35 Burst results for "Nikolai"

Nancy Pelosi Blocks Members of Congress From Honoring Fallen Military Service Members

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Nancy Pelosi Blocks Members of Congress From Honoring Fallen Military Service Members

"Who are the democrats. It's not just biden yesterday. The speaker of the house the most powerful democrat outside of the white house obstructed the reading of the names of our servicemen and women killed in kabul yes. Nancy pelosi refused to allow a double amputee. Brian mass combat veteran to go through with the reading of the thirteen. Who died because of biden's decisions. Well we will pay them tribute here on america first. These are those who gave the ultimate sacrifice and did so unnecessarily marine corps lance corporal. David l. espinosa twenty years. Old texas marine corps sergeant nicole g. twenty twenty-three sacramento california marine corps staff. Sergeant darren hoover thirty one salt lake city Staff sergeant ryan see now. It's twenty three tennessee. Marine corps corporal hunter lopez twenty two years old california marine corps lance corporal riley j. mccollum twenty years old jackson wyoming marine corps lance corporal. Dylan merola twenty years. Old california marine corps lance corporal kareem nikolai twenty years. Old california marine corps sergeant. Joe hannie rosarito pichad twenty five years old lawrence massachusetts marine corps corporal humberto sanchez. Twenty two indiana marine corps loves corporal. Jared m schmitz twenty montana navy hospital coleman max soviak twenty two years old berlin heights ohio then lastly marine corps coporo dagan w page twenty-three omaha nebraska. They gave the last full measure so authors could live but they needn't have died

Brian Mass Biden Old California Marine Corps Old Texas Marine Corps Nicole G Sacramento California Marine C Sergeant Darren Hoover Sergeant Ryan Hunter Lopez California Marine Corps Nancy Pelosi Kabul David L Riley J Jackson Wyoming Marine Corps Espinosa Dylan Merola White House Kareem Nikolai Joe Hannie
Nicola Tesla: Let There Be Light

History That Doesn't Suck

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Nicola Tesla: Let There Be Light

"Is no subject more captivating more worthy of study than nature to understand this great mechanism to discover which forces on active and the laws which govern them is the highest aim of the intellect of man nature has stored up the universe infinite energy com infinite energy in the universe. Indeed nicholas stand by the statement and goes on to explain his desire to tap into this infinite energy but the immigrant continues he will not wax philosophical tonight rather you'll contend himself with explaining and demonstrating one of the most important issues facing the world at present namely the production of a practical and efficient source of light going into professor mode the ingenious serb scratches out formulas on the chalkboard that high frequency alternating current the way forward. That's a claim that his former employer. Thomas alva- edison would certainly reject yet. Nikola argues alternating. Current could cindy electricity hundreds of miles but as intellectual as the audience in this packed lecture hall might be why just tell them about the virtues of alternating current when you can show them nikola flips a switch on his wooden desk. He's just engaged. A motor high frequency alternator and as he does so an arc in sparks. Jump between two poles incredible. But that's nothing. The lincoln venter's just getting started with the lecture halls lights dimmed nikolai now. Picks up to gasfield tubes that is geissler tubes holding one in each hand as he stands between the two large hanging zinc sheets. They start to glow americans essentially from now. Might look at these think lightsabres. Well these nineteenth century americans aren't far off from that one reporter here. Tonight will later. Describe the scene quote like aluminum held in the hands of an archangel. Those quote others are just lost as to how nikolai's doing it. The electrical review will write quote. Here mr tesla seem to act the part of a veritable magician close quote

Thomas Alva Nicholas Lincoln Venter Nikola Cindy Nikolai Mr Tesla
Extreme Heat in the West to Send Temps to Triple Digits

Environment: NPR

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Extreme Heat in the West to Send Temps to Triple Digits

"The west is broiling. Excessive heat warnings are in effect again today from phoenix where today's forecast was one hundred. Twenty degrees to eastern montana where some farming towns braced for highs close to one hundred ten. Npr's kirk siegler reports. There is little relief in sight. For the drought stricken region. How hot is it. It's like opening an oven when you're baking pie. Captain scott. douglas is a paramedic with the phoenix. Fire department the city is open sixty six cooling refuges and hydration stations at parks libraries and pools. It's hot and people say it's a dry heat. And i'm like well you know what when it gets two hundred seventeen hundred and eighteen degrees. It doesn't matter if it's dry. Moist phoenix broke records last year. For hitting a hundred degrees or higher for more than one hundred and forty four days last year was also a record wildfire year and much of the west and every day. There's a headline screaming. This summer could be worse arizona. Lawmakers are holding a special session this week to consider a hundred million dollar emergency bill for firefighting and prevention in nevada were invasive grasses and drought have fueled record range fires lately. Firefighters have been dealing with one hundred degree temperatures for the past two weeks. Paul peterson is the fire management officer for the federal bureau of land management. They're typically we wouldn't have a heat and winds until mid july. So i'm hoping that's not an indication of what we're going to see in the future. He's hoping that the monsoon rains arrive this summer. They were no-show last year. Meteorologists are blaming this blistering event on a heat. Dome stubborn high pressure ridge. That's blocking cooler systems. Nikolai rymer is with the national weather. Service in billings. Montana where the forecast. Hi today june fifteenth is one hundred six. We are very close to the hottest temperatures that we've ever recorded here rhymer says scientists can't pinpoint any one heat wave like this on climate change but he says the record drought and extremely low humidity. Right now is making the heat. Even worse

Phoenix Kirk Siegler Captain Scott NPR Paul Peterson Montana Federal Bureau Of Land Managem Fire Department Douglas Arizona Nevada Nikolai Rymer Rhymer Billings
China Filed a Patent Application for a COVID Vaccine Before Admitting Outbreak

The Dan Bongino Show

01:25 min | 3 months ago

China Filed a Patent Application for a COVID Vaccine Before Admitting Outbreak

"Couple more gems in here as well. Ladies and gents. It appears that Chinese military scientists filed a patent application for a covid vaccine. On February 24th of 2020. 2020 what today's date. Can you double check this? Monday, June 7th Wait, Let me go to the map. Google calendar. Let me see if we have that. Oh, 2021. Yes, that is correct. So that sounds like a while ago. February of 2020. They were looking for a vaccine. How are they looking for a vaccine? If they didn't know this was going to happen, and it had just come from a pangolin or some bat soup with some American it or something. How did how did they know that? How did they know it would become a global pandemic and therefore they put in some patent for a vaccine? You want me to read from the peace in case you think we're just throwing this out there? The applicant is listed as the Institute of Military Medicine Academy of Military Sciences of the P L. A. And the lead inventor is military scientists. Ju use in why you s e n Professor Nikolai Petrovsky from Flinders Institute in Australia, who had developed the Covid 19 vaccine said the early timeframe left open the possibility that Chinese scientists were working on a vaccine

Institute Of Military Medicine Google Nikolai Petrovsky Flinders Institute Australia
Washington DC schools hope to pack extra learning into summer break

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Washington DC schools hope to pack extra learning into summer break

"An eye on summer and how very different it will be for some of our kids this year. Now, that certainly has not been a normal school year. And for many students in the district this summer break won't be normally they're extra learning will be happening all throughout the summer. Not only is the entire DC public school system off In summer programs across every grade level. Each school is developing summer learning plans to sign to serve 10 to 35% of each school's population. We will design the programs for students who would most benefit from the additional support. Cory Colgan, the school system's chief of teaching and learning, says it's important for students to have opportunities to catch up and start feeling more normal again. We are working on the approaches to recovery that will help accelerate student learning registration for this. Summer programs will be made available early next month. Nikolai Nellie, double duty o P. News

Cory Colgan DC Nikolai Nellie
A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

The Vergecast

06:52 min | 7 months ago

A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

"Week. Senior reporter addie robertson. Who have heard on the broadcast many times before held an event about section two thirty. That's the law that says platforms aren't liable for their users publish. It is a critical lot. The internet also just turned twenty five years old last month. So addy held an event with a keynote by senator. Amy klobuchar democrat from minnesota is one of the sponsors of the tech act. That's an act that would reform section to thirty as well as a panel featuring michael chia. Who's the general counsel video sedan. Harry is a researcher writer. And a strategist human attack and amana keeping general counsel at wicca media which runs wikipedia. Talking about where section two thirty is where might go in the future. So we're going to run some highlights of that event for today addie and russell are gonna join talk about how it went and what they heard what they thought and as it happens here right now. Russell has done good. Love it addie. Congratulations on your event. It was a good one. Hey thank you so. Tell me how you think. The event went. And then i'm going to hand over the episode to you and we can listen to some highlights and talk it through. But how do you think of went. I thought it went well. One of the things i like about. Section two thirty is that. It's just a really weird conversation that people kept asking okay. What sides her can there are like fifty different sides and we had a really pretty interesting spread of perspectives and senator klobuchar speech was really good scene. Setter and i'm overall pretty happy. Yeah you know. What i thought was really interesting. Just as i watched the whole event senator klobuchar has some very strong perspectives. About what can be done in those perspectives. We're definitely not shared by the entire panel. In fact the safe tech act is it's it's always interesting to me to hear. Senators talked about their own legislation. 'cause they always make it seem so common sense but it's actually quite controversial. Some of the changes that she was proposing. Oh yeah absolutely well and also like you know. She addition to talk to thirty. She takes a pretty hard line on antitrust. I was actually surprised by how sort of enthusiastic she was about it. And i sort of imagine. The video guy is sitting there easter like. She's talking about breaking up google. He's like yeah. Okay a lot of the sort of civil society tech people which this is part of what we wanted to introduce the conversation like. They don't have a problem with antitrust. They are mostly hoping that section two thirty doesn't get changed in a way that makes it impossible to have wikipedia exist and then bringing up things like misinformation also just throws its own kind wrench into things because that's actually not largely problem that addressed with section two thirty and so you end up slipping weird stuff like first amendment reforming there. Yeah this was. I think is the panel went on the combination of we think facebook too big but if we changed to thirty to punish facebook we might end up punishing ourselves and then senator klobuchar talking about an inch. Just dead ahead. And even to some extent bringing up the idea of breakup as a potential remedy. All of that is a swirl and we've been talking on swirl for for some time and it was just really interesting to hear the spread of perspectives during this event. So at russell. I'm excited for this. Why don't you start and take us through this event and what we heard. Yeah absolutely. I think the one thing i want to start with this sort of like the chronological beginning. But like you know. I always like it when these things make a little news. And i think i was very interested to hear santa club. Stars line on antitrust. She sort of coming to the fore of like the democrats antitrust policy. She wrote a book called antitrust and is the chairman of the subcommittee on competition policy antitrust and consumer rights which is basically the senate home for antitrust policy so she's really sort of at the forefront of it and i thought it was interesting she a lot of time she gets gloucestershire's like this moderate voice but she was pretty harsh on facebook. Here we have. We have this clip at the root of this problem lies the ability of a few companies to act as gatekeepers and as we see when they dominate markets exclude rivals buy out their competitors. We've got a problem. In the emailed words of mark zuckerberg. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands already meaningful. And if big go to a large scale could be very disruptive to us they could be very disruptive to us. I always about the tech industry was about disruption it's about disrupting the status quo and bringing in new good ideas that basically blow up the marketplace in a positive way we can't have monopoly stopping disruption so in a way the work i am doing is simply a reply to that email so the interesting thing so this was this was something that we had on the site like dual casey and nikolai byline. When the antitrust hearing happened he's talking about instagram and path so instagram they bought path proved not to be disruptive to facebook. I think it's fair to say but this is not a public statement. He meant to make. And i do think i don't know i mean do do we do. We hear this. And think like amy kluber. Shar is on team break-up facebook it feels like it will qualify that by saying at the very least it's team don't let facebook acquire anybody else. Yeah but team break-up facebook. I don't know it definitely seems like it's on the table ray. Which is very interesting so there have been on the left. A lot of really aggressive sort of pushes for stronger antitrust like we need some new like we need to empower the justice department. We need some new legislation that will enable us to kind of go after these businesses more heavily. And it's fairly recent that closure is trying to to kind of lead that i mean she just. She's only now coming to the to the lead on this committee. And i think because she ran in the democratic primary sort of as a moderate voice. She's been glossed as like. Well she's not in the end gonna like usher in this new era of trust busting but then elsewhere in the keynote. She's talking about well. You know it worked pretty well when we did this against. At and i mean. I don't know. I'm still kind of undecided. It's always hard to know how committed people are going. It's going to be a really politically difficult road to walk. If they move on. you know.

Senator Klobuchar Addie Robertson Addie Michael Chia Wicca Media Facebook Amy Klobuchar Russell Addy Santa Club Subcommittee On Competition Po Wikipedia Minnesota Harry Nikolai Byline Amy Kluber Google Mark Zuckerberg Senate
Return to Dyatlov Pass

Ghost Town

04:32 min | 7 months ago

Return to Dyatlov Pass

"Nineteen fifty nine. The bodies of ten young students experienced hikers and skiers were found in bizarre and puzzling ways strewn over a forested mountain tap. Their deaths would remain a mystery until a week ago. I kid you not. This is the story of the die off pass so again starts in one thousand nine hundred fifty nine. There's a group of early twenty somethings. They're all in their early twenties from like twenty two twenty three to one thirty eight year old outlier to kind of lead them has a little bit more experience under his belt. And they all study at the euro polytechnical institute and it was an organized skiing expedition across the euro mountains in the soviet union. Eager deitz lov. Three year old radio engineer was kind of the leader who assembled everybody asking nine of his college friends. Eight men and two women to join up again. I'm sorry if i mispronounced names. I'm bound to do that. Even deitz love pass. Was his stretch for me so again. Apologies in any case. All of them were experienced great to hikers with lots of skiing experience. Also it was kind of going to be a high scoring hybrid trip. And when they returned all of them would be receiving their grade three hiking certification which is really impressive. It was the highest certification available in the soviet union and required candidates to climb over a hundred ninety miles. The route was designed by dight loves group to reach the far northern regions of spurred lofts oblast and approved by the sverdlovsk city. Route commission even though it was supposed to be the most difficult time to take that route. The goal of the expedition was to reach a tort in our which is a six point. Two mile high mountain semi-in terry of who is previously certified to go with another expedition of similar difficulty. Decided to go with the dice. Love group on twenty third of january nineteen fifty-nine semyon Law of yuri. D'oro anco ludmila duhniah yuri christmas chanko alexandra Love tov is a nedia. Colomer dorota rustam slobodan nikolai thebault bre goals alexander and your yudin all left on their expedition. The group arrive by train at dell small town in the middle of spare lofts ups done two days later then. They all took a truck to his high where they bought a bunch of bread and carb loaded for the next day's start when the actual hike would begin as they hiked one. Member your yudin. Who suffered from several health ailments. He had rheumatism. And a congenial heart defect decided to turn back his knees and joints for giving him a pretty hard time. It would be a decision that saved his life on january thirty first. The group arrive at the edge of a highland area and began to prepare for climbing. They secured food and equipment. There that would be used for when they would come back through the next day. The ten plan to get over the pass and make camp for the next night on the opposite side but bad conditions snowstorms and decreasing visibility. Made them lose their direction and push the group more west than they had planned when they realized that they were more west than they should be. Group decided to just set up camp right on the slope of the mountain rather than move a couple of miles downhill to a forested area. Which would have offered a little bit of shelter from the weather. Diaries and cameras founder on their last campsite possible to track the group's route up until this point which is really a really profound part of the story to see their writing and to see the pictures they had a camera. The film was developed after the fact so it feels very very spooky in that way and they're all so young and very positive and optimistic and really excited about each other. And the you know exploring the mountaintop the group had so much ahead of them and they talk about what they were studying and how that was significant to this expedition but unfortunately that night would be the last day that they would all be alive before leaving on the expedition. Dight love told the university sports club he would send telegram no later than february twelfth on the twelfth passed and no messages have been received there was no immediate reaction because it was pretty normal to encounter delays etc but on february twentieth. Travelers relatives demanded a rescue operation. And the head of the institute sent the first rescue groups consisting of volunteer students and teachers

Yudin Euro Polytechnical Institute Deitz Soviet Union Dight Sverdlovsk City Route Commission Skiing Colomer Dorota Nikolai Thebault Dell Small Town Yuri Alexander University Sports Club
Winter Snowstorm to Arrive in Washington DC Area This Weekend

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Winter Snowstorm to Arrive in Washington DC Area This Weekend

"Storm warning in effect for most of the region with a winter storm watch in effect. For the northern suburbs from snow expected to move in after midnight. This will be the biggest winter storm we've seen in a while, but believe it or not, we've actually lucked out with this one. Thanks to the timing of it. Most of the wave of storm energy is going to be on Sunday, so we won't have the rush hour factor. Well, that's good news. But it doesn't mean we're not going to have some pretty significant issues on the roads throughout Monday, with potentially more snow falling, plus freezing rain and ice pick a +12 punch one system than another National Weather Service meeting. Urologist Kevin Witt. It's gonna be an impactful storm, promising to bring the most snow we've seen since 2019. That year. A January storm dumped 10 inches of snow that in February. Another brought us about three inches. Nikolai Nelly w T o P News It is 404. The

Kevin Witt National Weather Service Nikolai Nelly
Navalny releases recording of call to his alleged poisoner.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:31 min | 9 months ago

Navalny releases recording of call to his alleged poisoner.

"Released a recording of a phone call on monday. He said he made to an alleged state. Security operative who revealed some details of how the politician was supposedly poisoned and meteoroid identified as a member of a team that is reportedly trails navalny for years. The man in the recording indicated that he was involved in cleaning up navalny's clothes said that they wouldn't be any traces of the russian president vladimir putin's top critic fell into a coma while on a domestic flight over siberia during the coded call. The man said that if the plane hadn't made an emergency landing the situation would have turned out differently. The man who was named in a news report last week is an operative from russia's. Fsp domestic security agency pointed to navales underwear as a place where the substance that poisoned politician may have been planted. Navalny fell sick during the flights on august twentieth in russia was flown to berlin while still in a coma for treatment. Two days later. Labs germany france and sweden and tests by the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons established. He was exposed to soviet era novichok nerve agent. Russian authorities have vehemently denied any involvement in the poisoning. The video showed him speaking on the phone with one of the alleged operatives belling cat and other meteorite. Let's identified the man as constantine could drive. Staff trained chemical weapons specialist. Nevada only introduced himself as an aids to russian security council secretary nikolai patrol chef and said. He urgently needed to debrief the man on what had happened in another siberian city. Tomsk where the politician believed he was poisoned. The conversation lasted forty five minutes. Valley said the man on the other end of the coal indicated that he was involved in the processing of navanly's clothes so there wouldn't be any traces. The clothes navalny was wearing when he was hospitalized in a coma of not being returned to him when nevada asked him which item of clothing bore the highest concentration of the toxin. The man said it was the underwear. He suggested that the substance was absorbed quickly and that was why no traces of it could have been found on the politicians body. The most prominent member of russia's opposition alexina valmy campaigns to challenge ladimir putin in the two thousand eighteen presidential election but was barred from running

Navalny Coma Fsp Domestic Security Agency Organization For The Prohibiti Russia Vladimir Putin Siberia Nikolai Patrol Berlin Sweden Tomsk Germany France Nevada Aids Valley Alexina Valmy Ladimir Putin
UN Mideast Envoy Nickolay Mladenov; Celebrating Hanukkah

People of the Pod

07:03 min | 9 months ago

UN Mideast Envoy Nickolay Mladenov; Celebrating Hanukkah

"In two thousand fifteen. Former bulgarian minister of defense and farm minister. Nikolai mladenov was appointed by then. Un secretary general bunk moon to serve as the special coordinator for the middle east peace process since then. Nikolai has served with distinction. Doggedly working to stave off conflict escalations to speak up against comas. terror and to speak up for palestinian needs. Nikolai will soon be leaving his post and he has graciously agreed to join us now on people of the pod to share his thoughts before he does nikolai. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having now. You and i recorded a podcast interview. Two and a half years ago at the ajc global forum two thousand eighteen in jerusalem. Your very first answer began. And i quote right now. There is practically no peace process because there are no talks were very far from the conditions. Which would make such talks meaningful and to add an additional complication to that the palestinians. The americans don't talk to each other unless i'm mistaken. You could answer this first question in a similar way today. What are the prospects right now for israeli palestinian peace. Well if i had to ended my answer two years later i will delete the word practically everything else stats because there is no peace process. I don't think either. The palestinian or the israeli side are in a position to initiate meaningful discussions on issues. That would actually lead to sustainable solution to the conflict. Of course the palestinian hopeful that was the new american administration. Coming in this will change. I would argue that. What is important are the conditions on the ground. Firstly leadership on both sides for their own reasons different reasons for their own reasons is not in a position to initiate such discussions. Secondly i think the region has shifted in a different direction with different threats. The region has identified as more of a priority. And thirdly i think demands a very serious effort by the international community to create the conditions that are necessary to sustain such meaningful negotiations. Would i were argue. Is that right now. Both sites needs to do unilaterally some positive confidence building measures so that some of the trust that is nice. Sue for negotiations to be meaningful can be rebuilt. And there's a lot of stuff that can be done by both. Israel is under postseasons to that when last we spoke. You also said that. The situation in gaza to which i know you've paid a tremendous amount of attention and invested a tremendous amount of time. You said that that situation was extremely desperate. Has life improved at all for the people living in gaza. I don't think i can say that. It has improved. I think it's actually on a number of fronts become much worse with covert democ now. In fact only a couple of weeks ago we came up with some new research which we published and tens of thousands of gaza have lost their jobs because of the economic socio economic crisis caused by the virus endemic. We've seen a rapid increase in the number of people who need food assistance and a healthcare system in gaza which is on the verge of collapse. It is only managing to do with the cases that now the coronavirus cases that it has because of the extensive assistance the un in coordination with israel and with the palestinians provides to hospitals. Be that ventilators face masks desk kids. Whatever is necessary but no live. there hasn't improved and the only way that you can see. Life in gaza. Improving is if you have a combination of the following factors. One is the legitimate palestinian authority. Government comes back in takes control from hamas islamic jihad not various militants. Dinner there so that they put weapons into their control and reduce the risk security risk on the grounds secondly that israel reopened some of the closings on gaza in terms of limitations. What can go in. Because of the fear that julius materials that go into gaza get used for rockets or other terror related activities. Pick and that is. How lights can normalize but sadly we're more in a state right now off preventing wards and actually trying to build a sustainable peace as far as gaza is concerned have been many attempts to restart internal palestinian negotiations. All of them sadly failed the title of the job that you are preparing to leave is special coordinator for the middle east peace process. I know that often middle east peace process refers just to this kind of one long running conflict in one corner of the middle east. So does your remit nikolai. Does it touch on any of this kind of news. Between israel and arab states. my job title was invented. I don't think there was any there. Were any other conflicts in the middle east and this was the goal to conflicts for everyone. Since then they've been too many. And i wish there would be a general middle east peace process if you wish that involves all the countries in the region from libya to yemen to iraq and lebanon syria. Whatever lives who have my remits currently is on the israeli palestinian fronts. Only however i think that if you look more strategically how to resolve this really frozen conflict if you wish between israelis and the palestinians you tune in to bring the arabs it and this is something that we've been arguing for way back before even president obama's time the quartet it's national quartet needs to open up and engage with the arabs more openly and more constructively and perhaps in the future that will be more possible because of the abraham accords. Andy situation which you have now. I've been a strong advocate of bringing in the arab countries because i think in the current strategic and geopolitical environment neighboring benefits to all sides and to the region as a whole their key to stability and to promoting tolerance in the middle east they are critical to creating economic opportunities of engagement between israel and the gulf states trade tourism culturally -education exchanges. Their critical if you wish to supporting the palestinian authority in terms of funding and donations the un's activities on the coronavirus on any as crisis that we have so their strategic partners and swap. My term care. I've spent a substantial part of my time. Travelling to the gulf to egypt to jordan to other arab countries constantly briefing them consulting with them and bringing them. It's just a few months ago. When the annexation was still an issue of public debates in israel. I made it very clear publicly. That israel has a choice either to go down. The road of annexation which would have been against international law would create all kinds of security and other problems on the ground and would have alienated the arab countries or go down the road of normalization which actually creates opportunities for the future. And really glad that that's where we are today.

Gaza Nikolai Nikolai Mladenov Bunk Moon Middle East American Administration Israel UN Comas Hamas Islamic Jihad Jerusalem Julius Yemen Libya Syria Lebanon Iraq President Obama Abraham
Inauguration meeting with Washington DC Del. Norton abruptly canceled

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

Inauguration meeting with Washington DC Del. Norton abruptly canceled

"Seven weeks from today. But not even DC's delegate in Congress knows what to expect. The best guess is they don't know what they're doing. DC Congressional delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton had a phone meeting set for yesterday to discuss Inauguration Day plans with President elect Joe Biden's inaugural committee. But that meeting was abruptly canceled, leaving a long list of quest. Jensen answered. It seems clear to me that the inauguration committee is trying to figure out for itself. What to do. The crowd capacity limits for Inauguration Day aren't known yet. But Norden, another representatives have been getting a ton of request for tickets. Norton's office alone has received more than 1000 requests, and she can only tell those people to stand by until more information is available. Nikolai Nelly. W T O P News last week Right before Thanksgiving, President Trump

Eleanor Holmes Norton Joe Biden DC Congress Jensen Norden Norton Nikolai Nelly
Bill that could let more Washington, DC prisoners out early clears committee

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Bill that could let more Washington, DC prisoners out early clears committee

"Release has been approved by committee on the D C council. Currently, prisoners convicted of violent crimes can ask to be freed before they complete their full sentence if they've served at least 15 years and were convicted before they turned 18 years old. Be expanded to include those convicted before they turned 25 under the bill that now heads to the Full D. C council. Well, criminal justice reform advocates say young offenders should be given that Chance. Council member married Shae voted no saying it doesn't put enough weight on statements from victims and their families should be greater recognition to the victim's position. DC's police department is strongly against it, saying it would allow hundreds of violent gun offenders to be released early. Nikolai Nelly. W T. O P News Jefferson

Committee On The D C Council DC Nikolai Nelly Jefferson
Onion Domestication and Improvement

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:20 min | 11 months ago

Onion Domestication and Improvement

"We're going to talk about domestication again of a unique vegetable and when you ask people what their favorite vegetable is very few people say the onion however it's hard to think of vegetable or plant item for that matter. That has a more ubiquitous place in our culinary universe. It's you know the powders. The the the the basic parts of onion are important flavor in many different things that we consume and i think about just about everything i cook starts chopping up and onion so i wanted to pursue. Where did it come from. How did we get it. Where is it going. And so we're speaking with dr mike heavy. He's a he works with the. Usda agricultural research service in madison wisconsin and also as a faculty member in a department of horticulture. So welcome to the podcast. dr heavy. thank you so much. This is really cool. I think i actually got to see you. Give a talk once. And i can't remember where it where it was but i think what did you ever give talk in savannah georgia at the national onion association meeting. Yes i did about four five years ago. We had a joint meeting between the national onion association and then all the research community. I think we met there. Yeah that's i seem to remember that. Yeah i think. I may have asked you at the time too. If you'd be a guest on the podcast and just takes time so. Let's talk about onions. Like i mentioned before it has such an important culinary value. Where did it come from end. Do natural populations still exist. So the onion like many of our grain and vegetable and fruit crops was domesticated in central asia specifically iran. Turkmenistan afghanistan that area and it spread from there around the world and is now consumed in produced on every continent except in artika. There are still the most closely related. Wild specie is called alien babalola by and that grows naturally still in the kopech. Dr region which forms the border between northern iran and southern turkmenistan. And so the wild relatives still exists. There probably was in prehistory was more widely distributed but We can still find alien. Below by inet area oval ovalles. That was a discovery or at least a characterization by vavilov the species is named after him. Allie taxonomy in the former soviet union named this wild species after nikolai. About by batalov. Okay i never remember seeing so much about his his expeditions into places like iran. Turkmenistan you that he was Know prolific in that area. So but that makes sense to when you talk about the species of wild onion. I know that even here in florida there are things that they haul a florida. Wild onion and in chicago is named by from indigenous peoples term for stinky onion. So are these related to the major culinary onions or are these some kind of distant relative first of all the alliens. The genus of onion is distributed around the northern hemisphere and here in north america. Most albums have a seven chromosomes whereas onion and garlic chai have a basic chromosome number of eight. So they're distant relatives and we can't cross them with onion but they do have unique flavors in many places there still collected in consumed but really are very distantly related to the onion that we know. Have there been any efforts that you're aware of to domesticate those regional varieties that are grown with the seven chromosome ones that are growing around. Say the native united states. Yes you do find him showing up. Sometimes farmers markets different species out west in the california in the rockies. There are numerous albums that can be collected in consumed but to my knowledge. There's no effort to really Breed them in and develop some unique flavors or production characteristics from them so the primarily just collected so when you talk about the actual album that was used that is the forefather of the modern onion. Who was really the first to domesticate that they would have been probably nomadic tribes in central asia most of the central asian republics of the former soviet union onion and many of its wild relatives naturally exist and probably these people's started collecting him in eating them initially and ultimately i feel Asexually propagated them. Much like you would. Shall it today break apart. The basal plate planet and then i think probably seed production at conscious breeding occurred later but it would have been nomadic tribes in central asia tens of thousands of years ago they mostly use it for food flavoring or were there other potential uses of onion now. That's an interesting question that has been quite a topic of debate. A couple of things may have played an important role in the domestication of onion. One of them is that Because it was an editorial form is a perennial grows every year. It sprouts very early in the spring and many of your listeners may grow chives and the green leaves of tribes. Come out very early in while alley. That's true as well. It's not a good source of vitamin c. But it does have vitamin cs. I think you could think about a nomadic tribes taking advantage of that early green growth of the leaves in the spring as a source of vitamin c and potentially other vitamins and flavorings but the taste is also has to have an effect. I think and. I wonder if maybe wasn't important to mask off. Flavors maybe for some ranson meets or different foods that may not have it have an off taste and that maybe the early domesticated is used that straw salt pungency flavor compounds in the album's to their benefit.

National Onion Association Turkmenistan Dr Mike Heavy Usda Agricultural Research Ser Dr Heavy Iran Artika Babalola Vavilov Batalov Soviet Union Savannah Madison Wisconsin Florida Nikolai Asia Allie Georgia
"nikolai" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

Sustainability Explored

04:51 min | 11 months ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

"What the production to something less dangerous for the humanity often times. It works. Sometimes it doesn't it depends on how much resources can be brought from the outside, you know to facilitate this transition. It depends on many things from soil and climate sure where exactly is this particular moment and what they encouraged as opposed to International organizations. So yes, it is possible, but it is not easy. It is expensive and it's also very fragile off. I think it needs a lot of support. Yes. Well, I think Nikolay we have played our part today in communication and education on the topic back to wrap it up one last question. I usually ask my guests. Could you provide one piece of advice for the listeners of sustainability export with the angle on the topic that we have just discussed. Well since since we're discussing the conflict of similar amounts, I would say at this is an area which still doesn't have enough attention doesn't have enough exposure environmental issues. Luckily or unluckily are known and acknowledged enough climate change is everywhere people know that but the conflict dimension of environmental degradation. I think still could use a bit more attention because that birth Eventually over the mail also improve the situation diminished the month inputs and conflict areas. And again, we should remember that when the conflict already burning nobody would listen to those things. So we didn't need to talk about them before in advance before I had because that way somebody will at least remember that this is mature Faith. So I would bring it up and bringing people of understanding this bringing children up understanding this is extremely important. So I would say I would appreciate if off listeners would try to learn more about this particular connection, maybe spread the words and maybe see if they can also contribute so building the snow and it should be loading this understanding worldwide brilliant were Awards. Thank you so much for your time. I really enjoyed our conversation and I really hope my listeners our birth. Which nurse will follow your lead your example and your advice? Thank you very much and all the best in your tough and so important work off too much on that. It was my pleasure as well. Thank you very much for being with us today for listening to this episode The Unusual episode that we have dedicated to the international day of or prevention of exploitation of environment in war and armed conflict zones. As always if you have any questions to me or Nikolai, please don't hesitate to reach out off Lincoln. If you like the podcast, you know what to do subscribe share on your social media and leave a review on the platform you're listening on if you leave a review on our Chaser page page will reply to you in person as I always do I used to suggest some other related episodes. But today there is nothing I can suggest to you in terms of what we have already dead. Recorded for sustainability export instead, I would suggest you watch movies such as scared lens and wounded lives the environmental footprint of war zone and the age of consequences. So these are my tools has suggestions go through the reports of osc organization for security and cooperation in Europe map of Nations development program environment program also has some very good resources to to read to go through to educate yourself on finally reached out to me on LinkedIn challenge me with your questions suggest topics just guests topics. You'd like me to cover in the future. You will find this interview on our 76,000 platforms podcast platforms as well as on YouTube. We also have a Facebook group a LinkedIn page where we can all engage in exchange of ideas. So joining this was dead. Inability explored episode number 60 season 5 and me your host and Natasha. Thank you again for listening for being with us today and always and until next time next Thursday. Take care. Stay sustainable, bye-bye..

Nikolai LinkedIn Nikolay YouTube Europe Facebook Lincoln Natasha
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"Voting during a pandemic is something the U. S has done before during the midterm elections in 1918, when the Spanish flu pandemic was ravaging the country for historian. Nothing whatever unprecedented. Tom Ewing is a history professor at Virginia Tech, and he cites eerie similarities between now in 1918. Back then, some communities required masks for voters and large public gatherings had to be canceled. But the situation wasn't politicized in the way that it is now. When people disagreed with the policy, they didn't say. Was because someone so with a Democrat, a Republican, and the role of the federal government was much less significant. Voters listened mostly to state and local health officials and didn't turn to the president for leadership. That just was not the role of the president. Early 20th century That's one striking difference. Nikolai Nelly w T o P

President Trump Tom Ewing Nikolai Nelly Federal Government Virginia Tech Professor U. S
Music from Russian Operas

Classics for Kids

05:36 min | 11 months ago

Music from Russian Operas

"Hello I'm Naomi Lewin welcome to classics, for? Kids That's the pollen is from Modesto oxy's Opera Boris, Godunov, today music from operas by some other Russian composers. They call me Kyle Glinka, the father of Russian classical music. You hardly ever see Glinka opera Muslim and Ludmilla, but you hear the overture all the time. Well at least loosely, Ludmila has been performed. That's more than you can say for some operas. Lada flopped twice the first time a Russian theatre s four different composers to collaborate writing a combination opera ballet that Malaysia was never performed. Then rimsky-korsakov who was one of the four composers recycled the music he'd written into a Milonga of his own that Lada lasted all of six performances. If you've been Mada is a funny title. Sergei Prokofiev opera called the love for three oranges. The love for three oranges is about a prince who finds the princess he loves inside an orange one of three oranges. Love is a big problem for the title character in an opera by Tchaikovsky called Eugene on Yagan. A girl named Tatyana in love with you gene on Yagan but he doesn't fall in love with her until it's too late and she's married to someone else the two of them always seemed to be meeting up at a ball. So Tchaikovsky put plenty of dance music including this waltz into his author. Part of Modesto Resorts Skis Opera Boris good enough takes place in a Polish court where they do a Polish dance, the pullen his. Another Russian opera with famous dances in it is by Alexander Barra Dean Borodino was a professor of chemistry who only got to write music in his spare time. His only opera was prince eager in which the prince eager gets captured while fighting the pile-up Ziems. The best known part of the opera is when the Pelosi enslaves entertain prince e core by singing. Dancing. Ardine died before he could finish prints eager. But two of his friends who knew how he wanted it to sound finished it for him. One of those friends was Nikolai rimsky-korsakov whose flight of the Bumblebee is far more famous than the tale of Czar Sultan, the opera for which he wrote it. You can definitely hear a flying insect in the flight of the Bumblebee. From flying bees to dancing pelotons, I hope you've enjoyed this week's music from Russian operas.

Kyle Glinka Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Tchaikovsky Pelosi Lada Yagan Naomi Lewin Alexander Barra Dean Borodino Modesto Czar Sultan Sergei Prokofiev Modesto Resorts Godunov Tatyana Ludmilla Mada Ludmila Malaysia Professor Of Chemistry Ardine
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Modest Mussorgsky: The Mighty Handful

Classics for Kids

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Modest Mussorgsky: The Mighty Handful

"Hello welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. The mighty handful may sound like a rock band or a bad babysitting job and the mighty five may sound like a basketball team. But both of those were nicknames for a group of Nineteenth Century Russian composers interested in developing a Russian sound for classical music. Obviously, there were five of them. Mighty handful refers to five fingers. The ringleader of the mighty handful was mealy Bollock, a pianist and composer who wanted to promote nationalism in Russian music in music nationalism refers to a south. That's distinct Taylor country. Sometimes, that's done by using folk tunes, rhythms, or dance forms and a piece of music, but it can also mean including historical characters or legend from a region. While Akira, wrote an overture in which he put pieces of three Russian folk songs. Eventually Bala of became director of the Russian Court Orchestra. But for a while he quipped music and went to work for the Russian railroad in fact, every member of the mighty five held a nonmusical job at one time or another. Alexander Borodino was never a professional musician. He was a professor of chemistry. From the time he was a kid Borodino was very musical but he decided to study science instead he wound up founding the first Russian School of Medicine for women. After he met Bollock. The great cheerleader for Russian Music Borodino. Began composing. But since science and medicine took up most of his time, he didn't get a chance to finish very many pieces. One of the other members of the mighty hand full wound up putting Borodin's opera Prince Ebor into its final form, the man who cleaned up Laura Dean's music and music by quite a few other composers was Nikolai rimsky-korsakov. Rimouski. Korsakov was in the navy when he met up with Mealy, Bollock Kiro and decided that. Should be his life rimsky-korsakov quit the maybe to study composition after teaching himself to compose he wound up as a professor of composition at the new conservatory. In Saint Petersburg Russia rimsky-korsakov was great at orchestration knowing what instruments to assign to which lines of music in order to get the best sound. He finished a lot of pieces that some of his fellow Russians left unfinished and he also rearranged a lot of music some of which didn't necessarily rearranging. The. Last member of the mighty five was Cesar. Has An unusually UN Russian sounding last name because his father was French. In fact, he was a French military officer who decided to stay in Russia after being taken prisoner there while fighting with Napoleon's army. says. We started out in the military too but you guessed it after he met Mealy Bala. Cesar qe became a composer. Even, though he had no Russian ancestors, his mother was Lithuanian qe became a big champion of Russian music just like the other members of the mighty handful. There, you have the other for Russian composers who made up the mighty handful. Bella Kiev Alexander Barra Dean Cesar qe and Nikolai rimsky-korsakov. The fifth of course was this month's composer Modeste Ski. That's no Muss G. N. O., M. US. The GNOME. An m. e. from pictures at an exhibition by modest Mussorgsky's

Alexander Borodino Bollock Kiro Dean Cesar Qe Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Russian Court Orchestra Cesar Qe Russian School Of Medicine Mealy Bala Saint Petersburg Russia Rimsky Akira Naomi Lewin Bella Kiev Alexander Barra Officer Basketball Bollock Modeste Ski Laura Dean Muss G. N. O. Mussorgsky
"nikolai" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. The flight of the Bumblebee has become much more famous than the opera for which Nikolai Ski Korsakov routed today. Bits of other Russian operas that have become better known in the concert hall then on the Opera Stage they call Me Kyle. Glinka the father of Russian classical music you hardly ever see Glinka opera Muslim and Ludmilla but you hear the overture. All the time well at least loosely. Ludmila has been performed. That's more than you can say for some operas. Lada flopped twice the first time a Russian theatre asked four different composers to collaborate writing combination. Opera Ballet. That Malaysia was never performed. Then rimsky-korsakov who was one of the four composers recycled the music he'd written into a melodic of own. That Lotte lasted all of six performances. Malaga is a funny title. Sergei PROKOFIEV program called the love for three oranges. The love for three oranges is about a prince who finds the princess? He loves inside. An orange one of three oranges. Love is a big problem for the title character in an opera by Tchaikovsky. Called Eugene on Yagan. A girl named Tatyana falls in love with gene on Yagan. But he doesn't fall in love with her until it's too late and she's married to someone else. The two of them always seemed to be meeting up at a ball. So Tchaikovsky put plenty of dance music including this waltz into his office part of Modesto Missouri Skis Opera. Boris good enough takes place in a Polish court where they do a Polish Vance the pullen his another Russian opera with famous dances in it is by Alexander Barra. Dean. Borodino was a professor of chemistry. Who only got to write music in his spare time. His only opera was prince eager in which the prince eager gets captured. While fighting the pile-up Ziems the best known. Part of the opera is when the Pelosi enslaves entertain prints e core by singing. Dancing Borodino died before he could finish prince eager but two of his friends who knew how he wanted it to sound finished it for him. One of those friends was Nikolai. Rimsky-korsakov whose flight of the Bumblebee is far more famous than the tale of our Sultan. The opera for which he wrote it.

Modesto Missouri Skis Opera Opera Ballet Naomi Lewin Borodino Tchaikovsky Nikolai Ski Korsakov Tatyana Sergei PROKOFIEV rimsky-korsakov Ludmilla Lada Ludmila Yagan Lotte Malaysia Malaga Alexander Barra Eugene professor of chemistry Pelosi
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 3: Russian Operas

Classics for Kids

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 3: Russian Operas

"The flight of the Bumblebee has become much more famous than the opera for which Nikolai Ski Korsakov routed today. Bits of other Russian operas that have become better known in the concert hall then on the Opera Stage they call Me Kyle. Glinka the father of Russian classical music you hardly ever see Glinka opera Muslim and Ludmilla but you hear the overture. All the time well at least loosely. Ludmila has been performed. That's more than you can say for some operas. Lada flopped twice the first time a Russian theatre asked four different composers to collaborate writing combination. Opera Ballet. That Malaysia was never performed. Then rimsky-korsakov who was one of the four composers recycled the music he'd written into a melodic of own. That Lotte lasted all of six performances. Malaga is a funny title. Sergei PROKOFIEV program called the love for three oranges. The love for three oranges is about a prince who finds the princess? He loves inside. An orange one of three oranges. Love is a big problem for the title character in an opera by Tchaikovsky. Called Eugene on Yagan. A girl named Tatyana falls in love with gene on Yagan. But he doesn't fall in love with her until it's too late and she's married to someone else. The two of them always seemed to be meeting up at a ball. So Tchaikovsky put plenty of dance music including this waltz into his office part of Modesto Missouri Skis Opera. Boris good enough takes place in a Polish court where they do a Polish Vance the pullen his another Russian opera with famous dances in it is by Alexander Barra. Dean. Borodino was a professor of chemistry. Who only got to write music in his spare time. His only opera was prince eager in which the prince eager gets captured. While fighting the pile-up Ziems the best known. Part of the opera is when the Pelosi enslaves entertain prints e core by singing. Dancing Borodino died before he could finish prince eager but two of his friends who knew how he wanted it to sound finished it for him. One of those friends was Nikolai. Rimsky-korsakov whose flight of the Bumblebee is far more famous than the tale of our Sultan. The opera for which he wrote

Modesto Missouri Skis Opera Opera Ballet Borodino Tchaikovsky Nikolai Ski Korsakov Yagan Sergei Prokofiev Rimsky-Korsakov Ludmilla Tatyana Lada Ludmila Lotte Malaysia Malaga Alexander Barra Eugene Professor Of Chemistry Boris Pelosi
"nikolai" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on No Jumper

"My can't do that, that Nikolai skin. Car. Yeah. But then I just break everything for, I'm not gonna do it now. Look at somebody else doing it, and that's where it came close and shit. Everything from clothing just apply to all aspects. Everyday applied that back in. I actually saw you posted some shit on Instagram that you're like been selling merged. The coast. Buck in two thousand eight doing first of all, I've been making my own shit since I was like in middle school by when I started doing Rousson jeans I with my own genes and everybody does that normal you from everybody that could just won't buy or cooking. I came real creative, as- nigga will go on YouTube and figure out how to, you know, and then it got from that to make an shirt. Remember, Muskie starts with the paint on initiate paint shirts. So I started doing those the knows almost like the paint Marcello. Those start doing those people just tend to fit, you know what I used to do. I grew up with light Tyler and on my future. I would get like blink off future shirts from them, and I would fuck in tie them, and resell for double them. I do the exact one that Tyler is same colors ESE marketing. He's already wearing it. So they wanted. It is expensive and low key, that shit was not hard to do, but, like nobody around me or nobody was like, oh, let me just go tide is nobody everybody. Title, especially like you think about it. They love tied. I in that crew exact anybody that licked listens to future loves tied that's shit. That's fax. I'll see you say that automatically. That's what I think's boom. Next thing I think, okay, make some sheet for some like a whole group. So there's a whole groom fog address like this. I gotta make some shit in throw it on somebody in that group. Now all for warning nice fat, like some shit, make thirty though wondering got boys in it, and give them all free golfer. These now put them also. I am. That's as simple once three to you. Buy a lot of people, a lot of people don't think that for over. Now, you got to wait, so what? So how do are they? Let's start from. I know you've been tattoo in for a long time. Br I can do that. And they didn't go to college. Then they get not rich like everybody art and shit though, before of. See I'm in jail, too. When you go to jail, you drop facts them. So I've been jailed since I was going, John fourteen sixteen fifteen different Bush, it was a gun case, I wanted to I one with the gun case, then I just kept going back for like warrants. I'm fucking I'll catch all these warrants at the end of the year. They catch me do like a weekend. I don't have to pay shit damn where. I'll say that to if I would've knew that I wanna did that with the foot, I was just going to court all the time. Everyone. But now it's like biting me is try to like say, hey, I'm gonna go to court for the no you, not you never go to court, sir. So now back like, okay, I got to be on top of that shit you my password snatchers Bush wanted to say, I wanna say you must be doing something line, you fucking going to Korea and go, but. Certain countries, they don't care about sitting together, you maybe hunting Australia's on you. He does kinda like home wants me there periods wanted to if he wanted. It gets done as facts we want I wanna be in Canada. And they went to Canada probably have to get a sixty thousand dollar jet time with I was gonna let me in. They let you easy got urine. I thought idea. But. I Don I did. I don't know. Like to jet. She ended. So there's like shit ways to do everything. That's like that's like coda got caught on accident and turn it into candidate. I, he was in canon, they didn't even know..

Bush Tyler Nikolai skin Canada YouTube Muskie Buck Don I Rousson canon Australia John Korea sixty thousand dollar
"nikolai" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"Okay you know how people say so and so wrote the book on ex well agriculture ecologist ethnobotanist and franciscan brother gary nab han wrote the book on our russian botanist nikolai vavilov well v lav was from a very well educated family in russia i think every one of his siblings became a scientist as well the book is called the where our food comes from retracing nikolai babylon quest to end famine in the circle of life gares book shows that this russian botanist and geneticist story really begins in famine just like it ends the grew up in a period where russia in eastern europe had suffered one famine after another due to inclement weather causing crop failures these famines that he grew up with how serious were there they were of epic proportions from the eighteen sixties on there were six major famines killed over a half million people in eastern europe and and russia and so he grew up in this mel you tolstoy was writing about the vavilov upbringing around these horrendous crop failures and famines leads him to learn a ton about plants in botany in as he is doing his work as a botanist in the nineteen twenties he starts to get into this idea that collecting the plants or the seeds preserving an understanding crop diversity around the world might help fight off crop failures because he might be able to breed the plants and find certain strains that could resist bad weather and thus famine there were people with their eyes are on the same prize earlier on in history thomas jefferson for example who collected seeds and brock back cutting so to the americas.

nikolai vavilov russia scientist europe thomas jefferson gary nab tolstoy
"nikolai" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"It's four thousand as cabin posters of all right so here the nikolai kosta waldo he's in game of thrones shake where's waldo kit hang category yeah kit i don't know well kit harrington in game of thrones who i think is a lead then i think they're saying the dragon is lead shirt and he's a gimme two doug jones and star trek discovery the guys sifi legend he's very good on star trek and i'll say from david zone spilt from the one year that i was someone's plus one to the saturn awards in two thousand eight doug jones is like the jack nicholson of right right nobody wears a very brightly colored vest for like because he can if i were doug jones i would just like wear whatever the fuck i want fox and his body can because he's trained any clothes covered in goup wicker man like stuff all the time yes yeah he's he should just the ninth because right usually he's a fishman blocked out from the world makes jokes about him he does bits from the audience he kills a great nomination totally worth so he's he's it three okay four mina win he's gonna win by the way he's really good on the grill mike number four michael mckean and better call saul i'm not sure why that gets into the saturns you great performance totally nomination at the emmy which i think he gets go those nominations like he's been nominated they nominated francis dorm for best actress for three billboards i mean are they calling film noir genre like they said.

nikolai kosta waldo doug jones jack nicholson fox michael mckean saul goup wicker francis one year
"nikolai" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"Yes i who we forget that that was that was one of the most remarkable few in the history of the of the wrestling business i i don't want to forget nikolai all costs and there were there were also rematches with the stays eac and stan hansen but larry's visco i keep pointing to that that was the bruno feud to me of all time yeah so after the second tottering there's the protege mentor storyline with layers of bisco that's i have just childhood recollection of reading about that in the magazines that you were a big part of the after mags as they have been dubbed and it was sold to doug doug by day's meltzer by the way that's where that can't from that's interesting i feel like i'm well maybe i did i feel like i call them that even before i subscribe to the observer because you're he actually started calling them that and i used to call him and say please don't call them that chris it it's a just suspected the of the people on the magazines he said well you're the guy out there on tv you're the guy everybody sees it the matches so stuff you were the face of the brand in for and good to market it taste of the brand not to heal shucks dan shock it nydia hill yes stu sacks he was a hilson type no joking i'm totally joking stews still there i know.

nikolai stan hansen larry meltzer doug doug chris hilson
"nikolai" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"That's great to hear it adamant you're saying that the error rate is really high so that's why this is not as much of a concern was there anything else that you wanted to add around that in terms of you know why quantum competing is still sort of far off in the distance for us for breaking all the codes i think we've chatted about how hard is to build these computers on how important it is to consider ero rates and don't just think that end bitcoin to computers is going to be able to solve problems like there's a huge difference between vall physical cubits and the theoretical cubits that we want to build out of many many rule ones and the second reason for don't panic is i said that we have huddled against this border of what we can solve and how much we put enough to make them efficient we can back away from that border a bit and we can still have quick fee that his were bussed in the face of quantum adversary we don't need to to his cooled quantum cryptography to do that so quantum cryptography is is putting expensive boxes of upticks on the end of fiber cables and using quantum phenomenon to guarantee confidentiality and so forth and that's exciting interesting but it's not sort of what nikolai looking at because we're not going to have dedicated five bucks links between the internet's we'd like to be able to use we've got we can do that we can use different problems public until kaffee that resists quantum computers and it's just no more software that runs on no more computers runs over the internet as we know in love it.

nikolai
"nikolai" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Wow because you know avs i don't know i have no idea what it happened but but we did we were down in fort benning georgia for a little while training and then we went directly over to morocco from there and everybody got to know each other and four bending the joke we have in our family is that you guys all had have you know the crew cut you know and you're all wearing helmets yeah as you should do in that situation and it's hard to tell you apart sure nikolai must've vol doubt was on the show which was really really cool he said he went and saw the film with his mom the film and she says oh my god that scene you had was so and so was so beautiful thanks so much that wasn't me maybe a little better if your mom doesn't know enough scene that was remember i think it was you and mcgregor i think what it was is she thought he was mcgregor which if you're gonna be compared that's pretty cool yeah danish totally got about a hundred pounds difference between detailed dairy impression but it's i don't know i mean it's such an intense film it is just on its own and i was able to wash it like just when religious finish finish cutting i went to down to jerry bruckheimer office and we watched it i was the first person to see it from the cast and and it was just i mean i couldn't believe that just cacophony of noise and in the way that the visuals were just so overwhelming we'd never seen anything like that before that's the thing that people might not remember is that there wasn't ever a depiction of urban warfare on on film like that before it was overwhelming heavy duty fell it's overwhelming and another one another one that was was changed in post production because of actual events so we shot the pre nine eleven and then it was more what we'd shot was more like book mark bowden's fantastic book by the same name excuse me but.

fort benning georgia nikolai mcgregor mark bowden morocco jerry bruckheimer hundred pounds
"nikolai" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Nikolai different and differentiated so shortly after you were installed as ceo you shutdown nokia which resulted in a total right off of the purchase about eighteen thousand jobs lost what was that i mean that's a pretty big deal to be handling both uh you know the mechanics of it and the emotion of it um shortly after you come in as a not obvious choice as ceo just walk me through what that felt like uh on your way to accomplishing that first full i think these hard decisions around what do pick and focus on is something that i believe a ceo uniquely has to do uh that's not something that you can delegate i mean ultimately that's your coresponsibility add an in especially taking those decisions that impact people's lives and livelihood is not easy razi all very heavily on post nilly so therefore i had to think it through and then having taught it through and made the decision we had to eggs acute on at to your point where my power waters will paramount importance was to make sure that the employees being impacted were treated with dignity and were given all opportunities to find their next play whether inside of microsoft or outside and that was my real concern that's where i poured my energy but i knew that i had to define the core value propositions that ruhuna creating the company uh was getting in a quite mature in an industry that was facing the really of existential disruption jeff sonnenfeld again the ceo expert at the yale school of management he did come into a culture that had become very bureaucratic it had become a possessed by very strong turf issues sonnenfeld thinks microsoft has benefited from new delhi's management style what you might call melo intensity sonnenfeld points to hounded della handled the nokia mass he had voted against this merger with nokia he he thought it was a mistake but he doesn't run around trying to shame of bomber and gates overages had looked in on this as we look at it now and a and a clear eyed way that wasn't the path to take doesn't mean that a mistake was due to idiocy or corruption is that in the light of day with some a different conditions we see we need to take a different path now.

ceo microsoft jeff sonnenfeld new delhi della nokia Nikolai yale school of management melo
"nikolai" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

07:09 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"And now we queued up the peace that they've been discussing this is lifted from the full show podcast and it's 16yearold pianist wing fun han performing the fifth movements not a tragic her from forgotten melody's by nikolai met ner the boom boom when calling han sixteen years old is in new york city he warned greece another tragic often without melody by nikolai met thanks for listening to our bonus content podcast for show 328 to hear the full show that wing fung was on download from the top podcast 328 boston and we'd love to hear from you you can leave us a message on our facebook page facebookcom from the top fans or on twitter at classical kid or find us on i tuned and leave us a review.

nikolai twitter han new york greece facebook sixteen years
"nikolai" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"I mean i don't know people like some they can't submit is not going to change anything it's that there's going to be a number and whatever it is we have to just accepted i guess but it just seems odd that they would spend the energy to to go through every movie review of all time at mummy hit him some that's your business i guess narrow so we're going to any business is good seems like we're gonna take whatever the main number is like you said it sometimes just like the audience number here this is an audience this is the rotten tomatoes the the critics the critics and the thing i'll say about of i guess we should talk about after we back on color anybody's i'm say 37 governor number i'm going to say here's anther seven also 73 going to go and going to invite you to flip flat padania me uh aga 25 wow have you seen license at her hip hop it's a really movie but it's not a good movie a renaissance now that we've oh garin gearing i'm gonna say fifty five a couple of nikolai can't you can't drive of can't drive looking to that if i think like i'd again i my opinion very skewed by the fact that i haven't seen it since i was a teenager but i think this is one of those movies that may be at the time it was unfairly a criticized by by it i think it's got good movie or for what it's trying to be but i don't know of critics were okay with that back then is as much as now like now a critical see like a movie like clueless and be like clueless is a great movie but like maybe in the early eighties they would've been like this is a team blahblah yeah like they didn't respect the genre so they were like it's bad even though it's like but you're not don't don't read it on the gandhi scale i get my happy gandhi but it might still be the gun to each other guy just make it up from zero to gandhi.

nikolai
"nikolai" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Double Toasted

"What an area the smell fought method of acting in he does that in the beginning of the movie in there he is right that is labral house abrazos thicken and he's got on lipstick and he's always doing this dialogue at his house yeah he's very effective in that began in the movie he is is he say and everything what a sneer yeah not didn't think that they're winning i want this within the rebel scum fools bastiat which is the need us picks nikolai guy hey we build now they set that up with him so that they can pull in a joke uh after welco will hated if we're like i they serious yeah so it's you did the other thing that is going out the movie the pools you win let you know that this is genuine authentic star wars right here the okay oh yeah that meant that colombian smugglers force awakens all right i'm not gonna call your undoing some nostalgia stuff you know i dacoota i don't think it was bad bringing him back in but on in his young on that crazy about the force awakens thought it was good but i said okay you know what with these characters be going to bring the men dumber hansolaf princes live luke skywalker said this is you you've got to do something for these characters this could not be banned service and i'm gonna wings which i'll do and when they come in and what they do with them they continue star wars as it should be done thank god their story the story aarchs develop and make sense and when i say that they develop its own develop they be vault like it's really incredible looking at princes layer grow into general leia she's a calm cool collected leader who know she has a lot of shit on hersholt all yet insane some shit yeah oh yeah definitely we've seen young as princess leia gopro bikini wearing slave layer news lately she liked their shit short sea water aware that it wants to kill job she's the cocky.

nikolai
"nikolai" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"We are presented by progressive ensures ramona shelburne of espn will join us next segment ramona shelburne will join us at 530 eastern she's got story oh jail in beed audit troll and he be don't is radios brought to you by upside dot com giving all business travelers the gift of a better business travel experienced this holiday season upside dot com or aids ever to not be themselves that is our telephone number and thanks to shannon for his amazing research jessica far for you guys yes they did aglet uh nikolai volkov was with wayne they made him lithuania chen actually applaud the w w f at the top for doing that they know dan will they had to get an allday detail all that was rush arizona better that russian mas people they need to break rushing in a little group is already had a steal russia right now as laws most people having to be concern it i geographically of inept country anyway uh so you know jerry jones you'll find his roger goodell thing yummy heard a roger goodell got his contract constitu shan i don't know if he's out barrage bedell said that he use of a flight any usable plane he will be paying for himself he was not able to get the plane in his negotiations while it's unfortunate i have no problem ask of it about away i had no problem get everything is you can get raj rages with you you you will hustler just like obama hasley get everything in world a you yet i really didn't have any problems with that but it was not unanimous as you may have heard in arthur blank said he was disappointed that it was not unanimous and of course all of us will agr wonder what owner or owners may have been voting against this and of course it was jerry giles good jerry jones is still on the kickoff why are we doing this right now why don't we wait and by the way i don't really have much of a counterpoint for jerry jones on that one uh magazine o j jones that he had like a street away we treaties players but i got where he was governor for all these like i don't see why there is any need for us to rush plus his idol seaney for us to rush is tied to since.

ramona shelburne espn business travel nikolai volkov wayne dan arizona russia jerry jones roger goodell bedell obama arthur blank shannon lithuania jerry giles
"nikolai" Discussed on The NBA Show

The NBA Show

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on The NBA Show

"Fortyeight it it would not be surprising v is a really good 3point shooter this year but he's not going to shoot 56 percent okay the shocking ones of the next two guys are aaron gordon and nikolai busiv mitch who so far this year have taken four and a half a game each and gordon a shooting fifty nine percent and busiv itchy shooting forty one percent from 3 and he's taking them me gordon is the sneaky will like i he was not i think on a lot of people's radars as to a possible boast improved candidate but i'm kinda believer in the first seven games not in the numbers maintaining themselves in terms of percentages but so far he's averaged twenty points nine rebounds in thirty minutes a game and i think if we looked up at the end of the season of people think wow eric or aaron gordon really took a leap that wouldn't be that shocking to me but what is shocking is i would have never suspected that both of those are shooting you know four and a half threes a game end hitting at an extraordinary clip even for seven games i wouldn't think they could do that right i mean it just hasn't that hasn't been there emo so i guess we'll see what their number ends up at the end of the year but both of them have clearly become weapons with that shot they are willing to take it and so far they've made it.

aaron gordon nikolai busiv fifty nine percent forty one percent thirty minutes 56 percent
"nikolai" Discussed on Game of Thrones The Podcast

Game of Thrones The Podcast

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Game of Thrones The Podcast

"A entered their turned in and they are actually does blocking it out and this they'd that like in in late july early august they are actually blocking the scenes to give two directors dino so they can go out location and start filming there's a interviewed nikolai koster wild wildau that says that he was planning to go back to work in october which is also like i guess it's like a sixty eight week window between the the actors getting their scripts and going to work in october which means strips could start leaking as early his leg tomorrow government initially 'cause like the first actors are probably going to beginning like the the you know that the the uh uh the peter dnc klages and the kit harrington's and amelia clark's of the world are going to start getting their scripts very soon um so if you if you take that math and nine eleven month a math the beginning of filming in october that gives you a july 2018 to september 2018 time line but the other rumor is there flirting with making all these episodes featurelength very never done before and also the interview say that there's just a truly preposterous amount to the effects in these final episodes abed yeah so that like easy start hitting aware if you don't hit october no one release like game of thrones is not going to be released in november night there is a dead there a deadzone from beginning in november two essentially mid the late january were you will not be a dislike hbo is not gonna release anything like new yet new new series in they typically tryon and place it so that nothing is airing over christmas right.

harrington amelia clark hbo christmas nikolai koster nine eleven month sixty eight week
"nikolai" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

Jim Beaver's Project Action

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

"With no programs and nothing to help them reintegrate back into society and in the the crappy part about that is that there is a number of these guys that don't want to um program they don't wanna go to help themselves they are just who they are now i don't know how you help them but there are ones that do want to do it right the do wanna get into substance abuse programs that do want other programs to help them understand how to get a job how to deal with society again and hopefully we can create more of those that we take some of the some of the burden off of our prison system that is just so overcrowded doesn't matter what stage living well and and i think he's done a lot of issues to i mean you even with nikolai did such a tremendous job at you know in his role but you know y you know he was torn you know there there was a guy there there was torn because he he really wanted to do the right thing and do right by his family in in the end it was distancing himself from them because he got in so deep but he had to to end up ultimately even attempting to get back to his family and to me there was just so many layers there and and i think that's what's interesting you know and and i can only see you know when the when these actual people do get out of prison you know there's so many layers there in and they're strings tying them back to prison than maybe nobody even know about you know but they're there and there's there can be threats on them or their family or their loved ones in it it's such a such an interesting dynamic you know and i think there's a lot at play that you know people on the outside you just look at it and it's not a black and white thing you there's so many different things in play.

nikolai
"nikolai" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"nikolai" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from tito's handmade vodka distilled from corn and naturally gluten free for recipes and more visit them at tito's vodka dot com eighty proof tito's handmade vodka fifth generation inc distilled and bottled in austin texas there's a crime problem in california's orchards beef thefts hib's or a target because farmers pay good money to rent them to pollinate the crops belly public radio's as redacted romero report seventy one million that's the number of bees max nikolai check tends in the rolling hills east of fresno each is worth a fraction of assent nikolai checks not wearing gloves or be suit while he's opening a high plus all the b a while he got a whole lot laura for nikolai chat stings are regular thing in fact he just got stung does come alive venables good for you know nikolai chuck isn't worried at all about these things he's worried about beef thieves he makes most of his money during allman pollination season and this year a thief stole four stacks of his hives he knew what the b because he went through every single be colony i had a t two goalie they'll good good bye you'll like the be yards on a hell of a security there no no fences that lack of security means he's had be stolen more than once literally billions of bees are needed to pollinate california's allman crop not enough bees live in california year round to do that so they are trucked in from across the country from places like colorado in nebraska.

tito texas california laura venables nikolai chuck colorado nebraska austin romero fresno four stacks