35 Burst results for "Nile"

Archeologists Unearth an Ancient Pharaonic City in Egypt

John Williams

00:34 sec | 6 d ago

Archeologists Unearth an Ancient Pharaonic City in Egypt

"A 3000 year old lost city south of Cairo. Complete with brick houses, artifacts and tools from ancient times, noted archaeologist So he Hawass said today that an Egyptian mission had discovered the city in the southern province of Luxor. It dates back to what is considered to be a golden era of ancient Egypt. He also said the city was built on the western Bank of the Nile River and was once the largest administrative and industrial settlement off the Empire of the Pharaohs. WGN Sports David and

Hawass Cairo Luxor Western Bank Of The Nile River Egypt Wgn Sports David
22 Mummies Are Moved in a Glittering Display in Cairo

Fresh Air Weekend

00:37 sec | Last week

22 Mummies Are Moved in a Glittering Display in Cairo

"Of 22 royal mummies across Cairo to a massive new museum in the city took place today. The ceremony snakes along the Nile from the Egyptian museum that overlooks Tahrir Square. The newly opened National Museum of Egyptian Civilization transporting 18 Kings and four Queens, mostly from the new Kingdom. Authorities shut down roads along the Nile to transport the mommies in climate controlled case is loaded onto trucks decorated with wings and Arrow inspired decides for the hour long journey from their previous home in the older museum. I'm Janine Herbst, and you're listening to NPR

Tahrir Square National Museum Of Egyptian Ci Egyptian Museum Cairo New Kingdom Janine Herbst NPR
"nile" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:49 min | Last month

"nile" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"As we mentioned earlier There are multiple egyptian gods and goddesses tied up with the inundation and ultimately with the nile. So if you if you were ever read anywhere you see. Like a god or goddess of the ancient egyptian pantheon described as the god of the nile than that is that is that is at least an over simplification of things because there is no one true god of the nile. There's no one central god even of the inundation but rather different divine beings that represent different parts of it which which is Which i think makes a lot of sense because again if this river and this annual flooding is so central to life and your view of the of the universe then it's going to be to. There's too complicated to have one figure one sort of you know a humanoid apparition summing up. Well yes. And i think you can see ways in which the inundation the yearly inundation of the nile took up so much of the brain space of ancient egyptian people's that it becomes a central sort of metaphor for anything that is overwhelming or unpredictable or bringing great Great riches or bringing bringing great destruction Was looking at a different part of geraldine pinches. A handbook on egyptian mythology. And there's one part where she's talking about one of the stories of the poisoning of the god. Ray and i think the story i believe is called the true name of ray and There there's a part where she quotes from a from a translation of the tax that said after he's been poisoned. The poison had overwhelmed his body. Like the inundation overwhelms everything in its path so. It's just this ready-made metaphor. It's the imagery that easily comes to mind whenever you're thinking about Any number of different dynamics. Yeah yeah in the same way that we depend so much on various technologies today are there. You know to draw metaphors from to make sense of what we're doing and The world we're living in Well i i might compare it to the metaphor of like The metaphors of the seasons in many other cultures that the inundation metaphor could be as common and easily accessed when one is searching for something with which to compare the thing. You're talking about right now to the way that we so easily reach for metaphors about winter turning into spring you know spring wrong or something now is the winter of our discontent exactly. Yeah you would say something more on the lines of now is the inundation of our discontent or content depending on how it goes. It's inundation time in america so you know with more on on the in a bit but basically the inundation itself was seen as part of the divine order of things or or not which is generally spelled m. a. t. In english and creator of all things though ultimately there's less emphasis on this in ancient egyptian mythology is the sign. The ancient egyptians were the children of the sun and the egyptian world existed at the center. and in its Divine order All encompassing and surrounding you had the primeval waters of none out of which the creator god emerged and the nile..

egyptian today america one part egyptians geraldine one figure one of the stories english one yearly
A Look at Postpartum in the Bible

Your Grandparents Did What?

04:33 min | Last month

A Look at Postpartum in the Bible

"Oldest record of postpartum instructions can be found in the old testament. Of course okay. So on leviticus. Twelve five which rate twelve five discussion already as a biblical scholar cracked rachel a biblical biblical assessment name. You do She must not touch anything sacred or go into a sanctuary until the days of her purification or complete because women are unclean after giving birth. Okay to mention children. The lord's children. I mean it's a good thing that women are pushed into doing right and then also then are also coming on. Babies were born like not consensually many and then once they are born now. You're like some dirty unclean. He them so offer. Rest if you had a son you would get thirty three to forty days. Okay and a daughter would give you sixty six to eighty days because the manar leslie yes. Inherently the original sin like from the bible. Yes from eve the whole yes. Women are just inherently cling from birth. There's nothing you could do get it like you're just born a woman you're born as a biblical scholar of us are born sinners right. Yes that's part of it. I i did take a world history. Colonised that i showed up to bolt right western religion. Yes we are. All born centers So back to my biblical scholar nece the postpartum depicted in the bible. Had new more bleeding at than did with resting. Okay back to the sin so it didn't really matter that you were healing. You just gave per day jim. Fuck like when you're done being dirty. He them disgusting anger women harm. You can come back okay. Carrie good moving to any ancient egypt. K new mothers were advised to have their backs rubbed. Great with oil sounds great in which a nile perch had been sued. You want they wanted to increase increase airflow milk. It's not how you do at bam smelly fish. You just get dirty old dead fish dirty old oil studio s can you imagine so Eating a mouse was thought to cure a number of ills and it was not the extent mother. Eight the mouse. She could pass along those cures through her milk. No passing the hantavirus through your milk or other Diseases of Yeah the roads are disgusting. Disease carriers yes so okay. Menstrual blood was another potent medicine and it was rebuilding infant to drive away any demons that might wish to hundred child. I mean so you just put your one station blood. I'm but like okay. So but yeah. Like i don't know if there's a distinction between measure blood in postpartum bleeding right like who different actions yet not that they would necessarily understanding. No i guess they just thought Baby on your period. Just blow up coming for coming out. Yeah you're not talking disagree about like shedding your lining with ovulation alerts as being a you being a Open wound inside of your body. Yes yep so. Ancient greece and the birth was followed by a period of rest lasting roughly forty days from other child which the forty day thing comes up over and over and over and over again. It's crazy to me i'm attempts. I read the theory days. And i don't know why i don't know if it's just like a nice number i'm guessing it hasn't been new six week postpartum thing which we also subscribe to now like when you go get your first offers visit. Yeah postpartum is it must. I guess there's an again. I was actually going to ask you that too because i was like when is how many visits like win is the first time now d- touchdown with a doctor after you give birth and i was released weeks weeks. It's horrifying come your every two seconds then buy post-partum dangerous tyner or person like a recovering because there's just so many things that can go wrong because you go to your pediatrician. A lot. they're like surf. Doctor is like laying is not fair. to your pediatrician. Auto be keeping an eye out. I don't think that. I think people care enough about birth parents. No

Rachel Carrie Egypt JIM Greece
The Toasty Podcast 41 #guestweek | Fabian Rafael - burst 03

The Toasty Podcast

03:24 min | Last month

The Toasty Podcast 41 #guestweek | Fabian Rafael - burst 03

"What's up guys is the toasty podcast. Money sky we'll talk about controversial topics in casual conversation and today. I have the proper bartender which he'll probably explain more of that anyway and matt can't be here. Sorry guys but let's toasty. What the heck do you do man. So thanks for the introduction. Yes i am. Social media not grew but on social media. My tag is proper bartender What i do is i supply beverage. Consultancy direct coverage programs. I develop them as well. A bar management and for typically the most recent program that i had was based in the stockyards unfortunately as we are all familiar with current events that was unable to last unfortunately did not receive the type of funding or direction that we envisioned that it would be able to receive in those regards and we just weren't able to the ownership wasn't able to hold on and we had to let it go but it was a program that was very very very proud of it was the excuse me it was. The only pre through post prohibition craft cocktail bar in fort worth little like this is like Like old school kind of sure absolutely so we're trying to say it was very much old school something it was authentic self. It was originally established in nineteen eleven. Right it's been a few things in the time period but it was actually texas. I gambling hall and salute so in nineteen eleven. What happened was they opened up again home saloon soon. After as as we're all familiar with prohibition hit now prohibition for those who are aware means that basically the consumption and production of alcohol became legal while when that happened Gambling was still legal. So what they did was. They moved at the bar downstairs hidden and they kept the gambling room upstairs. Interestingly enough soon. After the repeal of prohibition gambling in the state of texas became illegal so in order to fool the fuzz if you will the old switcheroo took place and they moved the bar upstairs and downstairs and it's a really great space. It's it's the history. There's incredible the original owner of time. So the downstairs still there. The downstairs is all american oak tables and chairs. It was actually attained that way because at the time the original owner gave a loan out to a gentleman who was a friend of his and he was unable to pay back said loan but the joe men was a carpenter and he worked at the local lumber mill. Yeah so in order to reimburse him he actually built him. Twenty tables and eighty chairs out of oak. And those things are sturdy and place has an incredible history. I mean we have people like we had people like bonnie and clyde we had Benny binion all of these historical figures who of helped form the the the the good guy bad guy type mentality of the wild west of even before it was all start becoming hollywood ask is

Matt Fort Worth Texas Joe Men Benny Binion Clyde Bonnie Hollywood
Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

podnews

02:57 min | Last month

Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

"Browns bean spreaker and captivate all subjects to eight to nile attack. The same attackers appear to have been involved. We were wondering why they targeted podcast hosts so we talked to them. You'll find that full report in our show notes and our newsletter today. A company called. Happy scribe is publishing automated transcripts of podcasters without the parent's consent of many of the publishers. We learned today. Cumulus media owner of westwood. One has its achieved more than one billion downloads. In two thousand twenty podcasting revenue grew forty percent last year to they say. They've made their bet on partnership arrangements with talent as opposed to going out and spending a lot of money on it or infrastructure the company uses spotify owned megaphone backtracks has launched a tool that monitors your head gesture movements. The tool requires the listener to be using airpods pro headphones investor. Andrew wilkinson says in a tweet. He's removing podcasts. From his phone because podcastone mostly people repeating ideas. You already agree with or talking about things that trigger anxiety. He's co founder of tiny capital which invests in ios podcast app castro podcast membership platform super fast and podcast producer. Righto media try and digital has released the latest podcast ranker's for the us and latin. America they're incomplete ranker's containing participating publishers only notably the ranker's don't include. I heart radio podcasts. Triton digital is being bought by the company echoing the open independent nature of podcasting and writing in the financial times fulmer spotify chief economist will page notes that major labels released one point two million songs in two thousand and twenty but diy artists released nine point five million songs the music industry. He says he's making more money but has more mouths to feed. Iv is a new podcast app. That offers a way to follow. Topics tags hosts or podcasts. Catholic part is also a new podcast for android with a great name. Mavi star homa smart speaker in spain from canada now incorporates. I've is podcast catalog. And i will be speaking at the rain. Podcast business summit with npr's. Brian moffatt tickets are free and available now from link in our show notes and our newsletter. Today and in paul cost us the journal has an interview with dominion voting systems. Ceo john pelos today. His company has filed three defamation lawsuits against tv networks. Saying his excellently. One hundred percent accurate and very handsome. Voting machines are perfect. Which of course they absolutely are and nassar's curious universe is the first podcast recorded on another planet if features raw recorded sounds from the mars perseverance rover

Andrew Wilkinson Tiny Capital Spotify Triton Digital Browns Westwood Cumulus America Brian Moffatt Dominion Voting Systems Ceo John Pelos NPR Spain Canada The Journal Nassar Paul
Tony Bobulinski, Hunter Biden and China

Ben Shapiro

05:01 min | 3 months ago

Tony Bobulinski, Hunter Biden and China

"The Wall Street Journal has a couple of reports detail in the rest of the sort of Bob Belinsky story one. The headlines has. Hunter Biden, Sex business partner alleges Father knew about venture, however. Corporate records reviewed by The Wall Street Journal show no record for Joe Biden. According to The Wall Street Journal. The Biden campaign denied that Joe had any involvement in this Chinese venture with this oil company or stood to gain by it. Belinsky said he was rankled by Joe Biden's public statements. He never discussed the international business activities of Hunter and other family members. He also cited nearly $5 million in payments. A Senate Republican report last month said that C E F C made $200 law firm has another reason to come forward. Jablonski said he took part in the meeting with Hunter, Joe Biden and Joe Biden's brother, James Biden in L. A in 2017 when they discussed the Biden family business plans with the Chinese, of which Joe Biden was plainly familiar, at least at a high level. Biden campaign spokesman didn't immediately respond to a question about the alleged meeting with Bob Belinsky, James Biden and attorney for Hunter. Biden didn't respond to requests for comment. And then they, of course issued from the campaign. This blanket denial. Text messages and emails related to the venture that were provided to the journal. Bye Bye. Belinsky, mainly from the spring and summer of 2017 Don't show either Hunter Biden or James Biden discussing a role for Joe Adventure. Mr Gillie are is one of the partners told the Journal. I'd like to clear up any speculation that former VP Biden was involved with the 2017 discussions about our potential business structure. I'm unaware of any involvement in any time of the former VP the activity in question it never delivered any project revenue. Which sounds like maybe just maybe the project was on the road, and then it sort of fell apart. Kimberley Strassel has report over The Wall Street Journal on this She says. That Bible in skis text message just show he was recruited for the project by that James Gillies. Our character, 100 associate, Delia explains in December 2015 text, there will be a deal between the Chinese and what one of the most prominent families from the United States a month later he introduces Rob Walker, also a partner of Biden in March, 2016 Gilyard told Bob Belinsky, the Chinese entity was C E F C Which was shaping up to be the Goldmans of China. Meeting Goldman Sachs. Earlier promise that's a month to develop the terms of the deal with Hunter at this point, Joe Biden, of course, was still vice president. Is the deal began to take shape in 2017 by Belinsky began to question 100 would contribute. Besides his name and worried he was quote kicked out of the U. S Navy for cocaine use. Killer acknowledged skill sets it missing and observed that Hunter has a few demons. He explained that in brand 100 is imperative, but right now he's not essential for adding input. Hunter was hardly visible through most of the work until final negotiations ramped up in mid May, he brought in his uncle Jim Biden for a steak hunter in Texan emails wanted offices in three U. S. Cities, significant travel budgets of statement for Jim a job for an assistant and more frequent distributions of any gains. And, of course, he explained, he wanted a hell of a lot more than 100 $50,000 per year because his ex wife would nearly take all of it. Hunter repeatedly made clear that his contribution was his name. He railed at Bob Belinsky that the CFC heads are quote coming to be my partner to be partners with the Bidens even remind him that in this instance only one player holds the Trump card in its me may not be fair, but it's the reality because I'm the only one putting on and putting an entire family legacy on the line. Abiding claims he never discussed his son's business. But of course there was that made 2017 expectations letter, including that 10% for quote unquote, the big guy in one text, 100 said, quote my chairman given emphatic, no toe a version of the deal. Bye. Belinsky suggested that the chairman referred to Joe Biden. Deal fell through on the Chinese and in the summer of 2017. So is it possible that Hunter was freelancing? He was going around that that Joe had spent years basically patting me on the head telling me to go pick up bags of cash if you could help him And then now Joe's out of office and 100 want help Mount. He was freelancing and every so often you'd run something my job. Certainly possible certainly plausible. Is it true that Joe Biden while he was VP? Probably knew what Hunter was up to. Yeah, that is, that is probably true. Okay, So here's the problem. Nobody. The media wants to talk about this story at all. They don't find it interesting or fascinating at all that you're Biden has throughout his career engaged in sort of the low level corruption that many public officials do. Reckoning, sweetheart mortgages and that sort of thing. Well, or at least a sweetheart land deal from from people who are interested in some of the legislation on the table when he was in the Senate. And NPR put out an actual statement before the Nile before the denial from the Biden campaign. Here's what NPR's public editor said. Quote. We don't want to waste our time on stories that are not really stories. We don't want to waste listeners and readers time on stories that are just pure distraction. As unbelievable that is a taxpayer funded journalistic institution, openly declaring that they simply will not engage, but they're not interested whatsoever in the story preemptively. To the media. I mean, so all this is the lead up to their bait, right? The media are obviously and clearly on the side of Joe Biden, which means that the debate the stakes are really high. Because now this is basically the last chance. For Trump to set the table for Trump to change the topic from Trump to shifted course of the race. The members of the media again. It wasn't just NPR. Many members of the media were over and over, declaring that the hunter by the story was not, in fact a story. They kept a clean without any evidence whatsoever that it was Russian disinformation.

Joe Biden Bob Belinsky Belinsky James Biden Biden Hunter Hunter Biden The Wall Street Journal Joe Adventure Mr Gillie Vp Biden Kimberley Strassel James Gillies Goldmans U. S Navy For Cocaine Use Jablonski JOE Jim Biden
Why 2021 will be an even bigger year for coronavirus

Coronacast

08:34 min | 3 months ago

Why 2021 will be an even bigger year for coronavirus

"But a lot of the people who are testing positive people who are already in quarantine in isolation we kind of feeling like it. It's not yet. But has new south wales more or less nile. The sydney outbreak have christmas and christmas under reasonably relaxed circumstances. You did have a massive gathering on eastern suburbs breach at bronte. Beach will only see the results of that in five to ten days time. But it's looking okay is still perplexes. Me that the premier of new south wales and the health minister are digging in refusing to mandate masks when that would give them an extra degree of security. I mean you had people the other day swarming. All over on boxing day swarming over the shops. There were some mask wearing but not as much as you'd hope and it would just be such a small thing to go to mandatory masks. You sort of need it to be a rule so that people follow it so that you get that mess coverage that you need for it to be effective. The other thing that i thought was interesting that they mentioned in the press conference yesterday was that some of the people who had testing positive had tested positive on ten or eleven of the isolation actually quite light in the isolation and that just goes to the varying incubation periods of this virus five days is average but it can go eight ten fourteen sometimes even longer than fourteen very. It's very small percentage of the golden fourteen. And then as we've said many times a corona cast your false negative rate right at the beginning of the infection is really quite high. Could it be could be anything up to eighty percent but then goes down to a low roundabout eight days and what you're seeing here is the false negative rate getting done pretty low as the infection proceeds in some people and it's just prudent to watch to see whether or not people are still negative as they come out of that chelation period. We've actually got a question from someone who is in quarantine or was at least when they wrote this letter to us. Lazy saying You norman and also the primary of new south. Wales urge people to celebrate christmas outside. But what about the quarantine is who have no fresh air for fourteen days and are relying on many hotel ventilation. Is it safe for them. Depends on the movie hotel. The ventilation has been a problem in some of them. And i think in some hotels they've try to fix up the ventilation so that is as it can be. But there's no guarantee in this the problem is if you're in quarantine and you're taking outside. That creates risk as they showed in victoria. So unfortunately you do have to remain confined to the room tough though that may be and question from phillip corinthian as well phillips making the comment that you say politicians talking about noncompliant behavior as being disappointing or surprising but He sort of going well. Why don't you just put them in jail. Where the regulations that there to make people comply with With regulations the problem here is coercion does not always work. They find that out in victoria. We mentioned this before wherever they please surrendered a supermarket. They arrested a woman. If you remember rightly And then they realize that you just alienate the community by too much coercion. You've got to bring the community along with you. That's what's happened in the northern beaches. It's not perfect. Didn't happen in suburbs of sydney over the christmas period. But you really just go to try and bring people with you and for really agree. Jesus offenders then you might have to find them or do something stronger. Yesterday they were talking about a woman who escaped quarantine in western australia and serious finds a waiting car but apart from the odd case. You just can't be seen to be too heavy-handed about this. You've got to bring the community with you. This many people in quarantine associational coming for testing like literally tens of thousands of people coming forward for testing. It seems a little unfair to focus on the very few people who aren't doing the right thing when so many people That's right and then. This is the problem of behavioral economics. If you like which is that if you think. The norm is misbehavior. Then you will change your behavior towards the norm. We we like to. Our behavior is typical of other people's with a few exceptions and therefore if all we're doing is broadcasting bad behavior actually the behavior of the community will drift towards bad behavior whereas if you focus on the positive and say the vast majority of people in new south wales during the right thing that becomes the norm and we do it. The same thing goes for just changing the subject from covid nineteen to say obesity. The more we say. Obesity is accused problem. Forty percent of people are obese or whatever. The number happens to be at that particular time people who are putting on weight thing. Oh well relatively normal. It's not a problem with being obese. Might not like it that much. But that's the way it's going whereas the actually say the majority strains are not obese and feeling gooden so on and so forth then you will tend to think. That's the norm and drift towards that so changing your behavior in that sort of form. And that's and that's how it works here to forcing you to hard doesn't work is the same the case with masks then like we were saying before that if you make the mandatory and people are wearing them then people just wear them well there is a there is a singing promoted by some people in healthcare. Which is there is a. There's something that you just do. It and mandatory mask wearing is adjusted. It's an easy thing to do You're not restricting people's behavior you're just asking them to wear a mask so it's not too onerous and therefore it's a reasonable thing to ask it's mandatory to others. We'll give him the is ls episode for at least a couple of weeks unless something big happens and we will be back if it does. Norman what sort of mindset show be should we be taking into two thousand twenty one. Well let's start with the so-called uk strain ovo people in britain. Are you jacking up with the uk strain. It's like people saying that. The krona viruses the china virus. So that feeling anxious about that anyway. There is a strain. I identified in south east of england which we saw yesterday in a preprinted that it looks as though the estimated increase in transmission ability. If you like is about fifty six percent not seventy percent for started. It doesn't look as though it's increasingly virulent in other words during more damage or even less damage to people and it. He's slowly taking over. In terms of the prevalent virus in that part of england and will probably start moving there and maybe even overseas once border. Start coming down. So there's not to panic about the comment in this. Pre print is the control of this virus. You've variant is the same as before it's lockdown. Actually it's a serious lock down the predict from their modeling that in the uk they won't control this variant with. Half-hearted lockdown measures is going to be the full thing including universities in schools. They predict unless britain does that. It's not going to be able to control this new variant given its increased contagious nece. Don't nothing i'd say. Twenty twenty one is what's for vaccines. The astra vaccine comes in and reports better effectiveness with new dozing van. We're in good shape and australia. And because we manufacturing it here but if they are stuck around sixty two percent. Australia has a major problem on its hands with a second rate vaccine and to acquire early doses of the vaccine from pfizer or moderna. So that we can be prepared particularly for clusters where if new clusters arise. We can immunize healthcare workers or even experiment with what we talked about before and chromecast ring vaccination but the astra vaccine is for australia's one to keep an eye on because if that doesn't pan out in the next few weeks to be in a highly effective vaccine. Australia's got a problem because we have a second rate vaccine on our hands. And the thing. I'll say for twenty twenty one. I'd love to leave you with a positive sense is that we've really got to begin for twenty twenty. One is going to be a long time before this comes under control and for most of two thousand twenty one. We are going to be at risk in australia from overseas. importation of virus from corona virus fatigue. Which i'm sure many people are feeling already. So we've just got to keep our vigilance. Keep our borders strict and hope that the vaccine gets in early and we can vaccinate as quickly as possible so that we get this under control and hope that those vaccines do prevent transmission. Those are the things to watch out for. And we're just gonna take a deep breath and digging for twenty twenty one absolutely but you've got to say that in terms of globally australia's going into twenty twenty one in a really good position competitive many other places in the world. It's really fantastic. And so as new zealand and conceive from south korea are fragile that can be sued. Just go to maintain our vigilance. Not rest on our laurels. But we've done well. Well

Phillip Corinthian South Wales Sydney Victoria New South Wales Obesity Boxing Phillips Wales Western Australia Gooden UK Australia Britain England
How A 100-Year-Old Treatment Could Help Save Us From Superbugs

Short Wave

03:44 min | 4 months ago

How A 100-Year-Old Treatment Could Help Save Us From Superbugs

"In twenty fifteen. Stephanie strategy and her husband tom paterson. Both scientists were travelling in egypt. They sell the pyramids the nile and then as she tells it in this text talk after dinner one night. Tom became violently ill. He vomited all night long. And i thought oh gee he's just got food poisoning and i pulled out a couple of antibiotic pills that we take with us on our trips and i gave it to them with some water. Nothing happened the next day. Tom kept vomiting. Stephanie called doctor he thought yes food poisoning and set up an iv drip for more antibiotics. But tom only got worse at a local clinic. He was diagnosed with pancreatitis. Inflammation of the pancreas and medevac to a hospital in frankfurt and there. He was diagnosed with something even worse. A superbug a bacteria by the name of oscillator b-actor bowman scary name scarier bacteria it tops. The world health organization's list of most dangerous superbugs bacteria that are very hard to treat often resistant to many antibiotics. Now we'll never really know for sure where time got his superbug infection. But we do know that. It was an egyptian stream. And we know that. By the time he was medevac. Thome to san diego that it was resistant to every antibiotic. Tom was in a coma. His organs were shutting down. He was on three different drugs to keep his heart. Beating and the doctors told me that tom was going to die. But seventy refused to give up. She turned to the scientific community for help. I'm maddie safai today. on shortwave. What stephanie found and how it saved her husband's life. It's a century-old treatment. That could be a new tool in our war against super bucks for months stephanie's husband. Tom would remain hospitalized fighting for his life and losing. Yeah i was just really scared out of my mind. But i knew that if i just sat back and waited then he was going to die and i needed to know that i'd done. Every last thing that i could do that i would leave no stone unturned so i hit the internet and i did with anybody else would do in my shoes. Google it well. Luckily you know there's google for scientists and that's called pubmed and it's this wonderful search engine where you can put in any words and a scientific paper will pop up and you know i punched in words like multi drug resistance and the name of his superbug which is assassinated b-actor mania and popular within an hour. I found a paper that mentioned something called page therapy. So tell me a little bit about fish there. Well fay jr are short for bacteria phages and that's derived from the greek word meaning bacteria eater and they are viruses that have naturally evolved to attack bacteria there's ten million trillion trillion pages on the planet. It's all a matter of finding the ones that will kill the bacteria that you want to get rid of. Okay real quick phase one. oh one i like. Stephanie said bacteria phases the viruses that infect bacteria are everywhere pretty much anywhere you find. Bacteria you'll find a phase we're talking and artika deep-sea ocean vents your. But i swear that'll make sense later. Second facials don't actually eat bacteria in this case the fees injects its own dna into the bacterial cell. Then the virus forces the bacteria to make more and more copies of itself feeling up the cell with viruses eventually the bacteria bus open releasing all those new viruses. Go off and kill other cells. It's ruthless

Tom Paterson Tom Kept Stephanie TOM Maddie Safai Pancreatitis Pancreas Thome Frankfurt World Health Organization Egypt Coma Fay Jr San Diego Google
"nile" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Until i had the right room locations at to make the story work on definitely an author who really needs to be able to see the place. I'm writing about like a film in my head bill to do a walk through and so my first draft was not successful. The one that i wrote before. I went to egypt and then went needed when i was on the cruise. We were there for almost a week and Ondeck every day. And i wrote and it just changed everything by the book because i suddenly could imagine what it was really liked to be there. Do the walk through finally and that just really helped. So i can't draw but i really do the while maps that's amazing so death set sail was actually written on the nile. It was it really was. I should say that the maps and my books are by illustrator. Nina tara who takes my horrible drawings and into yes. I think i'm the same. I definitely can't drill thanks. It's good to have the experts. Take that over. I'll be right back with more from robin on the break. This episode is brought to you by best fiends. The mobile puzzle game that has been my constant companion throughout this year. I like it because it's easy to dip in and out of when you have a few minutes or the puzzles also really absorb it. You can play as much or little as you like and still enjoy it this week. I've hit level. Seven hundred and fifty truly my greatest achievement of twenty twenty. The game gets updated every month with new levels so it's always evolving and adding new puzzles that you can get stuck into as you get further into the game. You collect new characters and add them to a team if each challenges and working out to deploy for. What puzzles is a great strategic element that i like a lot. I think any she listeners. You love solving puzzles will really enjoy this game..

Nina tara egypt robin
"nile" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:32 min | 5 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Shedunnit

"So i find it just so much fun to play with a setting that older readers. Readers who like me have grown up on christie marsh affecting those people will recognize while the same time creating stories. If you haven't read christie's you'll reply books. And then fleeing onto to them and be delighted and thrilled to see setting. That you really recognize speaks to you. And they're such glamorous exciting settings. I think that is one of the keys to christie's ongoing popularity. Her mystery. novels are places you'd want to visit even though you wouldn't want wanna merger to happen you want to be on your end express you want to be on a nile river cruise boats and you can do that and you read her books it so much fun to take one of her settings and put man spin on it. My books are totally different in terms of mystery that might detect for solving but the setting is the same. And i think that that is just really fun thing to play with the actual setting of my boats. The hatshepsut is literally the same as death on the nile. I looked at the map in christie's book and slightly tweaked it but was using the same thing so very much follow christie in my outlined and as well as looking to christie death set sail. What else was involved in the research process in putting together that book quite lot. I'm a huge fan of research. And i do a lot as the series is going on then more and more and for this book i read a lot about egypt's the history especially focusing on the nineteen thirties. I interviewed several people whose families are schoener. Who have lived in egypt to understand what it's like to be there and be from there now. I read death on the nile repeatedly. Very very important research. I watched the movie again and again. And that's my favorite. I went to egypt. And i went this year in january. Which is kind of astonishing to think. Now that we're we're where we are..

christie marsh egypt christie nile river
‘Deaf U’ shows the realities of Washington, DC college students who are hard of hearing

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

04:06 min | 5 months ago

‘Deaf U’ shows the realities of Washington, DC college students who are hard of hearing

"Students as they deal with dating friendship and finding their way in the world. And what sets this show apart from the usual hookup show on college campuses is that it takes place at Gallaudet University in Washington, D. C. That's a private college for the deaf and hard of hearing. The characters are all deaf or hard of hearing, and they mainly speak in American sign language. One notable exception is Rodney Burford, who has a cochlear implant and acts as a sort of interpreter for the hearing audience. People is difficult. It'll behalf people where they could talk. You have that people who used to talk about a deal talking and then you have people who know they can't so they just cleaned Rodney plays football for Gallaudet and describes himself as the bad boy of the cast. And he joins us Now. Hi. Hey, how you doing? I'm doing Well, thank you. Also Joining us is the executive producer of deaf You Nyle DiMarco, who, by the way 1 2015 Season of America's next top novel and the 2016 season of dancing with the Stars and Nile is joining us via his interpreter, Grace and Van Pelt. So the voice you hear will be Graysons. Welcome to the show Nile. Hi. It's a pleasure to be here. Thanks so much for having us today. It's great to have all of you know, Let's let's begin with you. You are an alum of Gallaudet. Why did you want to do or produce A TV show about your university. I think it really goes all the way back to the beginning, Which was my time on America's next top model and insolent stars so often being the only deaf person on a reality TV show left me with Ah, very sort of simplistic label. I was very one dimensional or cast that we have in spring. I was never really ask questions specific to maybe what I like. But I didn't like, or any sort of story that I brought to the table is a person. Andi thought there was a big flaw within the reality TV world s O. I came with the idea that I wanted to really spotlight students a deaf you Who are almost all completely deaf in college, but are experiencing the same things that every other college student would there facing decisions that every college student has to you. They're making the mistakes that are fairly typical and amazing. Things happened on that campus. I thought it was a wonderful entry point for getting people at home is an audience to see that People are just like everybody else. So it's a part of it is educating the broader public on what it's like to be deaf, right? And making that obviously a big part of the show. Not just saying, Oh, by the way, I'm deaf, but deaf. Being deaf is the central element. In life at Gallaudet and on the show. Absolutely Rodney, You are one of the stars of the show. And you are in various different love triangles are larger than triangles, squares. Rectangles pentagrams? I don't know. But you seem to have a very active love life. What is it like for you to be part of the show while going to school like l a debt? To be honest, it was just the same for me. Just accept the cameras for only me and change myself. I would live just living my life. But every part of my life was just being documented. Yeah, so, but it must be kind of weird to be Tohave every aspect of your life documented. Yeah, you could say that, Especially the more intimate moments. Right? Niles? Tell me why you want to focus so much on the romance. I mean, obviously, it's exciting and fun to watch. But why? Why is that a central part of the show? I think romance is such a universal feeling. You know, we really crave the feeling of being in love and You know, I think that's something that is so typical of the college experience, and we really truly felt that that was the perfect entry point for the hearing audience at home. To really make a connection to these cast members is deaf people right, but also is just equal members of society. And that was really our strategy. There is Rodney a lot of

Gallaudet University In Washin Rodney Burford Nyle Dimarco Nile Gallaudet Rodney Van Pelt America Andi Football Grace Niles
Human case of West Nile virus confirmed in Hillsborough County

Rush Limbaugh

00:10 sec | 5 months ago

Human case of West Nile virus confirmed in Hillsborough County

"Though, the Bay Area is no longer in a daze. Cone of uncertainty, With the storm moving farther to the West. Hillsborough County health officials have confirmed the human case of West Nile Virus Department has issued a

Bay Area Hillsborough County West Nile Virus Department
Disney Moves ‘Free Guy,’ ‘Death on the Nile’ Off 2020 Release Calendar

Pop Culture Cosmos

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Disney Moves ‘Free Guy,’ ‘Death on the Nile’ Off 2020 Release Calendar

"Among other things. Not only did they lay off some studio employees. Not only did one of their companies that they purchased in many years since. Espn lay off five hundred employees but on top of that disney went ahead and announced that free guy which had been pushed from twenty twenty one into twenty. Twenty is now being put off the schedule. Speed taken off of it and move most likely back into twenty twenty one at some point appointed time. plus also kenneth branagh's death on the nile. So i want to hear thoughts my friend on this. It's really disappointing to see that a movie that they have such high hopes for which already moved into twenty twenty as now been moved out of it.

Espn Disney Kenneth Branagh Nile
Texas counties, including Dallas and Houston report West Nile virus in 2020

Our American Stories

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Texas counties, including Dallas and Houston report West Nile virus in 2020

"Season. season. So far, So more far, than more than a dozen a dozen Texas Texas counties counties have reported have the reported trace the trace of the virus. of the virus. This year. This year. A new study A new study at Texas at Texas Tech shows Tech that shows mitigation that mitigation efforts are falling efforts are short. falling short. Professor Steve Professor Presley Steve Presley tested to tested see how to well see how insecticides well insecticides work work on mosquitoes. on mosquitoes. Two thirds Two thirds of the mosquitoes of the mosquitoes Showed resistance Showed resistance to the insecticide, to the insecticide, He says mosquitoes He says mosquitoes have been building have been up building immunity up immunity to the insecticides to the insecticides because some because Texas some Texas counties counties used used the same the ones. same ones. Year after Year year. after year. Study, he Study, says, he shows says, how shows important how important it is to switch it is to up switch up from season from season to season. to season. Jamie Jamie Cockney Cockney

Steve Professor Presley Steve Texas Jamie Jamie Professor
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 6 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Illinois reports first West Nile virus death of the year in Chicago resident

Ben Shapiro

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Illinois reports first West Nile virus death of the year in Chicago resident

"Resident has died from the West Nile virus, the first West Nile virus death this year in Illinois. Our Nic Gale has more. The Illinois Department of Health reports at the Chicago and became ill in mid September and tested positive then for West Nile virus So far, 24 other human cases have been reported in the state this year. Last year I DPH reported 28 human cases along with one death, although they stress that human cases are under reported West Nile is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito and symptoms include fever, nausea, headache and muscle aches. Nick Gale, 8 90

West Nile Nic Gale Nick Gale Illinois Department Of Health Illinois Nausea Chicago Fever
Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

UN News

05:42 min | 6 months ago

Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

"While Sudan has been hit by devastating floods the worst seen in decades impacting more than six hundred, thousand people across seventeen of the country's eighteen states with homes destroyed and farmland damage. Just ahead of the harvest season, he's been another shock amid multiple crises according to the Food and Agriculture Organization FAO urgent funding is needed to support a country already facing alarmingly high rates of hunger and food insecurity. Dominique Bergin FAO's director of emergency resilience has just returned from a mission to sedan. He told Charlotte Lomas how dire the situation really is for people there. They're just returned from Sudan couple of days ago where I wasn't a mission already to the floods which have been affecting the countries over the last couple of these floods are truly devastating down the largest thinking the country in over seventy years who have conducted happy assessments with the me of coacher and found that up to six hundred thousand households have been affected by the impact. Of the floods more than two point, two million actors have been damaged. So it's quite serious but the problem here is that this comes at the top of an already difficult situation for millions of paper as a matter of fact, before these, let's nine point six million people were already in acute food insecurity ready a very difficult situation related to a variety of of issues social economic crying he's covid crises and even know in some part of the country the issues already locust. So quite serious situation that therefore Esguerra, our full attention. You travel to two of the affected sites what were your impressions? So we went to two of the most affected states we undertook mission with government officials as a matter of. Factly culture was with us and we spend today's in blue, Nile State, and in Sennar state, and they're what we could see is the variety of the damaged. We saw the impact on commercial farmers, and with few damage, they will be very little employment opportunities for the people. So one of the things we saw. We saw. Livestock owners, Pasta list being severely affected. By doing of the floods having lost for some of them up to seventy five percent of their livestock, which in turn is a problem for them because this is their main source of livelihood we saw that forty two percent of those affected by by the floods are women and it all sorts. So we went to the field we we spend time with them, and what we saw is that I mean situation is very, very severe. This time of the year they should have sorghum that is one meter and a half I ready to our best. Instead, we could see field full of. wheats with sorghum and that will not be honest. So in talking to these women, we understand they're already struggling. They're adopting what we call negative coping strategies, which means that they are cutting the number of the means to quantity of them is and what we found is that at this point of the ready, they're only having one meal per day and very basic meal. So very T- tuition and therefore these people need our assistance. How will this floods affect food security across the country? The food security situation prior to the floods was already severe nine point six, million people in acute insecurity. Two point two million people in emergency face. When we visited the blue states, what was clear is that we were in a state where twenty seven percent of the population prior to the plots was already in acute with with insecurity. So it is clear that with the impact of the ways, the fact that people not be able to harvest with the fact that they have been losing animals with the fact that prices are extremely volatile and ever tendency to increase significantly. The estimate is that the food security situation will further. And therefore, we need to be ready to provide at scale. Livelihood Saving Assistance. In collaboration, of course, we other agencies what is doing to assist Sadan since the beginning of the year I feel despite the covid situation has been able to provide assistance who about nine, hundred, twenty, thousand people, which is quite significant in this context. Now, what we are doing is that we are appealing for additional resources innovation essentially to the floods, but the flood. Being one more driver of accurate with insecurity. So, what we are doing is essentially appealing for seventy million dollars additional. To basically cover the needs of the people for the coming season in terms of cash assistance for people to meet the most immediate needs press agricultural inputs for the coming season so that immediately they can go back to their productivity. Always bearing in nine FAO wide providing humanitarian livelihood saving activities is very keen to build the zillions of populations which as we know are essential when people face regular shocks.

Livelihood Saving Assistance Dominique Bergin Fao FAO Sudan Food And Agriculture Organizat Sennar Director Charlotte Lomas Sadan
Clark Middleton, Actor in ‘The Blacklist,’ ‘Twin Peaks,’ Dies at 63

Colleen and Bradley

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Clark Middleton, Actor in ‘The Blacklist,’ ‘Twin Peaks,’ Dies at 63

"And twin Peaks. Actor Clark Middleton passed away at the age of 63 on It's just It's sad, but he passed away from complications from the West Nile virus. And, Yeah, he was ah, director producer, and he was best known for his work with the black list when peaks and kill Bill volume to Oh, my goodness. That is really unfortunate. Yes, ads telling us this is kind of

Twin Peaks Clark Middleton Bill Director Producer
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 6 months ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
Dead crow tests positive for West Nile virus in San Mateo County

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

Dead crow tests positive for West Nile virus in San Mateo County

"Crow found in San Mateo County has tested positive for West Nile virus Mosquito in Vector Control officials say. It's the first detection of the virus in the county since 2018. The bird was found in South San Francisco earlier this week, and officials say the risk to humans is relatively low. You Khun still reduce your risk by preventing mosquito bites. This includes eliminating any standing water on properties and avoiding outdoor activity it dawn or dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

San Mateo County San Francisco West Nile Crow
"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"With me for free. Now Take Care of her baby you see what I'm saying but. My wife, I sleep late every night. So I don't WanNa hear that every night. So say you gotta go take your money and leave and he did Yeah I. Think y'all so much fan but y'all it's me and I thought it'd been this. Can I give us about business right? Quick. To all right I have let's go bounce houses of stationed in Baltimore Maryland and we're overwhelmed but I'm still going and then we have catering me and my wife selling McDonald's Okay and You know we I got family tricks low rent. I might high my high you probably Your Business Black Dennis I'm. From one of my kids. We water five houses. We have big battles, houses medium medium-sized. Every visit everything expand off I know. How Well tag meal instagram because I you brother got. Ta Ironic is it that he has let's go bounce houses and he just bounce assisted from the house. Tango you gotTA. You gotTA curve. What? You're going to get the house king. Speak into existence you won't. GET THAT HOUSE OH I. Just, why quick for you hang up I got a brother be call the radio station a lot right Hideo Gary McDonald. Jerry Jerry gearing. So books DOT COM pillar.

Hideo Gary McDonald Jerry Jerry McDonald Baltimore Maryland TA DOT
"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

08:17 min | 8 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Was involved in that he do away was we are family and coming to America and we are up he was in the cell that he did hear a song by black girls being played on the white radio station which was totally Just, never happened bathrooms and then. I'm meet him after you released Robert De. Niro's restaurant and walks in the door and like he's like president. Like wants to every single person in the world and when he finally got me and Bernard Somebody said Oh. Yeah. These are the guys who wrote Africa because a lot of African people think that the freak goes You. Think. Like Bam, you are bad. You wrote Africa. Ultimately, coming America. You working on a new film to America's well. I guess I guess are Yeah I. I wrote the theme song. So yeah, they just call me last week. Using and just let yourself. I wrote I sang it and I was laughing because damn. I know one brother who could actually pull this off and sound meal 'cause that's the thing about comedy. When you do comedy, you gotTa be dead serious about your jokes, right? So like I did be the player and we were doing that we and Mike Judge Road writing songs in. Charissa? Like I didn't talk to Nile I talked to Mike that was You know I would like go. Over for your love you know and stuff like that. You know. So when I was seen so globe to John Landis, he was on the floor crying. Like. All right. Well, I know the. Really got keep cry and I. Got Christopher map to you right seize your queen to be to see show. No so here's the thing. Is that the actor Paul Days? That's how he got the role she used that as his audition he has sued yet. He was just supposed to say she's your Queen Bee Create I, need Alexei you know deliver that but he looked at it and he decided to sit and you made up a melody right on the spot the only thing that pulled out of singer. So it was all over the place so I. Think clavier played it so that it sound believable. I WanNa make sure you finished your Nelson Mandela Story. That was it. He said African thing and we family and. Not Enough and you know and coming to America. so He's okay three. was so powerful as an Eddie Murphy because they're also at that meeting that night. So we were all in this room together and and so Medina tells us the story about how when paramount pictures release coming to America. The first time around they insisted upon the intervene integrated at the premiere, and that was something that resonated across the entire African continent black people. And White people sitting together to watch a movie and south advocate that was like the civil war. It shows you that music an art visual art dance everything has the power to communicate in a much more powerful and Saliba away or you know after the theater was forced to be integrated well, time actually felt just a few short years the athlete I mean so that I mean, we won't take credit, for stopping apartheid. But when something that's be cultural phenomenon happen you have to know your cultural phenomenon when a cultural phenomenon takes place, people can't deny because it's such a heart. You become a human deemed in is even if they don't want you to marry the daughter still putting you in a certain they look at you differently you know it's interesting. I just want everybody to note that now Roger said the breakfast club is a cultural phenomenon. Let's pass. Okay. All right. What the sledge record we are family now is there a hidden meaning that? Oh yeah, and of course, as I said So this was an album that we had written about these four girls that we never met. So we had to invent an identity, and once we invented that identity men we only wrote songs that. To those four people we know copies of sixteen. Virgil know any of that stuff we just know was the record company. You told them you know they were like family to us do stick together like Burgos. Went home like Oh. Okay. So we had to just make it up and once we made it up and they walked into the room and they weren't that. By. What we just due to the poor girl well, we didn't. Think that because we are images. Wants. To they should. And in a way I feel proud because I watched him grow into those people i. got it now Rogers. When we come back, let's get into a mini make someone records. He wrote some of the records performed someone records that was sample from him I to now's Rogers mini mixes the breakfast club morning that was a now rogers many mixed morning. Everybody is EJ Envy Angela. Yeesh guy we all the breakfast club we take. You to announce Roger Now shawny. Now Been Your experience with racism all throughout my life I've had guns, put it in my face ole for an over over and over again by cops or does random white people. If I'm down south playing somewhere we play in Augusta GM, you're happy with played in James. Brown. Coal town man I walked out. I was going through horseriding stable. These dudes rolled up on the guns in my favorite. More is that your girlfriend because manager the club I asked her to take me to horseriding you kind of meet and she was from Ireland and she said Oh yeah. This one right down the road driving Blah Blah Blah 'cause I was even too young to get arrested coffee. You can't rent a car to twenty one st drove me is when I defy. A life of my girlfriend I wouldn't be here talking to you. It would be no sad. Just one that's one of one hundred I can tell you about a hundred times that either police or just random people would have some kind of. You know us back off serious n word so that reality has always been my world even in the music you grew up in the civil rights movement he was young but did you understand the magnitude of that moment because I know eventually you became a black panthers I'm just trying to figure out you know what sparked all that? Yeah. I did understand it so I was in. Elementary School when President Kennedy got shot in nineteen, sixty three and I remember one girl in the class thing yeah. It's a tragedy but you know Martin Luther King could be president like President Kennedy and or McCain's jumped on her up and I went over and I protected her Walter home and she became my sort of girlfriend at eleven year old can go all the way. Yeah. You didn't get luck. For some reason, even though I was sort of like the joker, the class because I spoke to where. They backed off of our and very soon after that the Beatles came on Ed Sullivan Show and she told me to come over our house. And I remember talking about. Dr, Martin Luther King could be President President Kennedy and things like that. I'm eleven years old now and This is like hitting me like a ton of bricks because it's all started to unfold in front of my face. Do these things were on television every night and as a young black girl she opened my mind a lot when. I was in the Black Panthers when I was sixteen years old so I was.

America President President Kennedy president Black Panthers Mike Judge Martin Luther King Africa Bernard Somebody Robert De Rogers Niro Nelson Mandela John Landis Elementary School Eddie Murphy Beatles Roger Now Ed Sullivan Alexei
"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

03:59 min | 8 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Wisconsin we are expected.

"nile" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

02:39 min | 8 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Of West Nile virus in Weld. County was founded in traps on the east side of town. The town of birth actually during the week of July twenty seventh the identification of positive West Nile virus mosquitoes is slightly delayed as the state labs also meeting the demands of cove nineteen testing Let's see mosquito traps in superior. Lewisville and Longmont have also tested positive for West Nile virus now in case you're wondering. The weld. County. Health. Department uses a contractor to conduct mosquito trap thing in three zones in Weld County Zone One would-be the Greeley Evans area zone to. As previously mentioned the Johnstown Milliken Platt Ville area and zone three, the Fort Lupton. Firestone area. Finding West Nile virus positive mosquitoes said Dan. Joseph Environmental Health Services Division director is no surprise for this time of year with the hotter temperatures we've been seeing and July and August. We're also seeing above average numbers of Hugh. LEX Mosquitoes, and of course, culex mosquitoes are the ones known to transmit West Nile virus for the first time this summer, they're currently no human cases of West Nile virus and Weld County only one in all of Colorado last year there were a total of nine human cases in Weld County. West Nile virus symptoms can appear three to fourteen days after infection initial symptoms, include fever, headache nausea, and vomiting muscle aches, weakness and rash, but most infected people. Well, they don't exhibit any symptoms. Where have we heard that? Before if a person develops symptoms, they should see a doctor immediately. Unfortunately. There are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent West Nile virus infection. Ditto earlier aside and less than one percent of infected people develop a serious sometimes fatal neurological illness health officials. Of course recommend following the four DS as you've heard Dr News this morning to prevent skibo bites. Here's what you WANNA. Do. Drain Stanton Standing Water Around Your House weekly. Remember to drain water from tires, cans,.

West Nile Weld Weld County Weld County Zone Johnstown Milliken Platt Ville Joseph Environmental Health Se Firestone area Lewisville director Fort Lupton Longmont Hugh Greeley Evans Dan nausea Colorado fever
"nile" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:38 min | 9 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Pantheon

"So. We're in June. Nineteen seventy nine good times by chic just came out. There is a considerable public backlash against disco literally leading to a July twelfth after radio DJ Chicago organized a Disco Demolition Derby to literally blow up crates of disco records that they hated. Michael Jackson releases his first solo album. Departing motown records entitled off the wall. It will be looked back on as the last great disco album while off, the wall would prop up disco for another year or two. It was clear that the John was fading out. What was happening in the Bronx with hip hop was staying in the Bronx. However, it went half a decade. Decade without anyone else learning about it copying it or even reporting about it, but somehow new. Jersey raised white new wave artists Debbie Harry of the band blondie found out about it, and joined the scene by meeting and befriending Fab, five Freddy a graffiti artist and early hip hop promoter. It was this same summer of Nineteen seventy-nine when everything was blowing up with disco. That blondie invites Nile Rodgers himself to a party in a bronx playground. It's there that Rogers saw hip hop for the first time witnessing DJ's cut loop and scratch his song. Good Times while emcees rapped over it. You know what I'll just let him tell the story. was like the end of Nineteen seventy-nine. Beginning of one thousand, nine, hundred eighty. This thing this movement started to develop in New York City. That I have become. Loosely aware of because of my friendship with with Blondie with Debbie Chris. And they said Hey, you gotta come up to a hip hop. which is what they called it. They said a hit. And they were play the break of my song. Good Times, and they would just rap and rapping rap. For hours and hours and hours. and. I had never seen anything like that. I mean you could. I lived for the first time I saw. They took me to a CL-. They took me to a high school in Queens and then they took me to a spot in the Bronx. And all they played, was one song just over and over again, and it was just the breakdown to good time. It would just go good, good, good, good, good good. A few months after that after half a decade underground, the first hip hop song is recorded and released on September sixteenth, nine, hundred, seventy, nine, interpreting the good times baseline to provide support for possibly the most influential and well known rappers in history..

Good Times Bronx Rogers Nile Rodgers Debbie Harry Michael Jackson motown Debbie Chris New York City Chicago Queens DJ Fab Freddy
"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

06:53 min | 11 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Middle here. Hey Adam Buxton here now. It was at this point in the conversation when Niles team started looking at their watches and it became clear that his car had arrived to take him to his next appointment but I had bought Nyla gift. A copy of one of my favorite books and I wanted to see what he thought of it before I left. The book was kids. Right jokes collection assembled by the moderator of a kids joke website who particularly enjoyed the author and more nonsensical submissions and has since collected them and tumbler form and on twitter. And in this book people familiar with my stuff will have heard me reading some of these out before they make me laugh. A great deal bought. What would you think of them? The thing is that I'd spent several weeks immersed in the world of Nile listening to his music reading his book and I felt that I knew him quite well and that we were GonNa get on like a house on fire and that he definitely would love kids right jokes and I couldn't wait to give it to him and I just imagined US reading them out to each other rolling around but then sat in one of the Little Studios and Abbey Road with people giving us the wind up gesture it It just didn't go the way that I'd hoped don't get me wrong. It wasn't like the time I met Paul Weller. I don't think now wanted to physically hurt me but as soon as I started reading the first one out I realized I've made an error in judgment but still I did and I even got Nile to read one out himself here. We go for this last little bit. I have a voice that I read these in in my head. What do you call a sandwich with? Legs Brady Legs Brady leg. What did the goat say to the dog? Nice buttock you loser like that. So that's yours to study on the toilet or wherever how we doing? Are they wrap yes. Yeah Yeah Yeah it seems I mean I thought as much which is why unleash the Foot which is bit of a conversation. Stopper I once read out some of those jokes on Christmas Day when we're having family lunch. When my dad was sat around with us I thought they were going to go down better than they did. Yeah my dad is a couple that work. Hey give us what Knock knock. Who's there the big bed will? What do you want colored eggs? What color red I think. That's just the DNA great comedy. Wait why did the frog cross the road to get a New Tong? Why because it's tongue was stuck in a velcro tree continue? Hey welcome back. Podcasts Nile rudge's probably as I speak walking around nude in lockdown reading aloud from kids right jokes and laughing and laughing and it's very exciting to me now and I am extremely grateful to his team who kind and helpful and friendly and it was a fun day. I just wish I could have talked to him for longer Because he does have an extraordinary number of fascinating stories to tell. I do recommend his book. La Freak an upside down story of family disco and destiny. You'll find a link to it in the description of this cost as well as linked to the kids right jokes book also in the description he will find links to another extraordinary book it's called Ramble Book and it is available in audio book form. It's my book case. You haven't been listening to the PODCAST for awhile anyway. Give it a listen if you have already ported over. Eleven hours of Great great stories from my adolescents stuff about my relationship with my dad and having children of my own arguments on trains and then of course over an hour of Waffle with Colin Bolts at the end of it. All an exclusive podcast episode. If you get that audio book by the way if you're one of the people that have already bought it. Thank you so much. I'm very grateful. It took such a long time to put it together and I really appreciate all the Nice reviews and stuff that people have left for it. It makes a huge difference and for those of you keen to enjoy the book in physical form. The heart back is going to be out at the end of August but right now. There is a limited number of signed copies released. They will be signed By next week available for preorder at waterstones to save waterstones or waterstone's flintstones or flintstones. Thank you very much indeed to shameless Murphy. Mitchell full production support and Anika Jason for additional editing on this episode much appreciated both thanks to a costs for their continued support of this podcast. Most of all to you. I hope you're doing all right wherever you are and I hope you'll come back for another episode of this podcast. Rosie killer is back. Tiny hairy thoroughbred stallion be. Well put cats. I love you Success and when am?.

Nile rudge Adam Buxton Nile twitter Paul Weller US Niles Brady Little Studios Colin Bolts Mitchell Anika Jason waterstone Murphy
"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

12:12 min | 11 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Dan do? Bamboo Babylon let through the radio. And they're part of the thing you know so to me. It was critical to orchestrate Bowie. He was so into the idea. He wanted to be bigger. He wanted not necessarily a bigger star but he wanted his sound to be bigger and represent these other facets of music that he loves but didn't have people around him to do it yet right. This is one of the things that characterizes Bowie is that throughout his career he had a real genius for finding exactly the right people the most talented people to help him realize right here right at that time but then of course one problem. I suppose you could say with that. Approach is that people often end up feeling quite used or maybe a little bit exploited right. Yeah it's like oh he'll pick you up and he'll be all excited about working with you drop to on onto the next thing and he's got a stable of a new a one of the people that he return to and wanted to work with again but we always comfortable with that arrangement or did you know. I was actually a little bit upset. Because after let's dance was so big. He was now on the cover of Time magazine. And if you read that interview it's almost like I'm not even mentioning. I'm like going dude. You're on the cover of Time magazine because of let's dance and modern love and China girl is he. He's not playing any old music on there as you. Yeah Yeah Yeah. He didn't even know anybody he only personally knew was myself in. Steve Ray Vaughan whom he only met once so everybody on that record were completely unknown to Bowie and he took them as his band. See that's like those are the kind of record I make that my orchestration is now part of the ban so he just took the guys who played that and he figured well you guys can easily play my other stuff but to play. Let's dance and have it sound authentic. I need the people who did the record. So when you see the serious moonlight tour it so it's everybody who's playing on the record right. Save for Steve Ray Vaughan and myself. Yeah we busy doing other things all did he invite you on the road. All everybody invites me on their own. I'm a record producer. Go Out if somebody's music director. Yeah it's funny man as a producer. I don't really find myself following the artists that I've just worked with. It's just that as dedicated as I am to the last artists that I work with. That's how dedicated. I am to the current artists. I'm working with so it is not a huge amount of room in my life because I get so wrapped up into what? I'm doing that for that record and feel. Hey whatever man. We were like hanging out together every single day. And now I call you go Niles and move vision who he. He'll back honestly. That's really one of my biggest problems because I get super crazy with the car with whatever the current project is so I know that I didn't really follow what was happening with Bowie much. Except you know I'd get a phone call every now and then from the guys on the road and they were all my guys those everybody's calling me and telling me two different stories a lot of good and a lot of bad but you know just rock and roll that's just normal and then David Call me a few other projects so dancing in the streets. With him in Jagger for live aid now is cool. Because it's like I had three cool things going on at the same time at live eight. I had the Thompson Twins. I had just finished. Madonna ahead Duran Duran in the middle of that stuff and Oh and it just shows you how close I was billy idol because if you look at live aid the guitar player I brought along with me with Steve Stevens. Who was billy idol's lead guitar player? So I was having a blast. We I was the early eighties was really. I think my time to shine. I had so many great relationship. So many great records in excess Bowie Madonna. A bunch of Duran Duran records Paul Simon B fifty. Two's he worked with such a diverse T- of time and styles and all that but you'll sort of notably absent from the hip hop genre. Why do you think that is so after the whole disco sucks thing happened all the black music that should happen after disco was sort of political and when I say political meaning you had to be part of that scene so if you think about the way people dressed in the eighties when you think about groups kid and play and you know to see and and guy and all those kinds of bands you had to be in that scene? Well we had already developed as a sort of stylish couture type of ban would have been strange for us to go in the street direction when we weren't even though we were from the streets if you will but we clearly established that we weren't right. I mean so so. There was a word that they used to use. In hip hop called perpetrating. And the last thing that we wanted to be were perpetrators even on run DMC. They say voice of the eighties perpetrating. A fraud you're rock cool wet. Keep the crowd co board. You're the kind of guy that girlie Nord. I'm driving caddies. You fix in a four. So we didn't want to be perpetrated. We didn't want to pretend. Like oh mallow and said we're in the HIP hop we're down from the streets where drug dealers we're not. We're none of those things but we did right good times yen. Good Times was like the Rosetta Stone of Hip hop right. That's exactly right. And that was because of writing. Good times we became sort of like hip hop legends in a strange way because when you would go and see him sees that was the joint. I mean that Sh- view never heard any other record. I I remember the first time that Debbie Harry and Chris. Stein took me to what they call going to a hip hop The only record they played was good times and it was about fifty sixty. Mc's just dropping their rhymes over good times but even regular aren be after that. Like New Jack. Swing and things like that. Which is why I have a cool New Jack. Swing Song on my new record because now I don't have to be perpetrate. I don't have to be part of that scene. I could do it. Just because I love the music. Perpetrating is not exactly the same thing as cultural appropriation. Though is it or is it on some level. It's like you're pretending to be down with something just because it's happening where it's not part of your DNA. It's sort of like you're doing the hot thing like people. And it's well documented that I turned down a lot of people who wanted me to make disco records for them and I kept saying no. You're not a disco artist. Why would I do? That doesn't make any sense. Like I turned down people. Somebody told me Dolly Parton once you do a disco gone. Why did I do that? Cool country record for Dolly Parton. That'd be great They want us to make a disco record for the stones. They want us to make a disco records for Bette Midler aretha Franklin which is probably the the sort of story that actually hit the streets was she had written this song call. I'm going to be the only star tonight down at the disco. We were out to our house for a meeting. We were excited. She played the song and I was like I'm not going to be the guy that goes down in history as the one who made aretha Franklin the queen of Souls Disco Record. No way a today. That ain't gonNA happen but the way she told the story was that she fired us. The truth was that we know lettuce right your song because this was when we were writing Diana Ross. You know right after we do this. We'll do your record. It'd be great but but you want it wasn't a political statement. It wasn't like no. This is an authentic like what I'm getting out. I suppose is that obviously. Now there's so much discussion about cultural appropriation and when it comes to music. It's such a strange area because music is all about cultural appropriation. Of course as a matter of fact Bowie David. This was the greatest thing in the world so when we were doing. Let's dance right. We're listening to all these different records. I mean from all sorts of genres and when we listen to twist and shout by the Eisley Brothers which is how. Start THE RECORD. We do that. Dominant Seventh Actually go to ninth actually pyramid and we do the That bit. I said David you know like we report off the Eisley brothers. He says. No No. It's not ripping off. It's what we call postmodern. When what did he call it? Post modernistic re expressionism. Something like that. Post modernist degree expressionism. I was like okay. I'll buy expressionism. I'll take it Yeah it was like going okay. We're re expressing in a post modernistic way. We're not doing twist and we're doing. Let's dance and so yeah so you weren't sitting asked of getting worried about that amazing. China Goal Rift. Because you felt that some people might feel that it was cultural appropriation and it wasn't it was like a parody of Oriental sounds that wasn't yours to no. I I I came up with that Lake because I didn't think China girl sounded commercial and he wanted to hit by going well. This is the only thing that I think links the words China girl it had to have some kind of rhythm and it was interesting how I came up with that. After listening to the progression of Doon Doon Doon. To Go don't don't do. They do do do was they got Major to major seven two major six What is that sound? I and I thought about the Rufus. Song sweet thing did you. You do eat. We do do do our. Oh really do did I was like Holy Cow. Monessen something here. Yeah and I totally did it. Because of Chord changes in the rufus song sweet thing and because it didn't have a hook to me. Do you ever hear covers your own music and enjoy them. Oh yeah have you ever heard you the band. The full sure at did you hear that lost in music. Thinks it's quite folded laws music. Yeah figure Verse Chords. Must be the out going out now right now. This is this is. Aw Yeah this is it. You're in the.

Bowie Time magazine China Bowie David Duran Duran billy idol Dolly Parton Steve Ray Vaughan Doon Doon Doon aretha Franklin producer Thompson Twins Dan Diana Ross Steve Stevens fraud Niles Jagger girlie Nord
"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

17:20 min | 11 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Men sixty six years old. Now this is. We're talking like fifty years ago. Yeah no I haven't. I think that was actually the last time I did. It says these days. Yeah I think you know what I bet you. That was the last time I sniff glue. Now I think of it because the whole thing was no was it moves was but it wasn't. I wasn't once I got into it and nothing really bad happened. I somehow made my way home. Everything was cool except the police there looking for me because my grandmother couldn't find me for a day or two wasn't nothing bad so it was like a rollercoaster. You know you're afraid but see it's not like a real coca. I didn't know Anything Vale is going to happen in the first place so I wasn't afraid so the fear thing never happened So I just said wow. That was fun and I probably associated Lsd With beautiful older girls in like they were cool. This is amazing and not only that but this music made sense to you. The music made so much sense. It was ridiculous I came home. Of course I had the doors whole album remembered but it was the the end that I particularly like but Of course light. My fire was on there and stuff but I remember the trucks wild thing that's so basic though but you still got something out of it. Oh Yeah in So you went a snob Bono. No I loved it. I had a blast. I mean how could you not you have all these beautiful older women around you and they're treating you like you're something special because you're such an oddity that you were like. Et or something like could we? We were nothing like the people in that room. We were so our embiid out. We're so silk suited and ruffled shirts and white shoes. We had that we used to call. I'd talion 's know we were totally different. You like celebrity guests exactly. It's like hey come on man the water's fine. That was the beginning of my sort of deep deep dive into Surf Music and psychedelic music. We went to the beach boys. At all of that point everybody liked the beach boys. They went weird yet. They weren't yeah. The beach boys were just regular American pop music but it was great. It was weird like America was a super singles driven market. So instead of saying I'm into stepping Wolfram into the Scorpions or it's like I'm into a song amid into ran an Anna Wayne and Air Air Narain Air Nanu Nair Incidents Pepe. The you know you just like songs so I would listen to the songs that we play you know all the cool surf music and like the ventures and you hear that Twangy Duane Eddy kind of guitar and stuff but still my junior high school was still in in the hood in the ghetto. So at the same time that I was listening to that we'd have our weekly dances where they were playing. You know the marvel. Let's and you know when the temptations and Chris Clark and Edwin Starr and so you. I had a very a very balanced. I in the orchestra. We played symphonic music and our program. Was you know deep with Prokofiev but Beethoven you know a lot of guard you know in cooler newer composers a lot of Russian composers. I said like Prokofiev Schakowsky and yeah we. We were cool. Yeah we'RE COOL. We're good orchestra. We're we're pretty good for junior high school band What was your first professional? Gig As a musician. Then first time I consider myself getting paid for making music of an panhandling on the street was I played flute on. No Jewish traditional song called body. Now it's like wow I'm a real musician. I got money for playing. This is cool but then I quickly switch from woodwinds to guitar. And I'm trying to remember the first time. I remember getting paid money to play guitar. I don't even know what the song was. I just remembered the situation and it was clear that the guys who are in control of the money with gangsters and it was clear that we were going to write a song and they were GonNa pay us and we'll just get kicked out of the studio and they were going to keep the publishing you know and say that they wrote the song But the other musicians on the date explained to me that that's just how music business was. And if you WanNa make a living you gotta do this all the time so I did a bunch of records where I would you know in today's world I would have been the CO writer But I got nothing right so I'm gonNA fast forward now to the eighties. You talk fondly in your book about the eighty s and of course a decade in which you worked with people like Madonna and the B fifty. Two's I didn't know that actually until I read it. That's Melvin that. I really love great. Al Cosmic thing is wonderful really is scraped. But that doesn't immediately say now Rogers to me. Do you know what I mean. I now now that I know it. It does but it's it's a lot of stuff that you do so think about this. The beef the two albums before cosmic thing love shack deadbeat club Rome I wish true to their sound but vocally. I'm not trying to take credit here on. Just give an example vocally. Don't you think they sound better singing on the cosmic thing album than they sound on earlier records? Yeah just quality of vocal sure. No it's altogether a more lush accessible. Exactly yeah and it was something that we slightly argued over in the beginning and I said just try. Just trust me and try it. I said this is an old rock and roll trick that people have been using since the beginning of time multi track recording. Try this and I try and and when you believe that it's just cindy singing. It sounds like it's just cindy singing but it's not and when you believe that well. Fred of courses completely undeniable. Yes and of course it look at how much I featured Fred on on that album because I thought that as a hype person like which became really popular in hip hop as a hype man. Fred was incredible and You know the the guy who's going in it well I. I was getting ready to doing Fred Toys. But in hip hop the person who's not necessarily the feature. Rapper has hype person going. Yoda's my man's always also he gonNA kick it tonight. Come and they're always the one doing the double the accent vocal They'll say something like hip hop who hosted so the hype man backing on low and so the lead guy is going. You know doing the main rap the hype man is like getting the crown hyped up and and typically before you go right go to a hip hop show. You'll see the hype person come out. I would've been views a great hype man public enemy flavor flavors like a great great great height man but he was also part of public enemy. Yeah so you turn so. I turned fred into the great hype. Man I thought he was because he sounded like a carnival Barker to. I've seen a gazillion movie. Sound like that'd be club. Yeah Yeah Right. I wanted to have him do that. Thing and most especially yes say painted sign outside around. Yeah that's exactly right. I love the idea of you going to parties at Anthony. Michael Hall's place with Durant Durant right. I mean how you can't really get more than that and yeah and that was easy. 'cause that was around the corner one block from my apartment that was super eighties It's funny because we're still sort of friends to this day. Even though we haven't seen each other for a long time I still have clothing in my closet that he gave me on those wonderful Coke Doubt Nights. Yeah Right so those were your coke. Still when when did you clean up? I got sober Exactly twenty four years ago. On August fifteenth and It was interesting because it was Madonna's birthday party. Madonna's birthday is August sixteenth. But her party was I guess. On a Saturday on the fifteenth. She decided throw on a Saturday. Or maybe a Friday night. I can't remember but I certainly remember the date. It was really horrible. 'cause I don't think just being carried out a Madonna's house back to my hotel would have gotten me sober but what got me. Sober was that earlier that day. I had performed with a really brilliant Cuban musician named nil Lara. And this guy's a genius. He's a super super genius and I was going down to record him for the Jazz Label Blue Note and and he asked me if I wanted to jam with him I was like of course you kidding me. Get the play with nil. Lara live and started playing and I knew that he was sort of real. Cuban hero in Miami beach so I had to do something more than just play cool guitar so I was pretty high and I started doing the Hendrix. Tricked PLAYING GUITAR BEHIND MY HEAD. My back in the whole bit and showing all yeahs like Levin a little silly and the crowd was going crazy I was like oh I'm killing it and the next day I went to Nils House to work on the record and he said hey menu he would. She played last night. I said sure. And he played it back for me and it was pretty dreadful Now probably wasn't nearly as bad as I think but the fact is is that it wasn't as good as I remembered and that made me believe in one instant that I was going crazy because my memory was like wow hours killing it but the tape doesn't lie and tape said no you were not killing it. You were at best average so that was the that was all. It took that that was it. I called Some friends of mine and I told him to come down to Miami beach because I was hallucinating. I I knew about hallucination because I was the acid head when I was younger. But now I hadn't taken LSD. And I was actually suffering from my very first my one and only bout of cocaine psychosis I. The mob was out to kill me. I call some friends of mine. Who Were Detectives Homicide Detectives and said? Look I'll pay for the private jet for you to come on. Now come down get me. Get me out of his hotel. We'll go back to the airport. Fly Back to New York and it was all in my head. So what year would that have been? That would have been ninety four. So that's good Eleven years after you met and worked with Bowie right. Who'd of course Bain threw himself? Did you ever use to exchange cocaine psychosis stories with him? No No? He was all cleaned up by that he was. He was clean when we were doing. Let's dance. He was cleaning eighty two. He had the serenity prayer in Japanese tattooed on his leg. I even ask him what that was when I saw it. So wow that's cool. What does that Kanji he says? That's the serenity prayer in Japanese. What's the prayer? And then he told me it's like oh uh-huh and was there ever a discussion about like David's clean now so you can't be doing anything around him and or was that is just a sign of respect. Yeah I didn't write. And what was the initial approach? Then how did he he got in touch with? You just thought well. I want to work with this guy. I met him in an after hours club. I walked in with billy idol. He and I used to go out a lot together. Billy still a wonderful guy. Just saw him. We just play Coachella and I saw. Billy is great. I love the dude But we go out together all the time we really party buddies and And when we walked into this new club called a continental billy and I were walking in together and he looked me with as David fucking bow and when he said by we he barked back. David Bow Anyway. Hello billions of cool dude in the world man. He's like so awesome. Didn't even like break a step really proper view John. Yup but the thing is that because Iranian bar fight it and slow down or anything like that and I was already over talking to Bowie like right away. I saw him. I was just like we stuck together like glue. I introduced myself said that. Hey man you live in the same building with all my friends that I grew up with which all young Americans Luther Vandross and Carlos Alamar and Carlos. His wife Robin who sang on every chic record in the beginning as did luther so I was like yeah. You know. We're sort of like family and don't realize it yet but anyway we started chatting next thing you know we were talking about jazz all night and I was so impressed with his indepth knowledge of jazz from like the most straight ahead to the most avant garde I was like this. The real dude man. He's like he wasn't like just out stuff. That people knew like that was sort of popular in the hippie set like Sun. Raw Sunrise was out there so people dug him but he knew like the deep stuff. He knew Eric Palffy. He'd Taylor he was into it. I mean he didn't just know it he was into it he could sing the heads and all that sort of stuff because he played Sax. I I didn't really know that about him so he was fascinated because he didn't realize that I knew that and he didn't realize that I orchestrated and did all the sheikh records who like. Wow you do that yourself of course is is. There's never been a record. I've done that. Anyone has ever stood on the conductor's podium except for me. I mean never i. I don't just do your arrangements. Sit Back and let somebody else conduct. I do derangement. Then I'm in the room with all the musicians. Wow it's amazing so Yes and that was a whole element that you added to to well to the genre though you orchestrated those right brought something totally new cinematic and exciting and it just suddenly you got something. Different From Chart Record. Write that transported you somewhere else because I never treated the sweetening like they weren't part of the ban. See that's the difference between my style of orchestration. Is that a lot of people who orchestrated. They wanted the orchestration to sort of. Stand out in a weird way my style. You know you listen to a song light modern love and you know those horns part of the band or even let's dance. Let's dance. Who Reggie Dan do? Bamboo Babylon let through the radio. And they're part of the thing you know so to me. It was critical to orchestrate Bowie..

Fred Toys Madonna Lsd David Bow cocaine Bowie Miami beach Prokofiev Schakowsky cindy Vale Duane Eddy Billy Scorpions billy idol America Luther Vandross writer Melvin
"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

12:31 min | 11 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"About the clothing. Except if twiggy was wearing a unique twitty's name but now all of a sudden they had these supermodels and there was Imad and Lauren Hutton. And Beverly Johnson and all this stuff and Jerry Jerry Hall and so inspired by Roxy Music. I mean you a hippie though for longtime yes still an probably if I could live certain way and all was right with the world. That would probably be the way to live. How would you define hippie them? Then what did it mean to you and your young. I went to a light even now. I look like like I'm naked at home. That's why people always say to me. Know How come you don't have a big mansion in someone's I it I'd have to have a staff. I WanNa live in a house where I can walk around naked all the drive naked staff you can have. I could. I'm not that cool. I just I think that when I'm it in my own home I could be as relaxes. I WanNa be and I just like being nude. I don't know why as you know it. Just it feels better to me so I never got a house. That was too big to handle. I never wanted that and obviously fashion was always very important to you and that sense of fashion came from your parents. Yeah my father. My stepfather was Jewish. And he be. Yeah exactly Because obviously we grew up sort of black community but The Jewish community in the black community was very closely aligned in those days because a lot of black people worked in the clothing business. You know in the coat rack from store to store to store to warehouse to warehouse and my father was one of those. They used to call them a pilot for flying Jewish airplanes. Which was the slang for those coat rack? He said he was a pilot. L. Out And and my stepfather bobby. His uncle own one of these sort of really cool. Men's clothing stores and New York was a very fashionable place at one time. Probably all the way from the turn of the last century up until right after World War Two After World War. Two American started to get into this leisurely kind of thing. It may have happened during the sixties during the hippie years during the surf years and things like that but up until then I remember even when we went to the movies to the cinema. We'd get dressed up. I would put on a suit. People would go to sporting events in suits and proper hats and the whole bit. I mean if you go back and you look at a film of somebody going to a baseball game in the forties fifties or tennis match. Daryll dressed in suits so. I was born in that era and my parents dressed me like an adult while the other kids were starting to get into this sort of casual clothing. I was still wearing much more formal type of clothing and consequently kids made fun of me but you had your Elbow Tien. Yeah the whole little Lord. Fauntleroy thing really. Pretty funny to be in America in the ghetto dressed like that. But it's really interesting because if you just go back ten or fifteen years prior to that you see all the black kids in the ghetto dress like that and what were your folks dressed like. They were fantastic. My mom would be wearing the latest carnaby street fashion hip stuff and my father. Bobby would be dressed like a Hollywood movie star me all the time I mean it was. They were very young. Though right. Your mother correct me. If I'm wrong was only thirteen when she was pregnant with you right yes. The first time my mom had sex she was thirteen. It was around Christmas Day and She fell pregnant after that incident. Just the very first time. Boom right away Nine months later you could. You could count it from January to September maxine. Oh I was born September nineteen and she made the decision to hang onto you because presumably. Everyone was assuming that she would not look after a actually. That's not quite accurate. She had put me a for adoption as soon as I was born. Baby Boy Goodman is the original birth certificate because I was going to be given up for I was given up for adoption was born and even my father's name was an on there because basically what they did. It was a controversial program. That's now been phased out. But they used to take these children off the streets From the lower east side and send him to western part of America to work on farms and it was basically sort of like indentured slavery in a weird way and it was a lot of eastern European kids. That would come over. You know their families would send them over as the movie. The Godfather and these kids have you know just formed gangs and live on the street and so this one I guess altruistic woman thought that she was doing a real service to these kids would send them to the West and work on farms but in fact it was just cheap labor and They phased out that program but I was sort of the last group of those kids. That was part of that program. But I didn't get sent to work on a farm. I was actually just sent to a hospital. I was born very sickly. And during that time my mom sort of got inspired to go. Reclaim me because of my father's mother who was quite sharp and really a brilliant woman. She spoke Latin Super Roman Catholic and Mother's birth mother's add powerful custodial rights. Even back then so. She was able to manipulate the system. And get me back and and then at that point. My Mom was convinced so it wasn't like she just like she had Her maternal instinct. Got The better of her. Okay that's what I like to say. And so just easier and faster but you got the real story right. Yeah now thank you and how long after you were born to that happened. When did she get get you back? It took a few months because I was already used to the name. Gregory which is why. I'm not really a junior because the woman had named me Gregory and And when my mom went to retrieve me it seemed like the only thing that would calm me. Down was the name Gregory the woman would say. Okay Gregory don't worry I'll get you back soon. So my mother would say repeat the same thing. Okay Gregory Okay Gregory. It'll be fine. It'll be fine but then my my father's mother intervened and said you know we should name him after my son and that's when I became Nile. But because my middle name was gregory only because the woman was calling me. Gregory and my mom was used to it now sort of similar to when you adopt a dog you usually you keep the same name that they call them at the pound It's funny that I put it that way but that's true. My mom continued to call me. Gregory and father's name is Nile Erskine. Rogers but my name is Gregory Rogers Right. And he is one of many soft to heartbreaking stories that are in your book but your scrupulously non judgmental about all the people who are around you living very what we would consider what many of us would consider alternative lifestyles. Pretty Alternative your parents your mother beverly and your Stepfather Bobby. Were both regular heroin. Uses as was my father my biological father and my biological father actually worked for. Bobby's family in the clothing business. So they were friends a matter of fact all of my brothers are half brothers and all of the men who father children with. My mother are all close friends which is weird. That's why in my book. I called variations on a Mormon theme. Because is the central mother and all these different fathers as opposed to one man and all these different women he asked. It's a series of exercises in alternative experimentation that you have had throughout your getting and you write brilliantly about what's the line I wrote it down. A living room would be filled with black and white hipsters suspended in time and space while I ran through the petrified forest of their legs. So this is you aged five six now at that point. I was a little older because that was when we were living on Greenwich Street in the village and when we lost that apartment we moved to East Eighth Street and that would have made me eight years old because I went into the third grade. Okay so to you. You've grown up in this environment with your parents who are sweet to you and you love. Buffet tastic. Yeah Great. But you're just used to the fact that occasionally they will speak very slowly and they will not out mid sentence will so they were. They were beaten Knicks and the beatnik culture was one of everybody spoke slowly because so many of them were heroin users and that just became a five it was like hey man how you doing baby so It was actually like so in America when we had jazz on FM radio the FM radio DJ spoke that way they were they would say things so now. We have the latest record by John Coltrane. It's an experimental record. Know that kind of thing. That's that's how my family spoke. So we sat down to dinner they would say Hey put which my nickname short for pudding pie he put. Can you pass me the salt man? So my parents spoke to me like that and the harshest disciplined they ever doled out was one day. I said the apartment on fire not not the entire apartment but just the window just a very small portion of the pad and accidentally acts. Oh completely I was. I was a boy scout and I was actually. I was a cub scout. I was too young to be a boy scout yet but a billion little campfire out of stick matches not realizing that when they would oxidizing we go down as well as up. Well I burned the window sill. It was like Whoa and I tried to clean it up and next thing I took off all the paint and they came home and my father looked at me. He just stared at me for five. Long minutes had felt like an eternity and is the harshest discipline ever. Because I knew this was heavy. He just stopped speaking not because he was nodding either any went hood. Dig Yourself Man. Dig Yourself now that he was just like saying you know. You're smart enough to be introspective. Look at your activity. How could you be so stupid to not know that when you lit the matches that it was going to burn down as well as up your way too smart for that? Yeah but he was right. I had to dig myself so but that that's how it was. I I never had and this is really interesting. Do you know that in my entire life? My parents never ever told me what time to come home like in today's world like I don't even know how you raise kids in America but when I was a kid typically we played outdoors. We couldn't wait to go outdoors here. We go home. You do your homework as fast as possible..

Gregory Rogers America Bobby Beverly Johnson Jerry Jerry Hall heroin twiggy tennis New York Elbow Tien Roxy Music Lauren Hutton twitty Boy Goodman Daryll Fauntleroy Imad John Coltrane
"nile" Discussed on Storynory

Storynory

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Storynory

"Dedicated to Sacha Hello this is Bertie and I'm here with some history from the ancient world inspired led by the Greek historian Herodotus but I I have a quick message with spinning off my herodotus series into a separate podcast golden all the naturally Herodotus so if you want to catch future additions of Herodotus please subscribe to her auditors in I tunes stitcher. Google play or your favorite podcast APP. Previously I've been telling you about the incredible empire built by the ancient the Persians when their great leader Cyrus died five hundred thirty years before the birth of Christ his son combine sees took over all all the lands that he had amassed including much of what we now call the Middle East young combine cheese set his sights on conquering one of the oldest oldest richest and most mysterious kingdoms of the world Egypt Herodotus visited Egypt when it was ruled by the Persians and and in the second book of his history's he describes what he found there he famously called Egypt the gift of the Nile which is why in this episode. I'm going to be focusing on the River Nile as you may know. The Nile is the longest river in Africa and indeed the longest river in the world. It is over four thousand miles in length. People have been wondering since ancient Egyptian Times where Africa's Greatest River begins gins in fact there are two niles the White Nile and the Blue Nile which join at Khartoum in Sudan and become one great river which flows onto Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea but where is the source of the Nile a learner dejection the scribe of the Sacred Acreage Treasury of Athena otherwise known as the Egyptian goddess of Neigheth told Herodotus this following theory about the source of the Nile. There was a border town in the south of Ancient Egypt called the elephant or Elephantine. It was an island in the River Nile shaped like an elephants Tusk and is now part of the Egyptian city of us when the rapids were very fierce around the island and it was impossible to travel by boat along this part of the river the local God was consume whose head was the shape of a ram which is a male sheep and who supposedly Rosalie watched over the source of the Nile he was often shown holding a jar from which flowed a stream of water according to the learning learned scribe the waters of the Nile float up from the bottomless pit hidden below the swirling whirlpools at Elephantine Egyptian King Sam Medicos allegedly proved the pit went down for ever the ordered his servants to make a long long rope and to lower it down into the pit. They could find no bottom to it. The scribe told Herodotus that half the water from the pit flowed over Egypt and to the north and the other half to the south and down to Ethiopia. This was of course absurd the Nile only flows in one direction from south to north but it is true that Elephantine was the place where the Nile entered Egypt Herodotus has another story that suggested that the Nile L. flowed from Ethiopia. He recorded that an army of Agip Shin soldiers deserted their commanders and marched into Ethiopia there. They helped the king of the Theo Paeans defeat some of his own soldiers who were rebelling against him as a reward. The king allowed the Egyptians wins to settle around a lake. That is the source of the Nile Herodotus says it took four months to travel along the Nile from Egypt by water and land to this place and it is actually true that the source of the Blue Nile starts in Lake Tana in Ethiopia but the ancient Egyptians did not know that the longer prong of the river the White Nile starts even further south with a big source rising in Lake Victoria in Uganda and smaller streams flowing in from Rwanda and Burundi as late as Victorian. We're in times English explorers like Burton speak can livingstone trump away through the deep forests of eastern Central Africa in a race to discover the true source of off the Nile. Although the start of the Nile was very mysterious to the Egyptians they of course knew all about how it flowed into the Mediterranean Sea. A large part of ancient Egypt was in the Delta region of the Nile. This is where the river looks a little like the flat palm of your hand and with fingers pointing out into the sea in between the water channels. The land was very fertile and was one of the best places on earth for growing ruining crops by the way the American city of Memphis Tennessee on the banks of the River Mississippi is named after the ancient Egyptian capital to Memphis on the River Nile. Both cities are at the head of the Fertile Delta regions of great rivers so the name sharing between an American city and an ancient Egyptian. One is no coincidence for most of history. The Nile has flooded its banks in Egypt between the months of June on September. The annual flooding only stopped when President Nasser of Egypt built the giant concrete as when dam in the nineteen sixties not far from ancient elephantine the annual flooding the Nile watered all the lands on either side and made it very easy to grow crops her auditor says says that unlike almost anywhere else in the world the Gypsies had no need to break up the fields with plows all they had to do was wait until the Nile at finished flooding and then scatter seed on the ground afterwards they would let pigs loose to trample the seed into the earth naturally herodotus. I just wondered why the Nile flooded he considered various theories put forward by fellow Greeks who wanted to gain a reputation for being clever according to one theory which she thought was idiotic every summer when the snows melt in the mountains of Ethiopia water flows into the Nile and travels down into the sea through Egypt her auditors could not believe that there could be snow in a place as hot as Africa even though this is what actually actually happens and is the correct answer to the question by the Nile flooded. The idea he favoured was more fanciful he he believed that in winter the blustery north wind blew the sun through the sky to Egypt when it was there it sucked up the waters that flooded over the Egyptian chip fields. That's why the waters of the Nile were low in winter. He's clearly describing how water evaporates in the sun but in summer so oh he said the sun returned to its normal position in the sky and the Nile filled up again with water and overflowed its banks by the way just in case anyone is wondering it's definitely not true that the sun is blown across the sky by the wind herodotus got that wrong but it is interesting interesting to see how he thought over various theories even today about ninety five percent of Egypt's population live within twelve miles of the river were it not for the river and the rich black earth which swept it up the amazing civilization of ancient Egypt would never have existed an so herodotus was right to say that Egypt is the gift of the River Nile and I'm going to drop in a personal note note here my eight year old son. Sasha is fascinated by the source of the Nile his absolute favorite TV program ever is the top gear Africa special in which the car maniacs clocks and Hammond and may go searching through Uganda and Rwanda for the source of the Nile. He must have watched it it. A thousand times is other great interest is cars in fact his first word was car and his favorite song by the way is Africa by toto and so that is why I'm going to dedicate this episode of Herodotus to my son Sasha who has a long standing ending and great interest in the River Nile and if you would like to hear future episodes.

River Nile Egypt White Nile Herodotus Blue Nile Nile flooded Nile Ethiopia Africa Elephantine Egyptian King Mediterranean Sea Google Greatest River Egyptian Times Uganda auditor Rwanda River Mississippi Middle East Sacha
"nile" Discussed on Elevation Church Podcast

Elevation Church Podcast

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"nile" Discussed on Elevation Church Podcast

"And now they're on the other side. And so it seems strange that God would tell them to do anything other than run. But he tells Moses to do something. God wants you to do tonight. And he says I want you to take the instrument in your hand, a symbol of your past. That is a symbol of the mistakes that you made when you killed the Egyptian Moses and ran and hid him in the sand and hit yourself. The staff that is the symbol of your potential. The same one that you used. Turn the Nile river. To blood in those ten plagues of Egypt. I want you to take that same instrument. And before you, leave Egypt. Stretch it back over what you just went through. And when you do. You will understand the purpose of what you went through. God brought you here tonight. I can be so bold. As to say that I believe this applies to everyone in the room who will have the faith receive because he wants to use. What you went through. That's the good news. Got to tell you the whole thing. God wants to use. What you went through. So does the devil. And the question in this moment. Is will you allow God to use? What you went through watch this. And when he had finished leading an entire nation own night long in the dark with with with water that could collapse on them at any moment. Don't you think they moved fast through this tunnel of supernatural miraculous potential death that at any moment could sweep them away, and they make it to the other side. And God says stop before you take another step. I need you to stretch your hand back over what you just went through the water that you just went through was not sent to destroy. You. Can I tell you something everything that made you afraid this year was not the devil? Everything that made you cry this year. Was not the devil everything that broke your heart. This year was not the devil. Everything that you lost. This year was not the devil everything that didn't go. According to plan. This year was not the devil. Some of the stuff that was sent against you was not sent to destroy you at the time. It felt like it would at the time. You felt like you would never be happy again at the time. You felt like you would just drive away and never come back at the time. You felt like you would never find that love that passion that feeling again at the time it felt like it would kill you. But the thing that you went through was not meant to destroy you. And when you stretch your hand over what you went through what you went through is going to deliver you from what came out..

Moses Egypt Nile river
"nile" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"nile" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"When your sister Claire brought to Sheikh LP's back from a car boot sale. I have no memory of that whatsoever. I think it was. And you made me a cassette copy and had say, she come one side and Tongan chic on the other. Amazing. Yeah, not long. Take the base. So Bernard boots play? It was just a revelation to me. Yeah. Around the same time. You saw about vintage clip with him on VH one doing the free. Yeah. Yeah. I think Nile see-through fen distress. And then we went out and picked up the whole of their back catalogue on vinyl than we from hairy records on bold street. I think we'll keep in that shopping business back then and yet still league little suspiciously. Every time we walked in every single time. Anyway, Nile was born in nineteen fifty two in the Bronx New York City and raised in Greenwich Village. He had the colorful childhood to say the least and grew up in an autistic stimulating intellectual environments surround by music and the coterie eccentric local characters. Initially, he had designs on being percussionist like his biological father, but wound up playing flute in the school oak strength. Thank clarinet before discovering his true calling. As it gets artist, he began his professional career as a session player in NYC torn with the Sesame Street bond and joining the Apollo theater house bond while still in his teens. He met bassist Bernard Edwards in nineteen seventy and the two quickly bonded, nod tanning, the hitherto jazz influenced Nile onto funk R&_b.. They went on to form the Big Apple band together, which eventually evolved into chic. But NADA now, recruiting drummer, Tony Thompson, and taking their cue from the likes of Roxy music to forge the bans elegant sophisticated image science Atlantic in nineteen seventy seven. They recorded their upon them first album on a miniscule budgets and EPA. Spare time they had between gigs with Vandross was among the backing vocalists and was very much this secret weapon on many of the hit records. He wasn't the the group went on to record the top ten album. Say she and risque and the string of hit singles, including the dense flow Staples, LA freak..

Nile Bernard Edwards Sheikh LP Claire Vandross New York City EPA Apollo theater Tony Thompson LA Greenwich Village
"nile" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nile" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"What was happening that made all those people applaud in that moment i assume there was something else happening in the theater across streaker no the thing is it's hard to convey in audio but there was a screen behind me and it was so funny it was a photoshop picture of me waistdeep in the nile river i was in nihil at people were like that school okay i wish we could see that i know it was it was a magical moment 'cause it was the only image i played the whole show so i was nothing but my words and then into nine on and i could see for swiss second the whole crabby like what does that have to do with anything yeah you'll saying on word getting their screens okay because they have this logging applause break to for just saying that you're in denying psychotic got to know that in actuality there was a picture of okay the nile river and that you had planned it yeah got a personal trainer a personal shopper a personal assistant and personal agenda you can't shut me up you can't dumb me down because i'm tireless and i'm wireless i'm an alpha male on beta blockers yeah the non believer in an overachiever laid back but fashion forward upfront downhome low rent high maintenance supersize longlasting high definition fast acting oven ready and built to last now this is getting so long it is was there ever any thought to not doing it anymore after certain.

nile river personal assistant
"nile" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"nile" Discussed on Channel 955

"Nile is making last forever i promise you that no one else for lavish each you better and if you don't believe me i don't need yup me no no no no detroit's number one hit station channel nine five five it is emily and if you're doing a little grocery shopping today my the only one who will run into kroger and right when i get to the parking lot start devouring like half of the groceries i just bought down that road why the.

Nile detroit kroger emily