6 Burst results for "Nikola Twillie"

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:19 min | 7 months ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Many, many days. This is advertiser content, brought to you by AbbVie. We're always trying to understand how do we stop disease, right? Disease comes in. We try to stop it. That's how we practice medicine. An interesting thought would be, what if we actually didn't get disease? What if we prevented disease? Hi, my name is Howard Jacob. I'm a vice president at AbbVie. I had the genomic research center and I also had our data integration across R&D. Better medicine starts with better information. So Howard and AbbVie have been studying a collection of more than 1 million human genomes to advance our understanding of disease. It's a large amount of data. Your DNA extended end to end from all of your 100 trillion cells would go to the sun and back 666.5 times. All of that genetic information will have major implications for the future of healthcare, helping doctors tailor treatment to every patient's needs. For many genes, there are tests where you can actually say, oh, this is the dose you should take. This is when you should take it, and this is why you're taking it. It opens the door for prescribing medications differently and at different doses for each individual. Their work is already saving lives, but genetic researchers are far from satisfied. I just know that we can do more. I know we can enable physicians to practice medicine better. I know we can enable patients to live healthier lives. I know we can develop better therapies, and we just have to do it. To learn more about how AbbVie is shaping the future of medicine, visit here, now dot ABB, VIE. Brain fog, anxiety, depression, according to social media, you can cure all of them by eating yogurt unsurprisingly, social media isn't exactly right. But there is some really exciting new science showing that what you eat can affect your mental health. That what's going on in your gut literally changes your brain chemistry. And that's exactly what we're getting to the bottom of on this week's episode of gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Nikola twillie, and I'm Cynthia graber, and this episode we go deep to sort out the science from the social media hype. It's a story that involves some very sad mice and a cutting edge U.S. military experiment, but it's also news we can all use. What should you be eating to combat anxiety, depression, and more? Follow gastropod and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Another guy just collapsed out there. Oh, but the good Samaritan to the rescue? Oh damn, good Samaritan, Jess collapsed. Oh, and you PS guy to the rescue. Then the UPS guy just collapsed. Ladies stealing packages. Oh, and the lady just collapsed. It's today explained we're back with Neil danisha. He's vox's science and RICO fellow, and he's been looking into why it's so hard to talk about heat with any sense of real immediacy, despite the fact that it is a big problem. Heat is the deadliest weather phenomenon in the United States. It's surpasses things that you might think of as more deadly like floods and lightning and tornadoes and hurricanes by a pretty significant amount. And if you look around the world, you've seen pretty devastating impacts this year alone. An excessive heat warning is in effect in Seattle, Washington, where just 44% of residents have air conditioning. A heat wave sparked by climate change is causing death and destruction across Europe. Power outages in India and Pakistan have made it even harder to cope with record shattering weather. The Chinese heat wave is the third heat wave this year where nearly a billion people are being essentially cooked at one time. And when you put them all together, we're just seeing heat wave after heat wave after heat wave coming and hitting everyone. What makes heat waves so different and dangerous than other extreme weather events? I think the two big things about heat that I keep thinking about are that it's invisible and it's subjective. Heat waves are different because like you're surprised because heat waves don't have catastrophic winds ripping roofs of houses or rainstorms bringing floods. It's this thing that we feel it on our skin. We feel it in our bodies. We might see it shimmering in the air, but it doesn't have the sort of apocalyptic impact on our cities and on our homes. And that means that we can take it less seriously. And how exactly does heat hurt people? What is the scientific process by which heat kills me? Not to be grim. Well, that depends on how many gross details you want. I want all of them, frankly. It's pretty gnarly. The sweat is your body's primary mechanism for regulating temperature, right? And so the first thing that happens when things get hot is that you sweat, I think we all know this. And when it gets especially hot, you start sweating too much, and that means that your body starts to lose all the water and the salt that you need to stay alive. And if it gets especially bad, you start experiencing heat stroke, which is when your sweat mechanism just shuts down because it can't regulate your temperature well enough. And so your skin turns red and dry and your internal temperature rises extremely quickly. It can go above a 103°F in like ten to 15 minutes once your sweat mechanism breaks down, then your heart starts to beat faster and you develop a headache and nausea and dizziness and confusion and eventually you pass out. And this is what you see when people get heat stroke but you also see it with heat exhaustion and you see it faster with people who are older or who have like these preexisting medical conditions. It's a painful process. It's something that really brings you down to a level where you feel pretty helpless. I know that you've been looking at areas around the country that are unused to heat. In addition to ones that are used to heat, can you tell me some of what you found in your reporting that surprised

Howard Jacob Nikola twillie Cynthia graber Neil danisha depression ABB Howard U.S. Jess Seattle Pakistan Washington Europe India dizziness nausea headache confusion
"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:12 min | 7 months ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It really rapidly reshaped the philanthropic landscape in the U.S. and not just the philanthropic landscape, but like Soros and like the kochs tuna moscovitz and Pinkman freed are very interested in political donations. The effective altruists are getting involved in politics like the Soros and the cokes. Where and how are they spending their money? The sort of effective altruists push into politics began kind of an earnest in 2016 out of a lot of really genuine panic about Donald Trump. The effect of altruists a variety of reasons worry a lot about worst case scenarios. And often think that a way to do good is to prevent worst case scenarios from happening because people aren't as concerned about them as they should be. And a populist leader with autocratic tendencies getting control of nuclear weapons seemed like the worst case scenario. So tuna and Moscow it's poured lots of money and overnight became one of the biggest donors to democratic campaigns and to the effort to defeat Trump in 2016. They gave even more money in 2020 and by that point, bankman freed had become a billionaire as well. And he gave a significant amount of money, but I think beyond general support for Democrats, something that appeals about politics to effective altruists and that is appealed to philanthropists before is that getting people you like elected and lobbying them when those people have controls over budgets that can span billions, tens of billions, hundreds of billions of dollars, there's really good bang for your buck there. Beyond some of these political priorities, more recently, they've also been thinking more and trying to spend more money on affecting the very, very far future. The vast majority of all people who will ever live have not yet been born. My current thoughts are that you expected value the future is what matters. Coming up next, effective altruism, takes a sort of weird turn toward the future. I'm Alex heath, and I'm co hosting land of the Giants. This season, meta, the company formally known as Facebook. So far, we've told the story of Mark Zuckerberg's journey to reaching billions of users. From the creation of the news feed to the acquisition of Instagram. But such massive scale, that comes at a price. In our upcoming episodes, we'll examine how the company has had to grapple with the uncomfortable side of its power. From how to reckon with former president Donald Trump, I think Mark in the end felt that if you're going to start saying that heads of government can't threaten to deploy force to restore order that that sets a really quite a Boris impressive. To the harms its own technology amplifies. Borderline harmful sensational content, fundamentally does better under user engagement. Will Zuckerberg's high stakes pivot to building the metaverse work? And if it does, what does that mean for all of us? Follow land of the Giants wherever you listen to hear new episodes every Wednesday. Brain fog, anxiety, depression, according to social media, you can cure all of them by eating yogurt unsurprisingly, social media isn't exactly right. But there is some really exciting new science showing that what you eat can affect your mental health. That what's going on in your gut literally changes your brain chemistry. And that's exactly what we're getting to the bottom of on this week's episode of gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Nikola twillie, and I'm Cynthia graber, and this episode we go deep to sort out the science from the social media hype. It's a story that involves some very sad mice and a cutting edge U.S. Military experiment, but it's also news we can all use. What should you be eating to combat anxiety, depression, and more? Follow gastropod and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You're listening to today explains. This is a today explainer, chase explains. Explain death. Explain ducks. It's today explained amna will king Dylan Matthews, senior vox correspondent, donator of kidney, we've been talking about doing good for and in the present. But there's an evolution in effect of altruism, a really interesting one that has to do with caring about the very distant future. Tell me about that. The other big sort of intellectual shift that's happened within EA is away from what people sometimes call near termism and toward long termism. We talked a lot earlier about global poverty, global health, making sure that people living right now in the poorest places on earth are better off. That was never the sole focus of effective altruism, one other major focus has always been animals and factory farming. I think that gets less attention just because in the general public, the idea that pigs or chickens being tortured and factory farms have comparative moral worth to human beings living lives of extreme desperation is controversial. But that's always been something that the major donors have cared about as well. In the last 5 to 6 years, there's also been more focus on long-term and the long-term future of the world generally. So the reasoning here is humans are a pretty young species, the homo sapiens emerged about 200 to 300,000 years ago, mammal species like us typically live at least a million years. We're smarter than a lot of mammals, and so you might expect that to be even longer for us. That implies that the vast majority of people who will ever live will live in the future. Future generations matter feature people matter, and whatever you value, whether that's well-being or happiness, or maybe it's accomplishment, maybe it's works of art, maybe it's scientific, discovery. Almost all of whatever you value would be in the future rather than now. Because the future just could be vast, indeed. And so one way that this concern manifested itself is trying to focus much more on preventing human extinction. And that's something that I think is intuitively good to a lot of people, but is under invested in that there's really not that much money going into efforts to prevent nuclear war or the spread of nuclear weapons, efforts to prevent pandemics, efforts to regulate new technologies that could be really dangerous, like AI, and so I think this kind of long-term perspective pushed DAs into caring more about those things. I think what's interesting about what we owe to the future, which is the new book by will mccaskill, one of the founders of effective altruism and is his treatise for long-term, is that he's trying to argue that caring about all these billions

bankman Donald Trump Alex heath Giants Soros Nikola twillie Cynthia graber amna Dylan Matthews U.S. Mark Zuckerberg Moscow depression Instagram Zuckerberg meta Boris Facebook Mark EA
"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Today, Explained

"The racial wealth gap and increase economic mobility in the U.S., but that's just a start. Having ambitious goals is what helps the world make meaningful progress. And it's going to take all of us working together to make sure we continue to move in the right direction because to address these worldwide problems, it's going to take worldwide action. It takes everything to reach zero. For the love of making a difference for the love of progress. Learn more at city dot com slash ESG. Brain fog, anxiety, depression, according to social media, you can cure all of them by eating yogurt unsurprisingly, social media isn't exactly right. But there is some really exciting new science showing that what you eat can affect your mental health that what's going on in your gut literally changes your brain chemistry. And that's exactly what we're getting to the bottom of on this week's episode of gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Nikola twillie, and I'm Cynthia graber, and this episode we go deep to sort out the science from the social media hype. It's a story that involves some very sad mice and a cutting edge U.S. Military experiment, but it's also news we can all use. What should you be eating to combat anxiety, depression, and more? Follow gastropod and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. We're back, today explained we wanted to hear an argument for declaring Russia a terrorist state. So we turned to Kyiv. I'm Kira rudik member of Ukrainian parliament and leader of the whole party. As you'll hear, Kira rudik thinks Ukrainians and the rest of the world have got nothing to lose in declaring Russia a terrorist state. Absolutely. This is one of the key sanctions, key statements that need to be made will not only in the United States, but also in other jurisdictions. Why it is so important is it provides secondhand sanctions. So right now, when European countries Britain U.S. are cutting Russia of the market, Russia is easily finding the new ones. Look at the South American countries, look at the African countries, Asian countries, and it will continue being a problem because Russia will always have somebody else who will give them a hand. Acknowledging them as state sponsor of terrorism creates this status of non handshake able country. So everyone who will be doing business with Russia who will continue being a provider who will be doing the expert Russia will also be a subject to the sanctions from the U.S. side. And I believe it will have incredibly strong impact, even on the political level. My main direction of international work right now is unfreezing of deceased Russian assets in different countries and making them being used on behalf of Ukraine or to the support of Ukraine. If the country is a state sponsor of terrorism, then the Central Bank assets can be seized and used. And this is why we need this legal background. We need this statement because then we can work on top of it. And this is why we are calling for yes, Congress, we are calling for Biden to finally make this decision. We spoke with a guest from the international crisis group, and they seem to think along with President Biden and perhaps Secretary of State blinken, that this designation of Russia as a state sponsor of terror couldn't make it more difficult to negotiate a peace deal for Ukraine. Could make Russia less willing to participate in peace negotiations with Ukraine. What do you think of that argument? It hurts me. Because it implies that we will be in the peaceful negotiations with Russia without an appropriate amount of security guarantees. Look, I have been to bucha after it was liberated. The first day. I have seen the road. Covered with bodies. I have seen females by this that were tried to be burned. To cover for what happened to them. We have seen our people being killed tortured, raped. And we can not imagine having some peaceful deal with Russia without knowing that it would not be repeated. The war did not start on February 24th. It started 8 years ago and we know for sure. What Russia is capable of. We know that they are not keeping their work and we know that all negotiations all the deals with them there just useless. They are not even worth the paper that they are written on. And only way only way for us to get into any deal with Russia is to know who is vouching for them. Who are the world leaders who will say, okay, so let's make this deal, but if Russia attacks again, then what? And so then the argument saying, okay, we should let ourselves have this space to negotiate with Russia is absolutely cruel because we do not need this argument. We need an idea of how the world security will look like and how we are getting the protection. Let's work right now on using the Putin's money to cover for his crimes. It's so unfair that taxpayers of the country that are our lives should be paying for what Putin is doing out of their pockets. And if for this to happen, we need to acknowledge Russia state sponsor of terrorism, then let's do it. I think this argument is extremely weak, and I think it's inhumane. How about the argument that designating Russia a state sponsor of terror would be viewed by Putin as an escalation of this war would be viewed as an escalation from the United States and perhaps would make him feel even more isolated and thus perhaps even more free to escalate the violence, the rape, the brutality in Ukraine. So what do you think he will do? What should be should we be afraid of? My nation and my people suffered every single possible crime on their war crimes list right now. I am so upset that everybody's talking about what Putin thinks what Putin feels, what Putin will do and what do we should be thinking about what we are going to do. What the United States are going to do, what our allies are going to do. The whole world was watching how my country was being torn apart for 8 years. And right now there is still the same, oh, so whatever we will do, it will make Putin feel more free. What else do you think he will do? I understand why this is such a difficult conversation and why some of these questions seem absurd to you. But I suppose if you accept that Vladimir Putin is not acting rationally and can lash out at any point, even worse than he is now and that he is a man who controls a nuclear arsenal. Do you think there's a risk in pushing him

Russia Kira rudik United States Nikola twillie Cynthia graber Ukrainian parliament whole party depression Putin President Biden Secretary of State blinken bucha Kyiv international crisis group Central Bank Britain Biden Congress Vladimir Putin
"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:39 min | 7 months ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

"AK-47 rifles. To help maintain security and peace in the area of operations, your mission will involve Manning checkpoints to interrupt the movement of enemy forces. So it looks like you're in a city here. And right now I'm trying to figure out if the individual walking towards me is a friend or a flow based on his camouflage patterns. I'm going to call that a foe, so I'm going to shoot. I got it right. That's right, gastropod has become a military gaming show. This week, Cynthia shoots the enemy and sometimes her friends too. Watch out world. Oh, my friends should definitely be concerned because I am not so great with a gun, even if it's a virtual one. But luckily, I was not the one who really needed to worry about whether the person advancing was friend or foe, I was watching the future of the U.S. Army's plans to tweak warfighter guts so that the soldiers make better life and death decisions. You might be thinking, well, I have no plans to shoot anyone right now, and honestly, for that, we're grateful. But this research goes well beyond a battlefield application. If manipulating our gut microbiomes can really change how we think and feel, that's news we can all use. As you listeners already know, gut microbes are something we love here at gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Cynthia graber, and I'm Nikola twillie, and first of all, a PSA for your own health, please don't drink every time we say microbe this episode. Because this episode we're diving into our guts to meet our gut microbes to find out how they're connected to our brains. While gut microbes be the next mental health therapeutic breakthrough, it's a story that involves all our favorite things. Fecal transplants fermented foods and lots and lots of stressful situations just another day here at gastropod. Today's episode is supported in part by the Burroughs welcome fund in support of our coverage of biomedical research and by the Alfred P Sloan foundation for the public understanding of science technology and economics. Gastropod is part of the vox media podcast network in partnership with eater. This episode

Cynthia graber Nikola twillie Cynthia U.S. Army Alfred P Sloan foundation for
"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

"There you have been described as various things like tartlets, cakes, cookies, pretzels, and all sorts of names because they really look like the snacks that we enjoy nowadays. It's a remarkable that they actually from the 8th century, so they're over a thousand years old, but they look remarkably fresh. So let's take a look. There is no way cookies would ever last more than a thousand years anywhere near me, but apparently the British Museum staff has a little more self control. Yes, we really did see cookies that old and they were beautiful and almost modern looking and not crumbly at all. Amazing in so many different ways. And as you may have guessed by now, that's what this episode is all about. The amazing cookie, or biscuit, as is known in my homeland, I am Nikola twillie, British transplant to the U.S., and I'm Cynthia graber, and this is gastropod. The podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history, and I'm the American who has always called them cookies. But that transatlantic linguistic variation is just a tiny part of the cookies contribution to the English language. Cracker barrels slush funds, they're all cookie related, as is the British term for the Republicans, the stories behind all these words will be revealed, as well as why the earliest biscuits were invented. Hint, it has to do with battles, beer, and bread. All that, plus the true story behind the creation of the chocolate chip cookie. I warn you now, you will not want to listen to this episode without a cookie or two in hand. Even if you're not.

Nikola twillie Cynthia graber British Museum U.S.
"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"nikola twillie" Discussed on Gastropod

"For millions of Californians all around the state, 2022 will be the year that forever changes how we deal with waste. Here's top of an orange. Here's some egg shells. Starting January 1st, a new law across California will require every person and business to recycle all of their organic material. It's a way to make sure that things we waste don't go to waste. This is really the kick in the seat of the pants that we needed as a community as a region to build the infrastructure. I'm Brian white from news 8. I live in the Golden State of California, and so I woke up on January 1st, 2022 to a whole bunch of headlines like this about how everything was about to change. There were all these brand new rules about throwing away food scraps, and everyone was about to be kicked in the rear end. Millions of Californians, like hundreds of millions of Americans, toss all their apple cores and moldy lettuce from the back of the fridge straight into the garbage. So why is that a problem? And what will California and maybe all the rest of us soon be doing instead? That's exactly what we're digging into this episode of gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Nikola twillie, and I'm Cynthia graber, and this episode we're exploring something that Nicki and I both happen to be kind of obsessed with, and that's compost. It's not glamorous, we know, but we're kind of crunchy at heart. You know that by now. So in theory, we love compost. In practice, it can be kind of hard to have a satisfying relationship with this episode why making compost is harder than it looks. Why it actually really matters, and what we can do to make the best use of all our food waste. And why doing something useful with our food waste is actually a solution for a whole bunch of problems at once. Not least of which is climate change. And to figure out the future of the food we throw away, we're going to visit some of the most high-tech facilities in the country, all that plus fruit sticker bingo and lots and lots of microbes. Drink this episode is sponsored in part by the Sloan foundation for the public understanding of science technology and economics. Gastropod is part of the vox media podcast network.

California Brian white Nikola twillie Cynthia graber Nicki apple Sloan foundation for the publi