5 Episode results for "Nina Mary"

GAMES OF CLOWNS (PART 1) | TAGALOG HORROR STORIES | STORIES FROM SPOOKIFY

Stories Philippines Podcast

11:08 min | 6 months ago

GAMES OF CLOWNS (PART 1) | TAGALOG HORROR STORIES | STORIES FROM SPOOKIFY

"Thanks for taking time to listen in our podcast, we really appreciate it, and of course, is not possible without our sponsor anchor. If like us that loves to tell stories, you should also start your own podcast and nothing else we could recommend. But anger, it's your one stop shop for hosting editing and distributing your brand new shiny podcast. You can even make money anchor all that for free. There are lots of cool stuff in using anger including their brand new web based audio editor that Ula surely love. So what are you waiting for try anger now and start sharing what you got go to anger that FM slash start to get started that's anger that. FM. Start, I can't wait to hear your. Is Let us know when you do we'll check it out. Own. Subject Guys Welcome Back Nitsa Story Philippines podcast. For this episode along in Amara Osama. Coast necessary up. In this episode? Hindi tile or mckinney ignorant episodes. Be when Gal Alumni Cornell gays delighted support just NATO. Now Nina Mary Kanayama Story. In podcast among. Be One gang stories Barrow. Right now without untying. Bunk Story. Is Wrong Story Melissa Spooky Fi it is on page SA- facebook. So shout out the spooky five page. SA- facebook. So ask permission Sinaloa who did not being feature your Mama story NASA page added starting Podcast 'cause Powell Maganga Humana story ethos if I beach and ramming. Mabobeh and restore your mark on ten so. For my la Mugabe not. Story. About Adidas podcast. Now let's get it on to our story. Games of crowds. Hi. A Samara. First then Goma boost the SUSPI FI. Nick Baba Salama at mean at Banana Hama Quinto. I hope you like my story. Using all be doing society Tom Stress with dealing, arrow. He continued on. Our part for Hoban cleanup. Uncle Malayan. Arguing Netanyahu. But only at the home nagy kissing he'll. Art a Guinea. The own will only Bongino work. Boot. Socks. Sorry Colin Kaepernick's Arkin. McCallum not beleaguered. Are we not Hollow Woven ME. Layover in it, both of our way up beloved he Meka. With the whole. Way To going down down mo who of US On. The Golden Gate links on. NEPAD. Be. Not beleaguered shocking. Senior. Bolic's are going to look. One Pass. Nagging is bullet. Mean Nsen. Manana gained mono associate open a Guinea pig. But May pass off Norman. We are good. The horse I mean. Gallons school. Will. Begin care the WHO is to Junky? Some Otto. Bunsen goal. Guy Kinky Las Bill I attorney. Behind guy. Massa NAPATA pistole. Coming by. The federal income in appliances Burba. Parma Birthday Sam in chaos in casino. Bill. Nye. A. Guy Nodding in. Scare nothing. Latvian. Ballot. Hung. Eating tecom the tecumseh turn knock. Hannity Dinky Neil. Nina NATO non hunting Sabi. Grind Anoc Niro to Julia Latte parasail. Holik Diana night. Not. going. To. Yari Cosso senior Boondi Pappas Arkin knew how are the? Helen. Omar. ALITA. Among you might be on Avenida they. Look it up in. Decision Melissa our muscle. For my Agassi, don't least in the whole. Barbeque. MARLA bus A. Ninety Nine Hundred Disobey A socking Deng lunch box. Me Up now who might be suitable? On Celibacy? At the. Be On coaching part. disappeared. Sobbing UNNEC data home. Sign now. Thank you. Make, a high can akilah Stella gone arguing Maguelonne. BAIRRO INDIE COMMONER Awesome. Cutting mean unschooled. Nazi sorry nothing in. Feeling, go. Been Hamamdeh Battling Hong things a classroom. Ginkel up and. In Latin subject naming no bus moon among classmates out homa in. Soccer theory landing lunch. So Montana Bonilla. But but Issa. Bottle in. Middleton Young Gay you, Mama? lunchbox. Applauding go go. To. The dominated school. Amid. neponset according to some solid being. Somebody. At. been digging in a WHO died and made. The Arkansas. Will Now? Adam. COSIMA. snuggle learn the. Nas I'M UP Now who Syllabus eternal. Lucky. Taco young young Meat Nomination Lena. Holocene Anina. Guiding. Baio. The heart attack with trump to meet. Our Go Nathanson ABC News. Onto Neko Mugune. Dominion One. On game. Of Clowns. Sasso Mike Amis has. been battling don't. Call. Little. Bombing. Walking. Hollow. Hollow. Marking emotion. Deacon and Gakuen Kobe tomorrow we go. Commission hold onto long. BUYING ON A. Narita. Gobbo seen at that. But. Then you store. In Listener Miller muscular. Home on. The bag on on a tour. Osman. GAGO INCO. Leona Sparrow, they clown broader Speroni's. Are Not. But they. Did Not pay. US. Now mom our. COMPETE BUBBLE TOMATOES GHOSLAN UMBRELLA Known monarch grounds. Dongola Component Kasama and. Say say tomato power among clowns. NASA. WHO Do. Decide. creaming. HINDALCO. To be continued. Google. You Amy, my story and Nice Bahaji. Monari Lamba celeb- Salmon facebook page stories philly been spied gassed. I e. mean. STORIES BE AGE BY GUEST Jamile DOT COM. An melling NIAN adding description And done similarly. But I'm in. Cinema. Manar story.

US NASA facebook Guinea Ula Nina Mary Kanayama Amara Osama Tom Stress NATO Agassi mckinney Colin Kaepernick Go Nathanson ABC News audio editor Nina NATO nagy Parma Nick Baba Salama Google Banana Hama Quinto
Trademarking Essentials with Attorney Nina Ameri from One LLP

OC Talk Radio

26:06 min | 1 year ago

Trademarking Essentials with Attorney Nina Ameri from One LLP

"Here comes again lunch. Lippi the same old same old or you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs APP firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary for delivery welcome to the Zandbergen report where wealth strategies and investment wisdom collide featuring your distinguished host and certified financial planner Bart Zandbergen. Hello everybody it's a tip burgum. Thank you for joining in to the ZANDBERGEN report while we are talking about whilst strategies and investment wisdom. Thank you Paul for being here today. Bringing along a fascinating another uh-huh. I shouldn't say a fascinating another fascinating gust. Thank you so much. I appreciate you teeing up here so I have an amazing person here Nina a Mary and I just WanNa let you know that she's an attorney. She's beautiful beautiful woman and a mom and I'm just I'm so proud that you're here and I'm so thankful for you to be here. In students writing me yeah yeah so great so great she works with the one thing that nobody really understands trademark and and and my old world entertainment law that's what we were chatting about boy. I have some stories on both front that well so we are able to talk about things today but let's just dive into trademarks. If that's okay and I knew that you your local local here in southern California you have an office right around the corner in Newport beach in Beverly Hills and San Diego so I know we're here local right now and we're happy to have you here. Maybe you WanNa tell the audience a little bit about yourself in a little bit about your background grandma briefly yeah so I'm southern California native <hes> grew up in L._A.. On the West Side <hes> once U._C._l._a. for Undergrad and when it was time to go to law school of course I wanted to be with you know the the rich and famous so I went to peppered in Malibu it's beautiful but not the easiest place to study in hindsight. I probably should have gone somewhere else does anybody. I'll I'll. I'll just got interrupt. That's the most beautiful campus on it really is on the ocean in Malibu. I don't know how anybody goes to class. I got into loyal and that's the opposite it's in downtown L._A.. And I just when I was peppered I fell in love with the campus and everyone was so nice there. I have to say I had a really good experience in law school so <hes> after that you know I always kind of had a passion for entertainment I._P.. Trademarks was actually the class. I did the best in law school so I knew from early Liane. That's what I wanted to get into but just like everyone else. Everyone's trying to get into entertainment night P so for three years. I did something completely unrelated. I worked as a tax lawyer and what I did was I negotiated the I._R._S.. In state back taxes interestingly enough. That's how I kind of weasel my way in the entertainment and I._p.. World <hes> because a lot of people that are you know in <hes> sports and entertainment end up having tax issues. I need help they need. They need that kind of help a lot so <hes> I joined a law firm that was primarily focused on entertainment sports. <hes> I kind of learned through the School of hard knocks <hes> doing all kinds of deals a film TV General Business Transactions <hes> amazing stories stories <hes> so fast forward <hes>. I got introduced to one of the partners at one l._l._p.. And I learned about their practice I at that moment was transitioned Orange County so as excited to be at a firm that had both in Newport and Beverly Hills office and it's been two years and it's been awesome so I'm very grateful. That's so great so let's dive a little bit and just you're here to talk about trademarks. I know that <hes> you know why don't you tell the audience what a trademark actually is so a trademark is a word symbol or logo. Oh okay <hes> and it's used to identify either a product or a service okay. <hes> a lot of people get confused between <hes> trademarks copyrights patents. They're not the same so it's just going to ask you that. So why don't you define. What's the differences between them so a copyright is a form of intellectual property protection <hes> where the copyright holder is trying to protect for example a literary work work a piece of art film? It's it's something that's actually fixed intangible medium of expression so so let's use like my business logo as an example so I had my business logo at the beautiful circle and we're op divest and on so tell me what is it what what is it that I'm protecting so you're protecting two things you're protecting the brand name the the logo yeah and then as a piece of art you could also copyright right that symbol got it so you could have two layers production trademark and copyright for that God it but and then a patent is a form of I._P.. Production fern invention so if I have a great idea and I and then I can it has is to be something like a useful article like think of a machine computer and the difference between patents copyrights and trademarks patents or limited to twenty years production and they go into the public domains. You you get a lot longer. Timeframe protecting trademark or copyright says they have great idea. How do I know that it's patent or trademarks so it does someone else doesn't already have that you can do a search? <hes> so let's let's focus on trademark so <hes> you know a lot of times people will come up with you know a business <hes>. Let's say you know it's a <hes> clothing company okay and they're like hey Nina. I WANNA start selling these t shirts. I came up with this amazing name and I'll say okay great. So did you do a search. Did you see anybody else's using it. <hes> you know we I did some Google. Searches went on social media <hes> unfortunately that's not really enough. <hes> you know kind of the first thing that I do when someone comes to me with the name is I do what's called the poor man's trademark search okay and it's it sounds offensive but it really is it when is that it's due to its literally going on the U._S. P._T._O.. Website U._S._P._T._O.. Dot Gov okay then <hes> going to the search box okay and putting in the exact name and you'll see if anything comes up in the same category now a lot of people. They just stopped there okay. That's not enough all right the reason why is because if there are any other trademarks that are similar okay so maybe they have a word that's added or maybe we. They're not in exactly the same category of related category so let's say it's not you find something with the same name. It's not a t shirt. Maybe it's a it's a perfume or something okay. A lot of times. Consumers are confused when they see something in a related class right there are lots of clothing companies that have entered into the perfume market so you have to be really careful and the only way to really protect yourself is if you do a comprehensive search okay and how do they do comprehensive search. It involves ordering a report. That's pretty thick anywhere from two hundred five hundred pages don't worry I don't make you read it. I do that boring work and I read the goodness yeah and <hes> I right and opinion letter and I go through everything and I'm looking not just at pending a registered trademarks also looking at <hes> business names. I'm looking at domain name social media because you know in all essential conflict all potential conflicts flicks right because we're in a world now where you need have your domain right. You cannot have viable business. If you don't have right you know the dot com at you know or the very least the dot net gotTa <hes> so once you've kind of gone gone through that step and pain you know hey. I'm it's pretty safe. There's nothing similar then you can feel confident in moving forward with filing an application got it. So where do they go to do this. They have to go through an attorney like you due to have that star search actually done I mean after they've done their google search of course <hes> yeah I mean so the first steps I usually just you know I I wrote charge. He blog on. I'll go on the U._S. P._T._O.. And I'll do the poor man's search for for them. They'll usually do the google searches on their own but the comprehensive search you know you can order it yourself but I don't know to people that Wanna read two to five hundred hundred pages and they won't really the honestly know what to look for. That's the problem. They haven't read enough cases to see where the courts aren't examining attorney has said Hey. This is a conflict. This looks exactly like this or this is so close <hes> so that you won't really know what you're looking for. <hes> at what point do I want to engage your services to say I know I don't want to go through that report and I have a shirt company like we talked about but at what point do I say. I need someone like you to research this twice. Okay let me get my my company started to get going and then after establish. Everything's good to go then I reach you or do. I really really good question. <hes> this is where a lot of problems happen. His people don't hire a lawyer early enough so unfortunately virtually I've had people <hes> they already started manufacturing yeah and they kind of they finally realized Oh wait a minute. Maybe we trademark this and then they come after they've spent went all this money on their branding on their logo and then I'm the one that has tell them by the way there's somebody using almost the same mark in connection with you know maybe close or shoes and I think that this is actually probably going to get rejected so I think now the the number one thing that you can do in in any business transaction is get the attorney get the adviser as early as possible. Knowledge is power and the sooner you have this information the better I've seen too many people waste money because they didn't do the surge they waited too long to file the trademark and then they found out oh gosh I can't even use this right or toward the they they just filed it and then they had someone like you know Nike or one of these big companies telling them hey we can't use that. We've got something similar. <hes> it's it. It's money just down the drain. If you don't do an time time money resources everything everything yeah and I always say you know to business owners are in their starting off. Get your team and plays and try to be able to work in have a good think tank so be able to utilize your resources like we help our clients all the time like okay. Do you have the capital. How are you going to fund that? What does that look like on a financial side? Do you have your attorneys inside. Have you like you said. Have you have your trademarks research. Are you able to use that and sometimes people say like I don't have the money for all that stuff to start sometimes if you don't invest in yourself self and invest in that company to make those rights steps going forward you spend all that time and capital and realize you can't even use that and you have to start all over. Have you ever done that before well. I mean I've had people that yeah they went through all these steps they started manufacturing facturing and then they call me at the nineteen our mic guys we can't we can't use this. <hes> and I've had a client right now that you know they had to tell them and they're like no no just file it and I said No. I don't WanNa file this. They you know they got rejected and now they've come up with another. You know name that it looks good but you know they went through six months of using a name that they can never have a federal trademark on. But I think the two most important words is due diligence. Yeah just do your due diligence. It's a lot cheaper to do it at the beginning to do it. After the fact I think that goes with everything in life yeah no absolutely those are great words so so how hey so I understand that how do I select a strong trademark so a lot of people think that coming up with something that's generic or descriptive is is a good idea. Okay okay <hes> when it comes to trademarks being unique is the most important thing the strongest trademarks are going to be what are called Arbitrary Trademark Okay and let me give you a great example. <hes> apple apple is a word when you use it in connection with the computers. They're completely unrelated. That's an arbitrary trademark. Got It. <hes> the other type of very song trademark is a fanciful trademark okay so this is when you come mm up with a word that did not exist before so <hes> you know Xerox. That's just that's not a word that was in the English language. That's a strong trademark a horrible trademark. Is You know the pizza shop the trust me. You don't want that now. Are there trademarks that are very descriptive. I mean Pizza High Pretty Descriptive Ray. How in the world did they get their trademark? There is a way to get a trademark when you have something that's very descriptive after used it for five years five years you can prove camp <hes> that you have been using contests consistently that all consumers kind of know that you are the owner of that mark. You've got a lot of P._R.. Publicity on then you can file what's called <hes> a section two F. application okay and that that's one way to get <hes> registration on a district descriptive trademark mark but I don't. I don't advise people to go that route. You know I say try to living a little dangerous well. It's you know do you WanNa take the risk of going into business in knowing hey I don't have any federal trademark protection for or at least five years and maybe forever because it's pretty high standard to prove that acquired a significance. They're not just they're not handing out those trademarks rate <hes> so nowadays. I really urged people you know think hard hard and if you have to hire someone to help you come up with the name hire someone you know by the way it's not me up with the names people are always like we'll Nina an Mike. When did I become a branding person? <hes> we can can make introductions but that's that's not me you know hire someone that really knows you know branding and and come up with something really awesome okay so now what I have I have this t shirt company and I know that it's trademarked and we've done all of our due diligence and we're good to go now. I've always heard this term policing. So how do I maintain and make sure that might trademark is actually the not not being utilized by someone else. Okay so a lot of people have this misconception that okay great. I have my trademark certificate. I'm done Yeah No. It's not a Senate here not done one of the <hes> responsibilities of a trademark owner is to police there mark okay so what that means is that you need to be out on the look for infringers. If you know that people are using use your trademark and you kind of sit on the sideline <hes> an argument could be made that you have abandoned your rights in that mark so Kinda. How long is that like? What does the duration? What if you don't even know that they're you know I'm I'm saying if you have knowledge if you really have no knowledge but you also have to kind of take kind of you know reasonable measures like someone who knows but doesn't want to have to pay the capital to go after them is kind of what you're saying that knowledge but they don't want to save their okay? I see them but they're over there in this other state and maybe they're not doing that much. I know you've got a seven of a cease and desist you. GotTa tell them to stop. Stop <hes> because that's small company today could be could you huge tomorrow and the kind of couple strategies you can use. One of them is using like Google Edwards track it yeah to track if I on exactly yeah and then another thing that you can do is you can request a service where third party company <hes> Ice Tea <hes> Compu- mark for this will literally send you a report each month of anything that's been filed and you can pick which jurisdictions you can pick the U._S.. You can pick you know foreign territories. I had a company that that they were really big. In Asia. We searched Japan Korea China couple country in every come up with a report for you every month every month and then I would go through that report and I'd say hey this one looks excel kind of similar to ours doing something that is closely related to what we're doing. I think we should send them a cease and desist letter and that's that's not something that <hes> I think should be we looked at that. That's <hes> <hes> you know a <hes> heck. It's company. He's at a cost that you know it's it's good value right <hes> and it's a lot cheaper to catch these these folks when they're just in the process of getting their trademark 'cause then people are more likely to change it right because if I'm catching someone when they just filed you know they haven't invested two or three years in it and they're more likely to change it yeah. It makes sense so Paul. Do we have a break coming up that we need to cut out four row choirs. We've only got about five minutes laugh. Okay the show. You guys are covering so much ground. Yeah perfect. Thank you so much for letting us know okay so just because of time <hes> I wanNA make sure as or anything else that you want to make sure that the audience needs to know about trademarks tips for or implementation or how to maintain them or some stories that you feel like that invaluable through your process. Well you know there's one kind of situation that happened recently they is I think going to be more common in the future so I have a client that we got their trademark registration. They were very happy <hes> and <hes> we got an email that somebody <hes> said hey. Are you guys you know the Mike Client just <hes> for background there. They are in real estate but they don't do real estate financing. They do something completely different in real estate guy. They said the they got hair. You guys financing real estate deals now and and my clients said No. Why are you asking oh well? We just got a term sheet. <hes> where you know. This company said that they could <hes> finance this project in Santa Barbara but they needed an up front fee and yeah. I thought I the it was your logo in the corner. It looked just like your logo so so my client said. Can you send that to me so I can see what you're timeout. Lo and behold the company had almost the exact that same name they use the same font they use the same <hes> color. It was a hugh of blew. It was like nearly identical in a logo the the name the non is the same it was very similar. I mean I was even confused used <hes> we did some research on them and we found out that this was a new company that had just been opened the principle of that company had opened three other companies prior to that and what would he would do is every year kind of form a new L._l._C. Um and it basically you know his website. He had literally taken language from my clients website and put it on hit on their website wow so they were basically trying to mislead people into thinking that they're my client now because we had their trademark registration I filed what's called a you d._R._p.. A uniform domain name dispute resolution proceeding with Wipro there the World Intellectual Property Property Organization came and I wrote a complaint I showed the bad faith I gave them a copy of their website our website our logo their logo and of course they saw yes. These people are acting a bad faith. We're going to take down their website so we were literally utterly able to shut down great take down their website and protect my clients reputation so if if they yeah it was I mean it was it's unbelievable. This stuff is happening literally every day. Now there's so how many scam artists and without that registration. You really don't have really a lot that you can do to take them down so this is like your protection in your security for your company. It really is yeah. That's great so you know a couple of things I want. They ask you and it'd be for we are done with show is how do people find you well. I <hes> I'm partner at one L._P.. Our website is W._W._w.. Dot One L._l._p.. Dot Com <hes> you can google goal me and and <hes> you know the website should pop up Nina Mary <hes> and I you know I don't charge for initial consultation so if you have some general questions I'm happy to answer them and <hes> yeah I I love working with new <hes> Company startups <hes> serial entrepreneurs <hes> women entrepreneurs <hes> everybody so great. We asked us to every person that comes in in here. That's a guest so what is your ultimate lesson learned and it could be in business. It could be in life. This is my rule in business yeah <hes> I don't want you as a client or as a business partner unless Sir I would have breakfast lunch dinner drinks with you. I don't like you enough to sit down for a meal or drink. We're just not going to do business and that's what I you know if found like someone that much for not going to do business together yeah that's so great yeah good ruled a hat is what's important to you yeah well. I think that that's it but thank you so much for being here today. Really Fun went so fast yeah talk all day. Actually I hope hope that you <hes> in the audience heard a lot of things today and if you WanNa hear more new WanNa hear from Nina you guys can log on we're going to send it out as an email and links and online and social media so download and ask questions and if you have questions for Nina's while we'll point you in her direction to to help you guys out. Thank you so much. Thanks for tuning in tune in next week. For the latest edition of the Zandbergen Report Tuesdays at two PM catch up on our recent shows by visiting Bart Zandbergen Doc pod Gene Dot com the Zandbergen report is also available on Itunes Iheartradio and spotify interested in being featured guest on our show or have a question. You'd like to hear his answer email podcast at part Zandbergen Dot Com bar azan Virga C._F._p.. And LETITIA IRVAN AF are registered investment advisers with optimist INC and registered representatives with grammercy securities INC member F._i._N._R._A. S._I._P._C. Investment Investment Advisory Services are offered by optimus eight under S._e._C. Registration. Will your child be ready for kindergarten at Chester Brooke Academy Preschool. The answer is yes. Our curriculum offers the perfect balance of learning and play our teachers personalized experience for each child through engaging activities the develop skills. They need to be ready for what comes next attended Chester Brooke Academy Open House on Saturday August third from ten A._M.. To One P._M.. To find a preschool on your you click at the banner or visit Chester Brooke Academy Dot Com. That's Chester broke academy dot com just because it's called higher education doesn't mean high tuition costs have to be the norm at strayer university. We have the radical opinion that.

Google Nina Mary attorney Bart Zandbergen firehouse subs Zandbergen partner Paul California Beverly Hills ZANDBERGEN Newport Zandbergen Dot Com Chester Brooke Academy Dot Com Undergrad L._A
Trademarking Essentials with Attorney Nina Ameri from One LLP

OC Talk Radio

25:05 min | 1 year ago

Trademarking Essentials with Attorney Nina Ameri from One LLP

"Introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit at McDonald's. We don't need that music made with tender chicken. Let's lose the echo on a warm buttermilk biscuit perfect juicy simplicity of our buttermilk. The crispy chicken biscuits speaks for itself. Get it now for just three bucks and get a two dollars sausage mcmuffin with egg or a one dollars small hot coffee all from the one two three dollar menu simply your breakfast at McDonald's prices and participation vary cannot be combined with any other offer Combo meal welcome to the Zandbergen report where wealth strategies and investment wisdom collide featuring your distinguished host and certified financial planner Bart Zandbergen. Hello everybody it's a tip burgum. Thank you for joining into the Zandbergen report while we are talking about well strategies and investment wisdom. Thank you Paul for being here today. Thank you for bringing along a fascinating another. I know I shouldn't say affairs made a guest another fascinating gust thank you so much. I appreciate you teeing up here so I have an amazing person here Nina a Mary and I just want to let you know that she's an attorney. She's a beautiful beautiful woman and a mom and I'm just I'm so proud that you're here and I'm so thankful for you to be here in studio and keep writing yeah yeah so great so great she works with the one thing that nobody really understands trademark and and why and my old world entertainment law that's what we were chatting about boy. I have some stories from that well so we are able to talk about things today but let's just dive into trademarks. If that's okay and I knew that you your local local here in southern California you have an office right around the corner in Newport beach in Beverly Hills and San Diego so I know we're here local right now and we're happy to have you here. <hes> maybe you WanNa tell the audience a little bit about yourself in a little bit about your background grandma briefly yeah so I'm a southern California. Native <hes> grew up in L.. A. On the west side <hes> went to U._C._l._a. for Undergrad and when it was time to go to law school of course I wanted to be with you know the the the rich and famous so I went to pepperdine in Malibu it's beautiful but not the easiest place to study in hindsight. I probably should have gone somewhere else does anybody. I'll I'll. I'll just got interrupt. That's the most beautiful campus on it really is on the ocean in Malibu. I don't know how anybody goes to class. Well I mean I got into loyal and that's the the opposite it's in downtown L._A.. And I just when I was pepper and I just fell in love with the campus and everyone was so nice there I have to say I had a really good experience in law school so <hes> after that you know I always kind of had a passion for entertainment I._P.. Trademarks was actually the class. I did the best in law school so I knew from early Liane. That's what I wanted to get into but just like everyone else. Everyone's trying to get into entertainment I._P.. So for three years I did something completely unrelated. I worked <hes> as a tax lawyer and what I did was I negotiated I._R._S.. And state back taxes interestingly enough. That's how I kind of weasel my way in the entertainment and I._p.. World <hes> because a lot of people that are you know in <hes> sports and entertainment end up having tax issues they they need help they need. They need that kind of help a lot so <hes> I joined a law firm that was primarily focused on entertainment sports. <hes> I kind of learned through the School of hard knocks <hes> doing all kinds of deals a film TV general business transactions <hes> amazing stories. I have stories <hes> so fast forward <hes>. I got introduced to one of the partners at one l._l._p.. And I kind of learned about their practice. I at that moment was transitioning Orange County so as excited to be at a firm that had both in Newport and Beverly Hills office and it's been two years and it's been awesome so I'm very grateful. That's so great so let's dive a little bit and just you're here to talk about trademarks. I know that <hes> you know why don't you tell the audience what a trademark actually is so a trademark is a word symbol or logo. Oh okay <hes> and it's used to identify either a product or a service okay <hes> a lot of people get confused between <hes> trademarks copyrights and patents. They're not the same so it's just going to ask you that. So why don't you define. What's the differences between them so a copyright is a form of intellectual property protection <hes> where the copyright holder is trying to protect for example a literary work burke a piece of art film? It's it's something that's actually fixed in a tangible medium of expression so so he's like my my business logo as an example so I have my business logo at the beautiful circle and we were op divest and on so tell me what is it what what is it that I'm protecting so you're protecting two things you're protecting the brand name the logo yeah and then as a piece of art you could also copy right that symbol got it so you could have two layers production trademark and copyright for that God it but and then a patent is a form of I._P.. Protection for an invention so if I have a great idea and I and then I can make it has is to be something like a useful article like think of a machine computer and the difference between patents copyrights and trademarks patents are limited to twenty years production and then they go into the public domain so you get a lot longer timeframe protecting a trademark or copyright since they have this great idea. How do I know that it's patent or trademark so it does someone else doesn't already have that you can do a search <hes> <hes> so let's let's focus on trademark so <hes> you know a lot of times people will come up with you know a business <hes>? Let's say you know it's a <hes> clothing company okay and they're like hey Nina. I want to start selling these t shirts. I came up with this amazing name and I'll say okay great. So did you do a search. Did you see anybody else's using it. <hes> you know they might say we. I did some Google searches on social media <hes> unfortunately that's not really enough. <hes> you know kind of the first thing that I do when someone comes to me with a new name is I do what's called the poor man's trademark search okay and it sounds offensive but it really is it. When is that it's you too? It's literally going on the P._T._O.. Website U._S._P._T._O.. Dot Gov okay then going to the search box okay and putting in the exact name and you'll see if anything comes up in the same category now a lot of people. They just stopped there. Okay that's not enough all right the reason why is because if there are any other trademarks that are similar okay so maybe they have a word that's added or maybe they're not in exactly the same category but a related category so let's say it's not you find something with the same name. It's not a t-shirt. Maybe it's a it's a perfume or something okay. A lot of times. Consumers are confused when they see something in a related class there are lots of clothing companies that have entered into the perfume market so you have to be really careful and the only way to really protect yourself is if you do a comprehensive search okay and how do they do a comprehensive search. It involves ordering a report. That's pretty thick anywhere from two hundred five hundred pages don't worry I don't make you read it. I do that boring work on. I read the whole fitness yeah and <hes> i. Right an opinion letter and I go through everything and I'm looking not just at pending register trademarks also looking at <hes> business names. I'm looking at domain name social media because you know in all essential conflict all potential conflicts Elba <laughter> right because we're in a world now where you need to have your domain right. You cannot have a viable business. If you don't have right you know the dot com at you know or at the very least dot net gotTa <hes> so once you've kind of gone gone through that step and can you know hey. I'm I'm it's pretty safe. There's nothing similar then you can feel confident in moving forward with filing an application got it. So where do they go to do this. They have to go through an attorney like you due to have that star search actually done I mean after they've done their Google search of course yeah I mean so the first steps I usually just you know I I wrote charge. He blog on. I'll go on the U._S. P._T._O.. And I'll do the poor man's search for for them <hes> they'll usually do google searches on their own but the comprehensive search you know you can order it yourself but I don't know too many people that Wanna read two to five hundred hundred pages and they won't really honestly know what to look for. That's the problem. They haven't read enough cases to see where the courts aren't examining attorney has said Hey. This is a conflict. This looks exactly like this or this is so close <hes> so that you won't really know what you're looking for. <hes> at what point do I wanNA. Engage your services to say I know I don't want to go through that report and I have shirt company like we talked about but at what point do I say. I need someone like you to research this. Do I say okay. Let me get my my company started to get going and then after established. Everything's good to go then I reach you or do. I really really really good question. <hes> this is where a lot of problems <hes> happen is people don't hire a lawyer early enough so unfortunately fortunately I've had people <hes> they already started manufacturing and they kind of they finally realized Oh wait a minute. Maybe we trademark this and then they come after they've spent all this money on their branding on their logo and then I'm the one that has tell them by the way there's somebody using almost the same mark in connection with you know maybe clothes or shoes and I think that this is actually probably going to get it rejected so I think now the the number one thing that you can do in in any business transaction is get the attorney get the adviser as early as possible. Knowledge is power and the sooner you have this information the better I've seen too many people waste money because they didn't do the surge they waited too long to file the trademark and then they found out oh gosh I can't even use this right or toward the you know they they just filed it and then they had someone like Nike or one of these big companies telling them hey we can't use that. We've got something similar. <hes> it's it. It's money just down the drain. If you don't do an time time money resources everything everything yeah and I always say you know to business owners. They're starting off. Get your team and plays and try to be able to work in have a good think tank so be able to utilize your resources like we help our clients all the time like okay. Do you have the capital. How are you going to fund that? What does that look like on a financial side? Do you have your attorneys inside. Have you like you said. Have you have your trademarks research. Are you able to use that and sometimes people say like I don't have the money for all that stuff to start sometimes if you don't invest in yourself south and invest in that company to make those right steps going forward you spend all that time and capital and realize you can't even use that and you have to start all over. Have you ever done that before well. I mean I've had people that yeah. They went through all these steps. They started manufacturing. Lecturing and then they call me at the nineteen our mic guys we can't we can't use this. <hes> and I had a client right now that you know they I had to tell them and they're like no no no just file it and I said No. I don't WanNa file this. They you know they got rejected and now they've come up with another name that it looks good but you know they went through six months of using a name that they can never have a federal trademark on but I think the two most important words is due diligence. Yeah just do your due diligence. It's a lot cheaper to do it at the beginning to do it. After the fact I think that goes with everything in life yeah no absolutely those are great words so so how I understand that how do I select a strong trademark so a lot of people think that coming up with something that's generic or descriptive is is a good idea. Okay okay <hes> when it comes to trademarks being unique is the most important thing the strongest trademarks are going to be what are called Arbitrary Trademark Okay and let me give you a great example. <hes> apple apple is a word when you use it in connection with the computers. They're completely unrelated. That's an arbitrary trademark. Got It. <hes> the other type of very song trademark is a fanciful trademark okay so this is when you come up with a word that did not exist before so <hes> you know Xerox. That's just that's not a word that was in the English language. That's a strong trademark a horrible trademark is the pizza shop trust me. You don't want that now. Are there trademarks that are very descriptive. I mean Pizza High Pretty Descriptive Ray. How in the world did they get their trademark? There is a way to get a trademark when you have something that's very descriptive. After you've used it for five years five years you can prove that you have been using contests consistently that all consumers Kinda know that you are the owner of that mark. You've got a lot of P._R.. And publicity on then you can file what's called <hes> a section two F application okay and that that's one way to get <hes> registration on a district descriptive trademark mark but I don't. I don't advise people to go that route. You know I say try to make with some living a little dangerous well. It's you know. Do you want to take the risk of going into business in knowing hey I don't have any federal trademark protection for at least five years and maybe forever because it's pretty high standard to prove that acquired a senior and it's not just they're not handing out those trademarks rate <hes> so nowadays. I really urge people you know think hard hard and if you have to hire someone to help you come up with the name hire someone you know by the way it's not me but the names people are always like we'll need an Mike. When did I become a branding person <hes> I can? I can make introductions but that's that's not me you know hire someone that really knows you know branding and and come up with something really awesome okay so now what I have I have this t shirt company and I know that it's trademarked and we've done all of our due diligence and we're good to go now. I've always heard this term policing. So how do I maintain and make sure that my trademark is actually the not are being utilized by someone else. Okay so a lot of people have this misconception that okay great. I have my trademark certificate. I'm done Yeah No. It's not a Senate here not done one of the <hes> responsibilities of a trademark owner is to police there mark okay so what that means is that you need to be out on the look for infringers if you know that people are using. Is Your trademark and you kind of sit on the sideline. An argument could be made that you have abandoned your rights in that mark so kind. Of How long is that like. What is the duration? What if you don't even know that they're you know I'm I'm saying if you have knowledge if you really have no knowledge but you also have to kind of take kind of you know reasonable measures like someone who knows but doesn't want to have to pay the capital to go after them is is kind of what you're saying that they have knowledge but they don't want to save their okay? I see them but they're over there in this other state and you know maybe they're not doing that much. I know you've got a seven of a cease and desist you. GotTa tell them to stop. Stop because that small company today could be. Could you huge tomorrow and the kind of couple strategies you can use one of them is using like Google Edwards track it yeah to track on exactly yeah and then another thing that you can do is you can request a service where third party company <hes> Ice Tea <hes> Compu- mark for this will literally send you a report each month of anything that's been filed and you can pick which jurisdictions you can pick the U._S.. You can pick you know foreign territories. I had a company that they were really big. In Asia. We searched Japan Korea China couple country in every come up with a report for you every month every month and then I would go through that report and I'd say hey this one looks excellent kind of similar to ours doing something that is closely related to what we're doing. I think we should send them a cease and desist letter and that's you know that's not something that <hes> I think should be we looked at that. That's <hes> <hes> you know a <hes> company at a cost that you know it's it's it's good value right <hes> and it's a lot cheaper to catch these these folks when they're just in the process of getting their trademark because then people are more likely to change it right because if I'm catching someone when they just filed <hes> you know they haven't invested two or three years in it and they're more likely to change it yeah. It makes sense so Paul. Do we have a break coming up that we need to cut out four row choirs. We've only got about five minutes left. The show you guys are covering so much ground yeah well. Let's just keep on going perfect. Thank you so much for letting us know okay so just because of time <hes> I WANNA make sure. Is there anything else that you want to make sure that the audience needs to know about trademarks tips for our implementation or how to maintain them or some stories that you feel like that invaluable through your process. Well I mean I you know there's one kind of situation that happened recently. They is I think going to be more common in the future so I have a client that we got their trademark registration. They were very happy <hes> and <hes> we got an email that somebody <hes> said hey. Are you guys you know the Mike Client just <hes> for background there. They are in real estate <hes> but they don't do real estate financing. They do something completely different in Real Estate Guy <hes> they said the they got any musset hair you guys financing real estate deals now and and my client said No. Why are you asking oh well? We just got a term sheet <hes> where you know. This company said that they could <hes> finance this project in Santa Barbara but they needed an. Up Front fee and yeah. I thought that it was your logo in the corner. It looked just like your logo so so my client said. Can you send that to me so I can see what your timeout Lo and behold the company had almost the exact that same name they use the same font they use the same <hes> color. It was a hue of blue. It was like nearly identical in a logo the name the non is the same it was very similar. I mean I was even confused. I file <hes> we did some research on them and we found out that this was a new company that had just been opened the principle of that company had opened three other companies prior to that and what would he would do is every year kind of form a new l._l._c. Um and basically you know his website. He had literally taken language from my clients website and put it on hit on their website wow so they were basically trying to mislead people into thinking that they're my client now because we had their trademark registration I filed what's called a you d._R._p.. A uniform domain name dispute resolution proceeding with Wipro there the World Intellectual Property Operative Organization came and I wrote a complaint I showed the bad faith I gave them a copy of their website our website our logo their logo and of course they saw yes. These people are acting in bad faith. We're going to take down their website so we were literally early able to shut these people down. Take down their website and protect my clients reputation so you know if if they yeah it was I mean it was it's unbelievable. This stuff is happening literally every day. Now there's so many scam artists and without that registration. You really don't have really a lot that you can do to take them down so this is like your protection in your security for your company it it really is yeah. That's great so you know a couple of things I want to ask you and then before we are done with show is how do people find you well. I <hes> I'm a partner at one L._p.. Our website is W._W._w.. DOT ONE L L P dot com <hes> you can google call me and and <hes> you know the website should pop up Nina Mary <hes> and I you know I don't charge for initial consultation so if you have some general questions I'm happy to answer them and <hes> yeah I I love working with new <hes> Company startups <hes> serial entrepreneurs <hes> women entrepreneurs <hes> everybody so great. We asked us to every person that comes in here. That's a guest so what is your ultimate lesson learned and it could be in business. It could be in life. This is my rule in business yeah <hes> I don't want you as a client or as a business partner unless <music> I would have breakfast lunch dinner drinks with you. I don't like you enough to sit down for a meal or drink. We're just not going to do business and that's what I you know if found like someone that much for not going to do business together yeah that's so great yeah good ruled. It is important to you yeah well. I think that that's it thank you so much for being here today. Really Fun went so fast yeah talk all day. Actually I hope hope that you <hes> the audience heard a lot of great things today and if you WanNa hear more new WanNa hear from Nina you guys can log on. We're going to send it out as an email and links and online and social media so download it and ask questions and if you have questions for Nina's while we'll point you in her direction to to help you guys out. Thank you so much. Thanks for tuning in tune in next week. For the latest edition of the Zandbergen Report Tuesdays at two PM catch up on our recent shows by visiting Bart Zandbergen Doc pod bean gene dot com. The ZANDBERGEN report is also available on Itunes iheartradio and spotify interested in being featured guest on our show or have a question. You'd like to hear his answer email podcast at Art Zandbergen Dot Com.

Google attorney Nina Mary Bart Zandbergen partner Paul Malibu California Beverly Hills McDonald Art Zandbergen Dot Com Newport Zandbergen Undergrad ZANDBERGEN Nike
Nina Garcia & Diane Von Furstenberg

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

22:57 min | 1 year ago

Nina Garcia & Diane Von Furstenberg

"Welcome to the Bravo clubhouse for the podcast edition of Watch. What happens live with me? Andy Cohen in the clubhouse. One day you're in and the next year it's when Nina and Brandon Maxwell now come on your host Conan the bubble clubhouse ready to deconstruct tonight's project runway finale. Well I get ripped from project runway. Please welcome judges Nina Garcia and Brandon. You go great finale. I shed some tears. I mean it was really emotional and great close. Great close. Great Guests Josh Serena Williams. Can you imagine believe believable? Diet you say. She was one of the best. Gus She was she was wanted. I'll tell you why she was honest. She was passionate and at one point. Remember where she said you know I don't want to. I don't like to lose. Not even this. She was really make when it was time to vote. I don't like to live. I don't like to lose. She'd really liked the designer that she liked and she you know she stuck by it will over the bar. She helped the model surface all season on project runway. It's maybelline's lead makeup artist. Grace Lee Grace Creek over there and before we get into its waller alert. If you haven't watched the project runway finale yet twirl around and watch that I because we are about to reveal the results. I want to get started because of everything going on in the world by the way our crowd is really small but mighty in fashion terms. I think there are micro collection. We have linked denied enthusiastic staff numbers in our audience of things definitely Rodway. Sergio snagged himself a very special prize. A new fiancee. Watch this cade. My partner's coming propose think I'm definitely GONNA surprise. I know that it's I love you so much and I wish my life with you. Sergio had been a little salty through the season so it was very sweet to see this sweetness right. There was a Lotta sweetness at the end of the season. I really was crying at the very end. Like hysterically crying. Jeffrey called his dad. Like I was like really sitting on my living room. Florida's crying and myself. Oh your questions. For Nina and Brandon are coming in but before we get to those. Here's what three things I'm obsessed with tonight. I tonight Jeffrey. Max's innovative designs help him. Wrap up the title of winner. But here's what the jury getting there was not exactly a cinch. Watch design minutes left. Totally freaking out. Somebody get me a band aid. Just here's Jordan fix Jeffrey okay. Hopefully Great Oh my God. Has Anybody seen the bag? That has all those studs in it. I'm afraid of making some type of mistake. Enjoyed the show. This is truly my best work and I really believe in it said judge. We have our decision. Let's bring up the designer Geoffrey. You are the winner just winner of crude way. I if the every time every what were your favorite looks from Jeffries collection tonight. I like the chain mail. You like to change like the chain mail with the green that one yes and Brandon. I liked the brocade. The sort of see through and you can see the back. I love that I thought that was like such a nice breather. Wow that was a by the way. I think that the whole fashion show was pretty great. This year was huge. Easing and how. `Bout Hudson yards amaze hours also. Incredible I mean it was really spectacular and second is editor in chief of El. Nino has seen a full spread of famous faces. Grace OR MAGAZINE COVER. But how did each specific person get in her good graces need? I'm going to run through some Pastel cover models. Tell us the most impressive thing about them. Michelle Obama got with. Oh my God well listen. She's a class act but was really incredible. Is that while we were shooting. She had the time to say hello and give time to every single person in that studio that day down to the assistance. That's very rare lady Gaga. She gave us an incredibly powerful interview. That was very raw and very honest about depression sexual assault. He was really incredible. She's just very honest. Answer so incredibly famous fought when you meet her in person she is the kindest. Lizotte one hundred percent confidence. What you see is what you get eyelash really eyelash the future of music and we were the first magazine to have her love it. Yeah Oh my God. Professional thoughtful willing to take risks. I adore this woman. Thank you very much branded grooming crashing career. The only thing more massive than the twenty five foot training designed for God's Met Gala Ensemble is his a-list Ross clients so brandon. Isp and route of questions about the folks who've worn your clothes. It's time for do Towel Brandon Maxwell Round to Gaga you've had so many moments with Gaga. How did you arrive at this insane Matt Gala Luck? We were sitting in the pool together on vacation. Decided to go together. Celine Dion. You wrote it when you met Selene last week. She thank you for your work and pretty much. Nothing came out of your mouth and literally what? What do you wish you had said to her? Like just the basics like hello. My name is thank you see. You really went day. Ob Campbell did you have any level of fear dressing such an in the fashion world especially since she's never shy about expressing an opinion. No I've been friends with Naomi for years now for this show and hathaway a pregnant and after we looked radiant in this pink. Cut OUT DRESS. Vegas. What is your biggest pet peeve with maternity okay? Well I think it's such a special time in woman's life and I just love to see the bound you know sensu eight the Bob. We went through that one of the challenges. It's like. Just accentuate the bombs. Helen Mirren was this. The first time a dame has learned one of your design it was and I love it. Thank you very much. The budget one way contestants love to make a big reveal on the runway. But I'm more interested in having my guess. Reveal some juicy info from beside behind the scenes. Here's what we did ask you both questions. Might your time in the industry. You'll help us learn on okay if you go see. A friend's runway show in their clothes or a complete dud. What do you say to them afterward? Oh She's done this you don't like it. She's like yes. Congratulations really congratulations. What stood route is thing a client has ever said to you. Read and Oh ever said to me. Yeah well most of the time when I'm not I don't know I'm not sure I when I'm doing private. No I'm always been like sweatpants like sometimes when they come into my office. They're always like this brandon here. Kobe right something. How long does it designer have to be in the business to earn the right to throw their logo all over their designs? Nina Admiral Victoria got a lot of crap for this and then she didn't take the right. Yeah I would say at least a good ten years at least a good ten years. Yeah I mean there was like a actual Chiapas crock Johnson. Before we need that. What do you think is supposed boring predictable? Fashion Choices. Celebrity can make the red carpet. Right now Boring or I don't know I wish somebody would like go to the store and got their own clothes and stuff. You know like my favorite thing ever was like Sharon stone and the gap but Nah I wanna see that a little bit more. People should take more chances. All right thank you very much by the way did you. All unanimously agree on Jeffrey. As the winner was a unanimous decision was it. Contested note was sent. It was cut split really is unanimous was who was Serena's peck telling that leaves. I was lucky just to be in her presence right her. Sergio was her pack. Yes and was Jeffrey your pick. Yeah well sort of yes no. I don't remember so I I do. I did think that he should have won. And to be honest with you I think closer very modern and just having come back from the fall collections. It's very much what we're seeing. Jedis WANTS TO KNOW. How is it? That Victoria made the same addresses over and over all season and got to stay. Okay Internet I disagree. I mean listen. Here's the thing everyone's like you love her so much. Why do you love her so much? And I just think that you know what you're always looking for with anybody see of people as somebody who was a very clear point of view. You don't have to see something different. Every single time in like for a designer to be successful in the Sea of designers. You'd have to be instantly. Recognizable on that to me was a smart thing about it answer. Yeah Okay Braden Carly Tease said. I read somewhere that you don't know about the workroom drama until runway airs after watching the show back what moment major draw drop. Oh good evening jumped out. Use It you know. I don't like the drama. I don't get into it like whenever they're talking to each other and I love everything that Victoria says like when she's talking love it like foxfire right. Let's go to Stephanie from Texas Stephanie. What's your question Andy My question is for both brands. Then Andina Guy. Giving Sergio's political statement with its pieces helped or hurt him in the competition. And do you think he would have won if he was more open to the judges feedback throughout? This event would have had a better chance to win. Had he been a little more open to our feedback in terms of his clothes and I think his delivery we kept telling him we know he was very passionate about social justice. It just didn't come out as very genuine and it really was about the close if there is a message and he feels very passionate about it. That should be second but the close is really what they're what he's there for right. Yeah let's go to AP. Oh sorry. Leather Not Fox for the Victoria always says sorry thyroid drama between Sergio and Christian. I also love anyways moving on. Let's go to Abbie from West Virginia. Hey Abby what's your question. Hey my question is for Brandon Antonina I wanted to know if you agree with Christian using the series on Britney especially since she only lasted a few weren't weights in the competition. I do yes. Yeah I think that has been through this before and I trust what he what he's saying. Of course I mean let's go to crystal from Dallas. Hey Chris so what's your question. Hey my question is for Brandon Brandon. Did you disagree with the Lane? When she said you're not a marquee says chippendale look wasn't fair. Hey krystal from Dallas. I knew crystal from Dallas. The question had to be for me and no like sometimes. I just have references. That people don't understand I don't know did she say something to me about that. A hair remember. I don't remember I mean she's never been to a chippendales right. You know what I mean. So like. She wouldn't understand the reference I get it. I asked her. She said no okay. Great we don't see eye to eye on this issue. Let's go to Sidney from Kentucky as Cindy. What your question. He I loved you. I have a question for Nina out of out of all your seasons. Judging Project One way runway which contestant do you think had the worst attitude towards the judges which contestant all these years Oh my God well yes there was one? I think it was season. Three or four. What's her name Kelsey or no? It was a guy and I cannot remember his name but he almost before he was very upset with the critique he was Bravo and he came he almost kind of went up out of his wasn't Geoffrey. Geoffrey he was. I can remember staying but he was very aggressive and security was like oh you got back got yes. It got really heated secure. I'm sweating bronze for both of YOU JESSICA wants to know if you really bought that. Sergio had no idea about selene. Dion Celine Dion. Iconic backwards talks moment. No I did not. You didn't believe that we needed to not either. Well clearly right okay. It is gametime. Everybody pioneers but when it comes to identifying other trailblazers how well she can do so without using her eyes at all. It's time to play. Who's sailing marina with Nina? As Ramona is in had honor of women. Different famous women will appear next to you. Brandon's going to give you clues brandon. You sit here okay. And then look at that monitor. And he's going to give clues if you've got seven redeyebeets look with. Yeah you actually do. Okay let's play the greatest of all time. Are you kidding? Best Honky US Finale guest judge the greatest player of all time. She was the winner of the popular. Vote for the two thousand sixteen presidential election. Hillary Clinton have you seen hustler. Selena maid in Manhattan. She's from she's editor in Chief of American Vogue I. Aws Yes sir. Oh great living actress of all time. She was in Delaware's products Johnny's sister. Donna tell you a Nieta Zach. G wants to know how hard was it to get Arianna Guerande out of her ponytail for the cover of Al really no game game. She loves L. And we love our Lawrence g went off. There was a contestant this season that you both were surprised. Went as far as they did. No No Nina Mary C. Wants to know besides Christian Serena who do you think are the most talented alumni from project runway? Well I think Sebastian Gray from last season he was grades. And how do you keep in touch at all? Actually he's just designed a dress for that new movie called one Milan Milan fashion to suggest he had a he. He showed passion week. If you guys to go see him now launch and closer beautiful that's great. Let's go to Olivia from California. Hail Livia what's your question. Hi Andy so brandon. Since you're so close to Lady Gaga what do you think of her cramp we find him? What's her name sorry her name. Olivia Olivia you know. What if any of my friends are happy? I'm happy for them. I think in general. Don't talk about my friends relationships. I'm always happy to see everybody in love and she is living life. That's Nice Nicole view wants to know Nina. How did the crown crowd go at the show when Jaylo came out wearing the green drag? That was an incredible moment. Channel SURPRI taught surprise. Nobody knew it. They kept it so on the low down and when she came out with donatella these two incredible icons the went crazy. And that's a very hard Crou- yes absolutely. Everyone's jaded crowd. You need to have like a circus. Happy Interested and there's not not of that it was just these two incredible women walking together Normally I would give my Moslo today. But I'm joined by two fashion Maven. Who always have an opinion up their sleeves. I would love to hear the trends that get their muzzle jackal instead so brandon. What is Your Mazal? Okay my Masel. Is the return to classics coming back. Neutrals classic suiting staple pieces. You're welcome our rights. Okay what is Your Jack Hall? Oh my God my jackal is those nineties ten drills have you seen it there this hairpieces have you seen. I you really and I really want. We will not be seeing these L. No we will not certainly real and these are happening right now. Oh No I don't like that either handled by the way I wanNA take brandon for bringing your rallies. We've all been applying so liberally. I wouldn't hey everybody back with Nina and Brandon Bravo dot com to enter Maybelline contest. Let's go to Cindy from Florida. As Cindy what your question. My question is for both in Branson okay. At the very beginning of the season who each abused secretly predicting was to win the whole competition at the beginning of the season. Did you have thought I mean? Would you have thought that it was Jeffrey? Now I did it. I thought it was going to be Vittoria. I thought it was going to be Brittany. Oh really wow That's why it's fun to keep. Yeah you never know. You never know Nina told me about from day one. She's like just let it play out right right. Let's go to Tracy from Arizona Tracy. What Your Question Candy Love? You love you question for me. I wanted to Last night on watch what happens. Live three out of the four finalists said that you were the toughest judge on the show. How do you feel about that? I feel okay about that. I'm very candid and very frank. I've been in this business a long time. I've met a lot of designers. I'm going to say as it is and I hope that they take the criticism as it is helpful fashion week and then Paris fashion week. And then you right now. I came back for John and I got quarantines. You got quarantined when you got back. Yeah wow so you just worked from home for two weeks or two weeks and I just got back to work and now we might be quarantined. That's incredible were you over there to no no. I was at home and I have been self quarantined for like. I'm going on week three now. I came out for this. You know just because you felt like you had been interacting with people who had been. Oh No I just. I'm good and I think you know really. I think like safety. I honestly I and I just feel I I. I'm I'm good safety. I say he asked me. When did you come back from a little bit of a Germaphobe? A little bit so obviously and I. You know I'll shut down the damn office. Somebody coughs one time known to do earlier in my office please exit stage so you so but isn't that hard to work from home doing what you do or do. I just finished a collection so right now. I'm just making new ones around my house and my robe like drinking coffee being like. What do I have to say creatively and right? Now it's not much panic right to see how that channels itself into the close. Well thank you for coming out of your core jazz making sure that the new south words and thank you for being all the way over there dot com goodnight. Everybody thanks for listening to the PODCAST. Everybody hope you enjoyed the show. Remember new episodes go live Monday through Friday at four? Pm Eastern time? Make sure you're subscribed have great or not.

Brandon Brandon Nina Sergio Jeffrey Andy Cohen Gus She Nina Admiral Victoria Brandon Maxwell Celine Dion Lady Gaga Josh Serena Williams Brandon Bravo Geoffrey Nina Garcia Cindy Florida Dallas Lee Grace Creek Brandon Antonina partner
EP.94 - NINA STIBBE

The Adam Buxton Podcast

1:17:37 hr | 1 year ago

EP.94 - NINA STIBBE

"Ball. Gye mud cost been. Now you out that podcast out and started listening. I took my micro and found some human vocal, then I recalled all the noises while. I his at Buxton. I want you to joy. That's the. Hi, one. How you doing podcasts? Excuse me, that was probably the moment for a lot of people where they thought. Nah, I don't think this podcast is for me and they would've switched off. Right. Then. All they would have just skipped the conversation. Hey, look. It's cool. Either way. It's not a problem. I'm very easy going. Wow. I wish you could be out here with me today podcasts, not all of you. But a nice selection of some of the better ones it is just the most incredibly beautiful day. And I am joined as usual on a walk by my best friend. Rosie Buxton Hof whippet Hof poodle, all dog and one of the best ones that, that. She's taking a dump a summary, dump anyway. Listen today, you will hear my conversation with British writer Nina be Nina fax, Nina was brought up in LeicesteR with her unconventional single mom and her upbringing and the twists and turns her life, took their ofter form the basis for a series of comic, novels featuring Nina's fictional, alter ego Lizzy, Vogel, Nina's book man at the helm published in two thousand fourteen is about Lizzie and her siblings, trying to find a suitable man for their way with mum paradise lodge published in two thousand sixteen finds the teenage Lizzy working at a care home for the elderly like man at the helm. The story is set in the seventies, and it gives Nina the opportunity to make some very funny. Obsessions about the peculiarities of British life and society in that decade. And. We talked about some of the more shocking of those peculiarities in this conversation. So if you're likely to be offended by Frank discussions of attitudes and behavior that most of us would now agree on not acceptable. Then you might want to have a finger or whatever part of your body, you used to stop offensive podcasts hovering over the pause button. The latest in Nina's Lizzy Vogel series is called reasons to be. Cheerful that was published earlier this year, two thousand nineteen and this time the story takes place in the early eighties, as Lizzie, fines work as a dental assistant, a job that Nina herself did for several years. As a young woman talk about that. Nina's first book love Nina despatches from family. Life was published in twenty thirteen and love Nina was a collection of letters that Nina wrote to her sister in the eighties, while she was working in north London as a nanny to the children of Mary, Kay Wilmots, who is the editor of the London review books, the letters chart, the young Nina's adventures at the Wilma's house, which included regular encounters with variety of colorful characters, including stalls of the literary world like Jonathan Miller, and especially Alan Bennett, who would join Nina, Mary, and the children quite lot for supper over the course of the book you also see Nina making the decision. To go into higher education and study humanities at Thames paulie which is where she met her friend, Stella, and Stella was with Nina the day, we recorded our conversation. She was set on the same Sofer as Nina and now and then Nina would ask a question, and Stella would respond off Mike, but yeah, it was it was really fun. Hanging out with Nina and Stella all the back at the end with more solo burgling for right now. Here we go. Hey, Nina, it's very nice to meet you. Hey, it's lovely to be here with your friend, Stella. She is sat on the sofa with you. Stella heath. So I said that in a way that suddenly changes the tone of our interaction interns, intellect, where live. I know I know I'm, I'm lacking behind right? I'm going to change high as soon as I say. Hi, nina. Nice to meet you. You immediately looked guarded. I did. Well, that's that happens, doesn't it? So I'm going to little horse actually can you tell them whole? No, I couldn't tell just thinking little horse jokes. I knew you would sorry. That's just you the level generally operates. That's why I'm here. Now you are. There's I want to talk to you, but I really love your stuff my friend, Garth Jennings. Got me into it. So how do you know Goth? I know goes because out of the blue he wrote to me, say how much he liked my books, I think my first book actually love Nina. And when people do that, and they have no reason to do it. It's so touching. So we should've kept in touch after he done that we kind of friends and we love each other stuff. You know, love his films son of Rambo, which I think you had a little, I wasn't son of Rambo. Yes, that's one of the three films in two thousand six the teach teacher. And I was badly injured in the head in each of the films that I was in. Yeah. And I've got a part in sing to oh, good. Are you in seeing wan? I'm gotha. We says, oh, yeah, he's in sing one, but it's really like I say two words in the background of you sing. One big a part in into I so far. You never know though. Never know anything could happen. Exactly. Always lashed. Exactly. The all they great Phil. Well, I've not seen seen to sing. One is just a joy. You've got children. Right. Yes. And were they the right age for sing? They were the right age, for seeing they were little bit older than the target audience, but funny enough, they went seat in Truro, when it came out, and they loved it. And my son Alfie is now seventeen is a complete Beatles fan. He's mad has always been on the Beatles. And when that song, I can't even remember the name of it and slow. Yes, he, he was just decided to sing it rather than just say the title. Yeah. And then it goes to you got to carry the right carry that way, wait, yes, it's marvelous anyway. So yes, we loved it. I loved it and selfish favorite Beatles album. You should know he'll be really I'm going to have to answer that question. I predict that it will be either rubber soul revolver. I think it might be revolver revolve was pretty good. He's obsessed and his favourite Beatles, George. Well, that's a good favorite. He loves John, but he loves the feel of George and he got involved with all those films. He was involved with Alan Bennett with you know the pig fill. My comment with the name of it. Private five function. Yes. And made film wasn't it? And they life of Brian. Yes. Yes. Yeah, the wholesome Michael Palin. Alan Bennett, George Harrison thing going on. But Adam, do you know what's so funny? Is that I much in that? We'd be talking walking in highways and by ways of Norfolk, we should have done that. But it's too far away from me. But the thing is, you know, in my mind, sometimes I imagine usage of with Zayd Smith sort of in a studio. That here. Did you is my friend Mark zippy's house in London? So this is where you do that. But, but, you know, when you did say, Garth and mind horn. Yeah. That was gosh, you walking alone because they're the only people that will come and visit me in offer these I wanted to when I was a bit of conduit yet. I'll do it wasn't if I thought it was in London, I would've done it, then but I thought I'd got to get from Truro to Norfolk, and I thought, what I must make thing of it. Because, you know, when you live in Norfolk or call more, you come to London, and you just chrome everything in don't you? And so you think, oh, I've got to do the interview with blah. So see that person that person that person. And then you have a free Ning and you go to a bizarre party that you wouldn't have gone to the isn't that strange. That happened is fun though. Do you think yes, because you do things you would never have done? It took me a while to make that adjustment. Because every time I would go to London just be like I'd go mental. Yes. And I'd be off the leash. I can do this new children around by wife's note around. It wasn't sift doing anything inappropriate, but I was, you know, just gallivanting. Yes. Do that bold who's got got bored with gallivanting quickly, did get bored. I used to come back and feel all hollow. Yes. And just reproach myself the next morning. But I'd still being my well-leased from Cornwall because in comas probably saving. No, we don't really have to get dressed. I mean you just pop an anorak own pair of ways in head out to the woods is the same in Norfolk. We don't generally dress, I work in a shed, that's across the way from the house, our houses out in the middle of the countryside. This is what I was imagining. And so in the morning, I'll get my Cup of tea and some toast, and I'll walk across to the shed, which is where my studios and sometimes, and I've got a little flat over there. And I've got my own, washing machine and things like that. It's pretty great self contained. Yeah, I'm totally independent from the chaos in the main house. I want to oh, we all need to is good. And it's where my dad lived when he moved in with us. And so it's very useful to have a now my teenage sons use it to hang out and have parties and things that were very lucky, but occas-. Originally. I will forget that I've left all the washing across the way, and I have no clean clothes. So I'll have to just walk nude across to the shed and the children of usually gone to school. But I'm always thinking this is risky, because the DVD guy could turn. But those little risks are so enjoyable. Yeah. Yeah, we all do it. I mean, I don't touch across the courtyard, naked like you do. But I do things I think this is really the thing I do is I go for a week downstairs. Don't shut the door and anyone because I've got two teenagers, and they've always got people round and that would be terrible. Wouldn't it much? I saw eve as MoMA lose it would be really shaming. She'd think you a groupie now. Now. You know that they don't think that, you know, you have to keep well out the way. Well, everything you do as a parent is embarrassing to teenage child. No matter what not all parents get that they think they call. I know I'm not cool. I got it very quickly. And I keep out of the way, I'm so reluctant, that is going to be the other way. And they'll call me mom Jack's. Hey, come and say Hello. And I think, yeah, great. Because I'm so hidden away in reclusive, but not all parents are like that they could try and hang out. And I think that's very uncool. No feel very awkward. I'm must say, and I think that I'm probably as you say too far the other way I feel as if I'm slightly scary. Grumpy is best way, shadow, dad. I think that's the way that's how you should be. I'm proud of you for doing that. Thanks very much. You'll Ma is still with us, right? Yeah, what's her name Elspeth? And I've heard you talk about this before. But I'm curious in and you know, I guess we have to assume that a lot of people listening to this might be new to your stuff. So have you mind repeating yourself to some degree, but she looms large in your fictional universe? So, yes, my three novels of very autobiographical, and I never intended to reveal I always thought you said they were novels, but very early on. I did blurt it out. And then people very interested because, you know, interesting stuff happened and my mum, if you have a mum like mine, why would you not write about her? I mean, she was in the first novel, she was a little bit tragic in a way because my father left, her for a man, and that's fine nowadays, but back in the mid sixties, that was quite shaming really for her. And she got four kids, she was a single mom and Shuster groovy in a bit. Orthodox in a bit badly behaved, and she's a bit of a drinker and funny, and she met this sort of wrote rather ordinary guy, my step dad, and she married him. But yes, she's always been a bit of a not one. And so if you've got someone that's in your life who doesn't mind you writing about it. Why wouldn't you? And how did you stab wish that she didn't mind was a conversation or did you just sort of start writing? And then she didn't object. I had written an autobiographical novel and try to sort of Senator publishers agents over the years. And that was before love need that was before love Nina, my memoir, in lettuce came up. So I'd written it and I sent it out a bit. And I'd always I better, not publish this is too close to the truth. And everyone's going to be really crossed because I talk about my mom, and I also talk about people being very nice to us and being a bit of snippy about my mom being single mom and all that kind of stuff. And so it was just sort of something I did. I was tinkering with it. And then completely by accident I published love Nina because publisher happen to being somebody's house. Am I'd send her some of the letters we'd found the letters and I was typing them up, emailing them to this woman who I'd worked for as a nanny, and this publisher happen to be in her house, and she happened to read them and offer me contract for the book. And so that was I mean Adam not such a huge thing I was fifty years old, imagined that it was just crazy. So I quickly wanted to rewrite letters and make myself look better and nicer and coverer but I couldn't because she got them to publish out already had them. So that was I had to stand behind them, exactly. As they were really. You didn't change that much. I took a few things out, but I wasn't allowed to change or add anything. So, you know, there I was being awful about Shakespeare's being offered about Thomas hardy, and being a bit flippant about Alan Bennett. I didn't you know, if I'd been able to edit the letters, I'd have said, oh. Alan bennett. He's writing these cutting edge television. He such a marvel but what I'd really written in one thousand nine hundred eighty two or whatever is written Allen Bennett really doesn't know how to make solid. He keeps putting oranges in it all that kind of thing. And so he's just this ordinary rather silly person instead of the marvel so that book came out. But of course that's what's so great about it. Get that completely as it turned out. That's what most people liked by here. Yeah. I think Allenwood quite like me to include some other stuff about him, but it put him on the map, Adam, of course. No. He's done what he's done. Well. And George Miller pops up as well. You some tools from Jonathan the soul. And there are lots of literary and creative people Yatra while I remember while your trip to the theater to see a play by Beckett. Yes. I'm back it with Stella, I think Stella fell asleep in the play. And he looked like a rag doll, fishermen or something. He was there. It was Billie Whitelaw, but it was just her saying being Bong being bombs. It was eighty five and you weren't having it as I recall. Yeah. I didn't think much to it. And also, I seen Becca sitting there and nobody believed me, and that sort of thing would always happen to me. I suddenly Prince Charles would be somewhere like low can they go not? Isn't it time? You saw Jackie O and I go, no. It was Jackie O and two days ago. I saw Ken Loach impeach express. It was on his own having a pizza, having Venise Yana. Honestly it with him. But nobody would believe me, it was, hey, I can believe that should be in patriots very late at night, though. Now that night when we saw Ken Loach was very exciting night. I had just done an event with your friend David sedaris. Oh, I wanted to talk to you about go. I would hesitate to call him my friend wished that he was your podcast with him. Made me die out. Good. I'm glad you. We're quite upset and said like you should have put warnings that he was going to talk about gouging eyeballs in ages. The your response was so wonderful, but yes, so I done an event within British library, and I'd had to interview him. And I was absolutely terrified of the first time you've met him. Yes. I adore him. I think he he's my number one writer. Yeah. He's hard to be. He's just extrordinary. He's liking alien the way he looks at the world. He wrote me a postcard afterwards. Oh you lucky thing, I'm sure he'll write you on better. Write me a postcard. He took my address at one point. He just said, oh, what's your address? And he wrote me, I know that he does it a lot. He's he doesn't send me one. I'm gonna be pissed. The post insurer can be a bit late go and tell me what does he say. What was he like he was? Absolutely fantastic. I was very intimidated. Very nervous same. Yes. Because I thought, where's he going to be at he could easily be quite cranky and spike? That's what I thought. But I don't think he ever would be no instead he was very warm, and so polite and formal. Yeah, hence the letter writing thing. Yes. And hence the compulsion to meet people and talk to them at length and not just do a suit of cursory, meet and greet. Have you seen him doing signing? No. But we talked about it and strolled, he's there for eleven hours. I still don't quite understand the logistics of how you do an event in the evening, and then stay at the venue for up to eleven hours. I'll tell you what happens quite often. It's a big venue. He will start the signing well before the event. So it starts before, and people have got to know that and then afterwards. He sits. And he says, how big the table is to be, and exactly how it is in the house. Two helpers not his the venue has to provide two helpers, and they make people right on post. It's what they want to write. And then David has his dinner, he at the table and so he'll have steak and potatoes. And it's wonderful because one time a man reached over and took one of the potatoes. What guy who was queuing hearings? Yeah. He took one of David potato knock. It wasn't cooling. David was really upset. Now. I'm trying to make it sound as if I was there when it happened. But I wasn't I think it might have been in the USA, but it happened because David told me on sounds like the kind of thing that would happen in the US. I can't see that happening in the taking each other's potato. I, I caught I mean if it were a chip. Yeah, that's maybe did. I still my memories. It was like a new potatoes popped it in his mouth. And then David was so annoyed. It was sort of reflected in the signing. I'm sure isn't. He just the most charming delightful really. Nice. I mean, I'm sort of counting the months until I can ask him to come back and they must have in back. He's got a interesting funny perspective on so many things, and especially nowadays, where it's people very cautious quite rightly a lot of the time about what they say, and people are trying to think more Kathleen about their attitudes and prejudices. You get the impression that he's not that much. He's not he's not he does seem to say as he finds it and he's well he's a chronicler and that's his job, but he's very liberal in kind. So he will report. You've read the diaries. Oh my God. I mean, you know, some of the things some of domestic abuse and stuff in you think. Wow. I'm not sure I'd be talking about that. But actually, isn't it great? He did. I think so. Yeah. I mean, one of the things that I asked by law is writing about my family. Do they mind is what's the moral and ethical position of this because I'm telling their story? And I think possibly one of the reasons I love David sedaris so much is because he doesn't more than I do. And I'm like, well, you know, I'm not I'm not. Sedaris is a God. I I'm very happy with with thousand nine point nine percent away. Does differ said defa that sign up, what I said. Same. Same. I'm a bit old say say that's nice could old days. One of the things there are seldom talks about is sex. Same. Is that right? Because I do not like writing about saying okay, but it pops up a little more than it does. In David sedaris his work. Sex diaries, but he says after the sex, I thought such so we know he's had it, but he doesn't describe gold, right? It's the sort of final frontier, I would say, quite rightly. I feel very conflicted about the sex positive modern world where people are trying to be all groovy positive about pornography and sex in general. And like let's get it out in the open. Let's talk about it. Yes, let's not feed people's hangups, and let's make it a sort of inclusive non judgmental environment. Great. But let's not remove all the things that are fun about sex kind of furtive creeping around secret aspects. I haven't heard many people say that because some people don't wanna read about it, and don't wanna out in the open and other people do, but it does slightly ruin. It doesn't it. I think I don't really enjoy writing about sex, and I had to write about sex in my latest book, because my character, my narrator my protagonist had become eighteen and although in real life, MS eighteen I wasn't going anywhere near it. I was very odd and an eccentric constrained. But I thought when I she's got these. Not exists and talk about it a little bit. So I had to sort of have her being a bit talk about she kisses this guy, and she really likes and she's impressed that he doesn't is the phrase use whined his head around. Yeah. He doesn't do that. The, the clothes horseshoe starts kissing showing it was such a shock. I remember the first time I had one of those 'cause it's like French kissing. Wow. That was revolution. When you find out, did you French her? What are you doing? What are you doing with tongues? And I thought, no, I didn't put my tongue in. Sane die. Just a big exchange on your germs earth. Would you do that? That was way before I found out about oral sex. Holy christ. So you so fringe kissing. All right, great. Wow. I'm touching tongues with this person. This is very exciting. But then the day you French kiss with someone and they do the washing machine thing, and it's totally there's no passionate whatsoever. Yeah. But you, you see people doing I don't think they don't never see anyone doing it now. Do you like watching people like that on film? I think it's quite funny. I don't like it. I had the noises when we're watching in my wife and they start doing a long kiss, like that. We have to start going. When they kiss on the archers, and obviously, they can't of these very difficult. So they do quite a lot of, of mouthy noises. And my friend, John says they get out the plunges in the wet rags. But yeah, I'm I'm just I think sex should be completely private and secret. And we shouldn't talk about it or say, on films, really and writers shouldn't have to write about it to size isn't there because I grew up in a household where sex was never mentioned not. Luckily, not because anyone was very puritanical or anything. I don't think they would just conservative and they thought it was embarrassing, and they didn't want to deal with it. So you're younger than me. Aren't you, you be such to? That's right. You fifty so you're fifty so you're not that much. I actually look hold the Nina does, which is a drag you, don't you young much. You've got very good hair. Thanks. Although within a year, I would say it's going to be as great as my but he doesn't. It's not about the color. It's about good. Thick head of hair. Thanks. This is nice. Got good Hecker. Oh, you reckon. I like you. I think you're very good looking man. This is exactly. I hope you've gotta do. You know you look like you. Cross between canoe Reeves and David Nichols. The writer both very handsome men doesn't. He look a bit like canoe. Always on. We're still actually funny. But I choked. No. You David Nicholls and canoe. Thank you agree, Stella return, the company Stella, she will not do you agree? Do I look like. Well, you look like a lot of girls that I've gone out with. And I definitely when I was reading love Nina, I just thought I would have gone out with you so much. I was so cool, we just into the same set of stuff that I was into in your mind, worked in a way that was very appealing. Yeah. I know I do like myself than I was really great. I was I was I wasn't particularly active. True. I've seen pictures of you. How how if you changed, then why why, you know, wrong I'm much more caned, please people. You know, I'm I want people to like me, and so sometimes I'm pro bit. I don't say oh, you know, you're an idiot, maybe that comes with each other. That's in itself, an attractive quality, I would say which which one. Clearing about what other people think spin it as being sort of needy or unctuous, or whatever there's lots of negative ways to spend that. But I think you care about what people thinking you care about not needlessly. Hurting feelings and ruining that thing where I thought it was completely unnecessary to say goodbye, at the end of the phone, call people to in films, where they go. Yeah. Meet me at the blah and then hang up have to do that. Stupid prostitute. In a saying goodbye so I'd be a bit like that. And people say to me, gosh, she's just hung up on me and to have to because I think you're talking about thrillers things, where it's like cops or rubbers Matty's was planning to meet at the pub, tying up. You'll be nice though, to have some bodies that said, or I by. No, you hang up. Well, despite your queasiness about sex when you're writing. On your own life. I'm not gonna cost dispersion. Yeah. Very keen. You do have some good little observations about sex, and particularly after two six in the seventies and in the eighties, when the new book is set and this stuff is a lot of stuff that makes me laugh. But you mentioned the fact that men used to get their Cox out more routinely. Can I just say to the listeners, I would never use the word. No, no, no. Sorry. I regret using it. You, you say peanuts do because I think it has to be called. You have to because it makes feel. Dislike women sake growl. Stella. Anyway. I said that their penises out in the nineteen eighties. They did. They did. I mean, even I remember that I remember going it didn't happen all the time. My friends were not in the habit of getting out there released young, then that sort of grow than men when I was a bartender for a long while, and we had these things called bar huddles, where all the ball tennis would get together and go crazy. And I was already thinking. I don't know about this because I was never a sport guy. So when we used to get together and drink me, and Joe and Louis and people in my pals, we would be just crapping on about films and things like that. And we didn't it wasn't too laddish in that way. And then suddenly, I went to the ball huddle and it was very laddy, and it was, and we have city hammered, and then at one point, one guy to the pasta out, and he was to sat in the chair with his head Lulling. So everyone took Polaroid's of like each one of them. Standing behind this guy with Willie resting shoulder. Oh, yeah. Yes. And I didn't do that. I would really. No more for back then. And I remember thinking I don't I'm not going to go to another bar huddle. Go to buy bad for the. This is humiliated. See when people talk about toxic masculinity. Part of the problem is that so much was expected of you guys back then that you were expected to in order to join in and be part of the group and be accepted, you had to put you Willie on the man's shoulder in the voter, and it was very hard to say. No, I really get there. And I'm really I've got brothers. And they were all very well behaved, I have to say, but I know that they will have had times where they were expected to do things, but my memory as a female at that time was that often men would get their penis out, and it wouldn't always be aggressive act or it wasn't it wasn't like a horrible flasher scenario. It would be seen as a compliment. It was can you give me an example? Well, even someone wants was driving me somewhere. You know, gave me lift somewhere, always taking me out to the cinemas you might do in those days, you'd be taken out. And sitting in the passenger seat. And he's driving long, one handed undoing his trousers and getting his penis out. But that was an overture to what he hoped was going to be a great like it was quite precarious anyway, because he wasn't that good a driver. And it was busy streets of LeicesteR unless heaving that time of night. So he's driving on one hundred trying to change gear quickly and. And it was completely unoriginal and not very pleasant. And I just said forgot sake your hands on the wheel. And there's lots of things like that. But one of the things I talked about last night, I did this little book talk. And the interview got me onto this thing and actually the audience were bit horrified because it went on too. Long was about when women had driving lessons in the seventies eighties that often the driving stroke would on. Yeah. Just being in close tiny, little space in close proximity with young woman because often were very young, having driving seventeen eighteen and obviously couldn't control themselves. And they all he'll come out there was this one driving stroke that we all knew would do that. But he was really cheap. And it never had a fail. So you'd be like can I handle it? Can I handle it? Can I handle hurry Janis gangs penis? I guess that's the thing. That's shocking for younger people isn't it is that it's impossible nowadays to think of that kind of thing as anything other than sort of violence in a way. Yes. Sexual violence Asman at the very least, and I think today it would be. Yeah. But back then, of course, the worthy violent times. And I had lots of horrible flashy experiences where it was somebody trying to impose some kind of weird power thing. I mean, there are lots of men older men who suddenly warp it out and be a bit scary. But there were the other times where it was. I think trying to signal can we be romantic? And actually funny enough in my current book that just came out today. Reasons to be cheerful. There's a part where the narrator says mend quite often gather penises out and my deter suggested I add the line, this often meant as a compliment or something like that, and she's younger than me, but it was a very clever intervention, because it was often meant kindly. I mean obviously it's now possible to decode that and to say, well, it was probably indicative of certain. Oh, absolutely toxic. Yeah. It wasn't coming because your exactly general. But the actual in the moment, wouldn't be someone that meant you harm. No. But it was deeply wrong in horrible. This shocking thing, looking back was, I mean, there was one time, stellar imme-. We're on holiday with some friends some other big girly holiday, and we weren't cavorting, but we splashing in the sea, but we weren't we weren't naked. I mean we had our bathing suits on, but we were stretching around and there was a man sitting on a sort of a rogue masturbating, and we all ignored him and then Stella had glasses on. So she couldn't see. And I said, oh, there's a man. And Stella marched over to him and hit him on the head second you stop. Okay writer. I've been very gilded the she marched punched him in the. Nope. She slept with a grow. No. And then just after that, we were in a taxi going to the airport on that same holiday. And so we would in a taxi little group of girls, I was sitting in the front seat next to the taxi driver. And we on these sort of mountainous roads on the way to Han era port in Crete. And again, we went naked. We'd got clothes on and we weren't being sexual in any way and the taxi driver, starting masturbating at Cologne. Yeah. And I think he started doing it because a Madonna song came on. Sure, right. And it was I can't remember it might have been like virgin. And he got. Really getting into it. I would tell the others in the back. What was happening and also thought he could crash. So I said, guys. Troy said, impinging English because he was greedy, want him to know what was saying for some reason, and they didn't leave me. You don't hurt the guy's feelings. Didn't she's please people anyway, recently, the guardian wrote to me and said, could I write about Madonna sixtieth birthday and do fan of Madonna, fucking vine of Madonna? I told the story to the guardian, I said, you know, basically her song coming on not, not blaming Madonna directly, but her son coming on gave him the horn. I do not. I don't like Madonna because of that. So, yeah, there we go. Men in the penises, man that I mean is shocking though, because I think men for ages just didn't realize that, that happened to women all. Well, does does transport and stuff? I know that's one of the great things about something like Twitter where someone will say has a man of masturbated at you which seems like an open question. But it went crazy with people say, yes. Always looking in see with my friend and guy. Yes. I was doing this. Yes, I was doing this and again, really poignant side of this whole thing. Was that the men going what? Oh my God. No. I don't believe this. There was so many men really hurt and upset to think about it. Very odd. It's very odd. I wanna ask you about the actual business of writing. Did you always find it easy? Yes. Yes, I've always written from very young person. I mean, I can't remember when I started writing, but, you know, ten or something like that. But everything that I have has been given to me. So my mom who we've talked about a bit who was a bit of a monkey in a drunk and all the rest of it monkey. Do we? Had another side to, which was she was incredibly creative, and she read a lot, and she loved theater in film and plays. So I grew up in this unorthodox crazy, childhood with wall tool books. And with the mother who wrote who wrote poetry and read poetry and would go and see Shakespeare and would watch television comedy in spite Milligan, and just sort of surrounded us with lovely funny, creative things. So I thought writing was a normal thing to do. So what might I compare it with? So other women of my age might sort of sewing, or might do gardening for me writing was thing that everybody did. So I just did it. And then when I, I finally left scores, about fifteen and didn't get any levels or anything, but I did get myself into college while my boyfriend and I got got me A-level. He helped me he read all the texts and I struggled through on my own sort of I. Enrolled in night school. And so I did get into Thames polytechnic do this really brilliant degree, Stella, Stella heath eighty eighty eight and we both signed up to do this course. Called autobiography and fiction, which meant we would read, lots of biography and autobiography so we read via camera and that kind of thing and then one of the essays, we had to write was a bit of autobiography. So I wrote a bit, what biography and 'cause it was quite interesting because I'd had a really interesting childhood with his gay dad in an alcoholic mother. And of course it was perfect. Whereas everybody else was writing about, you know crikey, having their feet measured for clock shoes. How they you know, moved house once. So I thought, oh gosh, you know, this is I'm really lucky. I've got this. This is a good thing to have all this crazy stuff. And I got a really good Mark for that essay. I mean, that's the important thing for all my other essays I guess. See, and they tell you don't think you've read enough Wordsworth. But this one I got an A and the Tuta wrote, this is this is very fine. Piece of writing. So I thought my K this is my blush do this. So I wrote more and more and more and more, and then love Nina came out by accident. And then when my publisher said, have you got anything else, I said, yeah, I actually have he go. So I've got load got three novels already written pretty much. And when you're sitting down and writing nowadays. Yeah. Do you I'm trying to write a book at them? And I think my brain's just very disorganized, anyway. And I find it hard to concentrate. So I think of it is painting a wall. I'm putting down a paragraph here or a line there and gradually join up is it fiction? No sort of memoirs. Okay. So it's more. Yeah. It's like you know put on the undercoat and then gradually you do another layer on top. But how does it work for you? I mean, are you writing? Fully formed paragraphs, right the way through without stopping, and then going back or do you, do you just go line by line back and forth back and forth? I write splashes. So I write ideas something will come to me, and I'll write it. And that's how I've always done it until I got more serious would see lots more writers go to more writer events in hip people talking and novelist talking. And I've tried to change because I thought I'm doing a bad way. I need to plan more see the planning thing is a big deal. And a lot of really good writers talk about they don't write a word until they've planned it. So it's going to start there where Adam sits down on the green chair, then he's gonna go make lovely Cup of tea that takes the form of bullet points. Does it? Yeah, this is what they do my friend John rights to see a Graham, which she comes from films, where you say we. That person not person and that happens in this bit. And so it's all very planned out and I thought I should start doing that. So with my last book, I did that. And it completely fucked me up a really. Yeah. It can paradise lodge. Yeah. It took me twice as long to do it. I mean it's both basically memoir, I didn't have to make any of it up. But by doing the planning and trying to crowbar of if plot in because I've been very lucky and had very good reviews for most of white, but we're all of my books have had very good views on the whole unbelievably lucky, but the one thing that sometimes comes out is there's not much plot. Now I don't really care about plot. I'm not interested in plot. I don't want to read plot. I want to read the stuff, I care, whether it's just block cheese, but because I sort of micro respond to the bad stuff, so hundred people like one person says there's not much plot. What do you do you try to fix the thing that, that one person complained about which is really? Early thought me up as I say, and I'm never gonna do it like that again. So don't plan item. Okay. It's much. Now where do you write what where does your best stuff come into your head off? Can I don't know? I've only recently begun to have a more of a routine and actually sit down in the same place before I was wondering around experimenting like is this going to work? One day I went out with a campaign chair and sat in a field. You know, I was trying everything. And so what is working? Well now working is no. I mean what's working for you? So you're asking me to define work. What is working? Well, what seems to be working? Actually, it was a little bit helpful of speaking to David sedaris, realizing something that was quite obvious, I suppose, which was that it would be useful to read it out to a live audience, now that's brilliant. Because then he's honing it now that I don't call that. Manning. That's auditing editing. Right. Yeah. Yeah, editing. But it gives you what it does. And it also makes you realize that, that chunk of sentences there in the middle that you thought. Well, you gotta have that because it's, it's not funny as the other stuff, but, but it's doing a job. But then when you read it out, you think. No, it's not doing chart doesn't there's got to be either either. It's got to go all this going to be a funnier way. But then you get rattled. Sometimes when you're doing it live, if there's a paragraph that doesn't get a load of laughs and used to is that an indication that it's redundant. Or is that an indication that it's just a more serious bit? I mean, yes, because it's funny everything I mean, you, you're a comedian, sort of a comedy writer, but my writing isn't, you know hundred percent lulls so interesting, like sedaris every line of your stuff does a job. And very seldom is a line without any human whatsoever. This, there's something funny in there, being funny's very important to me. So I will when on doing event book events, I will go for the laws all the time. Sometimes the audience don't really want that they won't meet talk about the process of writing. And so I sometimes get it wrong. I wonder slightly misjudged it last night, quite lot folded arms. When they fold their own. Sometimes you get those audience people, you know, there's always one in the front row who looks like they wanna murder you like they've been dragged their and they hate you, but then you can do a gig and that personal come up. And so you off to those very see, I have a lot of women. We have more men than I do. I have my audiences of probably three quarters hour. Okay. Yeah. Or more even actually, the woman, d- men last night, and the men, always look, very stern and serious. But they come up to us in that, that really jolly. And I think that just listening and resting blasted face. Exactly. It's exactly that. And but if anyone smiles I then just talked to the smiling face here. So I'm just going, and then they come up after an so really didn't like the thing you said, I think I'll go, but you smiling somebody asked me in an interview I think it was yesterday. Have you always been funny, and I find that really awkward embarrassing? What how do you? Cope with that. Do you go? Yes. I love being very funny. If someone says you'll really funny or have you always been funny. It's exactly the same as someone saying, how is it being? Pretty isn't it is it me? Or is that the truth? Of course. It's true. I think so. Two other comedians. Like, I don't get the thing of American comedians coming off sit stage and telling you how hard they just crushed. That's your call. Yeah. That's so true known as a committee. It's, it's weird. It's like comedians who sit of don't smile and photographs and that like Rockstars, and I just think okay, you know, each to his own in this room for every type of comedy. But I always thought comedy was about being silly and mincing with vanity and dispensing with that level of confidence in careerism, or whatever it is. That makes you come off stage, and say, yeah, I just destroyed that I it is amazing is hilarious because you let's not take yourself too seriously. And I hate this sort of tears of clown thing as well. That, you know, if you'll really funny, if you add in books, a really funny, that when stellar I leave here in Europe side that we've gone, you're going to go depressed and gloomy. I don't think you are. I think very funny all the time. I'll be I'll cry for half an hour seven. Okay. But the thing of being put on the spot and saying, oh, yeah, you're comedian socially funny is bad and it does happen. Like I meet sort of friends older people, I mean, there's lots of people who don't know who I am so often in situations where people say, what do you do? And I usually budget, and I say something like, well, I'm right. Or sort that is not going to lead to the question, something funny, and you've got a funny bit in the new book about Lizzie being put on the spot. So Lizzie as a dental nurse dental issues in this book and reasons to be cheerful and early on. And she works for this monstrous character. J P, and you seem to distill everything. That's worst about men into this one, horrible, dentist guy. We, you yourself a dental nece. Yes. Oh, right. Because this deep level dental stuff in here, which is very funny. But this guy he. He, he smoked cities like Steve Martin little shop of horrors, or whatever like your nightmare, dentist. But he's had complaints that is thing is smell like cigarettes, so he gets his assistant to hold the cigarette. Four, heats him the cigarette so horrible things about the feeding the cigarette. I smoked as a young person teenager. And we didn't have many cigarettes. And so it was quite normal. For someone say gives a drag you wouldn't hand them the cigarette because they just walk off with it. And you've lost your fag. So you'd say all right, then you hold the cigarette to their lips, which is which is nice. If you have friends or the school bully. Real bitch from Hallo, go to drag or in the LeicesteR accent. And then then you'd hold the fact that lips. And they would take a really, they groppy wrist and they go. Nate lead. See cigarette just disappear. So I when I was asked to feed cigarettes to this guy that thing of pulling away, too soon or holding into long, and all that whole thing he doesn't get the drag when he wants it. He's going. And then the reason I mentioned of the backer of being told to perform tricks, like a monkey if you're a comedian is that your character or you foolishly boasted that you could blow smoke rings presage smoke rings, so they say, oh, yeah, go on blow some smoke rings. So then you have to take a drag on his. The ends what the end do you remember watching the meat? People. Now you if anyone at the end you hate them, though the worst kind of and you were sharing a fag. And you'd get any be like, oh my God. We used the phrase bum sucked. I we didn't somebody else said this to me from sucked and there's another phrase, and I can't remember what it was the Americans say them sucked. But I looked up bump sucked in the top definition twenty nineteen is to leave large passionate hickeys, I love bites inside another males rectum. Yeah. Well, it wasn't that wasn't that neither had any involvement any of that. But the, the walls thing I can't remember what it is. I had a feeling it was an Irish name that you alliterative or so. I don't know what it was a can't remember but there are some phrases, but yes, the wet end end and there's a stomach churning moment, where Lizzie the your character in the book has to take drag on this. Soden sick. Of this horrible guy that she's working for, in order to do her party piece and blow some smoke ring within a ring. Right. So I can do. Right. Okay. So that was one of my kids the other day. They had a friend, he had a vape. And they said, can you really do? And I can still do really brilliant rings my rings. They come out quivering. They're amazing. And I used to be twisting on themselves. Yeah. Oh, god. Yet, could you do them? No way. Yeah. It's like skimming stone. I mean you just some people can just do I am. I'd love to still be able to smoke just to do them. But my I, nobody says to me, your comedian told me Joe let you will get because I'm not seen as a comedian. I'm seeing his writer, but they know that I'm sort of, you know, dealing in funny. So they are very funny to me. Yeah. So I get a lot of really extraordinary. Sure, you must get a lot of his funny and that, she, I mentioned this to sedaris, I said to him because I know he writes history, all the time, he writes history every day, and I said to him what from today? Will you put in your diary, I asked him on stage. And he said, a very funny thing, which was about this woman who found an injured pigeon woman that we just met, and she told her she'd found this injured pigeon, and it was recuperating in Barth in the premier in. As we spoke it was there in the room waiting I mean, he is extraordinarily and, and you've sort of alluded to the fact that you were lucky in some ways to have an unconventional and an eventful life. And he seems to be the same to the extent that people often accuse him of making stuff up and he says, why would I make this up? How, how would you make up? But also I said to him so stuff ends up in your diary. Do you find people acting up to be in the door? And he said, yes, yes, and in fact, that's why the guy stole the potato. Because he wanted to be. I think I seem to have a memory that David sedaris wrote in his book nowhere, you're going to be my diary. I think I think that happened the that makes sense. Yeah. And I remember when Alan Bennett, I published his diaries, I looked straight at the bikes if I'd been, we want to be in each other's diary were, you know, I've never been in any I know when Simon Pegg published his memoirs, I went in and looked in the index as well, chose there wasn't. Is so bad. I mean, and there was only one line anyway, it was like he was referring to both of us actually fleetingly. Oh, yeah. He, he mentioned, Joe from nineteen teddybears STS adamant Joe. And I was like, oh my God, I just still slunk out the books, just so high. Fucking worm. So you just we want to just be knowledge. We've been in these people's lives, you know. So I'm very careful about that. I like to acknowledge people lot. I will bring people in. I will say my friend John, but then if it's not a thousand percent positive. Will you flag it for people before publication will you get in touch with old friends and say, this is a character in this book, and you might recognize a few things I did with this last book, because I was a dental nurse, and I did work for dentist, and I slightly still know that son of the dentist, though, I worked for who's exactly my age. And although this dentist wasn't isn't the, the dentist in the book is much worse than the real dentists, obviously real dentist was a fifty year old man in one thousand nine hundred so he wasn't a Saint, and I said, I've. I hope you don't mind. And I hope I've made clear that it's fiction and I think he was a bit side, actually. I do. I think he felt a bit sad and said that you haven't haven't really done much to disguise him. And he doesn't come out with much on on. I did feel like a bit of a he'll, and it's not fair because he's a lovely guy. It's so difficult is difficult in the name of art. Yeah. Yeah. And actually, I came much more about my mom, and I've had her, you know, stealing cheese and sleeping with Vickers. Trying to sleep with my own boyfriend. Yeah. The thing is what you have to do is not make them quite as bad as they were. And then they grateful. Yeah. Well, I'm writing about my dad who's no longer and I feel as if it's like season. I can say what I want. You can wreck. You can't in. You must I mean, I'm not throwing him under the bus, but I'm probably saying things that I wouldn't say to his face. No. And is usually an indication that you shouldn't say something right? No, it's not because he will he's not to be sensitive about it. And also, he was your dad that time an dads on the whole were very different than and so. You're not just talking about him. You're talking about the Aira, and I've slightly throw my dad under. And, you know, I've had I've outed him, although I think he didn't mind he's now dead. But when I my first novel, which outed him, he was still alive, and he was fine about it immediately died. He read the book. Strew. Honestly. That's so true but you know he'd had a very good innings. And I needed to make living pension. This is the thing I can't tell you about my dad is that bottom line. If the book does, well he'll be fine. He'll be exactly. The worst thing is. It's like if it's like one star no one buys it. Then my dad would be typical. Adam couldn't you written a decent book? I think what's all his best. I think it's more honest. You actually as a writer. It's your duty to be real. I really feel. And I think as long as you're not hurting somebody, you're not hurting him because he's dead. He's technically literally and in every sense. Yes, listen. I was going to talk to you about dentistry. So you're a dental Halloween dental gentleness three years. Yeah. Was it three years seventeen eighteen nineteen? Yeah, because I got the job so that I could go leaving LeicesteR and not living the tiny village anymore. And then I applied for Joe. Shop in the lady magazine to be ninety in London, because I had had enough of being in LeicesteR, so yes, I think it was three years. Did you enjoy it not at all? We, it seems like a terrible job. It was it was such a bizarre thing to do. But it seemed like a huge achievement for me because I left school without a single. Oh, level, and it seemed quite a decent job. But of course, I wasn't. So learning anything I wasn't sort of training to do anything. Always just there is a helper. And I was very naughty with it all. And I was very stretchy tea, and I have my friends in sister into give them a scale and polish, and I was always doing bits of guerrilla dentistry, and I was always polishing, my own tea. You know, picking around news it treatment, and using the scale to take mino- varnish. And also, I book in a family on a Friday afternoon, huge family of six that were didn't exist. And then on Friday lunchtime. I have them ring up and cancel so that we could have a couple of hours. Nice. So it's a bit naughty, and it was a bit Blee can horrible. Actually it wasn't. It wasn't a particularly. Nice thing to do. Do they have rubber dams back in those days? No one of the things we had was, I would have to hold in a sort of a suction thing into the. Yeah. So I'd have to hold it, and I'd get bored, and she was quite AK on the old arm. So I'd be holding. And then by the end of it pieces of leaning on the be all my weight on the person's jewel. As well. Because the that point you really want the nurse to, to do a good job with that. Because the build up of the saliva, right maddening, and then the patient would be basically drowning. And then, then you suction the tongue to board it. Yes, it's and then suddenly suction in this. And then you'd be leaning on it. But the thing that used to get me every day for three years, this happened every day. And I used to just think you can't about the dentist. I mean defense Pullman who's lovely but. Coming and he go Hello. Hello. Come in sit. And then they'd have to open their mouth, and he would just talk them and he'd say, what I don't know about you, Mr. Jewett. But I I've found my loans is dries to haystack isn't yours in the poor patient. We're got. And he said, you know, should we have had all these Ugandan Asians coming into? I don't think so. Do you. Talk mostly crime with injecting someone drilling them jutting to like a fucking hairdresser. Larry eighty when they do that. Attention. Let's segue from that to the subject to five Jonah's. Also writes about in the book, I was not familiar with. Can you explain? Jonah. Have you ever encountered? One day. No. I mean, I've never interacted with one. I don't believe unless I was very cleverly. Well, what Adams talking about is in my book, my narrator talks about contraception. And the fact that in, in the eighties women would start having serious relationships and they think about contraception and it was a very strange thing. This taking this pill, and there was lots of stuff in the news and in the women's magazines about how you might suffer a loss of lebeau or you might gain, a lot of weight, or you might lose weight, or you might become very spotty. Oh, you. Howarth genyk sometime. Yes. That all that, and more serious side effects were were talked about, you know, as a possibility and so going on the pill was kind of a mixed blessing. It was a right of passage, and you felt very grown up about it, but you might suddenly gain to stone or just never want to have sex. And so it's. Really strange thing and I had I'm going to say it was a friend. It wasn't me. She said, I am not going to take a pill that does such a huge thing to my body. I'm gonna take a daily pill is going to do this to me in order to say that somebody can jocular inside me. I'm sorry. I'm not going to do that. And she accidentally devised this method. Now, it just happened wants to her which he'd accidentally, or just by chance had arranged her inefficient is so that they produce the makeshift for Jonah. So I think they would having a dry, ride her and her boyfriend having sort of what you might what's dry ride, dry humping would be the concept. Yeah, not non-penetrative rotting. So they were doing that. And then what is that, too? So maybe some clothes came off, and then somehow it must've felt to the man as if they were having integral. But. Hadn't actually gone in it hadn't yet entered have giant going in between in between to the slimy thighs three times. I'm glad you're enjoying yourself, Stella shaking her head. Yeah. And so anyway, and all was well. And so, you know that it happened. And then, so this friend of ours told us all about it. And so anybody that had enough meat on their thighs could do this. And I remember one friend of mine, did it made her five China, too tight and the poor boy got a nose bleed. Whether the two things were related, but she talked about that because we had a good effort required to. I think she might have tightened once it was in something all got a little bit. And presumably, this is all being done either under the covers or in darkness. Absolutely. I mean, I think if you were having, you know, a long term relationship with somebody, you could spot the difference is. Yeah. Yeah. And also, you had to be in a bit of a funny position you had to be bit cross legged it was a little bit odd. At my hope you never have to experience it because it must have been quite difficult. I mean, it would be this point for my wife to seventy switch to five. China would disappointment. Something news. Want to rule it out? Rulli. Wait continue. Hey welcome back podcasts. Thank you very much deed to Nina sticky for making the time to talk to me, they're very much enjoyed that. Hope you did too. And maybe one day, she will join me out here in Norfolk and take a walk with me and rosy, which thing that rose. Oh, yeah. That'd be really great. And I really hope you talk a lot more about right in your book, because you probably still wanted to finish by that time because you have vanished so far up your. Being flight to write the book by. Ooh. Hang on, was that you talking just. Now, what was that the voice in my head now that was may token as during the band's I love you? I'm going gambling good. I was worried I was going mad. I love you too good gamble, by the way, Nina's son Alfie favorite Beatles album is Abbey Road. I should've guessed that from golden slumbers really should not. That is a good album, especially that side two medley, although one of the distressing things about life in the digital age, is that when I'm listening to songs on shuffle on my phone. I've got a lot of songs for my library on my phone, and occasionally one of those Abbey Road, medley tracks comes up. But then, of course, it just cuts off when I'm expecting. So I'll be listening to polythene Pam, and I'll be all get up to go. She came in through the bathroom window like a beetle because I should be in the Beatles. And it just cuts off road interrupters, it's no good. And actually what I've done is, this is a boring story. But I'm telling you anyway, is I imported all the tracks from the Abbey Road medley into logic pro and then rented them out as a single file. So now, if it pops up on my phone, I have the whole medley uninterrupted. No nasty cutoffs with random play good use of time buckles across all the important things in life. I see. Yes. Thank you very much for noticing speaking of good use of time. I saw what I consider to be a great film. The other day, Apollo eleven. New documentary about the Apollo eleven moon landings because fifty years ago, nearly why t was on the moon, of course a done bit. My sister now with Whitey on the moon, her face and arms began to swell and white is on the moon. I can't pay no doctor Bill, but white on the moon. Ten years from now we'll be paying still whitey's on the moon. They used that skill Scott Heron. Quite on the moon and they used it in the film. I man, didn't they I think, to acknowledge the fact that. You know, the moon landings were by no means uncontroversial in the late sixties, many people at the time, and since have felt that it was a colossal waste of money and resources. While there were so many other problems that needed dealing with on earth. I don't know. I love space and many other positive things have come out of the moon landings, if you can rationalize all that and concentrate on the human achievement and the courage, the sheer insanity of the Astros. Basemen. Sitting on the rocket in this documentary. They've dug out a load of new seventy millimeter footage from the time for this thing and. You know, clean it all up. And soccer is didn't it looks like a modern feature film looks as if it was just short recently. You have to keep reminding yourself that this footage was shot in nineteen sixty nine and I've seen a lot of documentaries, about the moon landings because, you know, I'm sad man, I want to run away from my responsibilities floats in space. But this new documentary is the best one. I've seen in knocks the other ones into a cocked hat the worst type of hat. Lift someone bought your tap fucking. You talked I wanted to Hamburg set a hat. Anyway, I like a lot of the other ones for all. Mankind is good. With the Brian Eno music on and I liked. I man. But this is real. This is real footage, or is it or is it warriors very convenient. They just happen to dig up load of lovely HD footage. That's suddenly turned up just as the fiftieth anniversary rolls around the scene. Actual footage from the sixties eight doesn't look that it's very grainy badly scratched the colors all shit. And yet this footage just happens to be lovely in Pristina. Oh, how convenient a wonder why could it be that it was shot last year on twenty eight K cameras? I can't even be bothered to make the footage Luke old because people are still buying into this crap about people ending on the moon. Could that be the reason don't get me started on the moon? The. Oh, shit mogul, someone's hanging there to try and distract from what's really going on. What's really important, which is the game of thrones production team is kept all the money they should've spent on hiring decent rights. Good flypast grows. They don't deal with any of those issues in the Apollo eleven documentary, but I still liked it and I do recommend it. Rosie come on. Right. Sweet. Let's head back Joey. Thanks to shame is Murphy Mitchell as ever without whom making these podcasts would be a lot more difficult, and thanks very much indeed to Matt Lamont for additional editing on this episode. Thanks, Matt, and thanks very much to eight cost for their continued hard work in support of this podcast. I appreciate it. All right. Listen hope things go. Well this week, you know, be careful and keep it together. And until next time you visit myself and rose remember, please that I love you. Then. Women have.

Nina writer David sedaris Stella heath Alan Bennett John Lizzie Adam LeicesteR Garth Jennings Jonathan Miller Joe publisher Mark zippy Shakespeare London Frank Ken Loach Beatles