35 Burst results for "Nile"

"nile" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

The Bible in a Year

02:59 min | Last week

"nile" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

"Exodus chapter one. These are the names of the sons of Israel, who came to Egypt with Jacob, each with his household. Rubin, Simeon, Levi, and Judah. Is a car, zebulon, and Benjamin, Dan and naftali, gad and Asher. All the offspring of Jacob were 70 persons, Joseph was already in Egypt. Then Joseph died, in all his brothers, and all that generation. But the descendants of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly, they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong so that the land was filled with them. Now there arose a new king over Egypt who did not know Joseph. And he said to his people, behold the sons of Israel are too many and too mighty for us. Come let us deal shrewdly with them lest they multiply, and if war befall us, they join our enemies and fight against us and escape from the land. Therefore, they set taskmasters over them to afflict them with heavy burdens, and they built for pharaoh store cities. But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied, and the more they spread abroad. And the Egyptians were in dread of the sons of Israel, so they made the sons of Israel serve with rigor and made their lives bitter with hard service in mortar and brick, and in all kinds of work in the field. In all their work, they made them serve with rigor. Then the king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, one of whom was named shipra, and the other pua. New serve as midwife to the Hebrew women, and see them upon the birth duel, if it is a son, you shall kill him. But if it is a daughter she shall live. But the midwives feared God and did not do as the king of Egypt commanded them, but let the male children live. So the king of Egypt called the midwives and said to them, why have you done this and let the male children live? The midwives said to pharaoh, because the Hebrew women are not like the Egyptian women, for they are vigorous in our delivered before the midwife comes to them. So God dealt well with the midwives, and the people multiplied and grew very strong. And because the wind midwives feared God, he gave them families. Then pharaoh commanded all his people. Every son that is born to the hebrews, you shall cast into the Nile. But you shall let every daughter live. Now, a man from the house of Levi went and took to a wife a daughter of Levi. The woman conceived and bore a son, and when she saw that he was a goodly child, she hit him three months, and when she could hide him no longer, she took for him a basket, made of bulrushes, and daubed it with bitumen and pitch. And she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds at the river's bank. And his sister stood at a distance to know what would be done to him. Now, the daughter of pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, and her maidens walked beside the river, and she saw the basket among the reeds. And sent her maid to fetch it. When she opened it, she saw the child and behold the baby was crying. She took pity on him and said, this is one of the hebrews children. Then his sister, said to pharaoh's daughter, shall I go and call you a nurse from the Hebrew women who can the child for you? And Faro's daughter, said to her, go. So the girl went, and called the child's mother,

Egypt Red Sea
The Birth of Moses

The Bible in a Year

02:59 min | Last week

The Birth of Moses

"Exodus chapter one. These are the names of the sons of Israel, who came to Egypt with Jacob, each with his household. Rubin, Simeon, Levi, and Judah. Is a car, zebulon, and Benjamin, Dan and naftali, gad and Asher. All the offspring of Jacob were 70 persons, Joseph was already in Egypt. Then Joseph died, in all his brothers, and all that generation. But the descendants of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly, they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong so that the land was filled with them. Now there arose a new king over Egypt who did not know Joseph. And he said to his people, behold the sons of Israel are too many and too mighty for us. Come let us deal shrewdly with them lest they multiply, and if war befall us, they join our enemies and fight against us and escape from the land. Therefore, they set taskmasters over them to afflict them with heavy burdens, and they built for pharaoh store cities. But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied, and the more they spread abroad. And the Egyptians were in dread of the sons of Israel, so they made the sons of Israel serve with rigor and made their lives bitter with hard service in mortar and brick, and in all kinds of work in the field. In all their work, they made them serve with rigor. Then the king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, one of whom was named shipra, and the other pua. New serve as midwife to the Hebrew women, and see them upon the birth duel, if it is a son, you shall kill him. But if it is a daughter she shall live. But the midwives feared God and did not do as the king of Egypt commanded them, but let the male children live. So the king of Egypt called the midwives and said to them, why have you done this and let the male children live? The midwives said to pharaoh, because the Hebrew women are not like the Egyptian women, for they are vigorous in our delivered before the midwife comes to them. So God dealt well with the midwives, and the people multiplied and grew very strong. And because the wind midwives feared God, he gave them families. Then pharaoh commanded all his people. Every son that is born to the hebrews, you shall cast into the Nile. But you shall let every daughter live. Now, a man from the house of Levi went and took to a wife a daughter of Levi. The woman conceived and bore a son, and when she saw that he was a goodly child, she hit him three months, and when she could hide him no longer, she took for him a basket, made of bulrushes, and daubed it with bitumen and pitch. And she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds at the river's bank. And his sister stood at a distance to know what would be done to him. Now, the daughter of pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, and her maidens walked beside the river, and she saw the basket among the reeds. And sent her maid to fetch it. When she opened it, she saw the child and behold the baby was crying. She took pity on him and said, this is one of the hebrews children. Then his sister, said to pharaoh's daughter, shall I go and call you a nurse from the Hebrew women who can the child for you? And Faro's daughter, said to her, go. So the girl went, and called the child's mother,

Egypt Israel Joseph Naftali Jacob Levi Zebulon Shipra GAD Simeon Asher Rubin Judah Benjamin DAN Pharaoh Faro
"nile" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"His name is Tim Tebow, and it's always a joy to have him on the program. Tim, welcome back. I appreciate it. How you doing, man? I'm doing all right. You're always busy doing wonderful things. You have a new book out called the one year devotional mission possible. I love that title. It's a 365 day devotional of inspiration. You have always been an inspiring figure, even before you were saying very much publicly, just when you were playing college football, you have this desire in you to inspire people. And the first thing I want to ask you before we talk about the book is do you remember as a kid when that happened or were you always like that even as a little kid? Because that's just a beautiful value and I remember when I just knew you as somebody playing college football, I thought there's just something beautiful about somebody who actually cares to inspire other people that he hasn't met or maybe we'll never meet. Well, I think I had two amazing examples in my mom and my dad that actually influence was something that they talked about all the time with us that every day you have a chance to impact the people you're around and if God gives you a big platform or it gives you a small platform whatever it is we all have the chance to influence and I remember as a very young boy we were in public and we were walking by the Nile and I put in a bad cereal. I believe it was cocoa puffs and then a dad in his son came up and said, hey my son, he saw you and I was only a few years older playing sports, but I was still young and he saw you and you were his hero and he put cocoa puffs and I was like, oh man, I knew I just impacted him in a bad way because that's obviously not a good thing for you and my mom used it as a learning lesson is look. You know, you're only and I don't even remember I was young and before I was even in high school and I had influence and how it impacted people and she just always talk about the ripple effects of all of our decisions

Tim Tebow Eric John Middle East America Tim football
Tim Tebow Opens Up With a Fun and Odd Story About Cocoa Puffs

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Tim Tebow Opens Up With a Fun and Odd Story About Cocoa Puffs

"His name is Tim Tebow, and it's always a joy to have him on the program. Tim, welcome back. I appreciate it. How you doing, man? I'm doing all right. You're always busy doing wonderful things. You have a new book out called the one year devotional mission possible. I love that title. It's a 365 day devotional of inspiration. You have always been an inspiring figure, even before you were saying very much publicly, just when you were playing college football, you have this desire in you to inspire people. And the first thing I want to ask you before we talk about the book is do you remember as a kid when that happened or were you always like that even as a little kid? Because that's just a beautiful value and I remember when I just knew you as somebody playing college football, I thought there's just something beautiful about somebody who actually cares to inspire other people that he hasn't met or maybe we'll never meet. Well, I think I had two amazing examples in my mom and my dad that actually influence was something that they talked about all the time with us that every day you have a chance to impact the people you're around and if God gives you a big platform or it gives you a small platform whatever it is we all have the chance to influence and I remember as a very young boy we were in public and we were walking by the Nile and I put in a bad cereal. I believe it was cocoa puffs and then a dad in his son came up and said, hey my son, he saw you and I was only a few years older playing sports, but I was still young and he saw you and you were his hero and he put cocoa puffs and I was like, oh man, I knew I just impacted him in a bad way because that's obviously not a good thing for you and my mom used it as a learning lesson is look. You know, you're only and I don't even remember I was young and before I was even in high school and I had influence and how it impacted people and she just always talk about the ripple effects of all of our decisions

Tim Tebow Football TIM
"nile" Discussed on Sky Blue Radio

Sky Blue Radio

03:41 min | 3 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Sky Blue Radio

"Me a Huron, sky blue radio. Got a hold on me. She got a hold on me God grim like my some heart and my soul love a little lady to the day I'm old and dead and got nothing no since the day we met. Two love was the same book so I thought just a nice story and then I got caught. No one could have saved me I couldn't have known the most powerful form of someone giving her now I sitting in the Nile the way the house. Was left with me she know it's up for me now and then I submitted and all we came never thought I was never heaven the same she got a heart she had a heart moment she got a heart. She got a grip like a fires on my heart on the soul of the little lady to the day I'm home then I'm not I know it's just a day we met. It was a good time and all of the best all of its years and hours and all of this we have I know it might be hard I'd do it all again such a nice and children story such a nice little story and all to have got a woman gotta hold on me I've got a woman got a hold on me. I got a woman got a hold on me. I got a woman got a who knows I got a woman got a hold on me I got a woman got a hold on me oh I got a woman got a hold on me so I got a woman got a whole she got a hold on me she got a hold on me but you gotta hold on. To your grip like a fire to my heart I'm the soul the only till the day I'm holding down my under since the day we met she got a hold on. She got a hold on me. She got a hold on me

"nile" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"nile" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Well tell us the country in virginians about your race You're running against this phony moderate And the area that you represent and why you are the true blue conservative and she's a phony moderate Sure you know Mark I just stepped outside we actually have a Latinos Vega rally going on right now where we have over a hundred folks that turned out here tonight And there is no coincidence for why we're having so many people coming out to our events People are tired of what's been coming out of Washington over the last couple of years They're tired of my opponents double standards and her lip service and they're ready for change folks are hurting right now because of record high inflation because of the cost of fuel because of the cost of groceries And because they're seeing every single thing in their lives going up from crime to the economy to big hand of government trying to interfere with everything that we do And so we're really excited as we get closer to election day We have the momentum We're talking to voters about the issues that matter to them And we're excited because we're seeing a movement here and there's nothing my opponent or the Democrat party can do to stop it Whatever you do or would you like to represent Say that again What is the area that you're running in So the 7 congressional district begins in eastern Prince William county and then it has the staffer spotsylvania Fredericksburg culpepper Greene county Orange County Caroline county and king George and half a precinct in albemarle So it's a newly drawn district after redistricting this district is now 70% new to my opponent And I live work and play in Prince William county and I've been serving there as a county supervisor for the last three years I also had the privilege of leading the Latinos for young and coalition where we proudly delivered 54% of the Hispanic vote across the Commonwealth And so we've laid the groundwork and now we're starting to see people coming out like never before and they are ready to take our country back

Han satellite Marco Rubio Florida redland cotton Pennsylvania Alabama Mississippi USA Egypt Tennessee river Nile River India
"nile" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"nile" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Yeah she's hot. She's hot and she's dying. She's outside. I kiss this time you're really. Just too good to do that my broken heart please. See what you love it's suicide. You say you're crying about the reason. The Nile swimming for the show. You left me drowning in my dreams and you won't save me anymore. Man I got you dinner one more chance girl I'll be there for you please follow us when you breathe. I wanna be here for you I'll be there for you. Soon. Can't say no to you I'll be there for you. You know you know it's good for me. Now they haven't had in place. But I can't promise you tomorrow. But I can't stop back here. For a long time. When you get out of your way. I feel so. Good to be there. When you were done. I wanna be there for you I'll be there for you. This is my first time watching you. With the things I wanna leave for you I'll be down in London.

"nile" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

14:52 min | 5 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Broken Record

"Pushkin. Geico asks, would you love a chance to save some money on insurance? Of course you would. And when it comes to great rates on insurance, Geico can help. Like with insurance for your car truck motorcycle boat and RV. Even help with homeowners or renters coverage. Plus, add an easy to use mobile app, available 24 hour roadside assistance, and more. And Geico is an easy choice. Switch today and see all the ways you could save. It's easy. Simply go to Geico, dot com or contact your local agent. Today. What if you were a trendy apparel company facing an avalanche of demand? To ensure more customers can buy more line jackets, you call IBM to automate your IT infrastructure with AI. Now your system is monitor themselves. What used to take hours takes minutes. And you have an ecommerce platform designed to handle sudden spikes in overall demand. As in actual overalls. Let's create IT systems that rule up their own sleeves. IBM. Let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com slash IT automation. Hey everyone,

"nile" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

The Officer Tatum Show

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"nile" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

"I got to talk about the police officers out of Kansas, right? Arkansas, I want to say Kansas for some reason. I almost want to say our Kansas, but they are from Arkansas. It was a video that has gone viral, where it appears to be police officers just beating the mess out of somebody. In a 32nd clip. Let me just clarify this for the audience. Whenever you see a clip that's 30 6 seconds or whatever, I want you to pump the brakes. I don't care what's in the clip. I want you to pump the brakes and begin to ask questions. Now, the solution or the conclusion to your question asking and your research may inevitably be what you originally expected in the video. Or it may be something totally different. Pump the brakes, give it a couple taps on the brakes. And go back and think about these very crucial things. If I'm watching cops beat up a guy in the video, the video is only 34 seconds. Is the totality of the interaction only 34 36 seconds or whatever that clip was. The one I saw I think was 36 seconds. Is this the totality of the situation that has occurred? If the answer is no, then you have to ask a few more questions. You say, oh, that's interesting. Well, what happened before the video started? Because I know you know, and Stevie Wonder can see that police officers aren't just appearing out of thin air on top of a person beating them. Something must have happened before this point.

Arkansas Benjamin kromp Kansas Stevie Wonder Al sharpton Jesse Jackson Nile River Mike lindell Tatum Brandon
"nile" Discussed on Gator's Rockapocalypse Radio Show

Gator's Rockapocalypse Radio Show

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"nile" Discussed on Gator's Rockapocalypse Radio Show

"The 1.12 gigawatts club. The song will be holding on. Or wait, no, no, sorry. Sorry. Sorry. I'm fucking up here. Sorry, yes. Do you think relief that album on the 15th it was semblant? Suited the Nile, that's a song in the album of vermilion eclipse. Only 15. But yeah, so with that said,.

Is Musk Making a Move to Buy Twitter?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Is Musk Making a Move to Buy Twitter?

"Now I want to get back to talking with my good friend Kurt schlichter because we are both huge advocates of free speech. We are both bomb throwing provocateurs on the Twitter bird platform and we are both huge fans of Elon Musk throwing a monkey wrench into old Parag the new CEOs the new Jack at Twitter's plans to be the thought police. So he turned down the board seat and the golden handcuffs that stopped him from taking over. Do you think he's gonna make the play and buy the company? I absolutely do, mostly because it will amuse him to do so, but it's much more important than that. Because this guy has literally more money than crassus.

Kurt Schlichter Elon Musk Twitter Crassus
"nile" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 10 months ago

"nile" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Is it a good idea to push Putin out? Because it's going to be a major challenge. It's going to be a meat grinder bloodbath mess. Major war major escalation, Poland giving tanks and all that. But the problem is, if you succeed, now you have embarrassed and shamed and given a loss to a guy Vlad Putin, who's not a big fan of losing who is not a very well balanced individual and who happens to still be the proud owner of a large array of chemical weapons and 6300 nukes. Now I'm not a Putin fan. He's a tyrant. He's a bad guy. But is it a good idea to give that bad guy a bruising loss and have to deal with the consequences in the potential danger that could happen? Yeah, great questions, Jim. And as you point out, I also am Putin is a complete psycho and a thug and a menace to society, frankly. And that's what he is. And we're seeing that every day in Ukraine with the atrocities that his barbaric military are carrying out on the ground in Ukraine. And if Putin is pushed into a corner, you know, how will he respond? And these are very important points. I mean, certainly there's a possibility that Putin may use chemical weapons in Ukraine. And the Russians have used chemical weapons before Syria. They use them on British soil. They use them these novichok actually in the city of Salisbury in the UK several years ago against a former Russian agent, and that killed a couple of British citizens. So I'm Putin's capable of using these kinds of weapons. We can't underestimate what he's capable of. But at the same time, you know, I'm on the view that with bullets like Putin, you've really got to stand up to them, you know, you have to really demonstrate strength and resolve because if he gets away with what he's doing in Ukraine, I'm in no doubt that he's going to set his sights further

Joe Biden Putin Biden Donbass Russia Baltic Crimea U.S. government Kamala Harris Boris Johnson Joe steps Ukraine Harris Iran Maxwell NATO United States White House Philadelphia James Bond
Nile Gardiner on Putin's reaction to a Defeat in Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 10 months ago

Nile Gardiner on Putin's reaction to a Defeat in Ukraine

"Is it a good idea to push Putin out? Because it's going to be a major challenge. It's going to be a meat grinder bloodbath mess. Major war major escalation, Poland giving tanks and all that. But the problem is, if you succeed, now you have embarrassed and shamed and given a loss to a guy Vlad Putin, who's not a big fan of losing who is not a very well balanced individual and who happens to still be the proud owner of a large array of chemical weapons and 6300 nukes. Now I'm not a Putin fan. He's a tyrant. He's a bad guy. But is it a good idea to give that bad guy a bruising loss and have to deal with the consequences in the potential danger that could happen? Yeah, great questions, Jim. And as you point out, I also am Putin is a complete psycho and a thug and a menace to society, frankly. And that's what he is. And we're seeing that every day in Ukraine with the atrocities that his barbaric military are carrying out on the ground in Ukraine. And if Putin is pushed into a corner, you know, how will he respond? And these are very important points. I mean, certainly there's a possibility that Putin may use chemical weapons in Ukraine. And the Russians have used chemical weapons before Syria. They use them on British soil. They use them these novichok actually in the city of Salisbury in the UK several years ago against a former Russian agent, and that killed a couple of British citizens. So I'm Putin's capable of using these kinds of weapons. We can't underestimate what he's capable of. But at the same time, you know, I'm on the view that with bullets like Putin, you've really got to stand up to them, you know, you have to really demonstrate strength and resolve because if he gets away with what he's doing in Ukraine, I'm in no doubt that he's going to set his sights further

Putin Vlad Putin Ukraine Poland JIM Syria Salisbury UK
The Governor Whitmer Entrapment Scheme Is the Stuff of Fiction

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:09 min | 10 months ago

The Governor Whitmer Entrapment Scheme Is the Stuff of Fiction

"Let's talk about some important stuff here with Julie Kelly, who is one of the great Americans who has taken it upon herself to cover the abuses of power by the deep state by the left by the Biden administration and the DoJ. And Julie, I hate to have a slightly positive attitude, but we got good news on Friday in that insane and trapped scheme that they did with the governor Whitmer attempt non kidnapping. Tell us about what happened. Jim, I say often that if you had the greatest fiction writer in the world, you could not have this person author a crazier story. That would happen. The various characters, including just low life FBI agents and informants who entrapped these several kind of sad misfits in a way, and other innocent men were given into the spot so they could produce the FBI once again interfere in a presidential election. We saw a certain negative headlines for Donald Trump as millions of Americans were voting for president in October of 2020.

Julie Kelly Biden Administration Governor Whitmer DOJ Julie FBI JIM Donald Trump
Box Office and Streaming Picks for the Weekend

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:13 min | 11 months ago

Box Office and Streaming Picks for the Weekend

"Let's talk about what people actually might want to see, which is what's coming up at the box office. Either this weekend or coming up soon that you think people should keep an eye out for. Well, you know, it's a little bit of a quiet time in The Batman just came out. Right. So that's a problem because that's going to kind of flood the deck and everyone's going to go see that. So the box office release schedule has been lighter than usual of late, which is interesting. And I think a lot of content, especially fresh content is coming directly to streaming and they're too quick notes is death in the Nile, which I thought was rather enjoyable, came out a few weeks ago. It didn't make much noise at the theater. But yesterday it was just announced that it will be a viewing on both Hulu and HBO Max at the end of this month. So if you missed it, don't blink, it's coming directly home very soon. And I think that we've seen that a few times, even nightmare alley, which is up for best picture, made a quick jump to Hulu. And more and more times you're seeing these major releases just going straight to streaming. So I think it sends a message to potential theater goers that, hey, hold your hold your horses. It's coming soon. So I don't think that's going to have a great effect in the box

Hulu HBO
"nile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Can only here on 97.1 Wash s out. I kiss this time, really? I'll juice he's shaking by. Last. My broken on you sit You love It's suicide. Yes, Save cry 1000. The Nile swimming for the shore. Let me drive it in. My C won't save head anymore where the God will give her one. Tank girl. I'll be there You are swinging. You put your breathe. I want to really air for you. I'll be. I feel so from the step. I can't say okay. I know. You know, it's fruitful. Now they have their own hat and place. Well, I can promise you tomorrow. What I can pop back yesterday savvy and my doctor wanted to be on time. My bill water Invested play you there When you get drunk, I'll be y I'll be back for you, Bob. And that's when you breathe the airport. You I want to go down when you were playing the most. Your baby. Oh, shall see below well scandal. Happy that for five words waiting and breathe. I want to be the air pulled you I'll be live and I die for you. Still somebody stop for you. What can't say what looking to be? Copy them for you. My words are sweating When you breathe. You want me? I'll be Stop for you Still self from the stop you What? Guests Into happy Mhm. Oh! Oh! We do, Toby and chilies. Nearly impossible Question. We're in Fairfax on this Thursday morning.

"nile" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"The need when y'all tonia. Gb zhang shock under. What a wonderful day to be in the house of the lord here with us for the first time please stand what a beautiful family glad. You're here daddy. Look that new far. He thinks good. Don't they try new goods like grandma. Canada goodall kirby off or loop. Grimace man it'd be sort of tumbled. Bob oh go ahead and the cornea learning into definitely nile. Who keep go under ankle. Define water somewhere web homes marzio shepherd. Pretty keep woj in the wild west world of podcasting. There is one podcast that is authentic and genuine continues to stand tall and its originality based on a passion for his guests.

"nile" Discussed on You Beauty

You Beauty

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on You Beauty

"You know how. I used to be a massive like acrylic shellac. Gal like my. Now's whenever i've taken them off have always been still quite strong. It's quite strange that's fantastic. I reckon you're probably in the minority there but a lot of that comes down to your diet and nio health and also the technician that did now so you must have a good person. So basically i mean shellac. He's one of the more gentle foams back in the day when it was acrylics lakes and it was a falling down the nile. And all that sort of stuff you really left with paper-thin nails at the end. Jails have come a long way but they still going to damage the niobe no matter what anyone says says because it has to adhere to the nile. So it's going to kind of hang on there and stay somehow so essentially you're waiting for that part of the nail bed to grow out and you're fresh now from underneath to come through. It's a long process. It can be a vicious cycle because you go. Oh my way he can now comey both a nego. Get you niles don again. A few tapes. That i have are all collagen. So an injectable. We'll make a massive difference to your niles collagen when ingested works on the protein. So your hair skin and nails. Whenever i take it and i am religiously taking it twice a day at the moment my nails are so thick and grow so fast that i have to trim them so often. I'm like oh my nails a too long. So i definitely get onto an all collagen supplement. Now hod is absolutely do work but they need to be applied day. They're a labor of love. I always aaad now. I do not apply to every day. I do it every four days but it starts to get a bit monkey but basically whatever you're going gonna do. It is going to take effort and time to grow up and to love that nile. That's a beach flaky and dehydrated so some of my recommendations in terms of nail harness. The m'voula scientific penetrating nile haba nineteen ninety-five. It's really fantastic. Rpi has the natural now strengthen our which is also about twenty bucks and also the revived and al intensive strength which is thirty dollars so those three are really good. But you need to apply reapply. The next day take it off. Apply reapply the next day every second day until you now's a nice and stone also. Don't do what i've done. And just like put layer upon layer on nor after the second day you generally have to take it off and start again otherwise it starts to get real real

lake campbell kelly mccarron Holly kelly Lee dick streit swimming Kim takashi rachel
How To Save Your Nails After Shellac

You Beauty

02:12 min | 1 year ago

How To Save Your Nails After Shellac

"You know how. I used to be a massive like acrylic shellac. Gal like my. Now's whenever i've taken them off have always been still quite strong. It's quite strange that's fantastic. I reckon you're probably in the minority there but a lot of that comes down to your diet and nio health and also the technician that did now so you must have a good person. So basically i mean shellac. He's one of the more gentle foams back in the day when it was acrylics lakes and it was a falling down the nile. And all that sort of stuff you really left with paper-thin nails at the end. Jails have come a long way but they still going to damage the niobe no matter what anyone says says because it has to adhere to the nile. So it's going to kind of hang on there and stay somehow so essentially you're waiting for that part of the nail bed to grow out and you're fresh now from underneath to come through. It's a long process. It can be a vicious cycle because you go. Oh my way he can now comey both a nego. Get you niles don again. A few tapes. That i have are all collagen. So an injectable. We'll make a massive difference to your niles collagen when ingested works on the protein. So your hair skin and nails. Whenever i take it and i am religiously taking it twice a day at the moment my nails are so thick and grow so fast that i have to trim them so often. I'm like oh my nails a too long. So i definitely get onto an all collagen supplement. Now hod is absolutely do work but they need to be applied day. They're a labor of love. I always aaad now. I do not apply to every day. I do it every four days but it starts to get a bit monkey but basically whatever you're going gonna do. It is going to take effort and time to grow up and to love that nile. That's a beach flaky and dehydrated so some of my recommendations in terms of nail harness. The m'voula scientific penetrating nile haba nineteen ninety-five. It's really fantastic. Rpi has the natural now strengthen our which is also about twenty bucks and also the revived and al intensive strength which is thirty dollars so those three are really good. But you need to apply reapply. The next day take it off. Apply reapply the next day every second day until you now's a nice and stone also. Don't do what i've done. And just like put layer upon layer on nor after the second day you generally have to take it off and start again otherwise it starts to get real real

Comey Niles Don RPI
"nile" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Why isn't he's indifferent or really. Good out so reciting season. I think is particularly special because we have two full moons in aquarius. Though every sense season has its full moon in its opposing side so in cancer season we have the capricorn a full moon. I will you know next season Which will be virgo. We have the pisces full moon. So the site. The twelve signs come in pairs they come. Imposing pairs of every sign has another sign that opposes it in the sky or on zodiac wheel and so for leo. It's opposing science aquarius. So normally any other year we'd have one full moon aquarius this year. We have two full moons and aquarius. Which is a very special and rare event. We're getting this double dose of aquarian energy On the full moons and then also the new moon leo which is august. Eighth occurs at the peak of lionsgate and lionsgate is his special time Th this like porto basically opens and we get downloads of information from the cosmos and the peak of lionsgate every year. is on august eighth and that is when the new moon in leo Happens to her this year. Is that to the landscape. Puerto as there's something with like the location of the earth relative to the moon or sun that gives offending of the veil or what exactly is eli the star sirius so it's actually serious is aligned at that point with the sun and then also the clock centers lactic center is the point that the entire milky way revolves around and is the center of the sun the galactic centre no center of the milky way. Everything everything revolves around while You can think of it as like the center of the universe as we know it. Seattle black hole. It's not really a black hole But it's just you know it's it's the actual black hole is there of definitional black holes But yeah so it's lined up at the start serious lined up with the sun and the earth earth sun. They're all in alignment and this is what The great pyramids were built around know the sphinx in egypt is said to hold up the lionsgate to hold it open Back then it. Also coincided with the overflowing of the nile rivers so it was correlated with abundance and fertility so this period of time has long been celebrated for for thousands of years. And so it's a really special time. Thought bring information from the star. Search star serious. Looks like a blue sun right so it like rises with the sun so if you if you have a good vantage point right there it looks like there's like two sons sky

lindsay simsek christopher williams jill winter christine kristen
Astrology Expert Jill Wintersteen on Why This Leo Season Will Be Different

Almost 30 Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Astrology Expert Jill Wintersteen on Why This Leo Season Will Be Different

"Why isn't he's indifferent or really. Good out so reciting season. I think is particularly special because we have two full moons in aquarius. Though every sense season has its full moon in its opposing side so in cancer season we have the capricorn a full moon. I will you know next season Which will be virgo. We have the pisces full moon. So the site. The twelve signs come in pairs they come. Imposing pairs of every sign has another sign that opposes it in the sky or on zodiac wheel and so for leo. It's opposing science aquarius. So normally any other year we'd have one full moon aquarius this year. We have two full moons and aquarius. Which is a very special and rare event. We're getting this double dose of aquarian energy On the full moons and then also the new moon leo which is august. Eighth occurs at the peak of lionsgate and lionsgate is his special time Th this like porto basically opens and we get downloads of information from the cosmos and the peak of lionsgate every year. is on august eighth and that is when the new moon in leo Happens to her this year. Is that to the landscape. Puerto as there's something with like the location of the earth relative to the moon or sun that gives offending of the veil or what exactly is eli the star sirius so it's actually serious is aligned at that point with the sun and then also the clock centers lactic center is the point that the entire milky way revolves around and is the center of the sun the galactic centre no center of the milky way. Everything everything revolves around while You can think of it as like the center of the universe as we know it. Seattle black hole. It's not really a black hole But it's just you know it's it's the actual black hole is there of definitional black holes But yeah so it's lined up at the start serious lined up with the sun and the earth earth sun. They're all in alignment and this is what The great pyramids were built around know the sphinx in egypt is said to hold up the lionsgate to hold it open Back then it. Also coincided with the overflowing of the nile rivers so it was correlated with abundance and fertility so this period of time has long been celebrated for for thousands of years. And so it's a really special time. Thought bring information from the star. Search star serious. Looks like a blue sun right so it like rises with the sun so if you if you have a good vantage point right there it looks like there's like two sons sky

Lionsgate LEO Cancer Puerto ELI Nile Rivers Seattle Egypt
Mosquitoes in Walla Walla County Test Positive for West Nile Virus

Seattle's Morning News

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Mosquitoes in Walla Walla County Test Positive for West Nile Virus

"Virus is found in our state For the first time this year. Mosquitoes and Walla Walla County are showing up with the virus, which can spread to humans Last year to people in our state contracted West Nile infections. Most people don't need medical treatment, but some develop a fever or other since DEMS.

Walla County Walla West Nile Fever Dems
An Introduction to Podcast Media Hosting

Deadset Podcasting

02:08 min | 1 year ago

An Introduction to Podcast Media Hosting

"Let's just really nile this one thing. We need to spend too much time on this. Because it could become a big thing your default hosting option at the moment nieces podcast hosting for people that are listening not website hosting specifically for hosting the media so your audio or video falls. So what are you going. Well it's a different question that went. I thought when. I was filling this out so just to for full disclosure right now. My podcasts are hosted with lipson. i also have a pint cast account. If i was starting over again today i might go with pied bean instead of lipson but my main concern for a even hobby podcast or would be to go with somebody that had. Ib podcast measurement guidelines two point. Oh statistics available because even if you're not gonna monetize at least you know. Those statistics are the same as another person that has statistics from an ib podcast measurement guidelines to puno certified host provider. And that. that's it. I mean you're not supposed to compare it to show a lot of people do and at least you know that you're comparing apples to apples versus oranges to come quotes. That's perfectly put and i agree. I i was only in for very long time. And it's probably because of the fist. The people that i locked used them and talk really positive in a positive way. I guess about them. So i just went with them for a long time. Cycled through others thinking that there's some magic ingredient that one of them will have the other stein thrill the same you just gotta get espy said when all the same. They're in the ballpark of offering the same coal faces but i'm using captivate don't fm now. And it is the only host of used in the last couple of years. Where i feel like. I'm looking at a differentiated product. The you is amazing. You can have as many shows as you want on the and for a hobbyist armel interested in paying to have more showers than my bad download limit calling or whether there's a number that i have to heat which they have won but start is everyone else they just talk about it

Lipson Puno Espy Stein Armel
"nile" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Thirty nome state. Your refunding gnomes but you can through from the bloody cry on top of cow do the nile. Everybody knows it's congress. Think one last kiss before best. We thought he no Monica were narrow sudoku near sacramento la. Vida on.

William Jacobson Argues Democrats Employ the Logical Fallacy of 'Kafka-Trapping'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | 1 year ago

William Jacobson Argues Democrats Employ the Logical Fallacy of 'Kafka-Trapping'

"They use. I read an interesting piece. It will be in my newsletter today upon you know that calm You want to check it out by William Jacobson is really terrific. It's a piece in the Washington Examiner, where he talks about how these proponents trying to teach your kids to be racist through critical racism theory. How they use the Kafka trap against their opponents. What the Kafka trap is love. These fancy terms, right? Makes you sound super smart, right cocktail parties. Got a little cocktail weenies going around. Hey, can I have one of those? And by the way, did you do a Kafka trap? Lesa makes you sound super intelligent. We're just going to throw it out there because it's true. What's the Kafka trap? The coffin trap is where you use the Nile's of something. To prove that the person is part of something they're denied. In other words, Deny Europe you go up and say Listen, I'm not gonna have this critical racism theory. Talk to my talk to my kids were not racist. In our household. We teach our kids to treat everyone fairly and responsibly to love our neighbor. And what did the leftist come back with the Kafka trap? You're denying it. That's white fragility. You know what that means? You're a double, super racist. And you're like, Wait, What? I just said I'm not a racist. Now you're telling me I'm extra super double, like mutant powered racist like how does that work? You are denied the stronger You deny it. Stronger. You're a part of it, and you're looking at them. You scratching your head like, uh, My living in like stupid ville. Am I living in a vacuum of dumb on the event horizon of an intellectual vacuum? Is this happening? That's the Kafka trap. Here. You want a definition caught this online. Kafka trap Replace X by the way with racist here and you'll see what I mean. A Kafka trap is a fallacy where if someone denies being X, it has taken as evidence that the person is X. Since someone who is X would deny being X. It's the ride from the novel The trial by the Czech writer Franz

William Jacobson Washington Examiner Europe Kafka Franz
"nile" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"nile" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Phony. Bill got the rating. The stomach fun committed meltdown. Expected though. We can't stop. But i had cloud so good old brad one shot but why are we talking. I saw you see world. We discovered the sun. Blue clear out Classical they might get annual but in the glass nile.

Archeologists Unearth an Ancient Pharaonic City in Egypt

John Williams

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Archeologists Unearth an Ancient Pharaonic City in Egypt

"A 3000 year old lost city south of Cairo. Complete with brick houses, artifacts and tools from ancient times, noted archaeologist So he Hawass said today that an Egyptian mission had discovered the city in the southern province of Luxor. It dates back to what is considered to be a golden era of ancient Egypt. He also said the city was built on the western Bank of the Nile River and was once the largest administrative and industrial settlement off the Empire of the Pharaohs. WGN Sports David and

Hawass Cairo Luxor Western Bank Of The Nile River Egypt Wgn Sports David
22 Mummies Are Moved in a Glittering Display in Cairo

Fresh Air Weekend

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

22 Mummies Are Moved in a Glittering Display in Cairo

"Of 22 royal mummies across Cairo to a massive new museum in the city took place today. The ceremony snakes along the Nile from the Egyptian museum that overlooks Tahrir Square. The newly opened National Museum of Egyptian Civilization transporting 18 Kings and four Queens, mostly from the new Kingdom. Authorities shut down roads along the Nile to transport the mommies in climate controlled case is loaded onto trucks decorated with wings and Arrow inspired decides for the hour long journey from their previous home in the older museum. I'm Janine Herbst, and you're listening to NPR

Tahrir Square National Museum Of Egyptian Ci Egyptian Museum Cairo New Kingdom Janine Herbst NPR
"nile" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"nile" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"Oldest record of postpartum instructions can be found in the old testament. Of course okay. So on leviticus. Twelve five which rate twelve five discussion already as a biblical scholar cracked rachel a biblical biblical assessment name. You do She must not touch anything sacred or go into a sanctuary until the days of her purification or complete because women are unclean after giving birth. Okay to mention children. The lord's children. I mean it's a good thing that women are pushed into doing right and then also then are also coming on. Babies were born like not consensually many and then once they are born now. You're like some dirty unclean. He them so offer. Rest if you had a son you would get thirty three to forty days. Okay and a daughter would give you sixty six to eighty days because the manar leslie yes. Inherently the original sin like from the bible. Yes from eve the whole yes. Women are just inherently cling from birth. There's nothing you could do get it like you're just born a woman you're born as a biblical scholar of us are born sinners right. Yes that's part of it. I i did take a world history. Colonised that i showed up to bolt right western religion. Yes we are. All born centers So back to my biblical scholar nece the postpartum depicted in the bible. Had new more bleeding at than did with resting. Okay back to the sin so it didn't really matter that you were healing. You just gave per day jim. Fuck like when you're done being dirty. He them disgusting anger women harm. You can come back okay. Carrie good moving to any ancient egypt. K new mothers were advised to have their backs rubbed. Great with oil sounds great in which a nile perch had been sued. You want they wanted to increase increase airflow milk. It's not how you do at bam smelly fish. You just get dirty old dead fish dirty old oil studio s can you imagine so Eating a mouse was thought to cure a number of ills and it was not the extent mother. Eight the mouse. She could pass along those cures through her milk. No passing the hantavirus through your milk or other Diseases of Yeah the roads are disgusting. Disease carriers yes so okay. Menstrual blood was another potent medicine and it was rebuilding infant to drive away any demons that might wish to hundred child. I mean so you just put your one station blood. I'm but like okay. So but yeah. Like i don't know if there's a distinction between measure blood in postpartum bleeding right like who different actions yet not that they would necessarily understanding. No i guess they just thought Baby on your period. Just blow up coming for coming out. Yeah you're not talking disagree about like shedding your lining with ovulation alerts as being a you being a Open wound inside of your body. Yes yep so. Ancient greece and the birth was followed by a period of rest lasting roughly forty days from other child which the forty day thing comes up over and over and over and over again. It's crazy to me i'm attempts. I read the theory days. And i don't know why i don't know if it's just like a nice number i'm guessing it hasn't been new six week postpartum thing which we also subscribe to now like when you go get your first offers visit. Yeah postpartum is it must. I guess there's an again. I was actually going to ask you that too because i was like when is how many visits like win is the first time now d- touchdown with a doctor after you give birth and i was released weeks weeks. It's horrifying come your every two seconds then buy post-partum dangerous tyner or person like a recovering because there's just so many things that can go wrong because you go to your pediatrician. A lot. they're like surf. Doctor is like laying is not fair. to your pediatrician. Auto be keeping an eye out. I don't think that. I think people care enough about birth parents. No

one episode ten months old one
Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

podnews

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

"Browns bean spreaker and captivate all subjects to eight to nile attack. The same attackers appear to have been involved. We were wondering why they targeted podcast hosts so we talked to them. You'll find that full report in our show notes and our newsletter today. A company called. Happy scribe is publishing automated transcripts of podcasters without the parent's consent of many of the publishers. We learned today. Cumulus media owner of westwood. One has its achieved more than one billion downloads. In two thousand twenty podcasting revenue grew forty percent last year to they say. They've made their bet on partnership arrangements with talent as opposed to going out and spending a lot of money on it or infrastructure the company uses spotify owned megaphone backtracks has launched a tool that monitors your head gesture movements. The tool requires the listener to be using airpods pro headphones investor. Andrew wilkinson says in a tweet. He's removing podcasts. From his phone because podcastone mostly people repeating ideas. You already agree with or talking about things that trigger anxiety. He's co founder of tiny capital which invests in ios podcast app castro podcast membership platform super fast and podcast producer. Righto media try and digital has released the latest podcast ranker's for the us and latin. America they're incomplete ranker's containing participating publishers only notably the ranker's don't include. I heart radio podcasts. Triton digital is being bought by the company echoing the open independent nature of podcasting and writing in the financial times fulmer spotify chief economist will page notes that major labels released one point two million songs in two thousand and twenty but diy artists released nine point five million songs the music industry. He says he's making more money but has more mouths to feed. Iv is a new podcast app. That offers a way to follow. Topics tags hosts or podcasts. Catholic part is also a new podcast for android with a great name. Mavi star homa smart speaker in spain from canada now incorporates. I've is podcast catalog. And i will be speaking at the rain. Podcast business summit with npr's. Brian moffatt tickets are free and available now from link in our show notes and our newsletter. Today and in paul cost us the journal has an interview with dominion voting systems. Ceo john pelos today. His company has filed three defamation lawsuits against tv networks. Saying his excellently. One hundred percent accurate and very handsome. Voting machines are perfect. Which of course they absolutely are and nassar's curious universe is the first podcast recorded on another planet if features raw recorded sounds from the mars perseverance rover

Andrew Wilkinson Tiny Capital Spotify Triton Digital Browns Westwood Cumulus America Brian Moffatt Dominion Voting Systems Ceo John Pelos NPR Spain Canada The Journal Nassar Paul
"nile" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"nile" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"Muslim was probably she wasn't she wasn't there right from the start. But she started going in the late sixties so it was always sort of out of our lives and mainly bothering me system. He says was a dunster and then we would go to functions and masses and see bonds. And that's the thing an and the tire center involved because my daughter start at dunston She's just left the house. She's now nearly says he and she's got her own kid who i'm sure he's already listening to music. He's eight weeks also show going soon So it's a generational thing really you either get. It was such a good good thing to get into. And i think really being sort of own obsessed with ireland since it was a teenager eighty music history literature going to the place of gotten out through the eyes center. Many great people see many great musical under the types of entertainment. And it's been a real privilege to be involved in a place. Sometimes i was your first memory of it actually. My first memory is a downside. I went to one dancing lesson. There was a lady called maureen bolger on the school system. I think it was already dancing. Will expose along and she made me go into the line to learn a step and got sold off appointing. I left instead of my right foot. And i ran back to me. Mom probably in tears and never went moscow. Vivid memory And i i still can't dance. Say me life. And i can't even want to three. Let's play a bit up. Join many sessions and that sort of thing but contents vivid memory. You're not just at the center of of my early days of about six or seven so that would have been in the old centre circa nineteen seventy. It was great. It was a great place but this is a great place. You've got now is a great place. In a very different way in different location. I was still doing all the things that went on. The center really wanted to exceptions during some different things. so you know lifers evolved. It's changed not ended. The call replaces is walking in and seeing tommy welsh and speaking an having shots on a saturday more. Tell me both from whom. I learned a loss and who was really the man who founded the first artist center. What are your first memories and i. I didn't go to the old irish center. And i've always found to islands but i never went to the old irish center because my parents didn't i stumbled across it one day and a half the children with me and they all got involved face away. They looked at so amdo amuse can johnson. The boys play football in a and just reopen there than really matt loads of the families. And how did you get involved with the committee. And i think it's just from cleaning up the place tidy around and do stuff and volunteered for things and obviously the storm for the committee. Not that. I have to ask a upn with the ball. What for five years. Now yes outsource lesson. Three four years. Ago where i can have you shifts to become the baugh on the angeles. Sony was was the manager at the time. And then i was says the system for -able twelve to eighteen months and then he laughs about a year ago and then being jonah trying to keep things as long as possible and had you been a regular at the center before that sensor will me momentos mass in the old or santa on the only grandparents in great sunk. is used to go to amend we. Let me grounds outs deitz He was you can decide a sensor on his friends. Used to call me. Evans still to this day is friends. On friends of megrahi's goals That's why that's why. I really saw something that has gone on through the generations. Patrick was saying something that throw families who've been going since nineteen sixty four sixty five. There are people who are sort of like synonymous with the place as good friends of ours like coachella england. Who was on their first committee back in one thousand sixty five. He's still going. So there's plenty of people who are trivia originals and you see the families going back generations with the singing of the johnson the music people like Lachlan's the quinlan's best to go and they probably original members still think that it's a place where you can walk in fact home just on a one off basis and people tend to come by so there's people i see in the bar who don't know and then suddenly they find that they're going we can and cannot do at the irish community it just like being in the place you know as a very welcoming you know relaxed laid back place and there's always something going on even if it's not formal echo and on this usually people making their own entertainment so there are families that are like you know is like almost a dynasty. But there's also a lot of people who are we just finding the place and that's what we gotta do to make it. Sustainable gotta keep bringing in new people. You know

patrick nile gibney maureen bolger eight weeks late sixties first angela Patrick goal first memory ireland nineteen sixty eighty muslim jasper one dancing lesson center danny liverpool Irish irish
Tony Bobulinski, Hunter Biden and China

Ben Shapiro

05:01 min | 2 years ago

Tony Bobulinski, Hunter Biden and China

"The Wall Street Journal has a couple of reports detail in the rest of the sort of Bob Belinsky story one. The headlines has. Hunter Biden, Sex business partner alleges Father knew about venture, however. Corporate records reviewed by The Wall Street Journal show no record for Joe Biden. According to The Wall Street Journal. The Biden campaign denied that Joe had any involvement in this Chinese venture with this oil company or stood to gain by it. Belinsky said he was rankled by Joe Biden's public statements. He never discussed the international business activities of Hunter and other family members. He also cited nearly $5 million in payments. A Senate Republican report last month said that C E F C made $200 law firm has another reason to come forward. Jablonski said he took part in the meeting with Hunter, Joe Biden and Joe Biden's brother, James Biden in L. A in 2017 when they discussed the Biden family business plans with the Chinese, of which Joe Biden was plainly familiar, at least at a high level. Biden campaign spokesman didn't immediately respond to a question about the alleged meeting with Bob Belinsky, James Biden and attorney for Hunter. Biden didn't respond to requests for comment. And then they, of course issued from the campaign. This blanket denial. Text messages and emails related to the venture that were provided to the journal. Bye Bye. Belinsky, mainly from the spring and summer of 2017 Don't show either Hunter Biden or James Biden discussing a role for Joe Adventure. Mr Gillie are is one of the partners told the Journal. I'd like to clear up any speculation that former VP Biden was involved with the 2017 discussions about our potential business structure. I'm unaware of any involvement in any time of the former VP the activity in question it never delivered any project revenue. Which sounds like maybe just maybe the project was on the road, and then it sort of fell apart. Kimberley Strassel has report over The Wall Street Journal on this She says. That Bible in skis text message just show he was recruited for the project by that James Gillies. Our character, 100 associate, Delia explains in December 2015 text, there will be a deal between the Chinese and what one of the most prominent families from the United States a month later he introduces Rob Walker, also a partner of Biden in March, 2016 Gilyard told Bob Belinsky, the Chinese entity was C E F C Which was shaping up to be the Goldmans of China. Meeting Goldman Sachs. Earlier promise that's a month to develop the terms of the deal with Hunter at this point, Joe Biden, of course, was still vice president. Is the deal began to take shape in 2017 by Belinsky began to question 100 would contribute. Besides his name and worried he was quote kicked out of the U. S Navy for cocaine use. Killer acknowledged skill sets it missing and observed that Hunter has a few demons. He explained that in brand 100 is imperative, but right now he's not essential for adding input. Hunter was hardly visible through most of the work until final negotiations ramped up in mid May, he brought in his uncle Jim Biden for a steak hunter in Texan emails wanted offices in three U. S. Cities, significant travel budgets of statement for Jim a job for an assistant and more frequent distributions of any gains. And, of course, he explained, he wanted a hell of a lot more than 100 $50,000 per year because his ex wife would nearly take all of it. Hunter repeatedly made clear that his contribution was his name. He railed at Bob Belinsky that the CFC heads are quote coming to be my partner to be partners with the Bidens even remind him that in this instance only one player holds the Trump card in its me may not be fair, but it's the reality because I'm the only one putting on and putting an entire family legacy on the line. Abiding claims he never discussed his son's business. But of course there was that made 2017 expectations letter, including that 10% for quote unquote, the big guy in one text, 100 said, quote my chairman given emphatic, no toe a version of the deal. Bye. Belinsky suggested that the chairman referred to Joe Biden. Deal fell through on the Chinese and in the summer of 2017. So is it possible that Hunter was freelancing? He was going around that that Joe had spent years basically patting me on the head telling me to go pick up bags of cash if you could help him And then now Joe's out of office and 100 want help Mount. He was freelancing and every so often you'd run something my job. Certainly possible certainly plausible. Is it true that Joe Biden while he was VP? Probably knew what Hunter was up to. Yeah, that is, that is probably true. Okay, So here's the problem. Nobody. The media wants to talk about this story at all. They don't find it interesting or fascinating at all that you're Biden has throughout his career engaged in sort of the low level corruption that many public officials do. Reckoning, sweetheart mortgages and that sort of thing. Well, or at least a sweetheart land deal from from people who are interested in some of the legislation on the table when he was in the Senate. And NPR put out an actual statement before the Nile before the denial from the Biden campaign. Here's what NPR's public editor said. Quote. We don't want to waste our time on stories that are not really stories. We don't want to waste listeners and readers time on stories that are just pure distraction. As unbelievable that is a taxpayer funded journalistic institution, openly declaring that they simply will not engage, but they're not interested whatsoever in the story preemptively. To the media. I mean, so all this is the lead up to their bait, right? The media are obviously and clearly on the side of Joe Biden, which means that the debate the stakes are really high. Because now this is basically the last chance. For Trump to set the table for Trump to change the topic from Trump to shifted course of the race. The members of the media again. It wasn't just NPR. Many members of the media were over and over, declaring that the hunter by the story was not, in fact a story. They kept a clean without any evidence whatsoever that it was Russian disinformation.

Joe Biden Bob Belinsky Belinsky James Biden Biden Hunter Hunter Biden The Wall Street Journal Joe Adventure Mr Gillie Vp Biden Kimberley Strassel James Gillies Goldmans U. S Navy For Cocaine Use Jablonski JOE Jim Biden
Why 2021 will be an even bigger year for coronavirus

Coronacast

08:34 min | 2 years ago

Why 2021 will be an even bigger year for coronavirus

"But a lot of the people who are testing positive people who are already in quarantine in isolation we kind of feeling like it. It's not yet. But has new south wales more or less nile. The sydney outbreak have christmas and christmas under reasonably relaxed circumstances. You did have a massive gathering on eastern suburbs breach at bronte. Beach will only see the results of that in five to ten days time. But it's looking okay is still perplexes. Me that the premier of new south wales and the health minister are digging in refusing to mandate masks when that would give them an extra degree of security. I mean you had people the other day swarming. All over on boxing day swarming over the shops. There were some mask wearing but not as much as you'd hope and it would just be such a small thing to go to mandatory masks. You sort of need it to be a rule so that people follow it so that you get that mess coverage that you need for it to be effective. The other thing that i thought was interesting that they mentioned in the press conference yesterday was that some of the people who had testing positive had tested positive on ten or eleven of the isolation actually quite light in the isolation and that just goes to the varying incubation periods of this virus five days is average but it can go eight ten fourteen sometimes even longer than fourteen very. It's very small percentage of the golden fourteen. And then as we've said many times a corona cast your false negative rate right at the beginning of the infection is really quite high. Could it be could be anything up to eighty percent but then goes down to a low roundabout eight days and what you're seeing here is the false negative rate getting done pretty low as the infection proceeds in some people and it's just prudent to watch to see whether or not people are still negative as they come out of that chelation period. We've actually got a question from someone who is in quarantine or was at least when they wrote this letter to us. Lazy saying You norman and also the primary of new south. Wales urge people to celebrate christmas outside. But what about the quarantine is who have no fresh air for fourteen days and are relying on many hotel ventilation. Is it safe for them. Depends on the movie hotel. The ventilation has been a problem in some of them. And i think in some hotels they've try to fix up the ventilation so that is as it can be. But there's no guarantee in this the problem is if you're in quarantine and you're taking outside. That creates risk as they showed in victoria. So unfortunately you do have to remain confined to the room tough though that may be and question from phillip corinthian as well phillips making the comment that you say politicians talking about noncompliant behavior as being disappointing or surprising but He sort of going well. Why don't you just put them in jail. Where the regulations that there to make people comply with With regulations the problem here is coercion does not always work. They find that out in victoria. We mentioned this before wherever they please surrendered a supermarket. They arrested a woman. If you remember rightly And then they realize that you just alienate the community by too much coercion. You've got to bring the community along with you. That's what's happened in the northern beaches. It's not perfect. Didn't happen in suburbs of sydney over the christmas period. But you really just go to try and bring people with you and for really agree. Jesus offenders then you might have to find them or do something stronger. Yesterday they were talking about a woman who escaped quarantine in western australia and serious finds a waiting car but apart from the odd case. You just can't be seen to be too heavy-handed about this. You've got to bring the community with you. This many people in quarantine associational coming for testing like literally tens of thousands of people coming forward for testing. It seems a little unfair to focus on the very few people who aren't doing the right thing when so many people That's right and then. This is the problem of behavioral economics. If you like which is that if you think. The norm is misbehavior. Then you will change your behavior towards the norm. We we like to. Our behavior is typical of other people's with a few exceptions and therefore if all we're doing is broadcasting bad behavior actually the behavior of the community will drift towards bad behavior whereas if you focus on the positive and say the vast majority of people in new south wales during the right thing that becomes the norm and we do it. The same thing goes for just changing the subject from covid nineteen to say obesity. The more we say. Obesity is accused problem. Forty percent of people are obese or whatever. The number happens to be at that particular time people who are putting on weight thing. Oh well relatively normal. It's not a problem with being obese. Might not like it that much. But that's the way it's going whereas the actually say the majority strains are not obese and feeling gooden so on and so forth then you will tend to think. That's the norm and drift towards that so changing your behavior in that sort of form. And that's and that's how it works here to forcing you to hard doesn't work is the same the case with masks then like we were saying before that if you make the mandatory and people are wearing them then people just wear them well there is a there is a singing promoted by some people in healthcare. Which is there is a. There's something that you just do. It and mandatory mask wearing is adjusted. It's an easy thing to do You're not restricting people's behavior you're just asking them to wear a mask so it's not too onerous and therefore it's a reasonable thing to ask it's mandatory to others. We'll give him the is ls episode for at least a couple of weeks unless something big happens and we will be back if it does. Norman what sort of mindset show be should we be taking into two thousand twenty one. Well let's start with the so-called uk strain ovo people in britain. Are you jacking up with the uk strain. It's like people saying that. The krona viruses the china virus. So that feeling anxious about that anyway. There is a strain. I identified in south east of england which we saw yesterday in a preprinted that it looks as though the estimated increase in transmission ability. If you like is about fifty six percent not seventy percent for started. It doesn't look as though it's increasingly virulent in other words during more damage or even less damage to people and it. He's slowly taking over. In terms of the prevalent virus in that part of england and will probably start moving there and maybe even overseas once border. Start coming down. So there's not to panic about the comment in this. Pre print is the control of this virus. You've variant is the same as before it's lockdown. Actually it's a serious lock down the predict from their modeling that in the uk they won't control this variant with. Half-hearted lockdown measures is going to be the full thing including universities in schools. They predict unless britain does that. It's not going to be able to control this new variant given its increased contagious nece. Don't nothing i'd say. Twenty twenty one is what's for vaccines. The astra vaccine comes in and reports better effectiveness with new dozing van. We're in good shape and australia. And because we manufacturing it here but if they are stuck around sixty two percent. Australia has a major problem on its hands with a second rate vaccine and to acquire early doses of the vaccine from pfizer or moderna. So that we can be prepared particularly for clusters where if new clusters arise. We can immunize healthcare workers or even experiment with what we talked about before and chromecast ring vaccination but the astra vaccine is for australia's one to keep an eye on because if that doesn't pan out in the next few weeks to be in a highly effective vaccine. Australia's got a problem because we have a second rate vaccine on our hands. And the thing. I'll say for twenty twenty one. I'd love to leave you with a positive sense is that we've really got to begin for twenty twenty. One is going to be a long time before this comes under control and for most of two thousand twenty one. We are going to be at risk in australia from overseas. importation of virus from corona virus fatigue. Which i'm sure many people are feeling already. So we've just got to keep our vigilance. Keep our borders strict and hope that the vaccine gets in early and we can vaccinate as quickly as possible so that we get this under control and hope that those vaccines do prevent transmission. Those are the things to watch out for. And we're just gonna take a deep breath and digging for twenty twenty one absolutely but you've got to say that in terms of globally australia's going into twenty twenty one in a really good position competitive many other places in the world. It's really fantastic. And so as new zealand and conceive from south korea are fragile that can be sued. Just go to maintain our vigilance. Not rest on our laurels. But we've done well. Well

Phillip Corinthian South Wales Sydney Victoria New South Wales Obesity Boxing Phillips Wales Western Australia Gooden UK Australia Britain England
How A 100-Year-Old Treatment Could Help Save Us From Superbugs

Short Wave

03:44 min | 2 years ago

How A 100-Year-Old Treatment Could Help Save Us From Superbugs

"In twenty fifteen. Stephanie strategy and her husband tom paterson. Both scientists were travelling in egypt. They sell the pyramids the nile and then as she tells it in this text talk after dinner one night. Tom became violently ill. He vomited all night long. And i thought oh gee he's just got food poisoning and i pulled out a couple of antibiotic pills that we take with us on our trips and i gave it to them with some water. Nothing happened the next day. Tom kept vomiting. Stephanie called doctor he thought yes food poisoning and set up an iv drip for more antibiotics. But tom only got worse at a local clinic. He was diagnosed with pancreatitis. Inflammation of the pancreas and medevac to a hospital in frankfurt and there. He was diagnosed with something even worse. A superbug a bacteria by the name of oscillator b-actor bowman scary name scarier bacteria it tops. The world health organization's list of most dangerous superbugs bacteria that are very hard to treat often resistant to many antibiotics. Now we'll never really know for sure where time got his superbug infection. But we do know that. It was an egyptian stream. And we know that. By the time he was medevac. Thome to san diego that it was resistant to every antibiotic. Tom was in a coma. His organs were shutting down. He was on three different drugs to keep his heart. Beating and the doctors told me that tom was going to die. But seventy refused to give up. She turned to the scientific community for help. I'm maddie safai today. on shortwave. What stephanie found and how it saved her husband's life. It's a century-old treatment. That could be a new tool in our war against super bucks for months stephanie's husband. Tom would remain hospitalized fighting for his life and losing. Yeah i was just really scared out of my mind. But i knew that if i just sat back and waited then he was going to die and i needed to know that i'd done. Every last thing that i could do that i would leave no stone unturned so i hit the internet and i did with anybody else would do in my shoes. Google it well. Luckily you know there's google for scientists and that's called pubmed and it's this wonderful search engine where you can put in any words and a scientific paper will pop up and you know i punched in words like multi drug resistance and the name of his superbug which is assassinated b-actor mania and popular within an hour. I found a paper that mentioned something called page therapy. So tell me a little bit about fish there. Well fay jr are short for bacteria phages and that's derived from the greek word meaning bacteria eater and they are viruses that have naturally evolved to attack bacteria there's ten million trillion trillion pages on the planet. It's all a matter of finding the ones that will kill the bacteria that you want to get rid of. Okay real quick phase one. oh one i like. Stephanie said bacteria phases the viruses that infect bacteria are everywhere pretty much anywhere you find. Bacteria you'll find a phase we're talking and artika deep-sea ocean vents your. But i swear that'll make sense later. Second facials don't actually eat bacteria in this case the fees injects its own dna into the bacterial cell. Then the virus forces the bacteria to make more and more copies of itself feeling up the cell with viruses eventually the bacteria bus open releasing all those new viruses. Go off and kill other cells. It's ruthless

Tom Paterson Tom Kept Stephanie TOM Maddie Safai Pancreatitis Pancreas Thome Frankfurt World Health Organization Egypt Coma Fay Jr San Diego Google
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 2 years ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

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