36 Burst results for "Nina"

Fresh update on "nina" discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

02:33 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nina" discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"That looks very very you know especially means now. It would have been different. If the if the lakers had started the season poorly correct there would have been different but we were like what twenty one and six and then took over right. So it's like what are you gonna do. I thought he had an excellent job. Considering all of the injuries we had to to deal with in fact. I think he's been doing an excellent job since dot here when you think about everything outside of basketball. He's had to manage bubble kobe's passing. Obviously the embarrassment of how he was hired. You know with everyone being interviewed. Accept him then he finds that. Okay i frank come on and kept it altogether. He has the pandemic. The bubble like is underrated. I know we've already played the game but bragg when his birthday comes. That's my selection. Yup no i. I agree i agree. Hey real quick. So here's the the lakers. I guess rumor so the internet the folks on the internet apparently have noticed something that both. Anthony davis lebron. James started following nina. Westbrook the wife of russell westbrook now remember once a week or two ago. We discussed it. There was a rumor out there. The bleacher report had it that russell westbrook to the lakers is probably a thing and we kind of like an not. Do ramona shamsur. Hanes and one of them. We ain't payments into that. So now does this bring perhaps a little more validity to that report in bleacher report. What save it for the other side. And then i wanted to know if you think that would actually work potentially so we'll get to that stick around plus we've got. Would you rather all coming up in two minutes here on seventeen. Espn all right. chris. I'll take it but you guys were talking about the toni. Braxton and who could break up s. l. k. i mean. There's a pretty obvious answer. Was that ki ki. Could come in and break everybody up. Yeah you'd be in trouble. Yeah i thought there was the obvious answer. I there is another obvious answer to yeah. Wait a second hold on. Keyshawn comes back to la and that breaks up s. l. k. There's actually won't mess up different.

Anthony Davis Lebron James Two Minutes Chris SIX Russell Westbrook Braxton Keyshawn Ramona Shamsur Both Hanes ONE Nina. Westbrook Seventeen Twenty One Two Ago Once A Week Or Espn Toni Second
What Are the Quirks That Come With Being a Developer

CodeNewbie

02:09 min | Last week

What Are the Quirks That Come With Being a Developer

"Let's start with you telling us about your coding journey. Where they're all begin for you. I i started getting into coating during college. I started out as a psychology major and was pretty intent on finishing up. Undergrad getting a master's degree and being a counselor About couple years into it. I realized i liked the more hard science a lot. Better than sort of the sop science and social science part of it. And i had taken a statistics class. Like just a psychology stats. Class really looked to that. So i got into statistics and changed my major to that and at that point i had to take a bunch of like stats computing type glasses. So for instance statisticians tend to use programming languages like our or sass or even just like sql database management. And so that was really my first introduction to programming at that point. Like i realized if i to look at the t. between statistics and computer science actually like program a lot more than i liked the stats part of it. Nah i landed up graduating with degrees statistics. During that time. I just did a ton of learning on my own. Did a lot of like could academy courses recode cam fluoro- site videos whole time. Packer rank exercises. I even read through twenty programming textbooks now on just java script html and just building stuff just trying to make little side project snack things together. And after i graduated from college. I landed my first programming job. So what was it about that stats class. And then getting into programming. That resonated with you so is taking ard says stats programming. Which are and it was really amazing. Nina we could like run simulations and experiments just for typing a few lines of co dried. We could run simulations of very simple things like let's flip the coin hundred times and see how many times it lands heads or tails or even just like data visualization like we have data set and using just a few lines of code. You could use like a stats package like something like g plot to create this beautiful chart. That was really cool that you could like essentially build something out of basically nothing

Undergrad Packer Nina
"nina" Discussed on Ageless

Ageless

02:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"nina" Discussed on Ageless

"This week. We have our friend nina. Agdal on the podcasts. You probably know her from sports illustrated but she is also a health and wellness guru. She has the doll method. Which is her fitness app and hosts classes in the hamptons. She is amazing. So we hope you guys love this episode as much as we loved her courting it and let us know your thoughts over on instagram. So let's just jump right into it with nina. I want to hear first about your health and wellness journey and how you first got into fitness. Oh my god. I mean dad journey honestly goes back to when i was so little like i grew up with a soccer dad like he trained my brother to to play soccer. My brother went semi pro and my family has always been so active like they were like you know. We weren't so into music or traveling like he was like playing sports like entering competitions. Always trying something new like my dad was like try something like if you're good at it continue doing it if you enjoy continue doing it but just keep trying new things so i basically grew up with that and started dancing. Competitively then started. Playing basketball again tried. Every single sport and played it started entering my teenage years where other things in life start happening like parties. And you know you wanna do other things than going to basketball games and dancing competitively. So i kinda like didn't do as many sports then. But that's when i was discovered to do modeling to and obviously modeling comes with a certain responsibility. Like i like to describe it. It's like you know you have to be a professional athlete. 'cause it's definitely moving towards the direction where the body and the sizing and the measurements are not as important thing god. We're getting there. But when i started. What is that thirteen years ago. It was not a thing where with okay to be like different sizes which is a completely different topic conversation. But that's when. I got into fitness where i really had to like. Educate myself on how to take care of my body which is also process. Because there's so many ways to do it like you know that just living in new york it's like there's a gym and a method and a right and a wrong way on every single corner and how to how to train yourself and how to get in shape and

nina nina. Agdal instagram this week first
Superhero/Supermodel Nina Agdal

Ageless

02:32 min | 3 weeks ago

Superhero/Supermodel Nina Agdal

"This week. We have our friend nina. Agdal on the podcasts. You probably know her from sports illustrated but she is also a health and wellness guru. She has the doll method. Which is her fitness app and hosts classes in the hamptons. She is amazing. So we hope you guys love this episode as much as we loved her courting it and let us know your thoughts over on instagram. So let's just jump right into it with nina. I want to hear first about your health and wellness journey and how you first got into fitness. Oh my god. I mean dad journey honestly goes back to when i was so little like i grew up with a soccer dad like he trained my brother to to play soccer. My brother went semi pro and my family has always been so active like they were like you know. We weren't so into music or traveling like he was like playing sports like entering competitions. Always trying something new like my dad was like try something like if you're good at it continue doing it if you enjoy continue doing it but just keep trying new things so i basically grew up with that and started dancing. Competitively then started. Playing basketball again tried. Every single sport and played it started entering my teenage years where other things in life start happening like parties. And you know you wanna do other things than going to basketball games and dancing competitively. So i kinda like didn't do as many sports then. But that's when i was discovered to do modeling to and obviously modeling comes with a certain responsibility. Like i like to describe it. It's like you know you have to be a professional athlete. 'cause it's definitely moving towards the direction where the body and the sizing and the measurements are not as important thing god. We're getting there. But when i started. What is that thirteen years ago. It was not a thing where with okay to be like different sizes which is a completely different topic conversation. But that's when. I got into fitness where i really had to like. Educate myself on how to take care of my body which is also process. Because there's so many ways to do it like you know that just living in new york it's like there's a gym and a method and a right and a wrong way on every single corner and how to how to train yourself and how to get in shape and

Nina Soccer Hamptons Basketball New York
Fanny Durack: The First Female Olympian To Take Home Gold

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:59 min | Last month

Fanny Durack: The First Female Olympian To Take Home Gold

"Francis durack better known as fanny was born on october. Twenty seventh eighteen eighty nine in sydney australia. She was the third daughter and sixth child in a big irish family. Her father thomas drac managed pub in town while her mother. Mary took care of fanny and her siblings. Fanny was not a natural swimmer. Her when she was nine years old fannies family went on vacation in the beachside town of coochie australia. While in the ocean. Fanny found herself fighting against the waves and struggling to get comfortable in the water instead of retreating and fear or discomfort vani made it her mission to teach yourself how to swim and she did that. Fannie trained in and mastered the breaststroke at the time that was the only style of swimming that had a championship for women when she was seventeen years old. She won her first state title as her abilities progressed. Fanny learned the trojan stroke and the australian crawl with these three styles. In her skill set she dominated the australian swimming seen her main. Competition was me no wiley. Nina beat fanny a few different events including the one hundred yard breaststroke at the australian swimming championships at rose. Bay as the nineteen twelve. Stockholm olympic games approached. There was discussion. About whether fanny and meena should attend the new south wales ladies amateur. Swimming association had a rule that forbade women to compete in arenas where men were present. The association believed it was immodest for a woman to be so scantily clad and the presence of men but fanny and meena's widespread success created enough public pressure. The association overturned the rule. Getting to the games was another hurdle. These were the first olympic games where women were allowed to compete in swimming.

Fanny Francis Durack Thomas Drac Coochie Australia Swimming Vani Sydney Fannie Australia Mary Swimming Association Meena Wiley Nina Olympic Games Stockholm South Wales
US Supreme Court Takes Major Case on Carrying Concealed Handguns

Q

00:57 sec | Last month

US Supreme Court Takes Major Case on Carrying Concealed Handguns

"Time in more than a decade, the U. S Supreme Court is headed for a major decision on gun rights. Court today, agreeing to take up a case testing how far a state may go in regulating whether an individual may carry a gun outside the home more from NPR's Nina Totenberg, 2000 and eight and 2010 the Supreme Court ruled for the first time that the Second Amendment right to bear arms guarantees the right to own a gun in one's home for self defense. But after that it was crickets on the subject of how far states may go in regulating guns now, with three trump appointees on the court and a new 6 to 3 conservative majority Long accepted gun regulations could be in real jeopardy For the first time. The case that the court has now granted will not be heard until the fall it tests in New York law that limits permits to carry a concealed gun outside the home. To those going hunting or to target practice and those who need protection like a bank messenger carrying cash

U. S Supreme Court Nina Totenberg NPR Supreme Court New York
Democrats to Introduce Bill to Expand Supreme Court From 9 to 13 Justices

NPR News Now

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Democrats to Introduce Bill to Expand Supreme Court From 9 to 13 Justices

"Has introduced a bill to expand the number of supreme court justices from nine to thirteen as npr's nina totenberg reports. The of justice has already been changed seven times but not since the civil war era. Progressive groups remain enraged at what they see as republican manipulation of the supreme court nomination process in order to give president trump to appointments to the court. I by blocking president obama's nominee to the supreme court for nearly a year and then by rushing through amy coney barrett's nomination just over a month after ruth bader ginsburg staff now faced with a six to three conservative majority on the court. Some liberal democrats are proposing a bill that would expand the court from nine to thirteen members but it has no chance of passage. Indeed house speaker. Nancy pelosi said she would not bring it up for a vote. She said she supports president. Biden's appointment of a commission to study the question nina totenberg. Npr news washington. This is npr news.

Nina Totenberg Supreme Court Amy Coney Barrett NPR Ruth Bader Ginsburg Barack Obama Nancy Pelosi Biden Washington
Asian American Business and Tech Leaders Raise Awareness

All Things Considered

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Asian American Business and Tech Leaders Raise Awareness

"And tech leaders are raising money and awareness for groups fighting violence against their communities. Hey, cuties, Nina Thorsen reports San Francisco Venture capitalists, Dave Lew said he wrote a letter to channel his anger and frustration after the Atlanta shootings, the targeted Asian Americans. He shared it with friends and now more than 1700. People have signed the letter, which appeared in the Wall Street Journal Wednesday morning. The effort. It's putting forth called Stand with Asian Americans intends to raise $10 million to help document hate crimes, provide legal help for victims and research, the causes and solutions of anti Asian racism. The group includes founders and executives from Zoom YouTube Door Dash, Pinterest Stitch, Fix and Pellet on. I'm Nina

Nina Thorsen San Francisco Venture Dave Lew Atlanta Wall Street Journal Zoom Pinterest Youtube Nina
Biden judicial nominees represent diverse professional backgrounds, identities

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Biden judicial nominees represent diverse professional backgrounds, identities

"Announced his first slate of judicial nominees, making clear he intends to fulfill his campaign pledge Ray more diverse federal bench. NPR's Nina Totenberg explains. Nine of the 11 nominees are women and nine are people of color. The nominees are also far more diverse in their professional experience, their public defenders as well as prosecutors with long experience in both civil and criminal law practice here in Washington, the president named Catan, G. Brown, Jackson and African American Trial Court Judge You feel the appeals court seat vacated by Attorney General Merrick Garland. She was on President Obama short list for the Supreme Court in 2016 and is often mentioned now as a contender should a vacancy occur. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington Less than a

Nina Totenberg NPR African American Trial Court RAY G. Brown Attorney General Merrick Garla Catan Washington Jackson President Obama Supreme Court
Pandemic Has Many Small Museums At Risk Of Closing Permanently

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Pandemic Has Many Small Museums At Risk Of Closing Permanently

"Has devastated the art sector and hundreds of small museums are trying to keep from having to close forever. Here's NPR's Nina Kravinsky. One of the largest collections of paintings from Harlem. Renaissance artist Palmer C. Hayden is on the third floor of a Macy's and alleys. Crenshaw District We are pretty small, Museum Micro Museum, hyper local and community based museum. That's key should do, Miss Heath. The director of the African American Art Museum that's tucked away on the top floor of the department store. Their doors have been closed for over a year, even though the Macy's has been open for most of that time. Because it's classified is retail under Al is reopening plan, but the museum is an entertainment space. So that means no gift shop sales, no events and no visitors wandering up and leaving a donation while they're there. In the usual year that money fuels a lot of their programming, and we don't run very well on empty this past year, they've had to rely on grants and donations to keep from closing their doors for good. They're not

Nina Kravinsky Palmer C. Hayden Crenshaw District Museum Micro Museum Miss Heath African American Art Museum Macy NPR Harlem AL
Supreme Court Set To Hear Case Pitting Unions Against Agricultural Business

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Supreme Court Set To Hear Case Pitting Unions Against Agricultural Business

"U. S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case that pits the rights of farm workers and labor unions against large agricultural employers in California. As NPR's Nina Totenberg reports. At issue was a state law enacted nearly half a century ago that allows union organizer's some limited access to farms to seek support for unionizing the workers. The growers who are challenging the law, contend that by giving union organizer's a limited right of access to workers on site during break times, The state is authorizing an unconscious tutu Schimmel trespass on the growers private property. This is not the first time the California law has reached the Supreme Court in 1976. After the state Supreme Court rejected a similar claim from the growers. The U. S Supreme Court declined to take up the case. But now, with a far more conservative high court in place, the growers are trying again, and it's significant that the justices have agreed to hear the case. Nina Totenberg, NPR NEWS Washington This

U. S. Supreme Court Nina Totenberg Tutu Schimmel NPR California Supreme Court U. S Supreme Court Washington
Amy Burle Captures the Complexities of Love and Family in The Year of Thorns and Honey

Charlotte Readers Podcast

05:49 min | 3 months ago

Amy Burle Captures the Complexities of Love and Family in The Year of Thorns and Honey

"In today's up so visit amy willoughby burly author of the year of thorns and honey a standalone companionship. Debut the lemonade year. The second chance romance falls photographer nina as she navigates the messy and imperfect intricacies of the relationships in her life her rebellious teenage daughter. Her ex husband fiance or complicated family. Ammann's she wants loved and most important of all herself. The reemerges for rex love or sort of reflect on our past and ask some hard questions about our future with debut flawed characters and david pros the year of thornton. Hunt is an exploration of the universal desire to find your true path. Bell adams author of the good luxton had this to say about the book. The year of thornton honey. Amy willoughby burly s crafted a warm heartfelt story of second chances exploring how we move forward in grace stunning emotional psychological depth the novels engaging characters wrestle with decisions large and small and discover starting over can be the most meaningful gift of all. You'll be drawn in by nina's charming voice ended up falling in love with her honest vulnerability and earnest desire to choose the best path. Any welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me. Yeah so a s- could have you on the show. Congratulations on the book. Thank you now a little bit about you before we get started here with the book You grew up in a small coastal town thing. It's cure north carolina and jerry. All the that always things with the that you say security hurly-burly you started writing it East carolina university and you now writer and teacher living in asheville With your husband for children. And so how does how does Being raised in a small town And the life that you're leading inform your writing and and particularly the book book of thorns. Yeah i loved growing up in in kerry beach. It was ideally in. Every way. And i think i do still have that small town Sensibility of family and neighborhood and community and that definitely informs my writing the year thornton. Honey is sort of unofficially set in asheville. I i don't name it as as asheville but Locals and folks who've been would certainly recognize some of the places and i think that just the sense of of community and family It really informs how i ride as as opposed to you know. I don't tend to set things in in big cities. Ashville is actually a pretty small town A really cool town but a pretty small one and so i. Yeah i definitely think that you know when. I'm when i'm crafting a story. I'm really thinking about the the characters and And how they how they function within their whole community are saw Emmy right Sort of about the mystery and wonder of life as you say and it's Contemporary fiction that focuses on these themes of second chances redemption and finding the beauty and the world around us. And i'm curious to what draws you to these things i think that on drawn to those particular themes of of second chances and redemption and learning how to see the the beauty in the around us because it's such a universal set of of themes. I think everyone is going through. You know that kind of thing. We're all making mistakes and hoping that we're given second chances. We're looking for forgiveness and very often in situations where we're called to forgive others And the the beauty in the world around us. I think sometimes we get so wrapped up in things that aren't going well or especially two thousand twenty the way we wish things were that we very often don't stop to take stock of of the things that that are wonderful and the the small beauties especially i think is is really what draws me is is the the small things that that make our live special. So what kind of teaching a year engaged in. Oh gosh i have. I think i have the best teaching job ever. I teach mostly creative writing and some literature to middle school and high school. Kids through a program called elevate life and art which is a home school enrichment program. So i have very small classes but I'm lucky enough to have classes filled with students who really want to learn to write and students really love to read. So it's the it's the best of all worlds. As far as a teacher is concerned really engage students. And who really love the subject. And and i feel really lucky. I've got some kids in my writing classes. That are just amazing. I feel like i'm i'm seeing. The you know the the the little middle school faces of people that will be on the shelves and in the future. Some some really wonderful talent and and i'm i'm happy to be part of their journey when when i started writing i was in that same age but You know typically in school. You don't really get that opportunity to to to write creatively in your classroom. So i'm i'm happy that they have that in and hoping that that it will keep those fires lit for them

Amy Willoughby Ammann Bell Adams Luxton Asheville Thornton Honey Nina Thornton Kerry Beach East Carolina University REX Ashville Jerry North Carolina David Emmy
U.S. Stimulus Checks Start to Land in Bank Accounts

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 3 months ago

U.S. Stimulus Checks Start to Land in Bank Accounts

"May be some money from the government there. Now. Over the weekend, The first of those $1400 stimulus payments started showing up in people's accounts theorists has the job of sending them out yet another project for the agency right in the middle of tax season, NPR's Brian Naylor reports. It's been a rough decade or so, for the I. R. S budgets were slashed. There was a hiring freeze and a loss of workers. Tony reared in as president of the National Treasury Employees Union, which represents many I R s workers Since 2000 and 10 the iris has lost nearly 33,000. Employees. It makes it very difficult for the agency to do its tax work when you know they've lost more than 20% of the workforce. Then a year ago, the Corona virus pandemic hit the filing deadline for 2019 taxes was extended to July and the I. R S is still behind in processing those returns. And now, with the 2020 filing season underway, the agency has new responsibilities. It needs to issue the latest stimulus payments to some 85% of American households, according to President Biden and implement other provisions as well. It is big task on top of filing season. As well as the other stimulus measures that were put in place by the bill that Samantha Jacoby she's with the nonprofit center on budget and Policy Priorities, She says the Iris will get some help in the bill and infusion of $1.4 billion to modernize the agency's 50 year old software platform. The IRAs knows how big of a task this is and how important it is. They've got this big infusion of funding, which is really important. There could be some hiccups. But the Iris is working really hard to get this relief to people. The IRA says it's reviewing the just past, Billa spokesman telling NPR the measure is a really heavy lift in some respects. Nina Olson, a former taxpayer advocate at the agency, says the iris should be pretty well prepared to issue the stimulus payments. I think that the stimulus checks are the least of their worries in this Sense that they've done this twice for in the last 12 months. They have the programming in place for most of it. Certainly with the December around, they showed how quickly they could respond, but also says another provision of the measure could be a bit more complicated. It's the new monthly child tax credit of up to $300 per child that Democrats included in the bill. Which the I R. S is going to have to figure out how to implement its A new pro. Graham. It requires monthly payments. Although the issuance of monthly payments is to me the least of their worries. It's are you paying out the money to the right people, you know if the child is moved to somebody else's household Or another child is added, and another provision in the bill, which makes unemployment insurance payments. Tax exempt for many Americans is a further complication. Many taxpayers have already filed their 2020 returns and may have paid taxes. They no longer Oh, says Samantha Jacoby. The good news is starting last year. The Iris will now allow people who want to amend returns to do so. Elektronik Lee, which wasn't the case in the past, and that might make it a little bit easier for some people, But she says it's clearly a big challenge for the I. R. S to carry out. All that's been put on its plate with the new legislation, and it's going to take some time. Brian Naylor. NPR News, the first Western country to get

Brian Naylor National Treasury Employees Un Samantha Jacoby President Biden NPR Nonprofit Center On Budget And Billa Nina Olson Tony IRA Graham Elektronik Lee Npr News
What a WoW virtual outbreak taught us about how humans

Science Friday

11:51 min | 3 months ago

What a WoW virtual outbreak taught us about how humans

"Hit last year, people reacted in different ways from complete denial to volunteering to help others. Some people flouted the rules, while others didn't leave the house, and some even used it as an excuse to hurl racist insults and physically assault other people. These actions may have seemed unpredictable. But a group of epidemiologists was not surprised They'd seen this all play out in another pandemic in 2005. One that happened online in a video game called World of Warcraft, players there became infected with the virus due to a glitch in the software. Side fry producer Daniel Peter Smith is here to talk more about that. Hey, Daniel. Hey, John. So briefly. What is World of Warcraft for those who don't know? Yeah, it's one of the biggest online multiplayer games of all time. It's been around since 2004 and basically you're playing in this huge medieval fantasy environment with millions of other people across the world. You can play as an orc made warrior. That kind of thing so kind of dnd stuff. On Deacon, explore the world and fight monsters and go on quest with other people I've heard about it never played myself that this m pretty cool. So how did this all start with the epidemic in the game? Yes. So in 2005 Blizzard, the company who makes world of Warcraft they created a new challenge. And basically was you go to this one area you battle of big villain, which is called a bus. This big snake demon thing that would cast a spell on you. That gave you a kind of infection, And this infection was called corrupted blood and the small basically, just like slowly sapped your health away while you were fighting it. It would obviously affect you in battle. But once you defeated the boss, you could like go out into the main world and you're basically non infected anymore so individual players could get infected while battling the boss. But then how did the spread the other players? Great question. So there was a bug in the software where if you had a pet with you can have these like companion pets. Your pet would also get affected on when you left the area and went back to the main world. Pet continued to carry the corrupted blood infection, and it would spread it to other players and other characters in the game, and they would slowly die. So this is basically a computer virus that was acting like a real virus, right? And this sparked the interest of some epidemiologists who happen to be playing the game at the time, and I talked to Eric Molinski about this. He's the host of the podcast called Imaginary Worlds. Which is a show about how we create these worlds and where we suspend our disbelief. And he reported the story about this outbreak and how studying virtual epidemics can teach us how to deal with real ones. And I started by asking Eric how the virus started to spread in the world, and he told me that in a virtual world, it spreads very easily and very quickly. In the real medieval world, you know, plague would would travel about as fast as it is the horse But you know, in this magical medieval world, you can teleport back to cities. And a lot of these cities have what we call in PCs non playing characters, so it could be like a shopkeeper or guard or, you know, just sort of townsfolk in the background. But they all got infected with this thing. So they were walking around, infecting everybody else. A symptomatically, which is also a very weird thing, which has been which is not supposed to happen. And so that's another way that they disease spread really quickly and like did you have to be like really close to them toe like actually get it like how it works with Cho. But, yeah, Yeah, You definitely need to be close to get to get to them. And also, you know, the longer you play in the game, the more sort of health and wealth you build up. So you you could almost be like the NPC is where you feel. It's equivalent of you have a cough. You know when people get Coben and they say, Oh, it wasn't that bad. It was just like a mild flu. Or maybe somebody has access to, you know, very, very high and medicine. You know, it's different from some of the lower level players that people that just don't have the time to invest that much into their characters and build up. That health and those people were just getting wiped out like crazy, and you would really get sick. I mean, you would just listen. I like about the blood would come out of it wasn't it Wasn't like you just sort of like turned into a skeleton and disappeared. Yeah, that is pretty graphic. So this country attention of some epidemiologists in effect, Furman, who at the time was at Princeton and Eric Lofgren. So they were gamers. Also, they were like, also in World War craft at the time. Yeah, What was fascinating to them was not exactly the way that the virus spread in the game as much as the way people reacted to it, because his epidemiologists they would often do you know models try to figure out how are people going to behave on economist have talked about this lately to that for so long. They're mathematical models would assume that in any situation People would behave what they were considered to be rationally and so with world of Warcraft, Here's a virtual environment where most these characters are being controlled by real people, which meant that they could study the behavior in real time as to how people reacted in the situation like this. It was really fasting to them because they were reacting in ways that no mathematical model would have predicted. Yeah. Can you describe those reactions into some of the amazing similarities to hell? That epidemic mirrored our real life pandemic? No. Sure, So has the menu before the sort of subset of players who were inadvertently responsible for spreading the disease were hunters who they're, you know, they're digital pets got infected, So there was a lot of sort of scapegoating against these, You know hunters, and I mean, it's a much, much more serious situation, real world. But there's a lot of anti Asian racism that you know, immediately started when covert 19 came to the U. S. It is still going on today. There were fake cures being spread around and just Ton of misinformation and conspiracy theories. People thought the company of Blizzard had created it on purpose. Or maybe there was some disgruntled employee who had created it. It was very hard to get correct information in the sea of misinformation. Another thing that was really interesting was that there were people that were good Samaritans people with very high health points. You know, people had a lot of health and wanted to help use their you know, go into infected areas and use magical spells to cure people, But very often they overestimated how healthy there Characters were and then they would get infected well, and then you know, there's a subject you've talked about before on the show Briefers. Um, you know, in this case, you know, it's people that basically have very troll ish behavior online, and there are people that would actually go up and try to infect other people, Which you know doesn't happen very often. You very rarely hear stories about that. But actually, Blizzard wanted people to do social distancing. But you know, in a video game where the whole point is that you get to interact with other people through their avatars. Social distancing is not a fun way to play the game. And they were just a lot of people that simply didn't care. People are flooding the rules. People were being jerks, and then the other people who are taking it very seriously. We're upset, and we're just saying, you know, you're ruining the game for us. This is not a joke for us. And that kind of conflict in terms of you know how seriously do you take it from? How much do you follow the rules? That, you know, had a lot of interesting parallels as well. How How long did the epidemic last in World of Warcraft and how many players got infected? Unless for about a week, which obviously compared to what we've been through doesn't sound like much, but so at the time World War craft had about 6.5 million players around the world and over half of them. About four million were affected by the virus. So it was huge. I mean, you had to just kind of like, you know, escape to a virtual mountain top and let your character just sit there for the whole week. You go to your your virtual cabin in the woods if you wanted to avoid. This thing or just not log on which obviously for you, cos disastrous, All right. It's like, oh, boy. Time to go to the top of a mountain. Do nothing. My favorite game log back in and see if my character is still staring at the sky so the virus is spreading in the game. There's like unchecked spread. People are traveling all over the place, and eventually, things like Stop mirroring. Reality as I understand it, because unlike reality, World War craft has an all powerful game developer named Blizzard, right? Yeah. I mean, this is the thing where you know you wish you were living in a virtual world. They took control of the whole thing there. First. They tried to put in a bunch of patches to stop the virus and that wasn't working, And eventually they had to just reboot the whole system. Yeah. So one of the things I thought was really fascinating about your episode is that the epidemiologists really anticipated this wave of noncompliant behavior that popped up with our current pandemic. I'm going to play this clip from your podcast, imaginary worlds. Epidemiologist Eric Lofgren talking about that, and I think one of the things that we're seeing in parallel is a lot of people don't take infection seriously, if it is not personally a risk for them. So you see a lot of people talking about Corona virus, and I'm like, Well, I'm young. I'm healthy. The mortality rate isn't that high for me. So why should I care? And I think in the corrupted blood case There was a lot of that similar thing where, you know, Okay, This is bad if you're high level, but it's not all that big a deal. But like the server is being destroyed by this epidemic. The economy has been crippled. Everybody can we cooperate for a little bit and get rid of this? Is, I think, sort of the important parallel there. Yeah, it's just incredibly important that epidemiologists are not taken by surprise. To some extent. I mean, obviously they're surprising things about it, but it was not a complete shock to them. And I think because this kind of began to lay the groundwork for epidemiologist understand that people are not going to react like mathematical models and It's an important part of their messaging as well to the public is to is to anticipate that this is gonna happen and again, not be surprised by it. Yeah, we've had quite a few epidemiologist on the show over the past year. And it's almost like they have to be kind of part medical scientist Part social scientist It seems like yeah, they're really inseparable. And again, I've noticed, you know, economists over the years have been talking about this as well that too often that they based things off of these sort of mathematical ideas of what people will do, and people are obviously ah, lot more complicated. It's ironic that what seems like kind of virtual people You know, even though they're controlled by real people is is kind of what made them realize that Do you know what direction was like to this paper when it came out? And if it in the paper had any impact in the scientific community, especially in covert, so was I Guess it is huge. I'm in the paper when when the paper came out, it was huge. Eric Glass granted. Nina for vermin give a lot of talks. It was generally very, very well received paper people were pretty fast in and buy it, and it's and and had a really fun. You know, element do it in terms of video game that I imagine a lot of epidemiologist papers. Don't you know? Don't have so What do you take away from the story after you finished working on it? Well, the thing that I really thought about a lot was what counts is human contact to some extent, you know, that's so interesting to watch. These people interact virtually through this, you know, in in this virtual world because we've all been doing that over the last year. In a way we've all become Maura like players in a video game, you know where we have You know, even when you're on zoom. I mean, you're sort of constantly watching yourself on zoom and it's like there is kind of an avatar version of me that's interacting in this virtual world. And I just I feel like in a way, the whole world has become more like the world of work Craft. Over the last year, and I really began to see that coming when I worked on this episode, and so it's kind of played out exactly the way I thought.

Daniel Peter Smith Eric Lofgren Blizzard Eric Molinski Coben Deacon CHO Furman NPC Daniel Cough Eric Princeton FLU John Eric Glass Nina Maura
"nina" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"nina" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Nina, Huh? Whoever exit does nothing they say is focusing calls. Jessica must forget about me. And that's just the way God, Carrie and Tell it to me last year. Many fish have it last You say find unanimously you'll see limitless giggles is my respect. You never call you Never. Toto. Trouble his thing the same thing. Good, Okay stores. Hey, listen, e know what you like about it? You let me know. Both of you, Bobby necessity. Illness, like Get in line with my ex Beatles. Love entices people. Single moms, music. I must tell you that, you know, let's settle this garden was happy to see you in school, every evil a banana, those Zs, but I'll take it to go hosts.

Jessica Nina Beatles last year Both Bobby Toto God Single
Interview With JC Escudero

Pool Pro Podcast

04:38 min | 3 months ago

Interview With JC Escudero

"We have jc eskandar today. Who is the owner of j designed pool and spy. He's be builder extraordinary. The orange county area. I believe jaycees at right around metro. La okay yes so. We're excited to talk to handle because we're gonna talk about pre startups today. How you prepare for these startup. Thanks j. c. For coming on today we appreciate it. You're welcome thanks for inviting me appreciate it absolutely. so dave. what are we concerned about with with pre startups. I know this is the topic that is close to your your heart in regards to make your service guys know what's up a service guy. I i really appreciate working with builders who gives more thought to getting off the ground the right way so many times in in my career Get a phone call in the builder. Just said well the bulls ball get over here when you can and yet they're both will adjust the water spout Equipment hasn't been started. And i think really. We need to work closer together. Builders and service people whether the builder does Does it himself. Or whenever he turns it over to a service person it needs to be better coordinated in jc. I know feels very strongly about that but getting off to a good start is critical. The what's going to happen the rest of the light of the bull so what we really wanted to talk about. What jaycee day. He had some great ideas of what needs to be done and coordinated between the builder and the service tech leading up to plaster day. How do we get own ready to start up. It's gone through sometimes years of construction process. At least months the homeowners chomping at the bit to get in get all these people off his property so he can have it back to themselves and this is step one of the process that gets him where he wants to be. Think casey exactly end up. As dave mentioned it's also what the plaster quarries expecting as well because because of it or not. i think it's a three way Not only the builder making sure. He's construction skills and he's determined to lever shell that it's probably i mean perfectly breadth or the blast crew to really work and do an excellent job and at the same time the service technician service company or wherever sticking care that will has the tools and knows exactly how old that transition works The elder is not there or the plaster crew. They usually they're just hired to do that Very few companies nina house last circle because it's just tremendous are loaded work unless it's a blessing company does just that but in general speaking. It's really only you know the transition between those and that's that's the the real in nutshell those three three moving parts that i need to work together day. Yes so how how far in advance of actual plaster day do we start to prepare for the startup. and let's start with. Yeah that's that's a great question in my opinion really starts if it is a near new construction from the excavation and i say they'll sings because a lot of the times either service technician or the blaster crew do not know where the problem is or how. How did we got here into this problem. If they don't understand where that he should came from an a lot of times. The excavation was not supervised properly and they may have you know on not enough room for the steel to go properly or the allegation is off. You're going to have problems. You know Servicing deadpool bull because the blogger will have to put this the the schemer or lines too low to high and all those little details. Sep start to add

Dave Orange County Jaycee Bulls Nina House Casey
Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

03:45 min | 4 months ago

Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

"Hi my name is. And i'm a final year english literature student at the university of bristol. And my spare time. I also freelance. And i've written articles for the telegraph the times the independent huffington post what is regional papers and i also am features editor of the top bristol So the last two years being jewish student has been quite hard at university of bristol as a result of elektra a sociology professor called professor dave Because in his class he teaches and matic conspiracy theories about jewish organizations. He has a lecture in his home against powerful module where he accuses zionism as being one of the five pillars phobia and he implies using this sort of weighed conspiratorial web that israel on british jewish organizations have a malign influence on british government. And sort of in that slide. He touches on a series of consoles tropes about jewish people and two years ago. My best friend nina freedman. Who was then president of bristol. Jason is now you diaz president-elect made a complaint against david miller on years later in the university still hasn't done anything about it and hasn't advised or supported jewish students in any way but the situation picked up again. I'm a week or two weeks ago. Because david millar appeared in a video where he said that zionism we must cool front end design. Ism were in. He touched on several of the anti semitic tropes of course it really is of course some people into target to join us at in relation to this community in particular done. This through interfaith were pretending that jesus was working together. We'll be an apolitical way of countries. Ism stylings though. It's is the horse for normalizing zionism in the community. I in islamic mosque for example where. The mosque unknowingly held this project of chicken soup with a together. This is really backed project to normalize is within the muslim community. And they're doing that time. During the attack on cobra on this sort of started a new upper on twitter and reaganite hit the movement to get david miller removed from bristol. University campus clinician nasty. Seeing jews everywhere even in loction soup made in mosques while bashing corbin the share arrogance of this man and in one glib soundbite he opposes generations and generations of jewish teaching centuries of daily prayers which users sites to return to. Zion is car us special envoy in combating antisemitism until january. Twenty twenty one. Sinus didn't start in nineteen forty eight zionism spring out of the first zionist cows. Zionism was born in russia. When god says to abraham go forth to a land that i will show you. Zionism reached its consummation in the exodus. When moses let the jewish people to the promised land and zionism found one of its clearest expression

University Of Bristol Professor Dave Because Nina Freedman David Miller Matic Elektra Huffington Post David Millar Bristol The Times Diaz Israel Jason Jesus Corbin Twitter Zion Abraham Russia United States
Supreme Court won't stop grand jury from getting Trump's tax returns

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Supreme Court won't stop grand jury from getting Trump's tax returns

"At the Supreme Court today when Justice is in a one sentence order. Often places Syria's of grand jury subpoenas for his business and financial records, including 10. Years of tax returns more from NPR's Nina Totenberg in 2019. The New York D A. Convened a grand jury in Manhattan to investigate allegations that Trump paid off porn stars Stormy Daniels and other women to keep them quiet. During the 2016 presidential campaign, but the investigation soon morphed into much more a probe of Trump's personal and business finances. Now, for the second time, the Supreme Court has rebuffed Trump's effort to block the investigation. Courts. One sentence order means Trump will have to produce a wide swath of information that could lead to criminal or civil charges he blasted. The court's action is a continuation of what he called the greatest political witch hunt in the country's history. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS

Nina Totenberg Donald Trump Supreme Court Stormy Daniels Syria NPR Manhattan New York Npr News
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 4 months ago

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:07 min | 4 months ago

Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

"It's been a crazy. Eight months herself is being crazy as being busy. Yeah and i've appreciated time at home and being able to have time to myself. Reflect more of john when you were say a lot of time to research the excited about a very eventful few months but today we're here to talk about sneakers. what makes an amazing sneaker. And what makes an amazing sneaker launch air. Dior or shoe which we have right here. It's like the most sought after sneaker in the world right now. yeah. I've been scouring the internet to kind of see what people are saying and how much they cost and you know it's crazy how quickly they've accelerated price. I wanted to start with your own relationship with sneakers because it goes back a long time. This is not a trend. You just jumped on. I mean most people who know me know that i started out working at a company called gimme five whereas college but before that when a student also at school nyc for me was the absolute must have an odd save off and dish. Dishwasher governed by pair of sneakers and people have michael jordan with the heroes and just everyone was wearing sneakers. Me and my friends would chip into bypass to share them and share parents of have jordan. Fives that were on. Discount in place in brighton that we bought a we went and three as on them now. Forty five pounds and we chipped by them and then we take them in terms of obviously make sure no one stood on them and sick have never allowed to go out anywhere teaching them and it was just you. Nuts is the design. It was just like it was a cult thing. It became colton. You know we both got these which the first one of the first has jordan's in the white and gray which is the basis for the ed your and the ideal thing was really dickel t and i've had a contract with nike for quite few years. And then they taught me about being jordan. And as i really love to do with your because they've never done and luxury house with georgian collaborations. I would take italian at you know jordan with the dior factories and really make something special and exciting. And it's really you know it was solid. Where do you want jordan's that was really how it started as bit selfish so before we get into the actual kind of design of the shoe. Because i think there's a lot of thought that goes into that. Of course the jordan one for the uninitiated amongst us. I think sneaker has called it the aj one. Why is that such an important shoe. Silhouette i think is just such design. Classic infamy you does periods in history. Whether it's been shoes. Come out like this on the air. Max ninety five that just speak to people and they speak to a generation of people for me. I didn't have the original pair of these because they a bit too young for them and they really out of my price range and they weren't so easy to get the uk. And then as i started going to japan as i graduated i started collecting fares what i think the first bought seven bucks in a flea market and then to visit a friend where does student and that was kind of to shake shaking. You just they just become infectious shots at me. Now you just love to design it so joining a club. I guess so. When you're thinking about designing a shoe that has to balance effectively three different brands right. Young jordan has its own brand completely new operated separately with its own team. Then there's night key which obviously is like gave birth to the jordan. There's there's three iconic brands so when you're when you're when you're designing a shoe and you have to balance the dna. Three brees was really like we need to netflix. Because that's one of the criterias of deal is significant advance. We knew the letter had to be sourced. We knew we wanted to have the finishings. Made like bag would be made. So you have the edge painting. You have the way that things are hand finished in the sewing. The oblique here is made specific size just the jordan and it scaled per size of georgian. And you have again. You have on the tongue which is a new technique that we developed an inside the leather so units inside which they did have the normal jordan and inside. I have the numbers or these are the ones from the miami share. Whichever forty has them and really making them for people that would appreciate something and understand the croft now in consumption when you talked about fashion. I'm very aware of numbers and craft being important people. I think young people are learning by nets and they won't buy things last longer for me. Doing things like this was something being a limited number of things but it's creates excitement. There were only thirteen. Thousand pairs of shoes made but there's also a whole bunch of other skews in the collection which may be the as much. Yeah i mean. We've mentioned what we michael jordan's wore jay. But he was because he was the coolest guy and it was like he will seats all the time and we were looking at we made of his clothes and then we had to call them present it all to him which was kind of because he sees everything can approves everything jordan. What was that like. I mean he was super lovely. And i get in chicago. We went to do the don't it was like. I was really impressed that he was to be honest. That's the cage stream isn't it. I guess it was. He was just radiant. He's and you want to keep them the stuff so we can keep it and travis was there and he was reading into it so you know promise travis he'd be one of the people have it and it was just it was. It was an appreciation for each other. That was the thing that was nice about. What did you have to see to the powers that via d. or to get them. I mean they've never done nothing like that. I had to piatra use my ceo and we have extremely good relationship. And i was like. I really want to do this. What you think it nina. He's in his twenties and he was thought it was cool idea who grew up here as per say that was pretty easy to do in nyc. Nike was little bit but then they got into. It was his reading managing expectations of everybody in the right

Jordan Gimme Five Whereas College Dickel Max Ninety Michael Jordan Young Jordan Colton Brighton NYC Nike John Netflix Japan UK Miami Travis JAY Chicago Nina
Florida man charged with COVID relief fraud

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Florida man charged with COVID relief fraud

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting a Florida man is charged with cold food relief fraud a Florida man has been indicted by a federal grand jury up to fraud in the paycheck protection program of more than seven million dollars federal prosecutors allege forty five year old don sister Nina received more than seven point two million dollars in corona virus relief funds by concocting hundreds of non existent employees on loan applications prosecutors say sister Dino claimed that is New York business had four hundred forty one employees but the company's only employees may have been sister Nino and his girlfriend and no wages were reported to the IRS in twenty nineteen sister Tina was charged with two counts of wire fraud three counts of aggravated identity theft and three counts of illegal monetary transactions hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Florida Nina Corona Dino Nino New York IRS Tina Mike Rossio
"nina" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"nina" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"Just wanted to remind you to keep all hands arms legs inside your vehicle. The reason i say that is because sometimes things can get so hilarious that you might be full lapin about and don't do it stay calm. Stay seated stay buckled up. It's the law. I got really stood at the end. There hey guys it's stephan. I know that you can choose many other podcast. But i wanted to thank you for choosing a comedy advice podcast. Isn't that a little desperate of airlines to say. You think we know that you. Can you have multiple options when you but thank you for choosing american. I don't know if i said that to a girlfriend. I know you have multiple choices when you fuck. Thank you for choosing. Stephan they might. That's just presenting the idea for them to four cate with others. It's opening up you're giving them a scintilla of a fantasy so hello good morning or good day to l. view a good night. I am so excited. That's why i'm rambling and i'm excited. Because i have a very special episode for you with my guest nina g. She's a comedian. She is a person who stutters. she's a speaker. she is an author. This nina is so freaking smart. And i was so happy to get her on my podcast. She is such a warm loving smart funny person. Oh got so. Many adjectives rolled into one. And this big ball of entertainment is going to be. Maybe i shouldn't refer to. My guests is a big ball of entertainment. She's an absolutely incredible person. And so i get to talk with a little bit about people who stutter stuttering education. Her book which is fantastic. Stutterer interrupted so. Then we get into some advice. It is just an awesome episode. And you guys are gonna enjoy it if you like what you hear. Police support her follower on instagram by her book. Stutterer interrupted and follow her support..

Stephan Stutterer nina g
"nina" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"nina" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Mean you do? I. Don't know you very well but you do strike me as someone who is managing a certain amount of awkwardness in social situations and the temptation is to assume that's why you. Manage Your interactions with your audience via characters and via the puppets. Yeah. I. Definitely. Prefer it. There's far too much storm of vulnerability in my own face, and then I just have that monkey whose face is so solid and unchanging you can project anything onto it and he can deliver a line with such gravitas. That's just the perfect vehicle for me as soon as that came along I thought off. Thank God. He can do it. Is Very. Nice. Because not only is his exterior. Lot Steadier than mine. I feel like the place he speaks from in my own head is sort of deep under all the waves. It's quieted down there too and I don't know where it is what it is or if you put me in an MRI machine, if you would see a bit light up, that's monkey I don't know how it manages to speak from somewhere bit lower and calmer. Yeah. But it doesn't exist completely alongside the Nina the you mean conversation I think when people hear. Performers explaining things like that. They sort of think. Oh, you're just pretending you're not that nervous you can get on stage and do it. So stop pretending that it's your sort of magically accessing this confident part of you via the Monkey. No, I don't believe you know what I mean. Well, I mean, I think the opposite of what people think I. Think people are more often telling me we're not telling me but goading me like but you can do it yourself could you? Know. But. The but you could do it. I. Mean someone saying you could do it well, maybe they think that. But. I mean, everybody's a bit braver behind some kind of mask whether it's. Internet or whatever it is. People are more bold. So it's just an extension really of.

Nina
"nina" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

07:20 min | 8 months ago

"nina" Discussed on Toure Show

"You worked really closely with senator. . Bernie Sanders on <hes> this last presidential run why do you think he lost? ? He was leading Close to the end and then everything stopped away. Why . do you think he lost? ? Control of things there's never any one thing is you and I both know. . When it comes to elections a certainly senator one Iowa is the popular vote people still. . Debate that's going to throw that in there and we won. . New Hampshire and we one Nevada in a fan five fashion in multicultural fashion, , which was so exciting for this campaign, , and then we get to South Carolina and beings change be part of it. . Certainly was the the coalescence of the moderate wing of the Democratic Party. I . mean I don't think it's any accident that. . Mr Bujak got out of the race he was poll and really not just Poland his performance was us doing well, , I think he was number two at that point in time and you got. . Senator Senator Kosher got out of the race. . So a lot of that coalescing of the moderate ruin going into South Carolina had an. . Impact on our campaign? ? Yeah. . I mean with <hes> Pete and amy, , was there a third candidate they all who's third candidate and and don't forget I mean Congressman Clyburn you know put down in South Carolina he he was a really important. . He's extremely important but <hes> with Pete and amy dropping out <hes>. . So close to Super Tuesday, , it really changed the whole trajectory of the race. . Are you supporting Biden. . One of those I know that trump must go. . So it is a binary choice at this point. . anti-trump. . That's. . I mean I found myself just to be anti trump story because so many people are anti trump me that's really the Democratic Party's platform which I think is really the wrong way to go is it's it's you have to give people something to vote for two years. . Later when fighting against neo-fascism no doubt. . That point right there you have to give people something to vote for is sort of the core of the argument that I've been having with other Democrats throughout this whole process that a lot of people are saying we just want to get rid of trump and I'm like I'm Ashley with you but we also need to give voters something to vote for and in a moment when so many people are saying anybody but trump, , why would you then go with a moderate? ? WHO's you know? ? Toward the middle of the scale when you could say, , okay, , let's then really change things in have a progressive who's truly going to have a revolution. . Inquiry. Mayes . wanted notes. . Recount election I asked myself those questions a lot of course, , many people reach out to me. . They have the same questions especially because of the moment that we're in Kovic is exposed all the fisa jurors in our system it was already broken. . A lot of people were already having a pan on regular basis. . You know if you are black and poor if you're white and pork Brown and. . Poor I mean if you just pour this pandemic, , just revealed in a deeper way which you went through what you are going through every single day, , and so you're right to combat somebody like Mr trump it takes his antithesis and I cannot even tell you how many folks since the primary have said to me. . You know what s t you guys right because what Medicare for all having Fifty million in climate people who've lost their jobs and we know that healthcare for example is tied to one's employment. . He got people who lost their jobs no fault of their own, , a pet pandemic it they lost their job and Bingo. . Now they lost their employer sponsored healthcare. . So unless they're blessed enough to have a spouse or partner who has healthcare they. . Right. . So yeah it just doesn't make sense and push a moderate at this time when people need boldness the thing that bothers me about. . What so much of this is I feel like it's a trade off in that a lot of people said Biden will get other people read. . Suburban Republicans right. . They will vote for bided and thus you sort of move the overton window over to the democratic. . Party. . Is kind of trying to make sure that Republicans are happy feeling comfortable to join the Democratic Party at least this one's. . Rather than saying, , we have these progressives don't take them for granted. . Give them something. . Right. . But you know the Republican Party doesn't think about things that way they don't try to win Democratic voters but we're trying to win them over and and. . In the success of a Biden. . True. . Democrats. . The democratic wing of the democratic. . Party. . Loses out because even if he wins if his if his win is thanks to what the fringe of Republicans did in terms of coming across the over, , then he doesn't need to pay attention to us and progressive issues he needs to pay into what they need. . That's exactly right. . The way you run is more like more than likely way you're going to govern. . Though. . It is a window into how the vice president. . Will govern and it is going to take a movement of people to continue to push who knows a miracle could happen. . But as it stands right now, , based on what we know right now the policy positions he's taken you may remember he had an interview probably been about three months ago now, , and he was asked by the interviewer if Medicare for all tasks and you both go, , that would be a miracle epic, , a necessary proportions, , but it the past. . Would you sign it? ? And he said he would not even in the face of a pandemic and so my suffering when it comes to lack of access to healthcare ninety, , two, , million people in this country are either uninsured or underinsured in that number continues to climb Toray so it doesn't make any sense and so the Republicans help you get over. . Yeah. Those . are the make book with for your entire term as president of. The . United States of America meanwhile back at the ranch meanwhile back in rural America Urban America. . Bourbon America with so many people are suffering because nope. . Just because somebody lives in suburb doesn't mean not catching hale but the people who are catch inhale the poor the work important. . Barely middle class what is where is the vision that provides pro vision for the people and because president trump is so bad. . because. . He is a clear and present danger. . This is an excellent opportunity for the Democratic Party to go. . Bold. .

Nina Turner Black Church America Gardner Clare Sanders Ohio Bernie
"nina" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"nina" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Lakers 2020 MBA Chance, Nina she and tell him what a port three That Staging votes and it does you Just Studio. Radio. Well. Stab More music, More variety show for three My FM birds of a feather human Me, but he didn't move around me happened in Gaza tumble in our bus. All of.

Nina Lakers Gaza
"nina" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:59 min | 9 months ago

"nina" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ten, the Otero, Bergeres family bought and expanded a home in Santa Fe to accommodate their growing family. This is on unseated land belonging to the Woo people, and it still stands today as home to the Georgia O'Keefe Museums Library and archives that same year Nina convinced her mother to set up trusts for her and her unmarried sisters including the youngest Isa Bell had an intellectual disability. Nina had realized that territorial law really limited women's property rights especially after they got married and she didn't want any of them to have to rely on the goodwill of men to survive in nineteen twelve New Mexico became a state and that year Otero Warren moved to New York City to keep house for her brother Liu number share while he studied at Columbia University well, living in New York she volunteered at a settlement house run by an in the daughter of J. P. Morgan. But then in Nineteen Fourteen Otero Warren's mother died at the age of fifty as the oldest daughter it was Nina's. Duty to take up the role of family matriarch. So she went back home to new. Mexico. One of her sisters Anita had been in the final steps of joining a convent when their mother died. Anita put her religious vocation aside and she went back home as well beyond their grief over the loss of their mother. This seems to have been difficult for everybody involved Nina inherited the Luna family lands, but she was not particularly interested in the day to day running of the household or caring for her siblings. The youngest was Joe, age eight and most of the daughters were still living at home. All of this work mostly felt you in Nita who was really doing this out of a sense of obligation and she later described it as ruining her life. Nina was also strict and had very strong opinions about her siblings, romantic partners whether they were good enough to marry. This was something that led to tensions and rifts within the family. Nina also made decisions about. Things like whether to sell property and how to handle finances sometimes without really consulting anybody else, and that led to some frustrations and animosity when people disagreed with what she had done as the family was still adjusting to all of this Nina. Otero Warren became involved in the suffrage movement something that really did not have a huge presence in New Mexico, at the time. When New Mexico became a state it was the only one in the.

Nina Otero Warren New Mexico Anita Georgia O'Keefe Museums Librar New York City Santa Fe New York Isa Bell Bergeres Nita Columbia University Joe J. P. Morgan Liu
"nina" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Went on this little ride and it took me. Out I guess that's everyone knows that I I don't know if everyone does I think I, do part of it is probably again I don't to say depression, but kind of like it's a spiral. Blake, our brains are maybe more apt to spiral out. Because even when I was talking to my psychiatrist, one of the questions he asked me was. If you're reading a book, can you concentrate on it? And I was like. No I definitely can't now that I think about it. You go well I've bought one hundred twenty books in the last year and Agneta them so yeah, I guess that is why. No. That's a good. Indicator, yeah, if you can't focus on the thing, yeah. And I definitely can't I'll use that as a benchmark once I start my medication. I'm reading a pretty good book right now. Okay and then seems as if there are twenty seven human emotions. Oh, I had a list, but there on my computer. There's no power. There's no power. Okay, so sorry there, actually twenty-seven human emotions new study finds in previous thought it was understood that there were six distinct human emotions happiness, sadness fear, anger, surprise and disgust, but scientists have now found that the numbers as many as twenty seven, though is not telling me the frequency of which you come in and out of emotion. I couldn't find that I. Don't feel like I have. What did she say? How many hundreds of thousands of the sort of the same thoughts yeah I don't feel like I. Have Thousands of emotions a day? Maybe my dad now I think it's supposed to be less I think that would be really not good. If you had thousand rows into Kammer of emotional day. Well and I guess some people do and that's. When to seek. Help. Yeah, so That's all for Nina. That's all for Nina. Why really really like her and for the people that weren't watching her on Zoom? If you're single and you live in the bay area, you should be dedicating your life to finding her and wooing her. I mean don't Stalker. I'm not advocating stalking her, but she's a real catch. Yeah, so if you're in the bay area, you can probably find her. Yeah, heart and smart. Those are good things to say they assets. Yeah, okay, that's all right love..

Nina Blake depression stalking
"nina" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome welcome welcome to armchair expert experts on expert on Dan. Sheppard joined by modest. MOUSE MINIATURE MOUSE MAXIMUM MOUSE MONICA MICKEY MOUSE MONACO MOUSE MAN! Welcome to the program today. We have a really really great psychiatrist Dr. Nina Vossen Nina is an American psychiatrist. She's a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. University School of Medicine and I don't want to spoil, but I will. She invited us to come lecture at Stanford. Yes, so it would appear that we're GONNA. GonNa be professors at Stanford, thanks Dr Nina these the author of the Amazon Number One bestselling book do good well your guide to leadership action and innovation so please enjoy Dr Nina Vasan. Louis are supported by Brooke Linen nothing makes me happier and being in a hotel and crawling of those crisp, cool sheets, bare, naked, and just writhing around and I always. Always thought. How do I get these beautiful hotel quality sheets? And then I started ordering them from Brooklyn, and now I can slide into bed anytime i. want and ride around our friend Laura she has a new boyfriend, and she's been staying at his house. And she said what are these amazing sheets and their Brooke Lennon surprised. She immediately called me like. Like what's the code, you probably heard us. Talk About Brooklyn before they are the home of the Internet's favorite sheets, but their towels. They are also amazing, varying levels of plush. The towel of your dreams is waiting to wrap you up. I just ordered a slew of these, did you? Yes, they literally arrived as I was walking out the door so excited. Look. It's perfectly fine to stay in your towel all day after you shower sometimes I'll stay in my towel until I'm ready to shower again. That's called efficiency in Brooklyn's towels..

clinical assistant professor Stanford Brooklyn Dr Nina Vasan Brooke Lennon Department of Psychiatry and B Sheppard Dan University School of Medicine Brooke Linen Louis Laura
"nina" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"What is holding us back? Nina from having more powerful and authentic sales conversations well, the one thing that I found held me back and has held back all my mind is their mindset. They seemed like is all the scary stuff out there? It's getting on the phone and having to talk about your price in your great product, and having to convince someone that they should be spending money with you and this affair about the prospect, saying no than all interested too expensive, or they need to think about it until we think is all coming from the outside, and that's what's scaring us, but actually <unk> are thinking thinking. We're creating moment by moment about. What we believe is going to happen on. That sells coal which fills us with fear. And up. What about biggest enemies that we makeup through our thinking is anticipation. We're anticipating house go. At. Such a big gap between US having been warring. How things actually are. When we buy into this big scary worry about how it's going to pan out. That's what makes us feel so scared is all coming from inside of us? Now I do have a question for you Nina de you have Karaoke and Scotland's I'm not prompt Scotland. I live near London Scottish dancing school, but we do have carried okay here. You Have Karaoke in England as well. Good because for me, this is always two quick things to is people across the board? They're scared to make those initial sales calls because like you said they have this anticipation. About how is GONNA go and They're filled with dread so I always tell people hey. Just do one call. Just do one call this week. That's it and what happens is they make that call? Because it's just one it's not like. Oh do one hundred calls today, which is very daunting. They do one like that was actually kind of easy and like to bring it around to like the actual conversation that have with people around Karaoke with this is. If you've ever been Karaoke Bar, you always see. There's like that one person that gets like pushed on stage by their friends. They don't WanNa, do it. They're terrified. They don't WanNa, do Karaoke and then they sing that song and like by the third bar? They are just like you. You, Know Adele? They're out there and they're singing there. Hardaway, then you literally can't get them off the stage and it's just sometimes breaking that ice. Realizing that is not nearly as scary as you're anticipating that it was so for me. That kind of comes back to mindset. So why is having the right mindset? Absolutely crucial for successful sales calls because we can think our way into being okay about having sales cools and taking away the fair, because everything is you know that we're seeing in the world where making up through thoughts and everyone has a unique perspective on the world, because there are seven billion or more unique thinkers in the world. Because! We are able to create thinking because we're the crates. Is Thinking bothered than the some possible thoughts? We are able to change our thinking and it's it's amazing. We have this. Incredible Gift of free thought that we can use to Crato reality and most located. We don't pay any attention because a busy. Reacting furiously to was on outside of US and eat a big sky, and anxious and overwhelmed, and yet we forget we have this amazing palace superpower. When we can change our thinking about anything. It changes our feelings, and it can just bring up so much. Courage and resilience and you'll. Writer is about taking action. I helped my clients to overcome. They block so they can take action in their business because we don't take action obviousness. No can't get kinds <unk> simplisafe. Semi. People scared. They're so scared off having conversation because they pay rejection. They worried about getting <unk> because when they get no. Those people are selling the services products, and when they get the take it, Brady Pass, nate and they feel that being passed rejected who they are is being rejected by the prospect, and that could fill a berry berry painful. We'll do anything become to avoid that pain. At. That's why we're muddling up. The the failed to sales compensation will make you all up in ahead, and we think he is waded through with buying into the story, but if we would strip that story away at just say okay. What I'm going to do now is have a conversation with this person for good <unk> together. That's all that can happen and what we take away. All the meanings that were attached to this means again. No too terrible, they may think. They may think I'm too expensive. I believe with my value, and they believe my value either won't be stocked crazy with these stories around taking a acton. Than, we can easy took US outfit, but we see justice neutral action, which is a compensation. That's all. That's GONNA happen the. Pus might say yes. They may say nerve it fun and they. We're GONNA have another compensation off that. There are plenty more competition going to have when we strip away and just. Look at the neutrality if you lie. Then it will stop making us feel scared because this the meanings for attaching. To the action, thus causing the fan or the actual action

Nina US youtube Cook
"nina" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Radiolab

"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"If we're GONNA talk about racism like the. Let's talk about racism you know like let's talk about yes. Talk About Anti Asian. Hate talk about the history of that built on You know let's also talk about mass incarceration you know. Let's talk about missing and murdered indigenous women. Let's talk about no Ice Concentration camps could talk about all of these other things that impacts our own community but also Other people who are in eighty eight violent. Yai After Mitch in this On Still Kinda struck by that Mike Morosi recommendation that thank God was not followed right? Let's former suicide squad of young nieces soldiers and you can hold their parents Hostage I mean in some ways. The forty second. I'm not saying they were a suicide squad. But because of the racism that was leading them into battle and the fact that their parents were being held hostage. You know in reality it and hope this is not taken in the wrong way in in no way. Denigrates You know the the heroism in the sacrifice of those soldiers but in in some weird sort of way that's kind of what happened right and and even as radical as that turned out to be completely wrong as we said a little bit earlier. Nina it didn't necessarily completely change the attitude. Now you know it did change some you know we and I think to this day there has that story gets told. I think it has had an impact on a lot of people the way it did on Yang but part of my belief is that should have never had to have happened. And I think that's your point too am i. Am I correct right? Yeah I I don't think it's a there. Ask anyone you know. It's incredible that over willing to make that sacrifice and you know put them on.

Mike Morosi Mitch Nina Yang
"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And I think a little nice shooting at them and causing act lotions. Yeah and what was the What was the basic defense of their attorney? I E argued at. This is the white man's country and it should remain so now is basically his entire argument. I don't know whether the scream or cry. Nina a little bit of both right so right so so again you brought all of this into your piece into your response to Yang's op Ed. You know essentially what I got from. Your piece was so. The there is precedent there. There was a time not too long ago when Asian Americans in this case Japanese Americans were targeted were scapegoated and vilified unfairly unjustly and some of them leaders and followers alike They tried to do pretty much. What at face value it Yang was recommending in his current peace. And it didn't bring about the embrace in in the respect that we're not getting now I mean that that's one of my big takeaways of your piece is even if we did these things not that we should have to but history shows that it doesn't change hearts and minds Yeah I think that You know and I don't think this is something that is unique to Japanese Americans or Asian Americans. I mean this is something that You know pretty much every community of color in the US.

Yang attorney US Nina
"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"They live. And if that had gone through then we would have on with But because people in this very small town that they live in actually spoke out and kind of vouched or family They were able to avoid that So I don't have a personal connection to the incarceration story but I I think just that story that I do have is how Important it is to stand up for your neighbors and you know if you do that in sometimes and stop bad things from happening. Yeah I mean I hadn't heard Stories like your ancestors but Y- like he just said Nina. I think in a sort of ironic way. You're you're just sharing. That is to me the better example that Andrew Yang could have pushed that that it's not up in in in the case of your great grandfather wasn't up to him and let not like he had the position or the power to actually make a difference but it was his non Japanese American neighbors who actually stood up for him and prevented an injustice. Right so I just think that's interesting. Maybe that's kind of running in the background when you were writing this response. So what did you think when you read his piece? I know you quoted the kind of the problematic section. I'll just read it here for our listeners. you said in an op. Ed for the Washington Post this week former Democratic presidential candidate enjoying urged Asian Americans to combat a recent surge in anti-asian hate quote embracing and showing Americanise in ways. We never have before in quote. He praised japanese-americans volunteered for military service for World War Two concentration camps to quote demonstrate that they were Americans unquote conveniently ignoring the state violence that narrowed their choices and erasing those who were enlisted against their will and concludes that Asian Americans who face racism today should likewise quote show without a shadow of a doubt that we are Americans who will do our part for our country in this time of need unquote. So take us from there. Yeah I have some feelings reading that I think like a lot of people I think that you know. Obviously what e- is referring to you know this.

Nina Americanise Washington Post Andrew Yang e
"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

13:33 min | 1 year ago

"nina" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Thirty nine. Where my guest? This week is Nina Wallace. She is the Communications Coordinator at a nonprofit organization in Seattle called dench. Oh and you can find it at dench dot org and just a great organization. That's dedicated to sharing the stories of Japanese. American incarceration during World War Two to promote justice and Equity. Today Nina herself is a fourth generation or Yonsei a Japanese American and She has written for a number of publications but it was her blog for dench. Oh in the immediate aftermath of Andrew Yang's much talked-about op Ed in the Washington Post where he was encouraging asian-americans to be inspired by the example of Japanese Americans during World War Two following the attack on Pro Harper by the Imperial Japanese Navy To to show their true Americanise by kind of overt displays including Wearing red white and blue and and you know putting on the uniform and going to fight like four forty second. Nina's column was Even to this day to me the clearest explanation as to why gangs use the Japanese Americans. History was problematic and so immediately reached out to her and she was kind enough to Agree to come on in a couple of days after that and We have this conversation where I asked her. Really to unpack so much of what? I appreciated from her blog. So really looking forward to you able to eavesdrop on that conversation with Nina now last week in the introduction. I shared that I was recently diagnosed with early stage prostate cancer and it still a very sobering. Thought to know that there's cancer in my body but honestly because I have no symptoms in also because they haven't prescribed any invasive treatments. It's not something that really preoccupies me. I don't like the idea that I have cancer but As the experts say slowest we have keep actively watching this. This very little chance that I'm going to die from this cancer. I'll die from something else but not this now. There is something physical that has been daily focus of mine for the last several weeks and that is Severe lower pain in my back or severe pain in my lower back and then more recently within the last week a flare up of the bursitis in both of my hips. Now I've been scratching my head and trying to figure out what was the cause of this recurrence of this back pain. I mean I get this every several years and I forget about it when it's not there but when it comes to me and there's no forgetting about this so part of it is Well I was working on a jigsaw puzzle with my family and I know that being hunched over a horizontal surface for hours on end has caused twinges in my back but because of that I made sure not to do it. That long This time because I'd been doing a lot of weeding of our large front and back lawns during this. Stay at home and Notice that when I finally straighten up I had the sharp pain in my back in so I was already kind of kind of babying it and so I kind of explained to my family. Don't expect me to contribute a lot. This particular jigsaw puzzle but definitely. I'm thinking that the number one contributor to this bout of this lower back pain is all the hours. I've spent binge-watching Very shows on Netflix. In particular during this time of having a not go out right You know my while. I'm sitting there watching it episode after episode. I'm kind of caught up in the unfolding drama but then I think too many hours of doing that especially in my comfortable recliner Sofa. It's just not been good for my lower back and it got so bad several weeks ago. That I finally said you know what I'm GonNa go find a new chiropractor and fortunately many of them were opened during this. Stay at home corentin. And so I found one and she In addition to the adjustments that she was doing was suggesting for me Something to do at home and one of them was icing which I told her. Well that's a problem because I actually have this condition that makes me produce huge hives as a hit me. Reaction to temperatures colder than seventy two degrees. Then the while. I've never heard of that. And then she said well If you can get an inversion table that would help relieve pressure on your spine. And I've been thinking about one of those ever seen them. But they're like a a big teeter totter and you clip your ankles securely and then and then you stretch your arms over your head and if you've adjusted the center of gravity correctly you slowly tilt backwards Various angles and you suspend their upside down for several minutes to produce. This decompression right. And so I went on guys very motivated. I went on Amazon and they found a good one and it wasn't that expensive in after. Tell you after each of my sessions every day It does feel like one. I'm Taller Pie increments. But it does feel like there's more space between my vertebrae and so I think that's good. My youngest brother who lives up in the Pacific northwest. He happened to call me while I was going through these treatments early on in this episode. And he's at. Hey Man I had the same kind of thing Every so often I get the severe lower back pain. It's like in barely standing can barely walk and Yeah I've seen a chiropractor into this. And that and he says the one thing that's really been helpful for me is to ice it I explained my allergy to cold. Temperatures and He said well all I can tell you. Man Is Isis the best thing. Because you know as your chiropractor said that areas inflamed and so then it hit me as well you know when I've had to go riding in the cold In the mornings I usually take an antihistamine and that keeps the highest at bay. So I've been taken to an his being Every day as I get up and I make my coffee and then I ice my back in ice both my hips. I have the Bositis and it does seem to bring some relief but the other thing that my brother brought up was that he's dead He had severe lower back problems for most of his life. And you know I used to think okay well because After the war when he came back he He literally built our own house in and he did a lot of heavy lifting We've heard all the stories and You Know I. I was convinced that his back problems. Because you know he he used the block and tackles set up the lower the huge air conditioning unit into the basement. That kind of stuff Wasn't because you know he. He's genetically predisposed to have lower back problems while hearing the story of my younger brother comparing it to my own. I'm now thinking differently that this back pain that my dad always dealt with was something that was built into his skeleton in fact my x rays actually showed that the reason I have bursitis is because of the skeleton is built so okay And did it. You know in in the years that I was living at home and around my dad and he would go through these periods of back pain I didn't have a whole lot of sympathy. I've had a lot of pity. It's like wow dad's really groaning can't straighten up fully too bad hate sex to be him. But now that I'm older and my brother helped me realize the parallels I'm like. Yeah you know what Maybe this is something that my dad passed on to us On kind of intrigued to talk to our middle brother to find out if he also suffer some these periodic bouts of lower back pain But just having the other sample of my other brother Makes both of US BELIEVE THAT? This is something that has come from being literally sons of our father It's it's it's not fun to have anything painful and certainly a chronically painful and I will tell you as I'm working through it this Most recent time There are days when I just wish this would all go away but I know in addition to going for my Jesmyn. I know there are things that I have to do and I am focused on doing because I'm just tired of groaning like my father in having those moments can't straighten up fully. And you know my chiropractor is telling me that once this is over and I'd say I'm on the but fifty sixty percent better at least in my back You know there are other things that have shown up in her scans of my spine and stuff like that that we need to continue working on to hopefully Alleviate this periodic Problem with my lower back. Hey you know at this point. I opened all kinds of ideas There are some of you out there who have chronic pain in problems that You don't have really any promise or any hope that is going to get better one day and again. I can't totally empathize with you. Because that's I don't think that's my situation but my heart really goes out to you having to deal with this right now It it really makes me think about my friends were confined to wheelchairs or a one particular friend who still dealing with the aftermath of his stroke. Where every day you're faced with challenges that seem to really dictate how your day's GonNa go. I know a little bit now about what that's like and I just want you to know that I can't mansion Just just having to deal with it every little thing with without a lot of hope that The darkness this this pain is is or problems. Are going to be lifted Anytime soon a obviously I hope and pray with them that it will but sometimes. That's not the diagnosis. I think a little bit about how my attitude might be affected. If this doesn't go away you know Right I'm working on things and seeing things a little bit better but you know what what if it never really completely goes away. What I can't return to the life that I typically take for granted and enjoy You know living I guess I'll have to see how I deal with that. If that's the case I guess the lesson here it there's two one is I think I am much more father son physically even and even I think spiritually Then I ever really thought growing up. 'cause my mom made it. Kinda her number one goal in life to make sure that we didn't really value our father in a lot to do with their relationship And already had some breakthroughs in appreciating that Some of the things that I I do value in myself I had to get them from my dad and You know but it's a package deal so I got my dad's back to but I think the other lesson in life. Is You know if your life is going good..

Nina Wallace cancer dench Imperial Japanese Navy Seattle Communications Coordinator Washington Post Netflix Pacific northwest Andrew Yang US Harper Amazon
"nina" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"nina" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Nina sweater now. Going down. Weather now of beat with everything Glanville's tight leggings. I just heard in Brown turn Brown. Slowly, falling through the ground to the ground. I'm taking photos of. All around watching the leaves dying is so damn pleasure. Jump into a giant stack of leaves your feeling Lacombe wild and a free. There is something sticky. Dole doggy duty underneath. Even couple drops of rain and now nobody can drive nothing beats the comfortable warm BAAs side. Even pick electric ones are still kinda. Punking punk AM spicy autumn season. Gives me the runs, but. Diet now. We did. It anyhow anyhow. Candy on Halloween dressed up as wolves. Comes around comes around. Twenty pounds. My body like a dumping ground dumping ground gravy on average thing. I feel much Baynes closing. Hello. Why everybody got the flu? Bogu residue. All over you. You got it too. Cozy place because I season. With mini pumpkin zone a serving tray of praise. The gordon. The blaze cocoa on a comfy couch. Tiny marshmallows floating round Gordon round quickly ended burns. Now, my mouth enjoy the painful sting of my tongue blistering. Now. Around the house. Watching movies data scary out. Gary Brady grew good dreams. John measles scared. Upbeat. Hello ground is. So. The sky is so grey turn my UB lamp too high. Back to play out in the puddles. Now. Now cuddle now just like a cucumber. Out out in wallets, outscore Armenia snuggling up. Now now now until the shape of me. Kano round carefree. That's why the fall suits me. Text. Five nine s I normally don't like the fall. But now, it kind of sounds, okay? Gonna need a sweater..

Brown turn Brown Glanville Nina flu Lacombe Dole Gordon Baynes Gary Brady Armenia John Twenty pounds
"nina" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"nina" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Maybe and now it's your the animals version which is strikingly similar be misunderstood and of course a couple years ago that was an oscar nominated and in very excellent documentary what happened miss simone and i think that was a lot of younger people's introduction to nina john legend quoted her on stage accepting i think in oscar long del ray asked for a special screening of it and beyond say told the director that she you know really loved the movie too so yeah i think that that movie combined with some of the recent appearance you know sampling for work and hip hop records has suddenly taken nina simone you know out in a bigger way than she was before what else did you learn kind of in your story that that's coming out about the way her influences out there i think you spoke to reopen giddens who had some interesting things to say about her right i think i think in the context of our times especially in the black lives matter movement i think she's become anita's most become an even more inspiring figure because she was her music increasingly reflected the times like you mentioned mississippi god damn and other kinds of young young gifted and black and songs that she recorded and wrote later on in her career and the whole dignity with which she held herself and and and associated new martin luther king junior and to us and so many important figures they they i think you can look at her now as as a really of newly symbolic figure in that world i think people like ran getting told me that you know she looks at nina simone those and she said you know as a person of color i have no excuse anymore for not you know pursuing my dreams and doing what i want to do and think she's nina's kind of newly inspired a whole generation of people her whole story is incredibly inspiring and sometimes harrowing you know to to start out as you know an actual prodigy slash genius who could play anything she heard on the piano at age three or four to the extent that in the racist south you know.

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