17 Burst results for "Nile Rodgers"

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

08:17 min | 10 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Was involved in that he do away was we are family and coming to America and we are up he was in the cell that he did hear a song by black girls being played on the white radio station which was totally Just, never happened bathrooms and then. I'm meet him after you released Robert De. Niro's restaurant and walks in the door and like he's like president. Like wants to every single person in the world and when he finally got me and Bernard Somebody said Oh. Yeah. These are the guys who wrote Africa because a lot of African people think that the freak goes You. Think. Like Bam, you are bad. You wrote Africa. Ultimately, coming America. You working on a new film to America's well. I guess I guess are Yeah I. I wrote the theme song. So yeah, they just call me last week. Using and just let yourself. I wrote I sang it and I was laughing because damn. I know one brother who could actually pull this off and sound meal 'cause that's the thing about comedy. When you do comedy, you gotTa be dead serious about your jokes, right? So like I did be the player and we were doing that we and Mike Judge Road writing songs in. Charissa? Like I didn't talk to Nile I talked to Mike that was You know I would like go. Over for your love you know and stuff like that. You know. So when I was seen so globe to John Landis, he was on the floor crying. Like. All right. Well, I know the. Really got keep cry and I. Got Christopher map to you right seize your queen to be to see show. No so here's the thing. Is that the actor Paul Days? That's how he got the role she used that as his audition he has sued yet. He was just supposed to say she's your Queen Bee Create I, need Alexei you know deliver that but he looked at it and he decided to sit and you made up a melody right on the spot the only thing that pulled out of singer. So it was all over the place so I. Think clavier played it so that it sound believable. I WanNa make sure you finished your Nelson Mandela Story. That was it. He said African thing and we family and. Not Enough and you know and coming to America. so He's okay three. was so powerful as an Eddie Murphy because they're also at that meeting that night. So we were all in this room together and and so Medina tells us the story about how when paramount pictures release coming to America. The first time around they insisted upon the intervene integrated at the premiere, and that was something that resonated across the entire African continent black people. And White people sitting together to watch a movie and south advocate that was like the civil war. It shows you that music an art visual art dance everything has the power to communicate in a much more powerful and Saliba away or you know after the theater was forced to be integrated well, time actually felt just a few short years the athlete I mean so that I mean, we won't take credit, for stopping apartheid. But when something that's be cultural phenomenon happen you have to know your cultural phenomenon when a cultural phenomenon takes place, people can't deny because it's such a heart. You become a human deemed in is even if they don't want you to marry the daughter still putting you in a certain they look at you differently you know it's interesting. I just want everybody to note that now Roger said the breakfast club is a cultural phenomenon. Let's pass. Okay. All right. What the sledge record we are family now is there a hidden meaning that? Oh yeah, and of course, as I said So this was an album that we had written about these four girls that we never met. So we had to invent an identity, and once we invented that identity men we only wrote songs that. To those four people we know copies of sixteen. Virgil know any of that stuff we just know was the record company. You told them you know they were like family to us do stick together like Burgos. Went home like Oh. Okay. So we had to just make it up and once we made it up and they walked into the room and they weren't that. By. What we just due to the poor girl well, we didn't. Think that because we are images. Wants. To they should. And in a way I feel proud because I watched him grow into those people i. got it now Rogers. When we come back, let's get into a mini make someone records. He wrote some of the records performed someone records that was sample from him I to now's Rogers mini mixes the breakfast club morning that was a now rogers many mixed morning. Everybody is EJ Envy Angela. Yeesh guy we all the breakfast club we take. You to announce Roger Now shawny. Now Been Your experience with racism all throughout my life I've had guns, put it in my face ole for an over over and over again by cops or does random white people. If I'm down south playing somewhere we play in Augusta GM, you're happy with played in James. Brown. Coal town man I walked out. I was going through horseriding stable. These dudes rolled up on the guns in my favorite. More is that your girlfriend because manager the club I asked her to take me to horseriding you kind of meet and she was from Ireland and she said Oh yeah. This one right down the road driving Blah Blah Blah 'cause I was even too young to get arrested coffee. You can't rent a car to twenty one st drove me is when I defy. A life of my girlfriend I wouldn't be here talking to you. It would be no sad. Just one that's one of one hundred I can tell you about a hundred times that either police or just random people would have some kind of. You know us back off serious n word so that reality has always been my world even in the music you grew up in the civil rights movement he was young but did you understand the magnitude of that moment because I know eventually you became a black panthers I'm just trying to figure out you know what sparked all that? Yeah. I did understand it so I was in. Elementary School when President Kennedy got shot in nineteen, sixty three and I remember one girl in the class thing yeah. It's a tragedy but you know Martin Luther King could be president like President Kennedy and or McCain's jumped on her up and I went over and I protected her Walter home and she became my sort of girlfriend at eleven year old can go all the way. Yeah. You didn't get luck. For some reason, even though I was sort of like the joker, the class because I spoke to where. They backed off of our and very soon after that the Beatles came on Ed Sullivan Show and she told me to come over our house. And I remember talking about. Dr, Martin Luther King could be President President Kennedy and things like that. I'm eleven years old now and This is like hitting me like a ton of bricks because it's all started to unfold in front of my face. Do these things were on television every night and as a young black girl she opened my mind a lot when. I was in the Black Panthers when I was sixteen years old so I was.

America President President Kennedy president Black Panthers Mike Judge Martin Luther King Africa Bernard Somebody Robert De Rogers Niro Nelson Mandela John Landis Elementary School Eddie Murphy Beatles Roger Now Ed Sullivan Alexei
"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Wisconsin we are expected.

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

10:18 min | 10 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Depression. When people felt the worse the happiest songs came out. So when you listen to the lyrics of songs, you could hear we were copying those songs. We were paying homage and tribute to songs like happy days. High. Hand. Out So good times goes happy days are here again, you know the time is right for making it was going to say my feet keep dancing tap dancing brave. Nicholas. Brothers. The Real Nicholas Brothers are tap dancing on our record You punish it with Benard that was always fascinated me and Brian I. Mean We. Went to school together. So we used to rifle RECCO pins in Liverpool looking for records that set the Chic Organization on it. You know we were fascinated by this idea he said company what is it? dudes. We we work with. From a song creation point of view. From. Pooh bear to Teddy Geiger to Benny. Blanco. We work with the finest songwriters in the world and everyone has that fascination that you're talking about with the chic. Organization and the way that these records were made because they still sound like you know even though they were made forty years ago, they still sound like two thousand and twenty, one, not nine, hundred, seventy, seven, one, thousand. Nine, hundred, seventy nine, and we were having this discussion earlier we did this study a couple of years ago where the interpolations in the samples of Nile Bernard's records are successful as the original records word just to put that in context the freak is the biggest selling single in the history of Atlantic records but that's one of the greatest record companies ever that has everything from aretha Franklin. Charles to led Zeppelin to grow you know. And this is the biggest selling song in the history of the label. This is a label that started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty seven, and is obviously the heart of Warner music. Group today and yet the interpolations and the records that are made out of sampling that record and leading parts of it and other good times and everybody dance and Tell them the story of Soup for one now So after this event, call disco sucks happened in the summer of seventy nine. It's hard to believe that we actually had to number one pop singles in Nineteen, seventy, nine, two number ones. But after that event, we never ever got another top ten record ever again under the name of Sheikh and it was through the heartbreaking because spiritually and artistically we hadn't changed at all. Because the mood had changed so drastically so quickly and also maybe a lot of it had to do with the fact that it was now a new decade and it seems like every decade you have the responsibility to change you to become. Cooler. We made a decision to. Do something, and try and pursue a different style of music anyway. So we got soundtracks and I went into video games and all that Kinda stuff you know in the future. But when we did our first recording of soundtrack, it was four film called Soup for one and the film was so bad that it closed in two days. Honestly two days, it didn't even stay in a week. But what's really funny about it is that the soundtrack years later, the songs soup for one, the title Song was covered by a group called Macho and they turned it into a song called lady hear me tonight and that became a number one record all over the world, and then even like songs like my score from coming to America Snoop Dogg samples the part where the royal penises clean. Your is all sorts of different motifs that. I would right We're being repurpose different artists because I think that no matter what the medium is. I'm always trying to write music that touches your soul that's why I say she is a soul band we play. So music I want you to move I want you to dance I. Don't want you to just sit there and think about owes guys are really clever. Wants you feel it first and then start to analyze it later that's just what I believe in. It should be primal. And intellectual but the intellectual part comes later you start to tear it apart after you see fiction two or three times you go. Oh Shit I. OH Now. I get it. I don't need you to get it the first time as a matter of fact, if you get it the first time I feel weird. We purposely try and make it. Honestly. We try and have double entendre we wanted to be confusing some of my closest friends. Even people who are in cheek sometimes singing the wrong lyric. We teach them the song like I had a girl in the band for a while when we would say just come on down to fifty four in la freak she was seeing just come on down to the fifth floor. Even though the lyrics prior to that are telegraphing that you're in a nightclub about a new dance craze, Blah Blah Blah but come on down to the fifth floor and there you can buy cosmetics shoes. What the hell are you singing and one night? I heard her and I said, we don't think the lyric is. Just come on down to the fifth floor. Bow. Was Saturday by Norma Jean that a hit in the first instance because that's kind of another one of a second wind in recent years. Saturday was written well, before we knew Norma Jean Saturday was a song that was in our repertoire when we will call the big apple band and we used to play that live and people liked it. It was a really good song. The only reason why it didn't make the first chic album is because we had dancing stance I won't give you the subtitle. And we had everybody dance and we had strike up the band and we wanted to tell a story to us. Albums are like films and the first seek album was basically our live show. We were an opening act. So a brand new opening, agan those days if you had seven original songs to play, that was pretty good said. So that's why we didn't put Saturday on that record, but we were saving it for when we thought it would be useful. What happened was I don't usually talk about this because I hate to say bad stuff. But what happened is that we didn't quite get along with Norma Jean is the way we would have liked to. So what we did was instead of just kicking her out of the band, we got a really big record deal. And say here now do it yourself but we'll make the record for you. Give you a really good cushion. We know this song Saturday is the bomb. So we gave her Saturday and we wrote every song except for. Sam Cooke Song that we covered. So when you Benard were working on songs for other artists like sister sledge, do a particular process. Is there any way you can talk us through the kind of way in which you would originate an idea? We we had a process, right? What we did was we conceptualize the record before we would write anything we would say, okay what is this all about sister sledge we were talked into doing by the head of our record label. He had offered us the rolling stones and Bette Midler, and Bernard and I knew that what I'm GonNa tell Keith Richards Guitar Parts to play until. Mick Jagger what lyrics to sing. Don't think so. I mean, we knew I mean can you imagine I mean nowadays of course? There could be a really big rock band who you guys are. Cool. SONGWRITERS here. Let me hear you saw. But in those days. The artists wrote their own songs. It would be really weird for the stones to get other people to write their songs. So we knew that we were basically songwriters and conceptual people. Sister Sledge was perfect for us because the head of the record company basically. The libretto to this opera this this movie that we were going to write about these girls. He told us that they were like family. When they come to the building they stick together like further, and then all of a sudden after this big pitch, he wanted us to produce somebody on Atlantic win. He finally got the sister sledge and we went home and we looked at our notes. The Chic. Organization right we tried to act like we were real professionals. So we wore suits to the meeting. We wore suits and we had like yellow legal pads and we're writing it down and when we got home, we realized that basically dictated the lyrics that we are family. Like, check this out dig this they stick together like birds. And we fly just like birds of A. No lie while they're religious. Okay. Cool. We got the I won't tell. No. Okay. So we are family was really like a story about sister sledge. What happened was it turned out so well that we holy cow, this song is too good to put out first because if we put this out, I know when is gonNA listen to the rest of the album and I think that pound for pound the sister sledge album may be the best record we've ever done like there's no lame song on that album..

sledge Norma Jean Nicholas Brothers Nile Bernard Norma Jean Saturday Liverpool Chic Organization Depression. Benard Teddy Geiger aretha Franklin Mick Jagger Blanco Brian Sheikh America Bette Midler Sam Cooke Charles
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

09:37 min | 10 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"For for me, you know I can't play the guitar I can't sing a song but I'm obsessed with music and I'm obsessed with the creative process. So the only thing that gives me a seat at the table with great people like Nihil is. A knowing my shit, and then be using that as a way to advocate and protect and communicate on behalf of artists so that the artist side of the equation is always winning because we work in an industry where everything is weighted against the artist and even though the artist is creating ultimately what it is that the consumer wants and that the consumers consuming. The artist is getting the smallest piece of that. And it takes people like myself to. Make a difference in them. Is An excise impassive you'll work getting to observe Nile in action say Nabi Road for instance where he is currently doing a Lotta work. Every day is incredible. We are, but you know we we pinch each other sometimes make sure that it's real. You know yesterday we were with Andrew Lloyd Webber and you know were going through and were helping Andrew figure out how to make some of the greatest songs of all time appropriate for today's fourteen year olds and a we go. We didn't know that was going to be part of our agenda this week and we have a pretty good idea what we're going to be doing next week but I guarantee you. As ING will end and our lap and my wife will have to figure out why we're not going to the west and. Made great waves in the industry last year when you're. Hypnosis Song Fund began trading on the London Stock Exchange can you explain what that venture is and where the idea came from? So again, this this is. Out of the riffing. The goes back and forth between Nile. About our obsession with music and you know the, the one thing that we realize that Niles career is a testament to is that proven songs hit songs are predictable and reliable and therefore investable. So we decided to take that idea to the financial community and we created this fund, which as you pointed out his raised over five, hundred, million dollars, half a billion dollars and that's invested now. And ultimately, what we sort of put forward to these people as these predictable reliable assets are exactly that there are new asset class and they're better than golden oil because if Donald Trump wakes up tomorrow morning and does something crazy golden oil is affected. If brexit happens golden oil is affected whereas with great songs, you know when times challenging people escaping with great zones when times are amazing, people are celebrating with great songs. So music being consumed all the time and wanted to. Not. Just on our behalf, we like to make money like everyone does, but we wanted for the songwriting community to create this asset class and to get the financial community to look at songs as being something that had extraordinary value. It's important to understand also that music is now being consumed at a greater level than it's ever been consumed in history because streaming because of convenience because it's so easy to hear the weird stuff that we love. It makes us not only happier because we can consume this music, but it also shows that the value of it can only go up because as more people consume. Even if it just stayed the way it was you would do better, but we plan to make it a lot better and. Certainly a lot more profitable for the songwriter with our fun. I mentioned we like to make money like everyone does, but our fund has an alterior motive that is as important as the motive which is that we want to change where the songwriter sits in the economic equation. The songwriter is the low man or woman on the Totem Pole despite the fact that they're delivering the most important component to artist having a hit an artist having a career, the business that I came into thirty five years ago was one where you know the songwriter and the artist were one in the same. Now Rogers. Today most you know, ninety percent of the artists that are being signed are very talented kids that ultimately have one endgame. How do I get famous and it doesn't matter who song this singing it doesn't matter whether it comes from TV talent competition or from social media. So. If your you know Zara Larsson and you have access to hit songs, you're at the top of the charts if your iggy Azalea in five years ago, you had the biggest song in the world with a song called fancy. But for whatever reason you no longer have access to hit songs you're nowhere. So the songwriter is delivering the most important component yet he or she are the no man or woman on the. Totem. Pole and this is because there's been a seventy five year paradigm where the likes of universal wondering. Sony. As the three biggest song companies in the world can advocate for songwriters because they're owned by Universal Warner and Sony the three biggest. Recorded music companies in the world and on the recorded music side of the business, you've got four fifths of the money. You've got a bloody great margin and in general, they own those assets perpetuity in on the song side of the business you've got one fifth of the money going that way you've got a tiny margin in relative terms and quite rightly whether it's reversions whether it's through renegotiations or whether it's just through smart deal making in the first place, the songs end up back in the hands of the people that created them. So the Universals, the warriors, Sony's at a point in time when the businesses improving as it is right now thanks to streaming. Use their leverage of recorded music owning songs to push that improvement towards rewarded music as opposed to the Creator's if there are no great songs there really is no music business. When I started, we used to go to concerts to hear new music that was basically the even if it was somebody as famous as the Jackson five that would have a huge catalog, but there's show would be sure you'd hear those hits eventually but they're show would be the new music that they were working on to figure out. Is it going to come out on the next album or it's on their current album but you just haven't bought the new album yet because you're only listening to the single so you basically. Only knew half the songs in the show that was entertainment that was show business in those days because you had to go on stage and groove yourself worthy of a person buying your music Now, it's very different because you can hear the music free anytime you want and it's of created a different kind of audience in that the people are expecting to hear hits that they know. So when Murk and I I started talking about this, we were saying that by concentrating on the songs that are proven hit records that you know that those are the songs that the audiences coming to see those are the songs that advertisers would use to promote and sell their products those are going to be. At the top of the food chain, those are the songs that are going to be out there generating most of the income and it's actually always been like that. That's what we used to talk about back in the day when we talking about the black box royalties and how it was always that money would somehow get funneled to all the people at the biggest hit records in the world because it was a lot easier to figure that out because they were at the top of the food chain. If you have a system like we do now where where you're going through streaming and we can tell what those numbers are almost instantly the whole paradigm shift has to happen and it's easier to. Be More fair and to have an equitable distribution of assets. I mean it's like I. When I first started, you were able to make a really good living with just records that were marginal hits. You didn't have to have the number one record in the world you could just be in the top forty and do really well, but the world has changed now imagine with streaming if we run into each other in the streets five years ago, we wouldn't be able to look at each other and say that the best days of the music industry are in front of it. We would definitely be saying that the best music industry were behind it. Now, the glory days are yet to come we've got. Two years ago, we had fifty million paid subscribers to music streaming.

Sony Nile Andrew Lloyd Webber Nihil Donald Trump London Stock Exchange Niles Zara Larsson iggy Azalea Rogers Murk Universal Warner Jackson
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

07:13 min | 10 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Evening everyone. Warm Welcome and Simon Barbara. This is my co host Brian. O'connor together we are. So the Jerker we welcome you to the Queen Elizabeth Hall this Very Special Podcast Recording of Soda Jerker on Racing in association with meltdown. We did ask for a big room this will have to suffice. In case you're unaware we began the so the Jacob podcast in our hometown of Liverpool in twenty eleven, and since then we've accumulated. Represents And since then we've accumulated over a hundred fifty interviews with weld around song races. Some of our past guests include Paul McCartney Paul Simon, Alicia Keys Diane Warren Johnny Ma and one of the gentlemen be. Evening. Gentleman is a songwriter composer guitarist and record producer who sold five, hundred, million albums and seventy five million singles that was some car boot. He's the chairman of the sunrises hall of fame, Inductee of the rock and Roll Hall of fame and a multiple grammy winner. There are numerous or the plaudits book we only have an hour. With. His late musical onto Benard Edwards, he helped forge sleek sophisticated this go funk blueprints in the form of Sheikh and his glittering recording and production career encompasses favored Bowie sister sledge, Donna Diana, Ross, Carly Simon Duran Duran monk name, but a few. Last. Year he was appointed chief creative advisor at the legendary Abbey Road Studios in London, and the also happens to be the curator of this year's meltdown festival. You may have noticed also joining us is his longtime manager, one of the most successful music executives and entrepreneurs of all time and the Creator and founder of the hypnosis songs unlimited, which since it began in twenty seventy, there's raised over five hundred, million dollars in investment capital is listed. On. The London Stock Exchange and it's quiet the copyrights number of hit songs by the likes of beyond say Reenter Justin Bieber Kanye West and song catalogs of songwriters like Jamie Scott the dream. They've students and would as well as that he's been a leading figure in music management for over three decades looking after such artists as beyond say sir. Elton John Guns and roses pet shop boys and Mary J. Blige and those just the obscure ones. We are super excited to have the opportunity to pick the enormous brains of these two industry giants this evening. So let's not waste another moment. Let's get them the hell on stage. Please give the warmest of southbank welcomes two Nile Rodgers UNMIK curiosities. Top that intro. Wow or not topic, but live up to. Merck thank you for joining us. On the success of meltdown so far to follow for it is yeah, we we'd stop I ask ago. We thought we'd stop asking how you guys actually met and John Wick together. I was very young. I had a lot of hair. And, we'd like this same video game. Ninja Dan yet or halo or Halo. We were friends for a long time and Nile had got into, which is something that are really a lot of people know about. But some of the greatest video games of all time are scored by now Rogers. Including Halo which is Microsoft and Bundy's biggest. Franchise it's okay. I'm proud of that. and. Our relationship really is one that starts and ends with songs and starts and ends with an incredible enthusiasm for music. So even right now up to this, very moment will end the night by talking about a record. We'll start tomorrow by talking about someone song or someone's record and normally would not critical. Normally we're enthusiasts but every once in a while we can be little bitches as well. Fan Back, in the day when. I'm a massive fan actually funny enough I bought dance dance dance the day that it came out and I hated. I hated the Yau's Yasser Yasser. Right. But I found myself despite being punk rock kid listening to clash records and things like that. I kept going back to this record over and over and over again even though I hated the. House apart, because the guitar was fucking unbelievable, the base was unbelievable. The playing was unbelievable and at the end of the day it was incredible song. Tao Hook though. That hook almost got in the way of the very beautiful relationship. and. Why is it? Do you think that you guys makes what you could seem? How'd you compliments each other? It's definitely because of our love of songs are love of musicianship. We can go on and on and on about different albums that we like different artists that we like their perspective on the world and the way that they express themselves through music. I mean mark and I are. All we do is talk music all day long the fact that we're in the business of music together is. Probably one of the most natural relationships I could have imagined because this no record that I could talk about that. He doesn't know something about I, mean it could be the wack years most avangard ridiculous because even the musicians themselves would say, you know I woke up this morning and I wrote some ridiculous ship. But I decided to record it after all what the hell. You know. So we know and love some of those ridiculous recordings and have incredible appreciation for the art of making records and making music. We were trying to explain kweskin in the jug band. Gopher last night. It's funny 'cause it started talking about Maria mold our because we couldn't believe that she was the original singer of exemption Kweskin, Judd Band like wow Maria mode our if you don't know her right away, she had a hit record called midnight at the. But before that season. Judge Dan by the way, I would sing midnight at the oasis for you but that would make the room run a mile. And I would definitely not seeing any JIM questions. Because then you would know how much of an acid had I was but. For for me, you know I can't play the guitar I can't sing a song but I'm obsessed with music.

Judge Dan Queen Elizabeth Hall Simon Barbara Yasser Yasser Jacob O'connor Carly Simon Duran Duran John Wick grammy London Stock Exchange Justin Bieber UNMIK Paul McCartney Mary J. Blige Liverpool Abbey Road Studios Elton John Guns Jamie Scott Benard Edwards
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:11 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"That more modern music. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Okay, my rent <Speech_Music_Male> is over thankfully <Speech_Music_Male> you'll get the next few <Speech_Music_Male> months off from hearing <Speech_Music_Male> my incessant pestering <Speech_Music_Male> as guy, and <Speech_Music_Male> I take a break between <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seasons. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you all so much for coming <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with me on this journey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so far it really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> has been a dream come true <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to finally put together <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and release this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> project I've been sitting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on for years <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like I said, season <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two will officially <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> come out in a few months, <Speech_Music_Male> but we'll be <Speech_Music_Male> releasing some special <Speech_Music_Male> content in between <Speech_Music_Male> so that the weight <Speech_Music_Male> isn't too unbearable. <Speech_Music_Male> Make sure to follow <Speech_Music_Male> the show on instagram <Speech_Music_Male> and twitter at <Speech_Music_Male> simplex. <Speech_Male> So you can stay in <Speech_Male> the know during the <Speech_Male> season and. 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"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"This song was a huge success going number one on the US Billboard Dance Charts Daft punk blended the funk soul and disco of the past with the electronic instrumentation of the present directly admitting they made the song around the world with Sheikh amount rogers in mind their first two albums nineteen ninety-seven homework and two thousand one's discovery sample chic sister sledge Barry Manilow Barry White Electric Light Orchestra and a dozen other funk and disco artists from the height of disco. In fact, many called the discovery album. Not House but post disco this demonstrated the ability for them to be melodic and groovy not just the mindless repetitive drumbeats much of the mainstream had written off the John to be in two thousand, thirteen daft punk released one of their most commercially successful albums today random access memories stepping away from drum machines they reverted to live session musicians to give the project a more organic feel the entire sounds oddly familiar starting with the very first track on the album. Give life back to music take a listen..

Barry Manilow Barry White US rogers John
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:33 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Space. Running. Hanging..

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:38 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Pantheon

"So. We're in June. Nineteen seventy nine good times by chic just came out. There is a considerable public backlash against disco literally leading to a July twelfth after radio DJ Chicago organized a Disco Demolition Derby to literally blow up crates of disco records that they hated. Michael Jackson releases his first solo album. Departing motown records entitled off the wall. It will be looked back on as the last great disco album while off, the wall would prop up disco for another year or two. It was clear that the John was fading out. What was happening in the Bronx with hip hop was staying in the Bronx. However, it went half a decade. Decade without anyone else learning about it copying it or even reporting about it, but somehow new. Jersey raised white new wave artists Debbie Harry of the band blondie found out about it, and joined the scene by meeting and befriending Fab, five Freddy a graffiti artist and early hip hop promoter. It was this same summer of Nineteen seventy-nine when everything was blowing up with disco. That blondie invites Nile Rodgers himself to a party in a bronx playground. It's there that Rogers saw hip hop for the first time witnessing DJ's cut loop and scratch his song. Good Times while emcees rapped over it. You know what I'll just let him tell the story. was like the end of Nineteen seventy-nine. Beginning of one thousand, nine, hundred eighty. This thing this movement started to develop in New York City. That I have become. Loosely aware of because of my friendship with with Blondie with Debbie Chris. And they said Hey, you gotta come up to a hip hop. which is what they called it. They said a hit. And they were play the break of my song. Good Times, and they would just rap and rapping rap. For hours and hours and hours. and. I had never seen anything like that. I mean you could. I lived for the first time I saw. They took me to a CL-. They took me to a high school in Queens and then they took me to a spot in the Bronx. And all they played, was one song just over and over again, and it was just the breakdown to good time. It would just go good, good, good, good, good good. A few months after that after half a decade underground, the first hip hop song is recorded and released on September sixteenth, nine, hundred, seventy, nine, interpreting the good times baseline to provide support for possibly the most influential and well known rappers in history..

Good Times Bronx Rogers Nile Rodgers Debbie Harry Michael Jackson motown Debbie Chris New York City Chicago Queens DJ Fab Freddy
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"By now a clear line has been drawn between good authentic disco music and bad disco, the influx of artists and labels into the John. Who knew nothing about the history of disco led to the market, being over saturated with meaningless robotically manufactured songs as White America to hold the John Jonah. The black youth who originated a decade, prior were pushed back into the underground to develop a new art form, continuing the cycle of musical innovation I discussed in. In the beginning while the record label started obsessing over the four on the floor, beat to the detriment of meaningful groove, a few disco, DJ's in the early nineteen seventies notice that executives were missing the point monotonous repetition of kick. Trump is not the only way that makes people dance. They realized that there was something else intrinsic to the rb soul, and particularly funk records that made people dance in the Funk tradition pioneered by James Brown there. There would be a breakdown section somewhere in the song. This is a deviation from the driving groove where the bass and drums can do a quick fill, freestyle or solo these quick Solos had higher energy and intensity than the surrounding song and people like Bronx raised Dj Cool Herk noticed these break beats as really driving the dancers onto the dance floor, particularly young bachelors who didn't necessarily have a partner to disco dance with he initially tried to play. Play only in the break of a series of songs one after another however most breaks are only fifteen seconds meaning. He was switching records every fifteen seconds eventually, he figured out how to lift the needle off of a record to play the break over and over again, guessing as to where to drop the needle to catch the beat. It was Finicky, but he didn't really care. He was having fun, and the crowd loved it coming from Jamaica. Bring the sound system parties of the Caribbean to the US building, a massive wallace speakers wherever he performed elsewhere in the Bronx Jamaican descendant grandmaster flash used his training to help invent modern mixers as we know them today with a cross baiter volume failures, and most importantly his peekaboo system, which allowed him to preview the next song before playing it for the dance. Dance floor this allowed him to use two copies of the same record to precisely time his loops. Creating effortless mixes funk breakdowns that could last hours as discos formed out of these Funk bands. The brakes followed often happening after course, and before averse deviating from the manufactured in a small moment of organic artistic freedom, expressed by whatever house band was recording that. That day, so by the end of nineteen seventy-five five Dj cool, herk, grandma's for flash and eventually African Bomba could play disco record from the start. Let the couples dance. Then when the break came, they would loop it with their peekaboo system and duplicate records. Suddenly, the young single kids would step off the wall to impress the room with their energetic freestyle. Freestyle. Dancing to the brakes. These kids eventually were just called the break dancers unsurprisingly and be boy and girl culture was formed each Dj took a different territory in the Bronx. Setting up underground clubs separate from the discos where they could just play break beats all night long as dance battles happened on the floor, taking any available space from basements to abandoned. Abandoned warehouses alleyways to empty basketball courts. They each had their own style. Cool herk focused on having the biggest and loudest sound system invoke affects grandmaster Flash, pioneered and mastered what we now call turntable ISM with grand wizzard, Theodore, inventing scratching and the physical beat box African Mamba on the other hand was all about the music selection. He traveled all over the world. World seeking the craziest most obscure breaks on the planet, no matter the genre. Eventually, all of these deejays ran into the same problem. Ten minutes of an instrumental break on Luke is just as boring as discos becoming again, call her turn to his Jamaican roots to find a solution in the nineteen fifties and sixties, tradition Reagan music was formed called toasting were. Were the master of ceremonies or MC of a party would stand on the stage with the band, and to a mixture of Scouting Colin response and riffing off of the crowd Jamaican immigrants in the Bronx brought this with them, combining it with African American vernacular English and an announcer style from radio called Jive. Talk or jive rhyme directly born out of A. Hip and urban persona early black radio hosts were expected to maintain on air in the fifties and sixties, so now with the microphones added in emcees were able to provide some poetic rhyming on top of Lucht, break creating something new out of existing material, these breaks would become some of the most recognized and sampled in history like Apache by incredible Bongo..

Bronx Theodore Trump White America John Jonah James Brown Caribbean Jamaica basketball African Mamba A. Hip US partner Luke Colin Reagan
"nile rodgers" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:09 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Pantheon

"Decades..

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:09 min | 11 months ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Decades..

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Middle here. Hey Adam Buxton here now. It was at this point in the conversation when Niles team started looking at their watches and it became clear that his car had arrived to take him to his next appointment but I had bought Nyla gift. A copy of one of my favorite books and I wanted to see what he thought of it before I left. The book was kids. Right jokes collection assembled by the moderator of a kids joke website who particularly enjoyed the author and more nonsensical submissions and has since collected them and tumbler form and on twitter. And in this book people familiar with my stuff will have heard me reading some of these out before they make me laugh. A great deal bought. What would you think of them? The thing is that I'd spent several weeks immersed in the world of Nile listening to his music reading his book and I felt that I knew him quite well and that we were GonNa get on like a house on fire and that he definitely would love kids right jokes and I couldn't wait to give it to him and I just imagined US reading them out to each other rolling around but then sat in one of the Little Studios and Abbey Road with people giving us the wind up gesture it It just didn't go the way that I'd hoped don't get me wrong. It wasn't like the time I met Paul Weller. I don't think now wanted to physically hurt me but as soon as I started reading the first one out I realized I've made an error in judgment but still I did and I even got Nile to read one out himself here. We go for this last little bit. I have a voice that I read these in in my head. What do you call a sandwich with? Legs Brady Legs Brady leg. What did the goat say to the dog? Nice buttock you loser like that. So that's yours to study on the toilet or wherever how we doing? Are they wrap yes. Yeah Yeah Yeah it seems I mean I thought as much which is why unleash the Foot which is bit of a conversation. Stopper I once read out some of those jokes on Christmas Day when we're having family lunch. When my dad was sat around with us I thought they were going to go down better than they did. Yeah my dad is a couple that work. Hey give us what Knock knock. Who's there the big bed will? What do you want colored eggs? What color red I think. That's just the DNA great comedy. Wait why did the frog cross the road to get a New Tong? Why because it's tongue was stuck in a velcro tree continue? Hey welcome back. Podcasts Nile rudge's probably as I speak walking around nude in lockdown reading aloud from kids right jokes and laughing and laughing and it's very exciting to me now and I am extremely grateful to his team who kind and helpful and friendly and it was a fun day. I just wish I could have talked to him for longer Because he does have an extraordinary number of fascinating stories to tell. I do recommend his book. La Freak an upside down story of family disco and destiny. You'll find a link to it in the description of this cost as well as linked to the kids right jokes book also in the description he will find links to another extraordinary book it's called Ramble Book and it is available in audio book form. It's my book case. You haven't been listening to the PODCAST for awhile anyway. Give it a listen if you have already ported over. Eleven hours of Great great stories from my adolescents stuff about my relationship with my dad and having children of my own arguments on trains and then of course over an hour of Waffle with Colin Bolts at the end of it. All an exclusive podcast episode. If you get that audio book by the way if you're one of the people that have already bought it. Thank you so much. I'm very grateful. It took such a long time to put it together and I really appreciate all the Nice reviews and stuff that people have left for it. It makes a huge difference and for those of you keen to enjoy the book in physical form. The heart back is going to be out at the end of August but right now. There is a limited number of signed copies released. They will be signed By next week available for preorder at waterstones to save waterstones or waterstone's flintstones or flintstones. Thank you very much indeed to shameless Murphy. Mitchell full production support and Anika Jason for additional editing on this episode much appreciated both thanks to a costs for their continued support of this podcast. Most of all to you. I hope you're doing all right wherever you are and I hope you'll come back for another episode of this podcast. Rosie killer is back. Tiny hairy thoroughbred stallion be. Well put cats. I love you Success and when am?.

Nile rudge Adam Buxton Nile twitter Paul Weller US Niles Brady Little Studios Colin Bolts Mitchell Anika Jason waterstone Murphy
"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Dan do? Bamboo Babylon let through the radio. And they're part of the thing you know so to me. It was critical to orchestrate Bowie. He was so into the idea. He wanted to be bigger. He wanted not necessarily a bigger star but he wanted his sound to be bigger and represent these other facets of music that he loves but didn't have people around him to do it yet right. This is one of the things that characterizes Bowie is that throughout his career he had a real genius for finding exactly the right people the most talented people to help him realize right here right at that time but then of course one problem. I suppose you could say with that. Approach is that people often end up feeling quite used or maybe a little bit exploited right. Yeah it's like oh he'll pick you up and he'll be all excited about working with you drop to on onto the next thing and he's got a stable of a new a one of the people that he return to and wanted to work with again but we always comfortable with that arrangement or did you know. I was actually a little bit upset. Because after let's dance was so big. He was now on the cover of Time magazine. And if you read that interview it's almost like I'm not even mentioning. I'm like going dude. You're on the cover of Time magazine because of let's dance and modern love and China girl is he. He's not playing any old music on there as you. Yeah Yeah Yeah. He didn't even know anybody he only personally knew was myself in. Steve Ray Vaughan whom he only met once so everybody on that record were completely unknown to Bowie and he took them as his band. See that's like those are the kind of record I make that my orchestration is now part of the ban so he just took the guys who played that and he figured well you guys can easily play my other stuff but to play. Let's dance and have it sound authentic. I need the people who did the record. So when you see the serious moonlight tour it so it's everybody who's playing on the record right. Save for Steve Ray Vaughan and myself. Yeah we busy doing other things all did he invite you on the road. All everybody invites me on their own. I'm a record producer. Go Out if somebody's music director. Yeah it's funny man as a producer. I don't really find myself following the artists that I've just worked with. It's just that as dedicated as I am to the last artists that I work with. That's how dedicated. I am to the current artists. I'm working with so it is not a huge amount of room in my life because I get so wrapped up into what? I'm doing that for that record and feel. Hey whatever man. We were like hanging out together every single day. And now I call you go Niles and move vision who he. He'll back honestly. That's really one of my biggest problems because I get super crazy with the car with whatever the current project is so I know that I didn't really follow what was happening with Bowie much. Except you know I'd get a phone call every now and then from the guys on the road and they were all my guys those everybody's calling me and telling me two different stories a lot of good and a lot of bad but you know just rock and roll that's just normal and then David Call me a few other projects so dancing in the streets. With him in Jagger for live aid now is cool. Because it's like I had three cool things going on at the same time at live eight. I had the Thompson Twins. I had just finished. Madonna ahead Duran Duran in the middle of that stuff and Oh and it just shows you how close I was billy idol because if you look at live aid the guitar player I brought along with me with Steve Stevens. Who was billy idol's lead guitar player? So I was having a blast. We I was the early eighties was really. I think my time to shine. I had so many great relationship. So many great records in excess Bowie Madonna. A bunch of Duran Duran records Paul Simon B fifty. Two's he worked with such a diverse T- of time and styles and all that but you'll sort of notably absent from the hip hop genre. Why do you think that is so after the whole disco sucks thing happened all the black music that should happen after disco was sort of political and when I say political meaning you had to be part of that scene so if you think about the way people dressed in the eighties when you think about groups kid and play and you know to see and and guy and all those kinds of bands you had to be in that scene? Well we had already developed as a sort of stylish couture type of ban would have been strange for us to go in the street direction when we weren't even though we were from the streets if you will but we clearly established that we weren't right. I mean so so. There was a word that they used to use. In hip hop called perpetrating. And the last thing that we wanted to be were perpetrators even on run DMC. They say voice of the eighties perpetrating. A fraud you're rock cool wet. Keep the crowd co board. You're the kind of guy that girlie Nord. I'm driving caddies. You fix in a four. So we didn't want to be perpetrated. We didn't want to pretend. Like oh mallow and said we're in the HIP hop we're down from the streets where drug dealers we're not. We're none of those things but we did right good times yen. Good Times was like the Rosetta Stone of Hip hop right. That's exactly right. And that was because of writing. Good times we became sort of like hip hop legends in a strange way because when you would go and see him sees that was the joint. I mean that Sh- view never heard any other record. I I remember the first time that Debbie Harry and Chris. Stein took me to what they call going to a hip hop The only record they played was good times and it was about fifty sixty. Mc's just dropping their rhymes over good times but even regular aren be after that. Like New Jack. Swing and things like that. Which is why I have a cool New Jack. Swing Song on my new record because now I don't have to be perpetrate. I don't have to be part of that scene. I could do it. Just because I love the music. Perpetrating is not exactly the same thing as cultural appropriation. Though is it or is it on some level. It's like you're pretending to be down with something just because it's happening where it's not part of your DNA. It's sort of like you're doing the hot thing like people. And it's well documented that I turned down a lot of people who wanted me to make disco records for them and I kept saying no. You're not a disco artist. Why would I do? That doesn't make any sense. Like I turned down people. Somebody told me Dolly Parton once you do a disco gone. Why did I do that? Cool country record for Dolly Parton. That'd be great They want us to make a disco record for the stones. They want us to make a disco records for Bette Midler aretha Franklin which is probably the the sort of story that actually hit the streets was she had written this song call. I'm going to be the only star tonight down at the disco. We were out to our house for a meeting. We were excited. She played the song and I was like I'm not going to be the guy that goes down in history as the one who made aretha Franklin the queen of Souls Disco Record. No way a today. That ain't gonNA happen but the way she told the story was that she fired us. The truth was that we know lettuce right your song because this was when we were writing Diana Ross. You know right after we do this. We'll do your record. It'd be great but but you want it wasn't a political statement. It wasn't like no. This is an authentic like what I'm getting out. I suppose is that obviously. Now there's so much discussion about cultural appropriation and when it comes to music. It's such a strange area because music is all about cultural appropriation. Of course as a matter of fact Bowie David. This was the greatest thing in the world so when we were doing. Let's dance right. We're listening to all these different records. I mean from all sorts of genres and when we listen to twist and shout by the Eisley Brothers which is how. Start THE RECORD. We do that. Dominant Seventh Actually go to ninth actually pyramid and we do the That bit. I said David you know like we report off the Eisley brothers. He says. No No. It's not ripping off. It's what we call postmodern. When what did he call it? Post modernistic re expressionism. Something like that. Post modernist degree expressionism. I was like okay. I'll buy expressionism. I'll take it Yeah it was like going okay. We're re expressing in a post modernistic way. We're not doing twist and we're doing. Let's dance and so yeah so you weren't sitting asked of getting worried about that amazing. China Goal Rift. Because you felt that some people might feel that it was cultural appropriation and it wasn't it was like a parody of Oriental sounds that wasn't yours to no. I I I came up with that Lake because I didn't think China girl sounded commercial and he wanted to hit by going well. This is the only thing that I think links the words China girl it had to have some kind of rhythm and it was interesting how I came up with that. After listening to the progression of Doon Doon Doon. To Go don't don't do. They do do do was they got Major to major seven two major six What is that sound? I and I thought about the Rufus. Song sweet thing did you. You do eat. We do do do our. Oh really do did I was like Holy Cow. Monessen something here. Yeah and I totally did it. Because of Chord changes in the rufus song sweet thing and because it didn't have a hook to me. Do you ever hear covers your own music and enjoy them. Oh yeah have you ever heard you the band. The full sure at did you hear that lost in music. Thinks it's quite folded laws music. Yeah figure Verse Chords. Must be the out going out now right now. This is this is. Aw Yeah this is it. You're in the.

Bowie Time magazine China Bowie David Duran Duran billy idol Dolly Parton Steve Ray Vaughan Doon Doon Doon aretha Franklin producer Thompson Twins Dan Diana Ross Steve Stevens fraud Niles Jagger girlie Nord
"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

17:20 min | 1 year ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Men sixty six years old. Now this is. We're talking like fifty years ago. Yeah no I haven't. I think that was actually the last time I did. It says these days. Yeah I think you know what I bet you. That was the last time I sniff glue. Now I think of it because the whole thing was no was it moves was but it wasn't. I wasn't once I got into it and nothing really bad happened. I somehow made my way home. Everything was cool except the police there looking for me because my grandmother couldn't find me for a day or two wasn't nothing bad so it was like a rollercoaster. You know you're afraid but see it's not like a real coca. I didn't know Anything Vale is going to happen in the first place so I wasn't afraid so the fear thing never happened So I just said wow. That was fun and I probably associated Lsd With beautiful older girls in like they were cool. This is amazing and not only that but this music made sense to you. The music made so much sense. It was ridiculous I came home. Of course I had the doors whole album remembered but it was the the end that I particularly like but Of course light. My fire was on there and stuff but I remember the trucks wild thing that's so basic though but you still got something out of it. Oh Yeah in So you went a snob Bono. No I loved it. I had a blast. I mean how could you not you have all these beautiful older women around you and they're treating you like you're something special because you're such an oddity that you were like. Et or something like could we? We were nothing like the people in that room. We were so our embiid out. We're so silk suited and ruffled shirts and white shoes. We had that we used to call. I'd talion 's know we were totally different. You like celebrity guests exactly. It's like hey come on man the water's fine. That was the beginning of my sort of deep deep dive into Surf Music and psychedelic music. We went to the beach boys. At all of that point everybody liked the beach boys. They went weird yet. They weren't yeah. The beach boys were just regular American pop music but it was great. It was weird like America was a super singles driven market. So instead of saying I'm into stepping Wolfram into the Scorpions or it's like I'm into a song amid into ran an Anna Wayne and Air Air Narain Air Nanu Nair Incidents Pepe. The you know you just like songs so I would listen to the songs that we play you know all the cool surf music and like the ventures and you hear that Twangy Duane Eddy kind of guitar and stuff but still my junior high school was still in in the hood in the ghetto. So at the same time that I was listening to that we'd have our weekly dances where they were playing. You know the marvel. Let's and you know when the temptations and Chris Clark and Edwin Starr and so you. I had a very a very balanced. I in the orchestra. We played symphonic music and our program. Was you know deep with Prokofiev but Beethoven you know a lot of guard you know in cooler newer composers a lot of Russian composers. I said like Prokofiev Schakowsky and yeah we. We were cool. Yeah we'RE COOL. We're good orchestra. We're we're pretty good for junior high school band What was your first professional? Gig As a musician. Then first time I consider myself getting paid for making music of an panhandling on the street was I played flute on. No Jewish traditional song called body. Now it's like wow I'm a real musician. I got money for playing. This is cool but then I quickly switch from woodwinds to guitar. And I'm trying to remember the first time. I remember getting paid money to play guitar. I don't even know what the song was. I just remembered the situation and it was clear that the guys who are in control of the money with gangsters and it was clear that we were going to write a song and they were GonNa pay us and we'll just get kicked out of the studio and they were going to keep the publishing you know and say that they wrote the song But the other musicians on the date explained to me that that's just how music business was. And if you WanNa make a living you gotta do this all the time so I did a bunch of records where I would you know in today's world I would have been the CO writer But I got nothing right so I'm gonNA fast forward now to the eighties. You talk fondly in your book about the eighty s and of course a decade in which you worked with people like Madonna and the B fifty. Two's I didn't know that actually until I read it. That's Melvin that. I really love great. Al Cosmic thing is wonderful really is scraped. But that doesn't immediately say now Rogers to me. Do you know what I mean. I now now that I know it. It does but it's it's a lot of stuff that you do so think about this. The beef the two albums before cosmic thing love shack deadbeat club Rome I wish true to their sound but vocally. I'm not trying to take credit here on. Just give an example vocally. Don't you think they sound better singing on the cosmic thing album than they sound on earlier records? Yeah just quality of vocal sure. No it's altogether a more lush accessible. Exactly yeah and it was something that we slightly argued over in the beginning and I said just try. Just trust me and try it. I said this is an old rock and roll trick that people have been using since the beginning of time multi track recording. Try this and I try and and when you believe that it's just cindy singing. It sounds like it's just cindy singing but it's not and when you believe that well. Fred of courses completely undeniable. Yes and of course it look at how much I featured Fred on on that album because I thought that as a hype person like which became really popular in hip hop as a hype man. Fred was incredible and You know the the guy who's going in it well I. I was getting ready to doing Fred Toys. But in hip hop the person who's not necessarily the feature. Rapper has hype person going. Yoda's my man's always also he gonNA kick it tonight. Come and they're always the one doing the double the accent vocal They'll say something like hip hop who hosted so the hype man backing on low and so the lead guy is going. You know doing the main rap the hype man is like getting the crown hyped up and and typically before you go right go to a hip hop show. You'll see the hype person come out. I would've been views a great hype man public enemy flavor flavors like a great great great height man but he was also part of public enemy. Yeah so you turn so. I turned fred into the great hype. Man I thought he was because he sounded like a carnival Barker to. I've seen a gazillion movie. Sound like that'd be club. Yeah Yeah Right. I wanted to have him do that. Thing and most especially yes say painted sign outside around. Yeah that's exactly right. I love the idea of you going to parties at Anthony. Michael Hall's place with Durant Durant right. I mean how you can't really get more than that and yeah and that was easy. 'cause that was around the corner one block from my apartment that was super eighties It's funny because we're still sort of friends to this day. Even though we haven't seen each other for a long time I still have clothing in my closet that he gave me on those wonderful Coke Doubt Nights. Yeah Right so those were your coke. Still when when did you clean up? I got sober Exactly twenty four years ago. On August fifteenth and It was interesting because it was Madonna's birthday party. Madonna's birthday is August sixteenth. But her party was I guess. On a Saturday on the fifteenth. She decided throw on a Saturday. Or maybe a Friday night. I can't remember but I certainly remember the date. It was really horrible. 'cause I don't think just being carried out a Madonna's house back to my hotel would have gotten me sober but what got me. Sober was that earlier that day. I had performed with a really brilliant Cuban musician named nil Lara. And this guy's a genius. He's a super super genius and I was going down to record him for the Jazz Label Blue Note and and he asked me if I wanted to jam with him I was like of course you kidding me. Get the play with nil. Lara live and started playing and I knew that he was sort of real. Cuban hero in Miami beach so I had to do something more than just play cool guitar so I was pretty high and I started doing the Hendrix. Tricked PLAYING GUITAR BEHIND MY HEAD. My back in the whole bit and showing all yeahs like Levin a little silly and the crowd was going crazy I was like oh I'm killing it and the next day I went to Nils House to work on the record and he said hey menu he would. She played last night. I said sure. And he played it back for me and it was pretty dreadful Now probably wasn't nearly as bad as I think but the fact is is that it wasn't as good as I remembered and that made me believe in one instant that I was going crazy because my memory was like wow hours killing it but the tape doesn't lie and tape said no you were not killing it. You were at best average so that was the that was all. It took that that was it. I called Some friends of mine and I told him to come down to Miami beach because I was hallucinating. I I knew about hallucination because I was the acid head when I was younger. But now I hadn't taken LSD. And I was actually suffering from my very first my one and only bout of cocaine psychosis I. The mob was out to kill me. I call some friends of mine. Who Were Detectives Homicide Detectives and said? Look I'll pay for the private jet for you to come on. Now come down get me. Get me out of his hotel. We'll go back to the airport. Fly Back to New York and it was all in my head. So what year would that have been? That would have been ninety four. So that's good Eleven years after you met and worked with Bowie right. Who'd of course Bain threw himself? Did you ever use to exchange cocaine psychosis stories with him? No No? He was all cleaned up by that he was. He was clean when we were doing. Let's dance. He was cleaning eighty two. He had the serenity prayer in Japanese tattooed on his leg. I even ask him what that was when I saw it. So wow that's cool. What does that Kanji he says? That's the serenity prayer in Japanese. What's the prayer? And then he told me it's like oh uh-huh and was there ever a discussion about like David's clean now so you can't be doing anything around him and or was that is just a sign of respect. Yeah I didn't write. And what was the initial approach? Then how did he he got in touch with? You just thought well. I want to work with this guy. I met him in an after hours club. I walked in with billy idol. He and I used to go out a lot together. Billy still a wonderful guy. Just saw him. We just play Coachella and I saw. Billy is great. I love the dude But we go out together all the time we really party buddies and And when we walked into this new club called a continental billy and I were walking in together and he looked me with as David fucking bow and when he said by we he barked back. David Bow Anyway. Hello billions of cool dude in the world man. He's like so awesome. Didn't even like break a step really proper view John. Yup but the thing is that because Iranian bar fight it and slow down or anything like that and I was already over talking to Bowie like right away. I saw him. I was just like we stuck together like glue. I introduced myself said that. Hey man you live in the same building with all my friends that I grew up with which all young Americans Luther Vandross and Carlos Alamar and Carlos. His wife Robin who sang on every chic record in the beginning as did luther so I was like yeah. You know. We're sort of like family and don't realize it yet but anyway we started chatting next thing you know we were talking about jazz all night and I was so impressed with his indepth knowledge of jazz from like the most straight ahead to the most avant garde I was like this. The real dude man. He's like he wasn't like just out stuff. That people knew like that was sort of popular in the hippie set like Sun. Raw Sunrise was out there so people dug him but he knew like the deep stuff. He knew Eric Palffy. He'd Taylor he was into it. I mean he didn't just know it he was into it he could sing the heads and all that sort of stuff because he played Sax. I I didn't really know that about him so he was fascinated because he didn't realize that I knew that and he didn't realize that I orchestrated and did all the sheikh records who like. Wow you do that yourself of course is is. There's never been a record. I've done that. Anyone has ever stood on the conductor's podium except for me. I mean never i. I don't just do your arrangements. Sit Back and let somebody else conduct. I do derangement. Then I'm in the room with all the musicians. Wow it's amazing so Yes and that was a whole element that you added to to well to the genre though you orchestrated those right brought something totally new cinematic and exciting and it just suddenly you got something. Different From Chart Record. Write that transported you somewhere else because I never treated the sweetening like they weren't part of the ban. See that's the difference between my style of orchestration. Is that a lot of people who orchestrated. They wanted the orchestration to sort of. Stand out in a weird way my style. You know you listen to a song light modern love and you know those horns part of the band or even let's dance. Let's dance. Who Reggie Dan do? Bamboo Babylon let through the radio. And they're part of the thing you know so to me. It was critical to orchestrate Bowie..

Fred Toys Madonna Lsd David Bow cocaine Bowie Miami beach Prokofiev Schakowsky cindy Vale Duane Eddy Billy Scorpions billy idol America Luther Vandross writer Melvin
"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"About the clothing. Except if twiggy was wearing a unique twitty's name but now all of a sudden they had these supermodels and there was Imad and Lauren Hutton. And Beverly Johnson and all this stuff and Jerry Jerry Hall and so inspired by Roxy Music. I mean you a hippie though for longtime yes still an probably if I could live certain way and all was right with the world. That would probably be the way to live. How would you define hippie them? Then what did it mean to you and your young. I went to a light even now. I look like like I'm naked at home. That's why people always say to me. Know How come you don't have a big mansion in someone's I it I'd have to have a staff. I WanNa live in a house where I can walk around naked all the drive naked staff you can have. I could. I'm not that cool. I just I think that when I'm it in my own home I could be as relaxes. I WanNa be and I just like being nude. I don't know why as you know it. Just it feels better to me so I never got a house. That was too big to handle. I never wanted that and obviously fashion was always very important to you and that sense of fashion came from your parents. Yeah my father. My stepfather was Jewish. And he be. Yeah exactly Because obviously we grew up sort of black community but The Jewish community in the black community was very closely aligned in those days because a lot of black people worked in the clothing business. You know in the coat rack from store to store to store to warehouse to warehouse and my father was one of those. They used to call them a pilot for flying Jewish airplanes. Which was the slang for those coat rack? He said he was a pilot. L. Out And and my stepfather bobby. His uncle own one of these sort of really cool. Men's clothing stores and New York was a very fashionable place at one time. Probably all the way from the turn of the last century up until right after World War Two After World War. Two American started to get into this leisurely kind of thing. It may have happened during the sixties during the hippie years during the surf years and things like that but up until then I remember even when we went to the movies to the cinema. We'd get dressed up. I would put on a suit. People would go to sporting events in suits and proper hats and the whole bit. I mean if you go back and you look at a film of somebody going to a baseball game in the forties fifties or tennis match. Daryll dressed in suits so. I was born in that era and my parents dressed me like an adult while the other kids were starting to get into this sort of casual clothing. I was still wearing much more formal type of clothing and consequently kids made fun of me but you had your Elbow Tien. Yeah the whole little Lord. Fauntleroy thing really. Pretty funny to be in America in the ghetto dressed like that. But it's really interesting because if you just go back ten or fifteen years prior to that you see all the black kids in the ghetto dress like that and what were your folks dressed like. They were fantastic. My mom would be wearing the latest carnaby street fashion hip stuff and my father. Bobby would be dressed like a Hollywood movie star me all the time I mean it was. They were very young. Though right. Your mother correct me. If I'm wrong was only thirteen when she was pregnant with you right yes. The first time my mom had sex she was thirteen. It was around Christmas Day and She fell pregnant after that incident. Just the very first time. Boom right away Nine months later you could. You could count it from January to September maxine. Oh I was born September nineteen and she made the decision to hang onto you because presumably. Everyone was assuming that she would not look after a actually. That's not quite accurate. She had put me a for adoption as soon as I was born. Baby Boy Goodman is the original birth certificate because I was going to be given up for I was given up for adoption was born and even my father's name was an on there because basically what they did. It was a controversial program. That's now been phased out. But they used to take these children off the streets From the lower east side and send him to western part of America to work on farms and it was basically sort of like indentured slavery in a weird way and it was a lot of eastern European kids. That would come over. You know their families would send them over as the movie. The Godfather and these kids have you know just formed gangs and live on the street and so this one I guess altruistic woman thought that she was doing a real service to these kids would send them to the West and work on farms but in fact it was just cheap labor and They phased out that program but I was sort of the last group of those kids. That was part of that program. But I didn't get sent to work on a farm. I was actually just sent to a hospital. I was born very sickly. And during that time my mom sort of got inspired to go. Reclaim me because of my father's mother who was quite sharp and really a brilliant woman. She spoke Latin Super Roman Catholic and Mother's birth mother's add powerful custodial rights. Even back then so. She was able to manipulate the system. And get me back and and then at that point. My Mom was convinced so it wasn't like she just like she had Her maternal instinct. Got The better of her. Okay that's what I like to say. And so just easier and faster but you got the real story right. Yeah now thank you and how long after you were born to that happened. When did she get get you back? It took a few months because I was already used to the name. Gregory which is why. I'm not really a junior because the woman had named me Gregory and And when my mom went to retrieve me it seemed like the only thing that would calm me. Down was the name Gregory the woman would say. Okay Gregory don't worry I'll get you back soon. So my mother would say repeat the same thing. Okay Gregory Okay Gregory. It'll be fine. It'll be fine but then my my father's mother intervened and said you know we should name him after my son and that's when I became Nile. But because my middle name was gregory only because the woman was calling me. Gregory and my mom was used to it now sort of similar to when you adopt a dog you usually you keep the same name that they call them at the pound It's funny that I put it that way but that's true. My mom continued to call me. Gregory and father's name is Nile Erskine. Rogers but my name is Gregory Rogers Right. And he is one of many soft to heartbreaking stories that are in your book but your scrupulously non judgmental about all the people who are around you living very what we would consider what many of us would consider alternative lifestyles. Pretty Alternative your parents your mother beverly and your Stepfather Bobby. Were both regular heroin. Uses as was my father my biological father and my biological father actually worked for. Bobby's family in the clothing business. So they were friends a matter of fact all of my brothers are half brothers and all of the men who father children with. My mother are all close friends which is weird. That's why in my book. I called variations on a Mormon theme. Because is the central mother and all these different fathers as opposed to one man and all these different women he asked. It's a series of exercises in alternative experimentation that you have had throughout your getting and you write brilliantly about what's the line I wrote it down. A living room would be filled with black and white hipsters suspended in time and space while I ran through the petrified forest of their legs. So this is you aged five six now at that point. I was a little older because that was when we were living on Greenwich Street in the village and when we lost that apartment we moved to East Eighth Street and that would have made me eight years old because I went into the third grade. Okay so to you. You've grown up in this environment with your parents who are sweet to you and you love. Buffet tastic. Yeah Great. But you're just used to the fact that occasionally they will speak very slowly and they will not out mid sentence will so they were. They were beaten Knicks and the beatnik culture was one of everybody spoke slowly because so many of them were heroin users and that just became a five it was like hey man how you doing baby so It was actually like so in America when we had jazz on FM radio the FM radio DJ spoke that way they were they would say things so now. We have the latest record by John Coltrane. It's an experimental record. Know that kind of thing. That's that's how my family spoke. So we sat down to dinner they would say Hey put which my nickname short for pudding pie he put. Can you pass me the salt man? So my parents spoke to me like that and the harshest disciplined they ever doled out was one day. I said the apartment on fire not not the entire apartment but just the window just a very small portion of the pad and accidentally acts. Oh completely I was. I was a boy scout and I was actually. I was a cub scout. I was too young to be a boy scout yet but a billion little campfire out of stick matches not realizing that when they would oxidizing we go down as well as up. Well I burned the window sill. It was like Whoa and I tried to clean it up and next thing I took off all the paint and they came home and my father looked at me. He just stared at me for five. Long minutes had felt like an eternity and is the harshest discipline ever. Because I knew this was heavy. He just stopped speaking not because he was nodding either any went hood. Dig Yourself Man. Dig Yourself now that he was just like saying you know. You're smart enough to be introspective. Look at your activity. How could you be so stupid to not know that when you lit the matches that it was going to burn down as well as up your way too smart for that? Yeah but he was right. I had to dig myself so but that that's how it was. I I never had and this is really interesting. Do you know that in my entire life? My parents never ever told me what time to come home like in today's world like I don't even know how you raise kids in America but when I was a kid typically we played outdoors. We couldn't wait to go outdoors here. We go home. You do your homework as fast as possible..

Gregory Rogers America Bobby Beverly Johnson Jerry Jerry Hall heroin twiggy tennis New York Elbow Tien Roxy Music Lauren Hutton twitty Boy Goodman Daryll Fauntleroy Imad John Coltrane
"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"nile rodgers" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"This week. I'm going to tell you right now. The Price Bay is the to Sushil focused on Sunday and Thursday then on the intro just walking around carpark rice in to to work waiting tinicum. That's what we do. We wait so you want to know how the hell did. I end up book in the Kanga Kanga phone himself Nile Rodgers Tacoma Mate May and if you underpay all candle festival so my friends Shola who worked Lauren Laverne six music she was asking me what I'm GonNa do what guests I'm not going to have and I said well in an ideal world because it's gotten our audience because because without on Friday I know now's manager here. Let me let you in on an email. This is how things work people do favors and he got back to a straightaway. This sounds pretty good and this was a while back said this sounds pretty good. He said email me like you know ten days before and we'll see if we can make it happened so I will. I'm just GONNA have to hold this one out and throw the dice and see what happens so a week before dropped her name. Al just explain more about what we do and they said how long genie will usually we have. We have an hour with our guest. Don't ask table is never possible in the festival on the festival at seen at again our with gas because people just don't arrive and if they do arrive on sat tired and now has been traveling always working always busy and he said I know it's an hour could we do. Maybe four minutes. How's that he said Lo. I give you twenty because he's Nile. You'll forget thirty and I thought well that sounds good but I can't do. I normally do like if we even tried to knock on the door of now's live with you know twenty minutes. I mean even our impossible badly ballygawley bloody primary school the Manas had such a life so couldn't get into it so what was going to do is wrecking brains thinking reformat formatting so why did is asked a few people that I know to ask him a question then I would ask it. Nile so very very different to what normally do in fact I've never really done that before so slide so of jeopardise about <hes> but the questions are gone were so brilliant and I I start off by asking him a question of my own just to eases in then. I got Tim Burgess from the charlatans. Jacqui Abbott from the beautiful South House Jason Williamson from asleep MODs Maverick from six music lame see say scrupulous pep dawn French so massive massive. Thank you <hes> <hes> to all those lovely people who asked the question to now. There was a very emotional woman in the front row who you'll hair. I mean a lot of people very close to his because now he's he's a warm and beautiful and it's very very honest guy. I very gracious and lot fans meeting. Rostro coffee just had a few minutes taking some photos. It was kind kind of overwhelming because there was a moment when he was answering a question is going great detail think it might have been about Bernard and and I just kind of came out myself one craig that's now rogers and his ability legend and he sat my office so snapper out rocket okay. Let's go so we have very different format for me. I can't be more thankful to now and his team for a facilitator in this and making it happen Alex so stage managing everything Tim Peaks Producer Griff obviously Shola my friend at six music thank you none of this would have been possible without so <hes> well. Have you doing if you're having a lying in bed and breakfast. Show Tate enjoy some stories here. This is episode ninety two of the to shop podcast..

Nile Rodgers Shola Kanga Kanga Jason Williamson Lauren Laverne Price Bay Sushil Jacqui Abbott craig Tim Burgess Tim Peaks Tate Alex Producer Griff Bernard rogers twenty minutes four minutes ten days