under no illusions that the fight is over with this case, you know, it's welcome all over and over again. And Leah Lippman, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School, cautioned That Robert's decision sets out a standard different from the one adopted by the court. In the past, the chief justice's reasoning was actually quite permissive in what it would allow states to do to restrict abortion. That said, however, the decision does appear to rule out state laws that, for instance, Ban abortions at 68 12 weeks or any other time prior to fetal viability. Even James Bop, general counsel for Americans United for Life, sees those bands as dead in the water. I've been saying for 10 years that those approaches are doomed to failure. The bop was disappointed in the Roberts opinion. He saw some hope he gives half alone. He sees the Roberts opinion as enabling states to mandate ultrasounds for those seeking an abortion. As well as allowing states to ban abortions for certain reasons, for instance, because of fetal disability or sex. And he sees the decision as sending a message to anti abortion voters tells the pro life movement that President Trump fulfills its promises with his appointment of Gorsuch and Kevin all and that we need Trump reelected in order to make future appointments, political groups on the right and left we're making that very point today. Were one of the liberal justices to retire and two of them are over 80. Another Trump appointment to the high court could make Roberts vote irrelevant. Given that mathematical reality, today's decision is likely to play a significant role in the upcoming election. Polling data has consistently shown a hefty majority of the public approve the right to abortion. But while Americans held similar views in 2016 exit polling at that time showed Trump was able to turn out Maura of his vote based on his stated goal of naming conservative and anti abortion justices to the court. Nina

Us Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts Louisiana District Court Texas James Bop Nina Totenberg President Trump Donald Trump Robert NPR President And Ceo University Of Michigan Law Sch Foster Shreveport Center For Reproductive Rights Kathleen Pittman
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today's landmark decision with NPR's Nina Totenberg coming up plus the family of racial or Brooks is speaking out and W. NYC has some new sounds after news headlines live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer president trump says he will sign an executive order tomorrow that will address concerns about police brutality NPR's Rachel Roscoe reports trump has faced pressure to take action after the killing of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis four global protests against police misconduct president trump says the executive order will be comprehensive the White House has said it will focus on encouraging police departments to meet professional standards for use of force and de escalation tactics one liners about law and order but it's about it's about justice also and it's about safety what trump has expressed concerns about the killing of George Floyd he has strongly defended law enforcement in general Democrats in the house of introduced a bill that would ban chokeholds and make it easier to pursue police misconduct cases Senate Republicans are also working on a bill aimed at greater transparency and accountability around the use of force I sure Roscoe NPR news in the wake of Friday's deadly police shooting of a twenty seven year old black man in the Wendy's parking lot Atlanta's mayor has wasted little time announcing a series of administrative orders aimed at altering department's rules when it comes to use of force when American show lance bottoms saying the changes will effect when officers use deadly force and how they deal with suspects officers should use de escalation techniques to gain voluntary compliance and avoid or minimize the use of physical force and to continuously develop update and train officers in de escalation techniques bottoms also said a police your fellow officer using force they should consider beyond reasonable under the circumstances they should intervene or chard Brooks was shot late Friday when he ran from police who arrested him for being intoxicated behind the wheel snatching a taser and pointed at an officer is down sparked protest at the Georgia capitol today a hundred liberal activists have signed a letter urging the presumptive democratic nominee Joe Biden to pick Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren as his running mate here's NPR's as McAuliffe this letter is a sign of the pressure by Jim faces from progressives on the left of his party but it also comes at a time when there is mounting pressure for biting to pick a black woman as his running mate especially after nationwide protests of racial injustice Elizabeth Warren drew most of her support from white voters during the democratic primary the Democrats urging bite into pick Warren right that she is the best choice to unite the party and bring in progressive voters who supported Bernie Sanders they also insists that Warren is a policy expert who could handle the multiple crises facing the nation whether it's racial injustice climate change over nineteen or the economy a small college NPR news after initially losing more than four hundred points early in the trading day on corona virus concerns blue chips in the broader market trend the other way the Dow was up a hundred and fifty seven points today the nasdaq rose one hundred and thirty seven points you're.

NPR Nina Totenberg
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Community NPR's Nina Totenberg has the details of the U. S. supreme court's ruling today that gay and transgender individuals are protected under the nineteen sixty four civil rights law and can sue on the grounds of workplace discrimination an employer biolase title seven that's the employment provision when it intentionally fires an individual employee based in part on sex it makes no difference if there are other factors besides the plaintiffs sacks contributed to the decision the statutory violation occurs if the employer attention intentionally relied even in part on an individual employee's sex when deciding to discharge that employee NPR's Nina Totenberg reporting and and double ACP rally in Atlanta has drawn roughly a thousand people demanding criminal justice reform and the resignation of Georgia secretary of state from member station W. A. B. E. Emily green has more a backdrop to the rally was last week's bungled election across the state voters contended with malfunctioning voting machines and lines that stretched on for hours with untrained poll workers some voters mistakenly thought that cast your ballot because no one told them their ballots had to be scanned in order to count James what all is state president of the Georgia and double ACP when we were marching in the streets will not operate Lloyd let's go out and vote we showed up to vote Tuesday was the police killing over the weekend of race hard drugs has added fuel to the calls for criminal justice reform in Georgia Brooks was shot in the back while fleeing police the medical examiner has ruled it a homicide for NPR news I'm Emily green in Atlanta the family Frisch R. Brooks is speaking out days after he was killed when police in Atlanta shot him outside a fast food restaurant has in Jamaica Holbrooke says people should know the kind of life that was taken if U. S. hello this young black man wolf look at your children when you see him later in a sense that your debt and is the sole you had a glimpse of what we post Richard Brooks was twenty seven years old the food and drug administration is now rescinding its emergency authorization for the use of two anti malarial drugs that president Donald Trump had been strongly promoting is covert nineteen treatment the agency cites data showing Hydroxycut Laura Quinn and Cllr Quinn could do more harm than good for patients with covert nineteen the drugs.

Jamaica Holbrooke Emily green W. A. B. E. Emily green ACP Laura Quinn Donald Trump NPR Frisch R. Brooks Lloyd Georgia president James Atlanta Nina Totenberg
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"President trump is threatening to cut off unspecified funding to Michigan and Nevada because of their plans to expand absentee voting I'm Jamie Floyd this is All Things Considered on W. NYC despite corona virus fears two of the largest high schools in Alabama are holding graduation ceremonies this week and one superintendent at least is defending the move based on what I understand from the governor we're now why bother lighting any group that has been given to us there will the pomp and circumstance and proper social distancing and we've been hearing the term contact tracing these past few weeks but what is it and how will it work on the ground well W. N. Y. C.'s Danny Lewis has some answers after news headlines live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer the US Supreme Court is temporarily blocking a lower court order requiring the trump justice department to turn over to the house Judiciary Committee secret evidence compiled by the grand jury during the investigation by special counsel Robert Muller last year more from NPR's Nina Totenberg the evidence being withheld by the trump justice department was first requested more than a year ago prior to the beginning of formal impeachment proceedings against president trump in a filing with the Supreme Court this week the house argued that information is nonetheless still relevant to an ongoing investigation and could even lead to new impeachment charges against trump to lower courts have ordered the evidence turned over to the house Judiciary Committee but the trump administration appealed and now the Supreme Court has put those orders on hold while the justices decide whether to tackle another big trump related legal case even if the High Court does agree to hear the case the justices are unlikely to decided until after the election Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington federal health officials are quietly releasing some additional guidance to businesses planning to reopen amid the crown of virus pandemic initial guidelines well put together more than a month ago had been.

justice department Washington Robert Muller Nevada President High Court Nina Totenberg NPR special counsel house Judiciary Committee Michigan US Supreme Court Jack Speer Danny Lewis W. N. Y. C. superintendent Alabama W. NYC
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nina Totenberg reports that will be the first time the court has allowed what amounts to live streaming of its audio it will also be the first time the court is hearing arguments via telephone book up instead of in the flesh that presents challenges for the lawyers who were used to rapid fire questioning and the ability to read the body language and facial expressions of the justices this however will be a more formal affair the lawyers will essentially be flying blind for their part the justices will be limited to just two or three minutes each for questioning with the order determined by seniority the only argument today involves a relatively uninteresting trademark question that was clearly picked to allow the court to work out any bugs in the system Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington members of the Senate returned to Washington today after an extended recess to prevent the spread of the corona virus the vote is scheduled tonight to confirm and new inspector general for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission lawmakers are also expected to resume discussions on the next corona virus relief package the next round of fund federal aid is likely to include additional funding for state and local governments on Wall Street the Dow is down two hundred forty seven points this is NPR news in Washington live from KQED news I'm terrorists either several bay area hospitals are starting to roll out machines that aim to sterilize is ninety five mass for frontline health care workers although not everyone is happy with them KQED's Joe fitzgerald Rodriguez explains governor Gavin Newsom in Kaiser Permanente say the machines are safe way to shore up a statewide shortage of N. ninety five masks for healthcare workers battling the pandemic but the California nurses association opposes the policy same machines.

Nina Totenberg Senate Washington KQED Gavin Newsom Kaiser Permanente California nurses association Nuclear Regulatory Commission NPR Joe fitzgerald Rodriguez
"nina totenberg" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on KCRW

"F. P. B. as part of its investigation demanded certain documents from the law firm the firm refused contending that the structure of the agency is unconstitutional because its director cannot be fired by the president at will instead the bureau's director like the heads of other independent federal agencies can only be fired for cause meaning malfeasance inefficiency or neglect of duty lawyer Andy Pincus who represents the chamber of commerce explains the theory of our government is that the popularly elected president will appoint officials and remove them if they're not doing what he wants so if you take away the president's power to remove someone then you're drastically limiting the political accountability of that individual that view however it lost in the lower courts and the sailor firm appealed to the Supreme Court backed by the trump administration central today's argument is a case dating back to nineteen thirty five when president Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried to fire one of five commissioners on the Federal Trade Commission over his policy views the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Congress created the FTC to perform quayside judicial quasar legislative functions and that the president could not therefore dismiss its members the way he could members of his own administration the sale a law firm and the trump administration will argue that the CFPB is different because the bureau's power was placed in the hands of a single director instead of a multi member commission again lawyer Andy Pincus multi member agencies the way they're structure in our system have to have people from different parties the president picks the chairman who has a lot of control about how it operates the terms are staggered so most presidents will have an opportunity to appoint a number of those people because the trump administration is not defending the CFPB structure the supreme court appointed lawyer Paul Clement to argue on behalf of the bureau comment notes that there are other single member directors at the government who cannot be fired by the president at well among them the comptroller of the currency and the director of the Social Security Administration the constitution says nothing about the president's power to remove officers confirmed by the Senate pointing to that fact Clement knows there are literally dozens of independent agencies that control everything from monetary policy to the stock market to public health and safety comment says that the consequences of invalidating the CFPB structure could be dire the issue in this case is like the thread on that sweater that if you start tugging on it and you tug on it hard enough potentially the whole sweater come sundown and the sweater here really is is the entirety of the whole alphabet soup of agencies that all have these for cause protections these agencies he notes are often central to our economy the federal reserve is a great sort of example of why Congress imposes these kind of restrictions because there are certain issues in the world that we deal with at the national level where it's nice to have a degree of insulation four eight discharging a particular duty where it's not going to just change with whoever's the president the trump administration however is willing to roll the dice in this case it argues that if a single director agency cannot be distinguished from a multi member agency the court should reverse the case decided eighty five years ago that would throw into doubt not just the C. F. P. B. but independent agencies that comprise roughly a third of the government and not just those agencies but also potentially the rules that those agencies have laid down over the years Richard Cordray the former CFPB director says that even a ruling limited to the C. F. P. B. could have unintended consequences notably in that case that's being argued on Tuesday the mortgage bankers association filed a brief saying whatever you do don't strike down the agency as a whole because it would cause chaos in the mortgage market the rules that are in place we've all adjusted to those those are working well the Supreme Court majority likely would want to avoid that kind of chaos but the conservative court majority is comprised of five justices who to one degree or another have indicated a hostility to the notion of independent agencies the question now is how far do they wanna go Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington this is NPR news you're listening to morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition several democratic presidential candidates have dropped out of the race and are now endorsing Joe Biden our goal has always been to help unify Americans to defeat Donald Trump this is also a tough break for everyone who's voted early for those candidates in today's super Tuesday contests that story coming up on morning edition on KCRW it promises to be a super Tuesday with major political repercussions in California that's also meant a whole new way of voting including polls opening days or even more than a week before hand I love that I was able to vote early we would go in the evening and if the lines are just being myself this really cut down on time immensely to take this report from the voting centers and early indicators about who's voted and how on the next greater LA today at one on KCRW live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly authorities in central Tennessee say tornadoes overnight have killed at least seven people Blake farmer with member station WPLN says one tornado hit Nashville leaving heavy damage power outages in at least two people dead the.

F. P. B.
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"F. P. B. as part of its investigation demanded certain documents from the law firm the firm refused contending that the structure of the agency is unconstitutional because its director cannot be fired by the president at will instead the bureau's director like the heads of other independent federal agencies can only be fired for cause meaning malfeasance inefficiency or neglect of duty lawyer Andy Pincus who represents the chamber of commerce explains the theory of our government is that the popularly elected president will appoint officials and remove them if they're not doing what he wants so if you take away the president's power to remove someone then you're drastically limiting the political accountability of that individual that view however it lost in the lower courts and the sailor firm appealed to the Supreme Court backed by the trump administration central today's argument is a case dating back to nineteen thirty five when president Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried to fire one of five commissioners on the Federal Trade Commission over his policy views the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Congress created the FTC to perform quayside judicial quasar legislative functions and that the president could not therefore dismiss its members the way he could members of his own administration the sale a law firm and the trump administration will argue that the CFPB is different because the bureau's power was placed in the hands of a single director instead of a multi member commission again lawyer Andy Pincus multi member agencies the way they're structure in our system have to have people from different parties the president picks the chairman who has a lot of control about how it operates the terms are staggered so most presidents will have an opportunity to appoint a number of those people because the trump administration is not defending the CFPB structure the supreme court appointed lawyer Paul Clement to argue on behalf of the vero Clement notes that there are other single member directors of the government who cannot be fired by the president at well among them the comptroller of the currency and the director of the Social Security Administration the constitution says nothing about the president's power to remove officers confirmed by the Senate pointing to that fact Clement knows there are literally dozens of independent agencies that control everything from monetary policy to the stock market to public health and safety comment says that the consequences of invalidating the CFPB structure could be dire the issue in this case is like the thread on that sweater that if you start tugging on it and you tug on it hard enough potentially the whole sweater come sundown and the sweater here really is is the entirety of the whole alphabet soup of agencies that all have these for cause protections these agencies he notes are often central to our economy the federal reserve is a great sort of example of why Congress imposes these kind of restrictions because there are certain issues in the world that we deal with at the national level where it's nice to have a degree of insulation four eight discharging a particular duty where it's not going to just change with whoever's the president the trump administration however is willing to roll the dice in this case it argues that if a single director agency cannot be distinguished from a multi member agency the court should reverse the case decided eighty five years ago that would throw into doubt not just the C. F. P. B. but independent agencies that comprise roughly a third of the government and not just those agencies but also potentially the rules of those agencies have laid down over the years Richard Cordray the former CFPB director says that even a ruling limited to the C. F. P. B. could have unintended consequences notably in that case that's being argued on Tuesday the mortgage bankers association filed a brief saying whatever you do don't strike down the agency as a whole because it would cause chaos in the mortgage market the rules that are in place we've all adjusted to those those are working well the Supreme Court majority likely would want to avoid that kind of chaos but the conservative court majority is comprised of five justices who to one degree or another have indicated a hostility to the notion of independent agencies the question now is how far do they wanna go Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington it's morning.

F. P. B.
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news in Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. The US supreme court has reversed a lower court ruling on fetal remains NPR's Nina totenberg reports the law mandates that aborted fetuses must be buried or cremated. Since the court upheld the fetal remains provision. It means that abortion providers will have to dispose of fetal remains after an abortion, either by burying them or by cremating them separate from other surgical waste, and there is the possibility that this provision can be challenged once again under a different legal standard. But for now, the law is in place, NPR's Nina totenberg reporting. At least one person was killed in saliva Ohio after multiple tornadoes ripped. Through the state overnight in Dayton. There are no reported fatalities, but twisters tore apart homes, toppled trees and downed power lines. Juliet from hold from member station. W Y SO report. Search and rescue operations are ongoing. The national weather service confirmed at least two powerful tornadoes touched down in Dayton, and its suburbs. Late Monday night, the storms to our houses and half leveled buildings and trapped people under debris gas leaks. Downed wires have resulted in multiple fires and widespread power outages have affected Dayton's water system..

Dayton NPR Nina totenberg Windsor Johnston US Washington Ohio Juliet
"nina totenberg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm Dwayne Brown. The supreme court is stepping back into the culture wars as NPR's Nina totenberg tells us the high court agreed to hear three cases next term on whether federal law barring employment discrimination on the basis of sex applies to gay and transgender workers. Nobody contends that the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act barring discrimination based on sex was originally intended to cover the LGBTQ community. What they do claim is that the language of the statute is so broad it does cover sexual orientation and transgender status the Employment Opportunity Commission takes that position. The Trump administration does not and the federal courts of appeal have split on the issue. The supreme court expected three cases to settle the question. Nina, totenberg, NPR news, Washington. The Trump administration is threatening to impose sanctions on five countries that import oil from Iran. A grace period is ending in early may secretary of state, Mike Pompeo says the US won't grant any new wavers. The goal remains simple to deprive the outlaw regime of the funds that juice to stabilize the Middle East for four decades. And instead of is Ron to behave like a normal country. China's pushing back on Washington's decision to stop buying Iranian oil or face sanctions. Beijing is one of the biggest foreign buyers of Iranian. Crude President Trump, you may recall restored crippling sanctions on Iran last year after withdrawing from the twenty fifteen nuclear cord, India, Turkey, Japan and South Korea could also face sanctions. But the administration didn't say what sort of punishments. They're contemplating if the country's ignore the warning stocks finished mixed on Wall Street as the price of crude Oil Search today, the Dow lost forty eight points down two tenths of a percent. The NASDAQ gained seventeen points up two tenths of a percent. You're listening to NPR news. An actor who wants played Ukraine's president in a television show has won a landslide victory in the country's presidential election. As NPR's Lucian Kim reports the political novice one more than seventy percent of the vote in Sunday's runoff fed up with five years of war government, corruption and widespread poverty. Ukrainians turn their backs.

NPR Nina totenberg Iran president Washington Dwayne Brown Employment Opportunity Commiss Culver City Mike Pompeo Trump Middle East California Lucian Kim Beijing China
"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. The prime minister of New Zealand is renewing her pledge to tighten gun ownership laws following the shooting deaths of fifty people at two mosques in Christchurch, here's NPR's rob Schmitz, prime minister, Justin. Dr Darren center cabinet is working hard on gun law reforms to ensure this type of attack does not happen. Again. She also announced the bodies of thirty victims have been approved for released to their families. And then on Friday, the government would broadcast the Muslim call to prayer nationally along with a moment of silence. The US supreme court takes up case today involving racial discrimination in jury selection. NPR's Nina totenberg says at issue is the conduct of a district attorney in Mississippi, Douglas, Evans, and his pursuit of a conviction against Curtis flowers over the course of six trials Curtis. Flowers has been on death row for twenty two years though, five of his trials ended up either with the convictions thrown out for prosecutorial misconduct or because. Hung juries when prosecutor Evans finally won a conviction. The six time around the US supreme court Senate it back to the state courts to evaluate on the question of race discrimination in jury selection defense lawyers say the state court upheld the conviction despite demonstrably different treatment of white and black. Jurors and the US supreme court is taking another look, Nina totenberg, NPR news, Washington. This is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC from New York. I'm Richard Hake. Newly released documents pertaining to President Trump's former lawyer may indicate where prosecutors will be looking next federal judge ordered the release of files including search warrants from Michael Collins home office, as well as redacted pages about a campaign finance scheme. WNYC's? Andrea Bernstein says that suggests an ongoing investigation that law enforcement doesn't want to jeopardize the unit. That's investigating him is not the financial fraud union is the public corruption unit. The people who sent who got. Convictions for dean's gallows, and Shelly silver, the former legislative leaders. So it suggests there's a public corruption angle that we may not yet understand Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and tax evasion and violating campaign finance laws says he is in regular contact with the US southern district of New York congestions whole plan brought out people outta town hall on the Upper West side last night, more than one hundred showed up Stephen nessen. Was there things got feisty real quick people wanted to know if there'd be any breaks for them if they live in the toll zone below sixty first street they wanted to know how they could be sure the MTA wouldn't waste the expected. One billion dollars year congestion pricing generate and what will happen to the street parking garages outside the zone. Many residents blamed Uber and the bike lanes for the increase in congestion and asked why do they have to pay for the congestion toll New York? Lawmakers have agreed to spend forty million dollars to help with census outreach. But as community organizations await the governor's final figure, they say the state is already behind. Schedule W SHO's Charles lane has more Cuomo says he's waiting for a report from a state commission before you offers a final number. But he also says the budget is tight and there's no new revenue coming in. Melvin Miller is leading the census initiative for the association for a better New York. She says California started last year and has already dedicated three times as much as New York. We're behind the curve is forty million enough. Probably not Miller says the money will go towards marketing and also door-to-door canvassing by community organizations to persuade New Yorkers who may be mistrustful of government. If you missed that big moon visible in the sky last night and early this morning. You'll still have one more chance. Nasa says the third and last super moon of twenty nine thousand nine we'll be visible tonight..

New York US NPR Washington Nina totenberg prime minister Evans Dave Mattingly Dr Darren center Melvin Miller New Zealand Andrea Bernstein Christchurch Curtis Cuomo rob Schmitz MTA
"nina totenberg" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"nina totenberg" Discussed on Here & Now

"Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg hasn't been there. She is still recovering from cancer surgery. This week also included the first opinion from Justice Brett Cavanaugh which in contrast to his contentious confirmation hearing was. Notably without controversy NPR Legal Affairs correspondent Nina totenberg joins us now. Hi, Nina high. So the actual decision Cavanaugh was writing for it was unanimous uncontroversial is that by design. Yes, by tradition. The new newest Justice, the junior Justice for his first or her first opinion is assigned a unanimous opinion when that's not terribly difficult. So that individual can start out with a relatively easy assignment. And that's what this was. This was a Adine zero decision on a rather technical legal point involving a question of the federal arbitration act and is Justice Roberts. The chief Justice who would have assigned Cavanaugh to to write this opinion is he treating Cavanaugh differently. Do you think than other justices other new justices? No, I think as far as I could see it's the same. But of course, we don't know what goes on behind those. Red velvet curtains in the in the court that we see in the courtroom. And I think it's pretty clear that the chief Justice would like this to be as uncontroversial term as possible. And so far he's succeeded at that it's not entirely clear that he will be able to continue to succeed because the Trump administration keeps leapfrogging the normal appellate process and bringing very controversial issues where it's lost in the lower courts up to the court and saying please stay what the lower court did block what the lower court did. And here this case. And so far it's been unsuccessful in that. But you know, you never can tell how concerned is chief Justice Roberts right now about just the image of the court after the cavenaugh confirmation. He's very concerned. And so is every other member of the court, and so all the other justices who have been out on the talking to various legal groups have made a point of saying that. That they respect their colleagues. They do not think that this is a partisan institution. They may have their ideological differences, but not their partisan that partisanship doesn't reflect that and even cabinet at one point tried to walk back, some of the more partisan things he said at his confirmation hearing, he said, perhaps I shouldn't have said that one of his public outings. What about his voting record so far? There was the Planned Parenthood cases, the chief Justice and Cavanaugh sided with the liberals on the court in passing on taking a pair of cases. This was seen as kind of interesting that he's sided with the liberals. Right. But this is not a question on the merits. This is a a very technical question. Where to lower courts had said. Yes. Medicaid recipients can challenge a state's laws barring individual providers like. Grandparenthood from receiving federal aid. So this is very technical question. And they took it up to the supreme court and the court passed on it six to three Justice Ginsburg voted from her hospital bed on the day. She had surgery she participated in that case and also voted in that case, the only one in which Cavanaugh has sided with conservatives and Roberts, the chief Justice sided with the liberals again to prevent a case from being heard was one of the asylum cases that came up to the court that doesn't mean these cases won't come back. It just means that for now they're passing on them. What about Justice Ginsburg has she doing now she's been absent from the court this week? You know, it's probably good for her that she didn't decide to sit on the bench. She is participating in cases by reading the briefs and reading a transcript of the oral argument and the chief Justice. Says that every day just before the oral argument, then she'll participate, so she's working from home. But you know, when I was researching the harassing surgery that she had what all the leading surgeons that I spoke to said is you can get back to work within two weeks, which is what she would have had to do. But you want to be careful not to take one step forward and five steps back. So she's not probably would be my guess is not going to sit at this sitting which is a six days over two weeks. But after that, there's also a three and a half week gap. It's called the writing period for the winter session. And I would imagine that she'll use that time to recoup and that you'll be back in February..

Brett Cavanaugh Justice Roberts Justice Ginsburg Justice Nina totenberg Nina high NPR Ruth Adine two weeks six days