4 Burst results for "Nikki Giovanni Sonia"

"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"He don't really hear it on this cut. But there was something that I kept thinking about as I listened to this album, and that's two thousand one space odyssey. Yeah. It reminded me so much of that film in so many different ways. I wanna play a little bit of a song called crawler. And you tell me what you think. It has that same strange celestial cosmic dissonance. And I think it's interesting because two thousand one space odyssey is about our quest for knowledge, and how that is sort of our undoing and it feels like this album is a little bit about that as well are how are seeking more and more knowledge power will be are alternate undoing and renders completely obsolete. We'll see I get the two thousand one reference, but I see at a different way two thousand one is also about interactions with an AI. Of course, how the the the lethal a on the spaceship and Holly Herndon his presenting interactions with artificial intelligence as a potentially healing thing almost positive thing and something that can connect us to our most human and even traditional cultural expressions for example, track displayed, Robin it's based partly and sacred harp. Singing the. Which of course, is the religious tradition of the most human kind of singing. So really her stated mission is to find a place where artifice intelligence can exist in proximity to an interaction with human beauty human love. I find this very very beautiful place to dwell. You know, all Holly heartedness, the artists are called proto. We could talk for the full half hour just about that one record. The let's go to the singer Jamila woods and her new album legacy legacy. Days. How? Best every home. On them. Service. Hilton. Sick onto. Is. Bye. You everything Joan. So you. Never. Hugh. Sure is a lot of good music in the world. This one comes from Jamila woods her album legacy legacy, and the song is called Zora. She is a singer poet teacher, and activist and this is sort of a concept album for her. Yes. Every track is named after another hero or hero. Win of hers. All major figures in African American cultural history. Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sanchez those are writers miles Davis Jean Michel Basquiat, the painter and in some ways so early into Jamila woods career is only our second full length album. This is a summation of her her mission, you know, because her work is very concerned with educating as you said with celebrating and steeping her listeners in the sensuality enjoy and power of this culture. You're the circuits really grand mission statement. And really it is a who I am and known largely as a collaborator chancellor apper chance to wrap. She's on macklemore. And Ryan she she has popped up as a featured guest bunch and has had collaborations go back and forth where people have appeared on hers, and it's a great session important moment right now for reclaiming these legacies. And I think her generation is very aware of the importance of that Jamila woods is the singer her new album is legacy legacy. We still have a few more elba's that we wanna play for this week's new music Friday. But first, let's take a short break, and we'll be right back support for this podcast and the following message come from Tito's handmade vodka born and bred in Austin, Texas, the live music capital of the world eighty proof Tito's handmade vodka fifth generation, inC,

Jamila woods Holly heartedness Holly Herndon Davis Jean Michel Basquiat Nikki Giovanni Sonia Ryan Tito chancellor Texas Joan Hugh Sanchez Austin Robin elba
The best new music this week: Jamila Woods

All Songs Considered

03:01 min | 1 year ago

The best new music this week: Jamila Woods

"Legacy. Days. How? Best every home. On them. Service. Hilton. Sick onto. Is. Bye. You everything Joan. So you. Never. Hugh. Sure is a lot of good music in the world. This one comes from Jamila woods her album legacy legacy, and the song is called Zora. She is a singer poet teacher, and activist and this is sort of a concept album for her. Yes. Every track is named after another hero or hero. Win of hers. All major figures in African American cultural history. Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sanchez those are writers miles Davis Jean Michel Basquiat, the painter and in some ways so early into Jamila woods career is only our second full length album. This is a summation of her her mission, you know, because her work is very concerned with educating as you said with celebrating and steeping her listeners in the sensuality enjoy and power of this culture. You're the circuits really grand mission statement. And really it is a who I am and known largely as a collaborator chancellor apper chance to wrap. She's on macklemore. And Ryan she she has popped up as a featured guest bunch and has had collaborations go back and forth where people have appeared on hers, and it's a great session important moment right now for reclaiming these legacies. And I think her generation is very aware of the importance of that Jamila woods is the singer her new album is legacy legacy. We still have a few more elba's that we wanna play for this week's new

Jamila Woods Davis Jean Michel Basquiat Nikki Giovanni Sonia Ryan Sanchez Joan Hugh Chancellor Elba
"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Historically groundbreaking. The entire suit sits within the teeth of the necklace and more than half a century since marvel comics I introduced the fictional African nation of what Kanda the film featured a new look that his itself become a cultural phenomenon. Ruth e Carter not only help bring to life. The latest iteration of the Black Panther suit. She also designed some fifteen hundred costumes for the film the goal. She says was to make fantasy familiar. We have to really base it on real life in order for people to believe it. It's not a place that we can make. So completely a fantasy that if feels like it's a Sifi or it's a fantastic place that no one could go to base it on so many rooted ideas, and cultural things that people feel like they can actually buy a ticket and fly to what conduct. To that end Carter researched and found inspiration in the real Africa. And it's people such as the doggone of Molly, the twelve in North Africa, the himba of Namibia, the costumes and the film in general. Also, celebrate the concept of afro future. Ism a blending of technology and futuristic themes with black history and culture harder points to the costume of renowned king to child his mother as one of her favorites, both are intricate crown and shoulder mantle were three d printed. We still really want to honor what the fans believe that will conduct is. And and in that way, it stays really rooted in the superhero realm in the comic Rome in the in the fantasy realm, but you know, this was an opportunity to take, you know, the afro future or the aesthetics of African diaspora and infuse it into this culture and. And bring it to life in that way, the process of creating superhero costumes is very different than tailoring a suit. And so that process was new to me. But as I got into it, I could see that. There were lots of things I could implement my ideas, and my art, but it's very intimidating at first intimidating until you got over. Do you get over Ruth Carter grew up in Springfield, Massachusetts in an artistic household? She was introduced to drama to after school programs and studied theater arts and design in college. Now, fifty eight her big break in Hollywood came through Spike Lee with whom she's worked on many films, including Malcolm X, which brought the first of her now three Oscar nominations at the time. She was the first African American to receive a nomination for costume design among her many other films. Steven Spielberg's almost dot. Ever. Do Bernice Selma and Lee Daniels the Butler, this is what Oprah's and then this was a so gains who was played by forest Whitaker. Who was the Butler? Some of her creations are still housed at the western costume company. A massive shop and warehouse in north Hollywood where we met in talked. I'm not sure that many people myself included understand your job. Costume designer. Yeah. How do you define it? A costume designer is a storyteller. She tells or he tells stories through wearable art, and it's not only just like buying a shirt and a jacket or creating something original. It's also giving it a little bit more of a story. It's just not to d a costume designers job does not end with a photograph or a sketch. There is that part that makes it a come alive, and and that's molding and shaping and creating a character composition color. Palette? All of those things come into play. This is not a field. This is not an industry that's been very inclusive. Yeah. Yeah. Why is that? What what did that mean for you coming up finding your way? I guess as I entered Hollywood. I didn't see very many people like me, even though I looked and researched. If there were and there was maybe one doing television. There was another person who was supervising, but not really in design capacity. And I was really firm that I wanted to be a costume designer once I landed in Hollywood beyond the individual films harder says she's felt a larger mission to help create an authentic portrait of African American people think I got into this industry because I like, you know, fashion and your, but it was really like James of Alwyn, Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sanchez told these rich stories that really made me want to get into theater, and what made me want to be a part of this. And I found that costume design was away where I could be an artist and a storyteller and contribute to a medium. That I felt had a had a great voice. So what is the Oscar nomination mean for you? I been reflecting on that quite a bit. It. It means that I'm an example to a lot of young girls who, wow, I'm getting choked up. You know, a lot of young girls who like me. Want this for themselves? This profession wanna get into it. And really kinda don't know how. But I may be forging their own way. I feel like I represent like that hope that they can go to the highest level. All right Ruth Carter. Congratulations to you. Thanks for talking to us. Thanks so much. And we'll continue our coverage of the Oscars later this week hearing from Regina king star of if Beale street could talk, and that's the news hour for tonight. I'm Judy Woodruff. Join us online and again here.

Ruth e Carter Hollywood Oscar Kanda Steven Spielberg Judy Woodruff Africa Spike Lee Namibia Massachusetts Malcolm X Molly Springfield Bernice Selma North Africa Lee Daniels Sanchez Oprah Nikki Giovanni Sonia
"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

Call Your Girlfriend

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"nikki giovanni sonia" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

"Begins to happen around each poem. Right. I mean in that that particular element of, oh, I'm surprised at the similarity here feels at least to me to be especially important in this political moment. And I'm wondering if you could talk a bit about being the poet laureate during this presidency in particular, I know you have not been poet laureate for under other presidencies. But but I mean for me like so much of your work addresses injustice or issues that I think are very much at the forefront and in the headlines right now and not that I think a poet laureate should necessarily be an activist or a newsy spokesperson. But I have to imagine that what's happening in the world informed. Some of the choices you make related to your position. Well, I think it's a really good time for poetry and. And it's exciting to be able to say to others. No, you do need this. You do need this in your life. And I just thinking about myself, I turn to the page when I have a question of fear and anxiety or a wish and this is the time when that's full of all of those things and in every direction, and it's exciting to be able to say, here's a poem that invites us to interrogate our relationship to this situation. Let's let's let's do that together. I feel like language is something that we should always be mindful of and I feel like it's not it's not even an an administration. But I think it's the the world that we live in that saying, oh, no, no. You don't have to sort through the intricacies of the grammar or word choice. Here. Just say this click on this. This is what you mean. And so I feel. Feel like the twenty first century has brought with it a whole host of invitations to let go of our thought process, let go of the rigor and the singularity of our unique perspectives. And I think that's dangerous for many reasons and a poem kind of it's almost like a little bit of exercise. That says words matter and the same old words aren't really going to be appropriate for you in your specific situation. So let's do the work to get to what it would take to tell you. What it feels like to be you? I think that can never be overvalued, right? Yeah. And it's interesting we are really living in an era of rhetorical shortcuts where it's like the leap from this word signals XYZ about intention without really thinking about on either side, whether using it or receiving it what what has gone into that. Phrasing. Is something that I've been thinking about there was like an obnoxious drunk man in a bar recently. Who used the term snowflake when he was like going off on something. And I was like, wow, you know, like like it's really interesting that that word which might have seemed to me kind of like poetic fifteen years ago to talk about a concept is like is. So is so politically loaded, and I'm like, oh, this tells me all these things about you. And they may or may not have been true. Right. But like when I heard that word, I was like, I think I know something more about you now. Yeah. That's the thing that really scares me all of the short hands even the little short hands at I've started popping up for me in my Email where I could either click on the prefabricated reply. I hate that time to write it out. All of this tells me that there is this urge coming from some place inviting us to think of others as something that needs to be processed out of our way or process so that we can be sure of who and what we're dealing with. Or who? What we're trying to persuade to our opinion. And I think it it's. It's the opposite of the empathy and compassion that probably could go along way toward solving some of the problems that we're at we're in the midst of right now, I find it frightening and dehumanizing that the options. Available to me are I can do the default ignoring of other people that has been validated by advertising, and by you know, all of the shorthand stuff in our world, or I could slow down and say, oh, actually, this is a person I could actually choose to see and consider and maybe even be changed or surprised by. I hate that. There's so many more voices telling us just process them just move past you need to get what you want you need to get where you're already late to be. And I think it's dangerous to that. And I would. I love to hear you talk about a poem that that stopped you or made you reconsider maybe like a rhetorical track that you had been on or something like that recently. I mean, it doesn't have to be like the best poem you read it the last six months kind of thing. But like, you know in the past week or two weeks what something to give you pause. Oh, I've I've been working on episodes for the slowdown my podcast, which is great because it means every day, I get to stop and say, I want to think deeply or just. Intentionally about life, and how this poem speaks to it. So there's a poem that came up recently called proximity by poet named Leo papura. It begins a man walks into a cafe, but it's not a joke proximity. A man walks into a coffee shop, but it's not a joke. I what coffee there last summer small with milk. It's never joke to walk in or out of shop, unharmed. It's easy to forget. You aren't a person being shot at I'm not I wasn't though. I was there last summer not shot at and I never knew it did not want think it thinking it. Now, the moment thins it sheers, and I moved back to other coffee shops where I never fell were blessed. And then I sit for awhile with my regular Cup in feel things collapse or go on. I can't tell. We live at such a great proximity to danger into violence and deter. It's a quiet poem that uses conversational language to remind me that you know, it's important to be grateful. And I think it's also a palm of grief, you know, very quietly under the surface for all the moments when people are not safe, Tracy. Thank you so much for being unclear girlfriend. Oh, thank you. It's been a real pleasure. Tracy case myth is the author of many books. Most recently the collection of poems. Wade in the water, and she also hosts the slowdown podcast, which you heard her mention that is all about seeing the world through poetry. And if you want a taste of what she is loving and reading in poetry right now, you can check out American journal fifty poems for our time, which she edited. Who are some poets that you are enjoying right now. It's funny question. Because like, maybe I'm like, wow. Now, I'm like thinking about I rely heavily. Unlike other people curated poetry for be in real time. I have a Nikki Giovanni collection that I got last year like one of her later like a later collection. I wanna say it's from the the late nineties that is about like, what was happening in in the political moment in the US. Like, there's a very embarrassing poem of her defending Bill Clinton. But but a lot of it is also about like her health and his kind of about the body, and like the frailty of the body and the collection is called Nikki Giovanni blues for all the changes. I love. What about you? I have been on a very strong June. Jordan kick, we June Jordan was an activist and poet and a playwright and truly one of the like most amazing humans of her generation and of many generations. And you cannot go wrong picking like any collection by her. I mostly like ridding block women poets. I was like this is an education that I never got. And and it's something that again like for me has been very eye opening and healing. I've been reading a lot of Audrey Lord poems. I'm very familiar with like all of her other work. The poetry has never been. You mean like her essays? Yes, very familiar with her essays. And when actually when you to me the cancer journals when I was going through Kenza last. I know every time I say it. I'm like did we really do that? We did that. But anyway, I'm like, I really send you the cancer journals. This honestly, you sent me the cancer journals. But you didn't send them to me because we're like you have cancer. You're like read this one specific thing, you're like had annotated thing. And it was like I needed to read it in the moment. So we are not going to dismiss how amazing we were in the moment. Okay. He beat cancer last year. Anyway, I am very familiar with like Audrey lords essays, and like, you know, her big nonfiction ideas. And I realized that for somebody who is studied so much and I knew so much. I didn't know anything about her poetry. And it has really been amazing to to like. Oh, yeah, you're somebody who like euro up ads and essays and criticism. But also like you fully writing poems in here. And that has been that's been very very very cool on the contemporary front. I really been enjoying friend of the podcast. Morgan Parker is like what a voice like whatever ways. I love Morgan's brain. Yeah. You're right. It is like a different kind of reading speed. I just find that like reading poetry keeps you it like slows your brain down. And it also like stretches your mind a lot. 'cause you're like these words are doing a lot like what is happening, right. Like one word in a poem lifting so much doing so much work. Your like, your leg, we stand syntax. We stand stanzas. We. And pros why is going on here. It's like a lot. And I just find that like it's a different kind of reading. But also it opens your it opens, your your mind and your heart to something different. And it's like when I think about like who people's elect are the great American poets. I was actually I'm gonna tell you who like Lucille Clifton fuckin-. Great American poet, Audrey Lord. Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sandra Morgan Parker's IE Jones like great American poets. And so it is both like sad to be like my age. Like, oh, I fully don't know anything about this. And also like amazing to be like, I can I still have a lot to learn in life, and it is delightful. Yes. To that. See you on the internet. You'll see you on the internet. You can find us many places on the internet on our website. Call your girlfriend dot com. You can download the show anywhere. You listen to your faves more on apple podcast where we would love it. If you left us a review you can Email us at call. Why RG app at G dot com where on Instagram Twitter and Facebook, call why Archie you can even leave as short and sweet voice mail at seven one four six eight one two nine four three that them in one four six eight one. He why our theme song is by Robin. Original music is composed by Caroline penny. Packer wrecks our logos. Or by concede. Our associate producer is desperate Maria. Sippy. This podcast is close by.

Morgan Parker Audrey Lord Nikki Giovanni Tracy cancer Jordan anxiety US Bill Clinton Nikki Giovanni Sonia Facebook Lucille Clifton American journal Leo papura Audrey lords Caroline penny producer Sippy Packer