16 Burst results for "Nih Clinical Center"

"nih clinical center" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"And there's some terrific shows our first guest is dr anthony fauci and we're talking in a conversation. It was arranged by the ninety second street. Y and we're talking about a podcast. Did for audible called soldiers of science. A really interesting podcast. Four episode podcast. That's available now. And one of the people i interview in that show is dr fauci and briefly. What the story is is one. That's never been heard before by most people which is that during the vietnam war. All the doctors were automatically drafted as soon as they graduated. Med school talk. They were able however to apply to do their service in the public health service and especially at the nih if they were accepted by them but only the cream of the crop were accepted and it turned out to be an an unusual moment in the history of medicine in our country. It changed medicine completely. It's an amazing story. We'll hear a little bit from dr fauci about what it was like for him as he got the chance to go to the nih internship And keeping his fingers crossed. I guess that he might get a call. And then i got a phone call from someone who would ultimately be my mentor from bethesda maryland. Who is in the public health service in said. Congratulations were offering you a position at the nih. You will be a commissioned officer in the united states public health service starting in july of nineteen sixty eight. Do you accept and i said absolutely and that was it so we had the chance now to apply for a particular kind of research and interestingly he chose the most basic research he could find and what he experienced was not just basic research but the the element that made work at the nih during that time so extraordinary it was something that most researchers probably all researchers at that time didn't get to experience and that was the benefit of being in a laboratory. That was housed right at the nih hospital. It's called the nih. Clinical center is the largest research hospital in the world. And that's where my lab was. That's where my mentor was so i did have the extraordinary opportunity of on the one hand doing very basic research but on the other hand continuing to see patients on a daily basis. It was very very unusual. You would have the wards kira and literally within twenty five feet around the corner from the hospital beds were the laboratories where we were doing our experiments so it was a wonderful marriage between the bench and the bedside. I interviewed More than a dozen the scientists in that program who were physicians scientists. They were so good at it that out of the approximately two thousand doctors who were in that program nine of them became nobel prize winners so we have a joke among us so there has. There's mike brown joe goldstein. Harold varmus and bob left goodson. Tony vilocci the only dummy who didn't nobel prize was knee. So most of the time during the podcast you talked about soldiers of science but at the end of it was obviously an inevitably turned toward the covert crisis and there was a critical question that you wanted to ask him. Here it is. Can i ask when you get asked. Questions about herd immunity. Is there any confusion about the two basic ways to get their herd. Immunity is not something we don't want a habit something we have but we don't have it by people dying enbrel. That's the point. You can get hurt immunity that really painful way and you could get hurt immunity. The much less painful way the most painful way is that enough people get infected in sick that the majority of the population is now immune. The only difficult is that we know. Now that already we only have about ten to fifteen percent of the population's been infected and we've already lost three hundred thousand people if you want to wait until you get seventy to eighty percent of the population infected. You're gonna lose a couple of million people that's unacceptable the way to get the herd. Immunity is not allow people to get infected but to give them protection by a vaccine so rather than having seventy to eighty five percent of the people get infected vaccinate seventy to eighty five percent of the people..

dr fauci nih dr anthony fauci nih hospital Med school Clinical center bethesda joe goldstein vietnam Harold varmus bob left goodson Tony vilocci maryland mike brown united states confusion
"nih clinical center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on KOMO

"Obviously, you don't have one size fits all. But as I said in the past, and as you accurately quoted me The default position should be to try his best this possible within reason to keep the Children in school to get them back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the Children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know, are causing spread In a very, very profound way in a robust way. If you bring that down, you will then indirectly and ultimately protect the Children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board. So my feeling would be the same thing. If you look at the data, the spread among Children and from Children is not really very big at all, not like one would have suspected. So let's try to get the kids back. Let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and and just push the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid. And those other things that you know. Well, the bars the restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those of the things that drive the community spread, not the schools and and Dr Fletcher. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government Can't force everyone to take the vaccine. So what about schools? Companies? Employers? Can they mandate of vaccine like in other vaccines? You know any individual group command eight vaccines in certain ways, Martha, It's not. I believe going to come centrally. I don't want to get ahead of the game there, but I doubt that. That would happen. For example, right now, myself. I mean, I'm at the NIH Clinical Center. I'm a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influence of vaccine or I'm not gonna be able to see patients, so individual units be they hospitals or other organizations. Can do that. It's within their right to say. If you want to work with us, you're gonna have to get a vaccine. But that's not gonna be, I believe essentially mandated process and Dr Fauci, There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious to see disease specialists in Boston, telling The Boston Globe the same energy that was placed into development and distribution of a Corona virus vaccine should have been placed. In messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. We have to engage the community Martha because we do have a degree of anti vax to begin with. But then there's skepticism about this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process Of determining whether it works. Whether it's safe and effective, has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've got to get the community. The broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that, And how could be we be sure there won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine. Well, you know, Martha, the one thing you've got to admit that in any intervention, there might be a side effect The history of vaccine ology that we know for decades and decades. Is that when you talk about prolonged side effects that's very rare and the side effects that occurred that are beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that. Generally occur when you look at like 95% of the time between maybe 30 and 45 days, which is the exact reason why the FDA said that they would not want to go to issue and you a or approve anyway an emergency used organization until 60 days after half of the people in a trial Have gone from their last dose. So already the FDA has baked into the process, a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not gonna have a very late effect. Having said that also, you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over, you have one or two years of the trial follow up in addition to post trial follow up, so that's something that is very, very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay. Thanks So much for joining us this morning, Dr Fauci..

Martha Dr Fauci FDA Dr Fletcher government Boston NIH Clinical Center United States fever The Boston Globe
"nih clinical center" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on KOMO

"Obviously. You don't have one size fits all. But as I said in the past, and as you accurately quoted me, the default position should be to try his best this possible within reason to keep the Children in school to get them. Back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the Children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know, are causing spread in a very, very profound way in a robust way. If you bring that down, you will then indirectly and ultimately Protect the Children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board, so my feeling would be the same thing if you look at the data Spread among Children and from Children is not really very big at all, not like one would have suspected. So let's try to get the kids back. But let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and and just push the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid. And those other things that you know. Well, the bars The restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those of the things that drive the community spread, not the schools and and Dr Fletcher. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government Can't force everyone to take the vaccine. So what about schools? Companies? Employers? Can they mandate a vaccine? Like in other vaccines? You know, any individual group can mandate vaccines in certain ways, Martha, It's not. I believe going to come centrally. I don't want to get ahead of the game there, but I doubt that. That would happen. For example, right now, myself. I mean, I'm at the NIH Clinical Center. I'm a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influenza vaccine or I'm not gonna be able to see patients, so individual units be the hospitals or other organizations. Can't do that. It's within their right to say. If you want to work with us, you're gonna have to get a vaccine. But that's not gonna be, I believe essentially mandated process and Dr Fauci, There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious to see disease specialists in Boston, telling The Boston Globe the same energy that was placed into development and distribution of a Corona virus vaccine should have been placed. In messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. We have to engage the community Martha because we do have a degree of anti vax to begin with. But then there's skepticism about this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process Of determining whether it works. Whether it's safe and effective, has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've got to get the community. The broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that. And how could be we be sure there won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine? Well, you know, Martha, the one thing you've got to admit that in any intervention, there might be a side effect the history of vaccine ology that we know for decades and decades. Is that when you talk about prolonged side effects that's very rare and the side effects that occurred that are beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that. Generally occur when you look at like 95% of the time between maybe 30 and 45 days, which is the exact reason why the FDA said that they would not want to go to issue and you a or approve anyway and emergency used organization until 60 days after half of the people in a trial Have gone from their last dose. So already the FDA has baked into the process, a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not gonna have a very late effect. Having said that also, you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over, you have one or two years of the trial follow up in addition to post trial follow up, so that's something that is very, very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay. Thanks So much for joining us this morning, Dr Fauci. It's always great to see you. We'll be right back after this from our ABC stations. Show your home.

Martha Dr Fauci FDA Dr Fletcher government ABC Boston United States NIH Clinical Center fever The Boston Globe
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

14:07 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Dire dire warnings warnings advising advising against against Thanksgiving Thanksgiving gatherings. gatherings. We We also also saw saw record record breaking breaking travel, travel, and and today we expect to break another record as millions of Americans are making their way home. This is just a snapshot of some of the nation's busiest airports this morning, but it is not just those lines at the airport that air causing fear. It is the images of these shocking lines across the country. Americans lined up for food. With the vaccine not widely available until next year. Businesses remain shuttered and more than 20 million people are claiming unemployment benefits. Dr Anthony Fauci is standing by, but first we wanted to take a closer look. There's critical moment and those struggling in the long shadow of the pandemic. We still have months of This battle ahead of US President elect Joe Biden, warning that the fight against Cove it is far from over. We have to try to slow the growth of this farmers. We all went to the doctors and the nurses and other frontline workers. It's about 2 30 in the morning. I just got home from work last March, when this all began, we talked to emergency room. Doctor Aaron Beaumont. All of the sudden we just got overwhelmed Ambulance after ambulance with Hypoxic patients people in respiratory distress. Dr. Beaumont, who works in the Boston area, has grown tragically used to the toll of this pandemic, but is bracing for a post holiday crush of patients at one of the constants that we've had throughout this pandemic since the beginning. Is the component of stress and fear that the health care workers in the front line providers are experiencing every single day or tired of this. We're exhausted, but the pandemic strange extend far beyond the halls of hospitals, months of economic hardship marking the start of the holiday season. That need evident across the country. Cars backed up for miles, people standing in line for hours, even in the rain just to get food. food. You You know, know, I'm I'm thinking thinking he's he's trying trying to to provide provide for for my my family family right right now now Networking Networking hunger hunger in in this this country country at at a a new new high high one one out out of of every every eight eight Americans say they sometimes don't have enough food to eat. For households with Children. It's one in six. I've never witnessed the system being more strange than it is right now just miles from my own home in Virginia Long lines here where they've seen a 45% increase in the family's coming for food executive director Charlie Main worries it could get worse. It can get very difficult at times watching These lines getting longer and longer. What do you expect in the coming months when county support federal support drops off, our families will come to us and even greater numbers, and that's my biggest fear. And you know we have to serve. All of those people were committed to serving everybody who comes to our doors. Joining me now now Live Live is is the the director director of of the National the National Institute Institute of Allergy of Allergy and and Infectious Infectious Diseases, Diseases, Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci. Fauci. Dr Dr Fauci. Fauci. Welcome Welcome back back to to this this week. week. Today Today could could be be the the busiest busiest travel travel day day in in the country the country since since the the start start of the of pandemic, the pandemic, even even though though you you and and other other public public health health leaders leaders have have made made appeal appeal after after appeal appeal for for people people to stay to stay put. put. And And distance distance as as much much as as possible. possible. When When you you watch watch these these scenes, scenes, what what do you do think? you think? And And what what else else can can you you possibly possibly say say to to them? them? Well, Well, I mean, I mean, the the travel travel that that has has been been done done has has been been done done right right now now is is people people go go back? back? We want We want to to urge urge them. them. If they've If they've been been in situations in situations outside outside of of the the family family setting setting in in which which they they really really don't don't know know the level the level of of exposure exposure to to be be really really careful careful when when you you either either return return from from the place the place that that you you went. went. Other Other people people come come back back into into your your house. house. That you've That you've really really got got to understand to understand the importance the importance of of trying trying to to prevent prevent further further spread spread and and further further surge surge that that maybe maybe when when you you go go back back to to where where you you came came from, from, if if it's it's possible possible to to quarantine quarantine yourself yourself for for a a period period of time, of time, or or even even get get tested tested to to make make sure sure That you're That you're not not bringing bringing infection infection back back to to another another place place being being another another home home or or another another family. family. Having Having said said that that we we have have to to be be careful careful now now because because they're they're almost almost certainly certainly is is going going to be to be an an uptick uptick because because of of what what has has happened happened with with the travel. the travel. We We understand. understand. The importance The importance of of family family is getting is getting together together and and it's it's just just something something that that we we have have to to deal deal with with that that we we likely likely will will have have an an increase increase in in cases cases as as we we get get into into the the colder colder weeks. weeks. Of the Of the winter. winter. And And as as we we approach approach the Christmas the Christmas season, season, please please don't don't forget forget the the standard standard public public health health measures measures that that we we talk talk about about The reason The reason I I say say that that a a moth moth and and and and almost almost plead plead with with people people is is that that we we do do know know That it That it does does work. work. Countries Countries that that have have mitigated mitigated have have turned turned around around the surge. the surge. States States that that have have mitigated mitigated have have had had a a turnaround turnaround of the of the inflection inflection of of the the curb. curb. So So it it does does work. work. And And as as we've we've just just heard, heard, help help is is on on the the way way Vaccines Vaccines a a really really right right on on the the horizon. horizon. Will Will be be having having vaccines vaccines available available for for the the higher higher priority priority people people towards towards the the middle middle and and end end of of December December and and as as we we get get into into January January and and February, February, so so everyone everyone is is totally totally empathetic. empathetic. About About the the fatigue fatigue that that everyone everyone is is feeling. feeling. But But if we if we can can hang hang in in there, there, hang hang in in there there a a bit bit longer longer and and do do the fundamental the fundamental things things wearing wearing of of mask mask uniformly uniformly avoiding avoiding crowds crowds and and congregate congregate settings, settings, keeping keeping physical physical distance distance washing washing your your hands. hands. They They seem seem simple simple in in the the enormity enormity of of the problem. the problem. That we're That we're facing, facing, But But they they do do make make a a difference. difference. Dr. Dr. Fauci Fauci pleaded pleaded before before the the beginning. beginning. Yeah, Yeah, Doc Doc Doctor Doctor Fauci. Fauci. You You have have said said that that again again and and again again and and again. again. We We saw saw all all those those people people traveling. traveling. So So you you know know what's what's coming. coming. And And with with Christmas Christmas just just around around the corner, the corner, do do you you think think will will be be under under the the same same restrictions restrictions that that you you recommended? recommended? On Thanksgiving On Thanksgiving going going into into Christmas. Christmas. You You know, know, Martha, Martha, I I can't can't see see how how we're we're not not gonna gonna have have the the same same thing thing because because when when you you have have the the kind kind of inflection of inflection that that we we have, have, it it doesn't doesn't all of all of a sudden a sudden turn turn around around like like that. that. So So clearly, clearly, in in the the next next few few weeks, weeks, we're we're gonna gonna have have the the same same sort sort of thing. of thing. And And perhaps perhaps even even two two or or three three weeks weeks down down the the line, line, Martha, Martha, we we may may see see a a surge surge upon upon a a surge. surge. You You know, we know, we don't don't want want to frighten to frighten people. people. But But that's that's just just the the reality. reality. We We said said that that these these things things would would happen. happen. As we As we got got into into the the cold cold weather, weather, and and as as we we began began traveling, traveling, and and they've they've happened, happened, it's it's gonna gonna happen happen again. again. So So I I cannot cannot see see all all of of a a sudden sudden a a relax relax ation ation of of the kinds the kinds of of recommendations recommendations or or restrictions restrictions because because we're we're getting getting into into colder colder weather weather and and enough enough in in even even larger larger holiday holiday season season as as people people travel travel to to come come back back and and forth. forth. For Christmas, For Christmas, so so I I don't don't see see a a relax relax ation ation of of the kind the kind of of recommendations recommendations and and restrictions restrictions that that we've we've made. made. And And Dr Dr Factually. Factually. The Supreme The Supreme Court Court on on Wednesday Wednesday struck struck down down New New York's York's Covad Covad restrictions restrictions on on religious religious gatherings gatherings in in the state. the state. How How concerned concerned are you are you about about legal legal challenges challenges to to pandemic pandemic restrictions restrictions going going forward? forward? Well, Well, I I mean, mean, they they happened, happened, Martha. Martha. There's There's nothing nothing I I could could do about do about it. it. I I just just keep keep saying saying that that when when people people ask ask me me for for Opinions Opinions of of specific specific things things rather rather than than make make a a comment comment on on a a specific specific things. things. I I could could just just say say it it doesn't doesn't matter matter who who you you are are where where you you are, are, when when you have you have congregate congregate settings, settings, particularly particularly indoors. indoors. When When people people are not are not wearing wearing masks, masks, that that is is a a considerable considerable risk risk for for acquisition acquisition and and spread spread of of infection, infection, no no matter matter what what the circumstances the circumstances that that is is a a risk. risk. And And you you said said there there should should be more be more regular regular testing testing available available for for asymptomatic asymptomatic people. people. How How soon soon do do you think you think before before Americans Americans could could have have inexpensive inexpensive home home tests? tests? And And why why haven't haven't they they so so far? far? Well, Well, I I hope hope it's it's sooner sooner rather rather than than later, later, Martha. Martha. I mean I mean they they obviously obviously we've we've done done better better in in testing testing than than we we did did early early on on in the in beginning. the beginning. But you're But you're talking talking about about different different kinds kinds and and different different motivations motivations and and different different objectives objectives of of testing. testing. If If you're you're trying trying to find to find out out if if a a person person is is infected infected either either for for contact contact tracing tracing or or what what have have you you then then you you want want a a highly highly sensitive sensitive test test that that might might take take a a day day or or two two to to get get a a result result back. back. When When you're you're trying trying to find to find out out what what the the extent extent of of the community the community spread spread is is that that is is driven driven very very clearly, clearly, at at least least in in part part by by asymptomatic asymptomatic spread, spread, so so we we need need to to know know the extent the extent of of the the asymptomatic. asymptomatic. The only The only way way you you know know that that is is what what you you just just asked asked for. for. And I And I would would like like to to have have seen seen it it already. already. And And I hope I hope that that we we get get it soon. it soon. Rapid, Rapid, sensitive, sensitive, specific specific home home testing testing even even one one that that you you might might not not even even need need a a prescription prescription for for so so that that people people can can have have within within their their own own power power to to know know whether whether or or not not it it is is in in his his highly highly sensitive sensitive is is the the other, other, but but it it is is very very helpful, helpful, particularly particularly if if you you do do it it over over and and over over again. again. I hope I hope we we get get that that soon. soon. And And Dr Dr Fauci Fauci in New in York New York City City Public Public school school shut shut down down again again earlier earlier this this month. month. I I know know your your default default position position is is that that you'd you'd like like to to see see the the skull skull schools schools open. open. But But how how do do you you make make that that happen? happen? And And how how would would you you advise advise the the incoming incoming Biden Biden administration administration on on getting getting a a sort sort of unified of unified response? response? Well, Well, you you know, know, Martha, Martha, that's that's a a good good question. question. We get We get asked asked that all that all the the time. time. You You know, we know, we say say it it not not being being facetiously facetiously as as a a sound sound bite bite or anything, or anything, but but you you know, know, Closed Closed the boss the boss and and keep keep the the school's school's open open is is what what we really we really say. say. Obviously, Obviously, you you don't don't have have one one size size fits fits all. all. But But as as I I said said in in the past, the past, and and as as you you accurately accurately quoted quoted me me The default The default position position should should be be to to try try his his best best this this possible possible within within reason reason to keep to keep the the Children Children in school in school to to get get them them back back to school. to school. The The best best way way to to ensure ensure the the safety safety of of the Children the Children in school in school is is to to get get the community the community level level of of spread spread low. low. So So if if you you mitigate mitigate the things the things that that you you know, know, are are causing causing spread spread In a In a very, very, very very profound profound way way in in a a robust robust way. way. If If you you bring bring that that down, down, you you will will then then indirectly indirectly and and ultimately ultimately protect protect the Children the Children in the in school the school because because the the community community level level is is determined determined how how things things go go across across the the board. board. So my So my feeling feeling would would be the be the same same thing. thing. If If you you look look at at the the data, data, the spread the spread among among Children Children and and from from Children Children is is not not really really very very big big at at all, all, not not like like one one would would have have suspected. suspected. So So let's let's try try to to get get the the kids kids back. back. But But let's let's try try to to mitigate mitigate the the things things that that maintain maintain and and and and just just push push the the kind kind of community of community spread spread that that we're we're trying trying to avoid. to avoid. And And those those other other things things that that you you know know well, well, the the bars bars the the restaurants restaurants where where you have you have capacity capacity seating seating indoors indoors without without masks. masks. Those Those of of the things the things that that drive drive the the community community spread, spread, not not the the schools schools and and and and Dr Dr fracture. fracture. You You talked talked about about the the vaccine vaccine and and the availability the availability of of the the vaccine. vaccine. The government The government Can't Can't force force everyone everyone to take to take the vaccine. the vaccine. So So what what about about schools? schools? Companies? Companies? Employers? Employers? Can Can they they mandate mandate of vaccine of vaccine like like in in other other vaccines? vaccines? You You know know any any individual individual group group command command eight eight vaccines vaccines in in certain certain ways, ways, Martha, Martha, It's It's not. not. I I believe believe going going to come to come centrally. centrally. I I don't don't want want to get to get ahead ahead of of the game the game there, there, but but I I doubt doubt that. that. That would That would happen. happen. For For example, example, right right now, now, myself. myself. I I mean, mean, I'm I'm at at the the NIH NIH Clinical Clinical Center. Center. I'm I'm a a physician. physician. I I see see patients. patients. I I have have to to get get the the influenza influenza vaccine vaccine or or I'm I'm not not gonna gonna be able be able to see to see patients, patients, so so individual individual units units be be they they hospitals hospitals or or other other organizations. organizations. Can't Can't do do that. that. It's It's within within their their right right to to say. say. If If you you want want to work to work with with us, us, you're you're gonna gonna have have to to get get a vaccine. a vaccine. But But that's that's not not going going to be, to be, I I believe, believe, essentially essentially mandated mandated process process and and Dr Dr Factory. Factory. There There are are concerns concerns about about the the anti anti vaccination vaccination movement movement and and infectious infectious to to see see disease disease specialists specialists in Boston, in Boston, telling telling the Boston the Boston Globe Globe the same the same energy energy that that was was placed placed into into development development and and distribution distribution of a of a Corona Corona virus. virus. Vaccine Vaccine should should have have been been placed placed in in messaging messaging and and community community engagement. engagement. Do you Do you agree agree with with that? that? Oh, Oh, absolutely. absolutely. We We have have to to engage engage the the community. community. Martha Martha B. B. Because Because we we do do have have a a degree degree of of anti anti vax vax to to begin begin with. with. But But then then there's there's skepticism skepticism about about this this vaccine. vaccine. So So we've we've got got to be to be able able to to get get out out there there get get community community people people who who the the community community trust trust to show to show two two things. things. The process The process of of the the development development of of this this vaccine vaccine has has been been one one that that has has been been scientifically scientifically sound sound safety safety has has not not been been compromised. compromised. Scientific Scientific integrity integrity has has not not been been compromised compromised and and the process the process Of determining Of determining whether whether it it works. works. Whether Whether it's it's safe safe and and effective, effective, has has been been independent independent by by independent independent bodies bodies and and transparent. transparent. We've We've got got to get to get the the community community the broad the broad community community of of the United the United States States to to see see that that and and appreciate appreciate that. that. And And how how could could be be we'd we'd be sure be sure there there won't won't be prolonged be prolonged side side effects effects from from this this vaccine. vaccine. Well, Well, you you know, know, Martin, Martin, the one the one thing thing you've you've got got to admit to admit that that in in any any intervention, intervention, there there might might be be a side a side effect. effect. The The history history of of vaccine vaccine ology ology that that we we know know for for decades decades and and decades. decades. Is that Is that when when you you talk talk about about prolonged prolonged side side effects effects that's that's very very rare rare and and the side the side effects effects that that occurred occurred that that are beyond are beyond the immediate the immediate pain pain in in the the arm arm and and the fever the fever and and things things like like that. that. Generally Generally occur occur when when you look you look at at like like 95% 95% of the of time the time between between maybe maybe 30 30 and and 45 45 days, days, which which is is the the exact exact reason reason why why the the FDA FDA said said that that they they would would not not want want Tonto Tonto issue issue and and you you a a or or approve approve anyway anyway and and emergency emergency use use organization organization until until 60 60 days days after after half half of of the the people people in in a a trial trial Have Have gone gone from from their their last last dose. dose. So So already, already, the the FDA FDA has has baked baked into into the the process, process, a a safety safety mechanism mechanism to to make make sure sure that that you you have have historically historically overwhelming overwhelming chance chance that that you're you're not not gonna gonna have have a a very very late late effect. effect. Having Having said said that that also, also, you you don't don't just just forget forget about about it. Once it. Once the the trial trial is is over, over, you you have have one one or or two two years years of of the the trial trial follow follow up. up. In In addition addition to to post post trial trial follow follow up up So that's So that's something something that that is is very, very, very very high high priority priority is is the the immediate immediate intermediate intermediate and and long long term term safety safety of of these these vaccines. vaccines. It's It's not not something something that's that's being being disregarded. disregarded.

Martha B. FDA Dr fracture Boston Boston Globe Dr Fauci government Dr Factory ABC NIH Clinical Center United States fever Martin Tonto
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:43 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"But as I said in the past, and as you accurately quoted me The default position should be to try his best this possible within reason to keep the Children in school to get them back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the Children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know, are causing spread In a very, very profound way in a robust way. If you bring that down, you will then indirectly and ultimately protect the Children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board. So my feeling would be the same thing. If you look at the data, the spread among Children and from Children is not really very big at all, not like one would have suspected. So let's try to get the kids back. But let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and and just push the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid. And those other things that you know well, the bars the restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those of the things that drive the community spread, not the schools and and Dr fracture. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government Can't force everyone to take the vaccine. So what about schools? Companies? Employers? Can they mandate of vaccine like in other vaccines? You know any individual group command eight vaccines in certain ways, Martha, It's not. I believe going to come centrally. I don't want to get ahead of the game there, but I doubt that. That would happen. For example, right now, myself. I mean, I'm at the NIH Clinical Center. I'm a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influenza vaccine or I'm not gonna be able to see patients, so individual units be they hospitals or other organizations. Can't do that. It's within their right to say. If you want to work with us, you're gonna have to get a vaccine. But that's not going to be, I believe, essentially mandated process and Dr Factory. There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious to see disease specialists in Boston, telling the Boston Globe the same energy that was placed into development and distribution of a Corona virus. Vaccine should have been placed in messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. We have to engage the community. Martha B. Because we do have a degree of anti vax to begin with. But then there's skepticism about this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process Of determining whether it works. Whether it's safe and effective, has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've got to get the community the broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that. And how could be we'd be sure there won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine. Well, you know, Martin, the one thing you've got to admit that in any intervention, there might be a side effect. The history of vaccine ology that we know for decades and decades. Is that when you talk about prolonged side effects that's very rare and the side effects that occurred that are beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that. Generally occur when you look at like 95% of the time between maybe 30 and 45 days, which is the exact reason why the FDA said that they would not want Tonto issue and you a or approve anyway and emergency use organization until 60 days after half of the people in a trial Have gone from their last dose. So already, the FDA has baked into the process, a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not gonna have a very late effect. Having said that also, you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over, you have one or two years of the trial follow up. In addition to post trial follow up So that's something that is very, very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay. Thanks so much for joining us this morning, Dr Fauci. It's always great to see you. We'll be right back after this from our ABC stations. More Americans.

Martha B. FDA Dr fracture Boston Boston Globe Dr Fauci government Dr Factory ABC NIH Clinical Center United States fever Martin Tonto
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

11:03 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Now Live is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr Anthony Fauci. Dr Fauci. Welcome back to this week. Today could be the busiest travel day in the country since the start of the pandemic, even though you and other public health leaders have made appeal after appeal for people to stay put. And distance as much as possible. When you watch these scenes, what do you think? And what else can you possibly say to them? Well, I mean, the travel that has been done has been done right now is people go back? We want to urge them. If they've been in situations outside of the family setting in which they really don't know the level of exposure to be really careful when you either return from the place that you went. Other people come back into your house. That you've really got to understand the importance of trying to prevent further spread and further surge that maybe when you go back to where you came from, if it's possible to quarantine yourself for a period of time, or even get tested to make sure That you're not bringing infection back to another place being another home or another family. Having said that we have to be careful now because they're almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel. We understand. The importance of family is getting together and it's just something that we have to deal with that we likely will have an increase in cases as we get into the colder weeks. Of the winter. And as we approach the Christmas season, please don't forget the standard public health measures that we talk about The reason I say that a moth and and almost plead with people is that we do know That it does work. Countries that have mitigated have turned around the surge. States that have mitigated have had a turnaround of the inflection of the curb. So it does work. And as we've just heard, help is on the way Vaccines a really right on the horizon. Will be having vaccines available for the higher priority people towards the middle and end of December and as we get into January and February, so everyone is totally empathetic. About the fatigue that everyone is feeling. But if we can hang in there, hang in there a bit longer and do the fundamental things wearing of mask uniformly avoiding crowds and congregate settings, keeping physical distance washing your hands. They seem simple in the enormity of the problem. That we're facing, But they do make a difference. Dr. Fauci pleaded before the beginning. Yeah, Doc Doctor Fauci. You have said that again and again and again. We saw all those people traveling. So you know what's coming. And with Christmas just around the corner, do you think will be under the same restrictions that you recommended? On Thanksgiving going into Christmas. You know, Martha, I can't see how we're not gonna have the same thing because when you have the kind of inflection that we have, it doesn't all of a sudden turn around like that. So clearly, in the next few weeks, we're gonna have the same sort of thing. And perhaps even two or three weeks down the line, Martha, we may see a surge upon a surge. You know, we don't want to frighten people. But that's just the reality. We said that these things would happen. As we got into the cold weather, and as we began traveling, and they've happened, it's gonna happen again. So I cannot see all of a sudden a relax ation of the kinds of recommendations or restrictions because we're getting into colder weather and enough in even larger holiday season as people travel to come back and forth. For Christmas, so I don't see a relax ation of the kind of recommendations and restrictions that we've made. And Dr Factually. The Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down New York's Covad restrictions on religious gatherings in the state. How concerned are you about legal challenges to pandemic restrictions going forward? Well, I mean, they happened, Martha. There's nothing I could do about it. I just keep saying that when people ask me for Opinions of specific things rather than make a comment on a specific things. I could just say it doesn't matter who you are where you are, when you have congregate settings, particularly indoors. When people are not wearing masks, that is a considerable risk for acquisition and spread of infection, no matter what the circumstances that is a risk. And you said there should be more regular testing available for asymptomatic people. How soon do you think before Americans could have inexpensive home tests? And why haven't they so far? Well, I hope it's sooner rather than later, Martha. I mean they obviously we've done better in testing than we did early on in the beginning. But you're talking about different kinds and different motivations and different objectives of testing. If you're trying to find out if a person is infected either for contact tracing or what have you then you want a highly sensitive test that might take a day or two to get a result back. When you're trying to find out what the extent of the community spread is that is driven very clearly, at least in part by asymptomatic spread, so we need to know the extent of the asymptomatic. The only way you know that is what you just asked for. And I would like to have seen it already. And I hope that we get it soon. Rapid, sensitive, specific home testing even one that you might not even need a prescription for so that people can have within their own power to know whether or not it is in his highly sensitive is the other, but it is very helpful, particularly if you do it over and over again. I hope we get that soon. And Dr Fauci in New York City Public school shut down again earlier this month. I know your default position is that you'd like to see the skull schools open. But how do you make that happen? And how would you advise the incoming Biden administration on getting a sort of unified response? Well, you know, Martha, that's a good question. We get asked that all the time. You know, we say it not being facetiously as a sound bite or anything, but you know, Closed the boss and keep the school's open is what we really say. Obviously, you don't have one size fits all. But as I said in the past, and as you accurately quoted me The default position should be to try his best this possible within reason to keep the Children in school to get them back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the Children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know, are causing spread In a very, very profound way in a robust way. If you bring that down, you will then indirectly and ultimately protect the Children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board. So my feeling would be the same thing. If you look at the data, the spread among Children and from Children is not really very big at all, not like one would have suspected. So let's try to get the kids back. But let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and and just push the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid. And those other things that you know well, the bars the restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those of the things that drive the community spread, not the schools and and Dr fracture. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government Can't force everyone to take the vaccine. So what about schools? Companies? Employers? Can they mandate of vaccine like in other vaccines? You know any individual group command eight vaccines in certain ways, Martha, It's not. I believe going to come centrally. I don't want to get ahead of the game there, but I doubt that. That would happen. For example, right now, myself. I mean, I'm at the NIH Clinical Center. I'm a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influenza vaccine or I'm not gonna be able to see patients, so individual units be they hospitals or other organizations. Can't do that. It's within their right to say. If you want to work with us, you're gonna have to get a vaccine. But that's not going to be, I believe, essentially mandated process and Dr Factory. There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious to see disease specialists in Boston, telling the Boston Globe the same energy that was placed into development and distribution of a Corona virus. Vaccine should have been placed in messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. We have to engage the community. Martha B. Because we do have a degree of anti vax to begin with. But then there's skepticism about this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process Of determining whether it works. Whether it's safe and effective, has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've got to get the community the broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that. And how could be we'd be sure there won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine. Well, you know, Martin, the one thing you've got to admit that in any intervention, there might be a side effect. The history of vaccine ology that we know for decades and decades. Is that when you talk about prolonged side effects that's very rare and the side effects that occurred that are beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that. Generally occur when you look at like 95% of the time between maybe 30 and 45 days, which is the exact reason why the FDA said that they would not want Tonto issue and you a or approve anyway and emergency use organization until 60 days after half of the people in a trial Have gone from their last dose. So already, the FDA has baked into the process, a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not gonna have a very late effect. Having said that also, you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over, you have one or two years of the trial follow up. In addition to post trial follow up So that's something that is very, very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay. Thanks so much for joining us this morning, Dr Fauci. It's always great to see you. We'll be right

Martha Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute of Allergy asymptomatic New York Virginia executive director Charlie Main Covad director Biden Supreme Court City Public school
Christmas and New Year’s restrictions will be necessary due to holiday coronavirus wave, says Dr. Fauci

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

11:03 min | 3 months ago

Christmas and New Year’s restrictions will be necessary due to holiday coronavirus wave, says Dr. Fauci

"Now Live is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr Anthony Fauci. Dr Fauci. Welcome back to this week. Today could be the busiest travel day in the country since the start of the pandemic, even though you and other public health leaders have made appeal after appeal for people to stay put. And distance as much as possible. When you watch these scenes, what do you think? And what else can you possibly say to them? Well, I mean, the travel that has been done has been done right now is people go back? We want to urge them. If they've been in situations outside of the family setting in which they really don't know the level of exposure to be really careful when you either return from the place that you went. Other people come back into your house. That you've really got to understand the importance of trying to prevent further spread and further surge that maybe when you go back to where you came from, if it's possible to quarantine yourself for a period of time, or even get tested to make sure That you're not bringing infection back to another place being another home or another family. Having said that we have to be careful now because they're almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel. We understand. The importance of family is getting together and it's just something that we have to deal with that we likely will have an increase in cases as we get into the colder weeks. Of the winter. And as we approach the Christmas season, please don't forget the standard public health measures that we talk about The reason I say that a moth and and almost plead with people is that we do know That it does work. Countries that have mitigated have turned around the surge. States that have mitigated have had a turnaround of the inflection of the curb. So it does work. And as we've just heard, help is on the way Vaccines a really right on the horizon. Will be having vaccines available for the higher priority people towards the middle and end of December and as we get into January and February, so everyone is totally empathetic. About the fatigue that everyone is feeling. But if we can hang in there, hang in there a bit longer and do the fundamental things wearing of mask uniformly avoiding crowds and congregate settings, keeping physical distance washing your hands. They seem simple in the enormity of the problem. That we're facing, But they do make a difference. Dr. Fauci pleaded before the beginning. Yeah, Doc Doctor Fauci. You have said that again and again and again. We saw all those people traveling. So you know what's coming. And with Christmas just around the corner, do you think will be under the same restrictions that you recommended? On Thanksgiving going into Christmas. You know, Martha, I can't see how we're not gonna have the same thing because when you have the kind of inflection that we have, it doesn't all of a sudden turn around like that. So clearly, in the next few weeks, we're gonna have the same sort of thing. And perhaps even two or three weeks down the line, Martha, we may see a surge upon a surge. You know, we don't want to frighten people. But that's just the reality. We said that these things would happen. As we got into the cold weather, and as we began traveling, and they've happened, it's gonna happen again. So I cannot see all of a sudden a relax ation of the kinds of recommendations or restrictions because we're getting into colder weather and enough in even larger holiday season as people travel to come back and forth. For Christmas, so I don't see a relax ation of the kind of recommendations and restrictions that we've made. And Dr Factually. The Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down New York's Covad restrictions on religious gatherings in the state. How concerned are you about legal challenges to pandemic restrictions going forward? Well, I mean, they happened, Martha. There's nothing I could do about it. I just keep saying that when people ask me for Opinions of specific things rather than make a comment on a specific things. I could just say it doesn't matter who you are where you are, when you have congregate settings, particularly indoors. When people are not wearing masks, that is a considerable risk for acquisition and spread of infection, no matter what the circumstances that is a risk. And you said there should be more regular testing available for asymptomatic people. How soon do you think before Americans could have inexpensive home tests? And why haven't they so far? Well, I hope it's sooner rather than later, Martha. I mean they obviously we've done better in testing than we did early on in the beginning. But you're talking about different kinds and different motivations and different objectives of testing. If you're trying to find out if a person is infected either for contact tracing or what have you then you want a highly sensitive test that might take a day or two to get a result back. When you're trying to find out what the extent of the community spread is that is driven very clearly, at least in part by asymptomatic spread, so we need to know the extent of the asymptomatic. The only way you know that is what you just asked for. And I would like to have seen it already. And I hope that we get it soon. Rapid, sensitive, specific home testing even one that you might not even need a prescription for so that people can have within their own power to know whether or not it is in his highly sensitive is the other, but it is very helpful, particularly if you do it over and over again. I hope we get that soon. And Dr Fauci in New York City Public school shut down again earlier this month. I know your default position is that you'd like to see the skull schools open. But how do you make that happen? And how would you advise the incoming Biden administration on getting a sort of unified response? Well, you know, Martha, that's a good question. We get asked that all the time. You know, we say it not being facetiously as a sound bite or anything, but you know, Closed the boss and keep the school's open is what we really say. Obviously, you don't have one size fits all. But as I said in the past, and as you accurately quoted me The default position should be to try his best this possible within reason to keep the Children in school to get them back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the Children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know, are causing spread In a very, very profound way in a robust way. If you bring that down, you will then indirectly and ultimately protect the Children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board. So my feeling would be the same thing. If you look at the data, the spread among Children and from Children is not really very big at all, not like one would have suspected. So let's try to get the kids back. But let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and and just push the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid. And those other things that you know well, the bars the restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those of the things that drive the community spread, not the schools and and Dr fracture. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government Can't force everyone to take the vaccine. So what about schools? Companies? Employers? Can they mandate of vaccine like in other vaccines? You know any individual group command eight vaccines in certain ways, Martha, It's not. I believe going to come centrally. I don't want to get ahead of the game there, but I doubt that. That would happen. For example, right now, myself. I mean, I'm at the NIH Clinical Center. I'm a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influenza vaccine or I'm not gonna be able to see patients, so individual units be they hospitals or other organizations. Can't do that. It's within their right to say. If you want to work with us, you're gonna have to get a vaccine. But that's not going to be, I believe, essentially mandated process and Dr Factory. There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious to see disease specialists in Boston, telling the Boston Globe the same energy that was placed into development and distribution of a Corona virus. Vaccine should have been placed in messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that? Oh, absolutely. We have to engage the community. Martha B. Because we do have a degree of anti vax to begin with. But then there's skepticism about this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process Of determining whether it works. Whether it's safe and effective, has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've got to get the community the broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that. And how could be we'd be sure there won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine. Well, you know, Martin, the one thing you've got to admit that in any intervention, there might be a side effect. The history of vaccine ology that we know for decades and decades. Is that when you talk about prolonged side effects that's very rare and the side effects that occurred that are beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that. Generally occur when you look at like 95% of the time between maybe 30 and 45 days, which is the exact reason why the FDA said that they would not want Tonto issue and you a or approve anyway and emergency use organization until 60 days after half of the people in a trial Have gone from their last dose. So already, the FDA has baked into the process, a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not gonna have a very late effect. Having said that also, you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over, you have one or two years of the trial follow up. In addition to post trial follow up So that's something that is very, very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay. Thanks so much for joining us this morning, Dr Fauci. It's always great to see you. We'll be right

Dr Fauci Martha Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Fauci Doc Doctor Fauci National Institute Of Allergy Nih Clinical Center Supreme Court Dr Factory See Disease Boston Globe Biden Martha B. New York New York City Influenza Boston FDA
"nih clinical center" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

05:11 min | 3 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

"I hope we get that soon. And dr fauci new york city public schools shut down again earlier this month. I know your default position is that you'd like to see this schools open. But how do you make that happen. And how would you advise the incoming biden administration on getting a sort of unified response. Well that's a good question. We get asked it all the time you know we say at not being facetiously as a sound bite or anything but you know close the boss and keep the schools open is what we really say. Obviously you don't have one-size-fits-all. But as i said in the past and as you accurately quoted me the default position should be to try as best as possible within reason to keep the children in school with to get them back to school. The best way to ensure the safety of the children in school is to get the community level of spread low. So if you mitigate the things that you know are causing spread in a very very profound way a robust way if you bring that down you will then indirectly and ultimately protect the children in the school because the community level is determined how things go across the board so my feeling would be the same thing if you look at the data the spread among children and from children is not really very big at all not like one would have suspected so. Let's try to get the kids back. But let's try to mitigate the things that maintain and just pushed the kind of community spread that we're trying to avoid and those other things that you know well the bars the restaurants where you have capacity seating indoors without masks. Those are the things that drive. The community spread not the schools and fauci. You talked about the vaccine and the availability of the vaccine. The government can't force everyone to take the vaccine so what about schools companies employers can. They mandate a vaccine in other vaccines. You know any individual group can mandate vaccines in certain ways martha. It's not i believe gonna come centrally. I don't wanna get ahead of the game there. But i doubt that that would happen for example right now myself. I mean i'm at the nih clinical center a physician. I see patients. I have to get the influenza vaccine. Or i'm not going to be able to see patients so individual units be they hospitals or other organizations can do that. It's within their right to say if you wanna work with us. You're going to have to get a vaccine. But that's not going to be. I believe essentially mandated process in dr fauci. There are concerns about the anti vaccination movement and infectious disease specialist in boston telling the boston globe. The same energy that was placed into development and distribution of coronavirus vaccine should have been placed in messaging and community engagement. Do you agree with that. Oh absolutely we have to engage the community martha because we do have a degree of anti vaccine to begin with but then their skepticism. About this vaccine. So we've got to be able to get out there. Get community people who the community trust to show two things. The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound. Safety has not been compromised. Scientific integrity is not been compromised and the process of determining whether it works whether it's safe and effective has been independent by independent bodies and transparent. We've gotta get the community the broad community of the united states to see that and appreciate that. And how can we be sure. There won't be prolonged side effects from this vaccine. Well marked the one thing. You've got to that any intervention. There might be side effect. The history of vaccine that we know for decades and decades is that when you talk about prolonged side effects this very rare and the side effects that occurred that a beyond the immediate pain in the arm and the fever and things like that generally occur when you look at like ninety five percent of the time between maybe thirty and forty five days which is the exact reason why the fda said they would not want to have to issue an e. u. a or approve an e you a use authorisation until sixty days after half of the people in a trial have gone from there last dose so already. The fda has baked into the process a safety mechanism to make sure that you have historically overwhelming chance that you're not going to have a very late effect having said that also you don't just forget about it. Once the trial is over you have one or two years of the trial follow up in addition to post trial follow up. So that's something that is very very high priority is the immediate intermediate and long-term safety of these vaccines. It's not something that's being disregarded. Okay thanks so much for joining us. This morning dr fauci. It's always great to see you up next..

dr fauci biden york nih influenza boston united states martha boston globe fever e. u.
"nih clinical center" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

07:55 min | 8 months ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"DOT ORG but I really wanted to let you guys get to know. Kevin because this has been such a passion project of mine, because if it's. Really on my own had quite in evolution in my view of nutrition as you can tell you financial media so I I just I wanted to. Just have Kevin kind of chocolate lab himself and his own kind of journey nutrition. What he's done research on Kevin. If you don't mind for anyone that follow me on social media and hasn't gotten to know you through instagram or twitter yet, Can you give everyone a bit of a summary Expanded summary about you and kind of? Nutrition, the first place for. I gotTA nutrition back in high school. I actually ended up losing eighty five pounds in about a year's time over enduring high school, and I had been really interested in just you know how despite the viewpoints were online, and how everybody had sort of religious zeal for their favorite diet, and that sort of evolved as I went to college and I ended up changing to being science major, and I think you know it's kind of funny when I look back on it now i? Came into college languages major like Talian. I took Italian Latin and Chinese and high school and I was like Oh have to keep on with this and part of with languages. There's so much that's like lost in translation. I remember I went to Catholic school when I was very interested in how the Bible was translated over time, and how things were interpreted. Nutrition has so much about where there's a lot gets lost in translation, or can get the the ambiguous things can get still down into something overly dogmatic when things are translated and. So as I progress through my undergrad science career. I realized that was going to I. wanted to be not only just an need. The clinical nutrition but I also wanted to do more research and something a little bit more intense are already credential as a great and are these are amazing, but their expertise is really in the clinical and practical aspects, succeeding and a lot of the nutrition science metabolism at a little bit more advanced level is more something. You need to get so I sat out on a path, and ultimately after a bit of a long narrow road of anybody has questions how to become Nardi and finish. A PhD can chat about with me. Quick question interrupt you on that I actually don't know the answer to so when you so you went from Undergrad Cheer PhD. Did you do your dietetic internship after your each year before? How did that work I? My so I? I did my Undergrad in. It's technically in biological anthropology, because my Undergrad did not have a dietetic program or even a nutrition science degree, but I was able to take most of the core all of the core science courses. And doing that, I think that. An anthrax gave me like a pretty profound appreciation for the ability of humans to adapt to a wide array of environments which I think still colors. My perspective on nutrition today I spent a lot of time in my anthropology Undergrad just like learning about all the Food Anthropology, and how anthropologists had done work in different indigenous populations across the globe and what their diets were on how? How resilient are and then so I did one year a masters DVD, program, although it did not finish the masters, I just took a bunch of the DVD courses, and then I went into Cornell's PhD, and then I applied for dietetic internships at the end of my PhD, which son to be writing a dissertation that applying for Daikin Digits but then I did my diy at. The NIH clinical center, which is like doing clinical, but in a research population. And then I moved to of medicine. Which is where I'm currently at now in the apartment of Pediatrics, and then I also moonlight in that department of saw Molecular Biology, but my dissertation research was largely sort of at the at was in a lab that was interested in metabolic pathways, called one carbon metabolism, and that's where a lot of vitamins intersect as well as nutrients choline so it. It was fun I wanted to do something like that. Because it would allow me to sit at the sort of a metabolic hub. I guess you could say where you link into Lipid. Metabolism and fossil Matab wasn't vitamin, metabolism and number of vitamins. Most people in their page nutritional study like one vitamin are one. But I was fortunate enough to kind of get to. This gets his study, a number of different nutrients and metabolic pathway is I got to do some work on colleen and pregnancy and then I also did some work on different types of. Fatty acids both a mega three fatty acids, but also different types of saturated fatty acids, pending chain link and yet took me and my clinical time. I also did some resources well in. Just childhood malnutrition in types of rare cancers and emerging immunotherapy is which spun and the now I have sort of continued on with my dissertation work. Sort of straddling still. In my pitch deck to working both fell on animal models as well as in human feeding and supplementation trials and. Trying to keep that up now still so it's sort of fun to spend the the whole spectrum. Usually, ability to do research, basic scientists in clinical stuff is reserved for more MD PhD's. So I feel pretty lucky that there's an opportunity as an already pitch to to get to engage knaw that I think that's a really good point, and there's a lot of. Medical Students, but of course, also a ton of UNDERGRAD students that listen to my podcast and i. think that you and Nikola guests have been to RTP. I've become very close within and learned a lot from both and I think it's interesting for everyone who's listening Buren Collagen. You're exploring health sciences to think about it. I don't think that it comes to top of people's radar. You know and I think it's a really nice combination where you get the clinical work and the research aspect of it and you get to. Do the Combo kind of has the best of both worlds I think the training like combined page in Attrition Science. And then the RD is really ideal for tackling a lot of issues that we're thinking about nutrition. It's certainly an uphill battle. And I always joked that the PSG artie combined gets me just a little bit less respect than an md alone, but you kind of have to earn your you have. Two people have a perception of dietetic particularly because it grew out of a field of home economics, so it sort of. Uphill Battle of like the old school ideologies that nutrition science like the Boys Cup Biochemistry and The the home econ. Field and there's obvious sexists routes that come into there, so straddling two has a. it's not done all that often. They're only you know there's a handful of. That you can see over time who really pulled in substantial grant money and have been involved in a lot of the major feeding studies and a lot of the major even social determinants of health kind of research there, but the NIH doesn't necessarily love like. More than fifty definitely don't compete with. MD's necessarily in the grant writing process, so there is still much like a nurse. Practitioner has had to advocate for themselves and veterinary medical doctors had advocate for themselves as growing Who are advocating like no, we have a very unique perspective that we can add to the scientific process and. I'm happy to be a part that group of growing folks who are trying to make sure that people realize that there is a unique expertise brought by the. Combined Synthesis of these sort of programs I'm. That's a free point. I think that especially with regards to you having both clinical experience plus your extensive research experience I mean your understanding..

Kevin NIH MD DOT instagram Attrition Science twitter Food Anthropology anthrax Nardi colleen Cornell Nikola Daikin artie
"nih clinical center" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

15:06 min | 1 year ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Five yes and you can also hear is by asking Alexa to play the program conversations on health. now stay tuned for our interview a doctor Diana beyond here on conversations on health we're speaking today with doctor Bianchi director the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for child health and human development part of the United States National Institute of health Dr Bianchi served as the founding director of the mother infant research institute at the tufts floating hospital for children at tufts Medical Center where she also is a professor of pediatrics obstetrics and gynecology Dr Bianchi has done extensive research on prenatal genomics cheered her medical degree from Stanford did her residency in pediatrics at Boston children's interpose stock fellowship in genetics at Harvard Medical School Dr Bianchi welcome to conversations on health care thank you very much you oversee one point five billion dollar budget for research which is aimed at improving child health it's bolstering maternal health in prenatal care all the way through adulthood help our listeners understand the real scope of the work and then I C. H. T. and how your strategic plan is taking the agencies work into the future sure first of all the national institutes of health or the largest funders of biomedical research in the world and there are twenty seven yes yeah. in I. C. H. D. is one of those twenty seven institutes and were named for president can be sister Eunice who convinced her brother that there was a great need to develop an incident that was specifically focused on children and on people with intellectual disabilities about fifty five percent of our research dollars go to child health research thirty percent goes to reproductive health research and the remainder goes to research for people with intellectual and physical disability and as part of our strategic planning process we created a new mission statement so our new mission statement is that that and I see it Steve needs research and training I understand human development improves reproductive health enhance the lives of children adolescents and optimize abilities for all. the doctor be accurate like to just dive right in and focus on the issue of maternal health because we are seeing such alarming data maternal mortality in this country appears to be a particularly dire issue for women of color share with us about this trend and what are the interventions that are necessary to address this public health problem and resolve what really is just a terrible example of inequity in health care outcomes this is a public health crisis sadly about seven hundred women in the United States each year died of complications related to childbirth data has shown that three out of five of these deaths are actually preventable so that's where we need to really target our work their significant racial and ethnic disparities in the rates of maternal mortality for example black women are three times more likely to experience a death around childhood than white women and also Alaskan native women and American Indian women have a nine two and a half times the rate of white women about half the grossness country are covered by state Medicaid programs and that coverage right now ends at sixty days after childbirth recent data have shown the complications of childbirth actually occur up to a year following the delivery the baby so there's this gap in time and women are not going to the doctor and so problems that could be detected if they were going to the doctor cannot be treated and that is a major problem so what in the C. H. D. is trying to do is focus research aimed at preventing or treating many of the complications of childbirth pregnancy and this post partum period and these include for example hemorrhage infection hypertension and can read result in. yeah zero we've also invested about eighty million dollars and something called the human placenta project we've all been connected to a placenta and one time in our lives but it actually functions as the organ that is providing your oxygen taking away you waste products and giving you traction during your feet a lot so the human placenta project is aimed at detecting problems that are going on during the pregnancy so that you can prevent complications later on we are now recognizing that there are abnormalities that you can see as early as the first trimester which will give us an opportunity to intervene so by studying pregnant women which we do actually through our maternal fetal medicine units around the country we are able to contribute to the lifelong health of these women well the sort of pulling the thread on that you're continuing also in the area of maternal health to sort of focus in on medications that women are prescribed during pregnancy and you know that's not an area that is well researched and the the N. I C. H. D. is maybe instructed or working with Congress as a mandated task force over the past couple of years to look at the issue and I'm wondering if you could shine a light on the goals of the task force in its current status we actually were directed as part of the twenty first century sure is acting as a very large piece of legislation that was signed into law at the very end of twenty sixteen and one of its provision was to create this task force analyze research specific to pregnant women and lactating women because on average about ninety percent of pregnant women take at least one medication during their pregnancy and most women take between three and five during their pregnancy and those medications in general have not been tested in or labeled specifically. for pregnant or breast feeding women and there's this old school general assumption that it's much safer not to take any and this may actually harm the mother and her feet and I C. H. D. convene a group of experts from spat tricks from nursing pharmacology to create a series of recommendations so the most important one was include and integrate pregnant and breastfeeding women in the overall clinical research agenda and then provide training opportunities to expand the work force the clinicians and investigators so that pregnant women are protected through research instead of from research. well like to go to another kind of specific issue within your domain in this research on reproductive health including fertility and infertility and if you like maybe also conditions aren't so often talked about but we know our wide spread such as endometriosis so how do you approach this as the institute in this area we specifically put reproductive health in our mission statement because really our research involves everything related to reproduction from the formation of the reproductive organs through some of the medical complications that ultimately result in infertility and we've decided to highlight endometriosis it affects one in ten women more hundred ninety million women around the world. it results from endometrial tissue which is the tissue that normally lines the war room but this issue is growing in places outside of the world so it could be in the abdomen it could be not long the heart and it does cycle and believe in those locations which results in severe pelvic pain even during times other than the menstrual period and on average affected women spend that eighteen days per year in that so it also leads to infertility and I see Gee we have a specific branch that is devoted to gynecologic health and disease and they are are funding research that is examining the causes of endometriosis and we're also funding research that's trying to prospectively identify biomarkers that could identify women who really do you have endometriosis currently there's no diagnostic tests in a CG funded research has recently led to the development of a new medication that treats the pain associated with endometriosis and that's called a lack a lex a drug that suppresses the production of estrogen also right here on our but that's the campus where we have the NIH clinical center which is the largest research hospital in the world we've just started a new program in pediatric and adolescent gynecology and the focus of that program is to treat girls and young women who are suffering from a variety of menstrual disorders we're speaking today with doctor Diane up young kia director the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of child health and human development at the national institutes of health you're also renown Medical geneticists with a special expertise on reproductive genetics in your research is focused in on non invasive genetic testing and how it can help a. in a fight illnesses in children even facilitating prenatal diagnosis and treatment and we were one of the ten health organizations selected by the National Institute of health to be part of that initial all of us initiative and I'm wondering if you could just talk a little bit about how it might focus in on preventing illnesses improving the long term health of children who are at risk. so I think along with the human genome research institute we have co funded a recent large project and it's called the newborn sequencing in genomic medicine and public health program and this study has explored the implications in the opportunities associated with the use of DNA sequencing information in the new one. when I was at tops for example in the newborn I see you there we would have baby names that they weren't necessarily premature but they were not thriving and we didn't know what was wrong with. and what the end site study shown is that you can use whole genome sequencing whole exome sequencing to diagnose what is exactly wrong with the six Newport and in fifty two percent case study they actually came up with the diagnosis. and it also had very significant implications for families one of the centers was comparing the current standard of care which is newborns get a little stick in there he'll and there's a little sample of blood that is taken and the blood is analyzed for beers proteins and what the investigators in that part of the insight project wanted to see was whether sequencing would perform better than traditional he'll stick. now and it did not perform better there were a significant number of diagnoses miss by DNA sequencing that were picked up with the bio chemical testing and then there was another part to this very interesting study that looked at healthy newborns and didn't having information on the baby's DNA sequence freak out. and it turned out that it didn't. eighty eight percent of the newborns carried at least one mutation which is what you would expect but the families felt that it was helpful information to do genetic counseling and help them with future pregnancy planning even more recent research has suggested that if you combine artificial intelligence with the DNA sequencing information you can greatly speed up the rate at which you diagnose rare disorders so it took about two weeks make like nose and now the diagnosis can be made in a day or so and that has tremendous implications for the care of the child as well costs so it's a very very very exciting time so much of genetics in my practice lifetime has been focused on making a diagnosis you felt like if you made a diagnosis you had really done something significant but work seeing such a shift now in rare genetic disorder in which specific treatment is becoming available and that is so exciting. I'd like to be accurate in other area of focus was really to focus on adolescent health which drove you to update your mission statement with that specific focus and any direction that that focuses going at this point in time so I'm a pediatrician as well as a parent and we all know that it's a critical time period in which there's so much change under going in the body as well as the brain and as part of our strategic planning process some were analyzing where we invest money we realized adolescence was a major gap. the other twenty six institutes and centers all find some aspect of child health so we created a trans NIH pediatric research consortium what things we found was that every institute had this gap in adolescence. transition to adulthood and the transition to adulthood is specially important for teenagers with chronic disease and especially those with intellectual disabilities I mean I remember this story where a baby that I had taken care of when I was an intern who had a genetic disorder showed up in the adult service topsy was now twenty five years old and no internus knew how to treat captured as pediatricians we were called upon because we were much more familiar with his particular condition so we have to address this issue and then I seed stay were focusing one is on learning to drive which is the real rite of passage for most teenagers and in our intramural program one of our investigators had parents cars equipped with special cameras and film teenagers for.

Alexa NIH Diana intern eighty million dollars eighty eight percent five billion dollar fifty five percent fifty two percent twenty five years ninety percent thirty percent eighteen days sixty days two weeks
"nih clinical center" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"And the little serendipity. Dr Collins was playing in the NIH rock band in two thousand sixteen when his bass player hematologist, Dr John dimsdale started riffing on an idea we'd finished setting up and went for pizza before that before the gig. I pitch to Francis that it was really time that we do something definitive for sickle cell disease. In the laboratory, Dr TIs Dell and his collaborators created a gene with the correct spelling then to get that gene into the patient, the use something with a frightening reputation HIV the virus that causes aids. It turns out HIV is especially good at transferring DNA into cells. So this shows the process, here's how it works. Corrective gene seen here in yellow is inserted into the HIV virus, then bone marrow stem cells are taken from a patient with sickle cell anemia in the laboratory, those cells are combined with the virus carrying that new DNA this virus will then find its way to one of those cells and drop off a copy or to the correctly spelled, gene. And then we'll will go back to the patient. If the process works, the stem cells with the correct DNA will start producing healthy, red blood cells. I can hear people are viewers out there thinking, wait a second. How do you know, you're not gonna get aids? From the virus? The short answer is we cut out the bits that cause infection and HIV, and we're really replaced that with the gene that's misspelled in sickle cell disease. So that it transfers that instead of the infectious part the stakes here are enormous. Yes. This really very little safety net here, right? Make no mistake. We're talking about very cutting edge research where the certainty about all the outcomes is not entirely there. We can look back at the history of gene therapy and see there have been some tragedies deaths. Yes. In nineteen ninety nine eighteen year old Jesse Gelsinger received altered DNA to treat a different genetic disease. He died four days later from a massive immune response, and in another trial to children developed cancer, Geno. Stevenson, understands this is a trial with huge. Risks. And no guarantees. This is when she arrived at the NIH clinical center in.

HIV NIH Jesse Gelsinger Dr Collins Dr John dimsdale Francis Dr Stevenson Dell nineteen ninety nine eighteen four days
"nih clinical center" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

11:14 min | 2 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"The headline from the New York Times through Lindsay's attention. And I'm glad she saw this. When the illness is a mystery patients, turn to these detectives to people to talk about this and the undiagnosed diseases network first of all, James Anderson. A director of the NIH is division program coordination, planning and strategic initiatives in anesthesia wise program director for the UD n in the national human genome research institute division of genomic medicine, both Greg gas. We bring them into the conversation. Thank you so much for your time. Anastacia I will start with you first. How did this all come about? How did the organization and the idea come together trying to help people out who have quality care who have been to a number of different doctors and still cannot determine what exactly they have? That's a great question. So the undiagnosed diseases network or upn began in two thousand and thirteen and it was really intended to expand upon the success of a. Program the undiagnosed diseases program that we had at the NIH clinical center that started back in two thousand and eight and what does program wanted to do was take individuals that at been through all of that cares. You mentioned who had been to see multiple doctors and still didn't have an answer. And try and take all of the latest cutting edge research technology, take genomic sequencing, take model organisms and try and be able to identify what might be the cause of their disease and get them a diagnosis. So James how how do people find you? I I was drawn this story because Lindsey ni- saw in the times if a patient is struggling and again getting quality care, and including places like the mayo clinic or the Cleveland Clinic. How does somebody say, okay, I'm sorry. I I know you guys are trying but I need to go to your organization. In the undiagnosed diseases network. Sure. Well, let me let me back up and say that that is rare diseases are rare there might be one or a few people have them or many more. But we define it as winner diseases less than two hundred thousand Americans there's about six thousand that we know of. So it's really several percent of the American population has what we call a rare disease summer series and some are not. And the problem is that they're not coming many doctors clinicians aren't aware of what they are. We don't know the reason for them. So a lot of people their families spend years suffering the condition that no one can put a name on and it's really isolating and they they suffer because that's the reason for setting up this program now, how can people find it? They can simply come to the undiagnosed disease network website. James at times to the doctors themselves were caring for the patient or the patient's say we feel like so far we've exhausted. What we can do what I have another group that I can really help you out. Yeah. That's that's the typical way that this works that network up prefers to take patients who can be introduced with their medical records, and and their histories explained. And then everyone works together as a team. And it says you let me ask you this. And I'll I'll tied to my family because I've talked often about the youngest of my three sons who has been diagnosed that he is on the autism spectrum. But we could not determine for years and years and years what he might have. And recently, we were given a diagnosis that he might have something that anywhere from thirty to two hundred people on the planet. Have we're still doing some work on that determined. That is is that the type of scenario we're talking about here where it is extraordinarily rare that somebody has this or is it that you're just providing the very different type of treatment for the for the patient. Yes. Those are definitely the kinds of cases that we see part of the undiagnosed diseases network. We recently published a paper in the New England Journal of medicine and of the cases that were diagnosed thirty one of them were previously unknown condition. So no one else had ever been diagnosed as having that condition previously. So really, we are looking for these really rare cases and trying to be able to help get them to that point of knowing what it is that's causing their disease. Anesthesia wise, James Anderson with us from the end diagnose diseases network and a stage who makes up the group how how does somebody become affiliated with you guys? Yes. So the undiagnosed diseases network currently has eighteen sites across the country. We have twelve clinical sites that actually see the patients we have a coordinating center that brings the network together and helps provide resources like our website for the patients to interact with we have to model organisms screening centers. And they do testing to follow up on these genetic changes that are found in the patients themselves to be able to try and determine if they're causative of disease by modeling it in different model organisms like fly, and fish and worm. We also have a bio repository that stores all of our samples metabolism court. That helps look at the metabolism of these patients or all of those different enzymes that are affecting the interaction and metabolites in your body and DNA sequencing core that provides genomic sequencing information on all of the participants. So it really is. Is a collaboration of bringing together the clinicians. The researchers and the patients to be able to try and make a diagnosis James. I'm gonna read right from the time story from from yesterday. In a recent study one thousand five hundred nineteen patients were referred to the network. Less than half were accepted for intense evaluation. No charge. The network completed the evaluations of three hundred eighty two participants and found a diagnosis about a third one hundred thirty two of them in the time since the study ended the investigators have diagnosed another one hundred twenty eight patients that that's a huge number. So that's I mean, you're well over two thirds in this area of diagnosing, these particular patients is that about the typical ratio. Well, I think that the success rate of being able to provide the diagnosis, and then hopefully a treatment is actually increasing as our technology gets better. We see more cases, I actually find these numbers astounding. These are people that ten twenty years ago would have suffered their whole lives or early. I'm just thrilled. I think this is a great success. Anastacia a lot of people whether for personal reasons or they just paying attention. What's taking place here? A lot about the genome, right? And what is taking place in the different advancements. And what we know now in two thousand nine hundred nineteen we didn't know whether it was five years ago or or fifty years ago, how much is that that that brilliant work by so many people in that area is helping what is taking place in diagnosing these these which for for years and years and years of not decades have just baffled people and caused them a great deal of pain. Yes. Or having the genetic information is definitely a key component of being able to make these diagnoses in the undiagnosed diseases network. So out of those participants that you were just talking about who had been able to receive a diagnosis ninety eight of them were made by using that genomic information from the sequencing, but it is important to understand that there are some cases as well. In this group that are coming just from clinical review of the records and learning more about the patients. So though, the genomic information is a really critical new piece that we have it's also about bringing the researchers together to be able to have that comprehensive review as well. James in the time story, they cited multiple examples. I'll just mentioned to you know, where it was one individual who was sober. Right. Was not drinking and all, but because it was taking place gave off the appearance. That she was drunk. Another one was a very fit individual and all the sudden something happened and she had a burning sensation about here throughout her life. Right. Are these the type of stories were talking about where it happens in an unexpected manner? How can we tie these stories to what are typical of the patients or can we say who has a typical patient? Many of these patients actually present when they're infants because most of these are genetic diseases, and they affect the body early on you've cited to that kind of appeared. And we're obvious later. I don't know if you want another example, go ahead. So generally about sixty years old when this appeared he lives in Atlanta. Now, he's happy to give his name. So you can find out in the article too. He started having hearing loss lost his hearing. It would come back again again again about three years later, these neurologic symptoms got even worse than he was made it to the hospital apparently with meningitis or inflammation around the brain headache. High fever. It was clear that he had meningitis on all the tests, but they couldn't find bacteria or virus. This went on for a dozens of episodes over the years. He was admitted to the program, and they determined by genetic tests said he had a mutation in a gene that affected his immune system. So his it looked like he was always responding to viruses and bacteria, even though they weren't there and the great fortune for this gentleman. There was already a drug on the market used for rheumatoid arthritis that was very effective intriguing this and this man is back to normal out of the wheelchair. And it's just miraculous. Example. But it it shows the power of what we can do when we drill down on these specific problems anesthesia last thing just a reminder of folks wanna reach out to you and your organization what what should they do?.

James Anderson NIH New York Times meningitis mayo clinic New England Journal of medicin director Lindsay Cleveland Clinic Greg gas Lindsey ni program director strategic initiatives High fever Atlanta ten twenty years fifty years
"nih clinical center" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Investigation of a cluster of finger Mona's Korean sus infections by Ryan Johnson from the national human genome research institute Bethesda Maryland in twenty sixteen a cluster of spingola Mona's infections sparked an epidemiologic investigation that identified twelve patients over eleven years who had been infected with genetically similar strains of single Mona's Korean says a rarely reported pathogen sink, faucets and water from numerous patient rooms were positive for s Korean SIS, which implicated hospital plumbing infrastructure as a possible reservoir in this study genomic and meta genomic techniques provided a higher resolution understanding of this intermittent cluster and revealed a pervasive reservoir in the war. Water system of the NIH clinical center. Whole genome sequencing of sixty eight s Koreans is isolates from the NIH clinical center obtained from patients and the plumbing system revealed a genetically diverse population hospital remediation strategies were guided by results of micro biologic culturing and find scale genomic analyses this genomic and epidemiologic investigation suggests that s Korean says is an opportunistic human pathogen that both persisted in the NIH clinical center infrastructure across time and space and caused healthcare associated infections. Tofa Sydney treatment and molecular analysis of cutaneous sarcoidosis by William damn ski from Yale school of medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. There is evidence that Janice kindness. Jack signal transducer and activator of transcription stat signaling plays a role in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis these authors treated a patient with cutaneous sarcoidosis with the Jack inhibitor Tofa, Sydney. The patient had not previously had a response to medications and had not received systemic glucocorticoid 's this treatment resulted in clinical and history logic remission of her skin disease, sequencing of RNA and immunologist chemical examination of skin lesion samples obtained from the patient before and during therapy and immuno history. Chemical testing of lesion samples obtained from. Other patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis support a role for Jack stat signaling in cutaneous sarcoidosis. Glucocorticoid induced osteo Perot SIS a clinical practice article by Lenore Buckley from Yale school of medicine. Newhaven? Approximately one percent of all adults and three percent of adults older than fifty years of age receive glucocorticoid for allergies inflammatory, conditions or cancer. Fracture is.

sarcoidosis NIH Mona Yale school of medicine glucocorticoid Koreans skin lesion Sydney Bethesda Maryland Ryan Johnson Newhaven allergies Janice Jack Lenore Buckley Perot Connecticut
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WCTC

"Patients at the nih clinical center but the agency would not admit new patients unless the nih director francis collins deems that medically necessary so that's an answer for you appreciate it let's go to david in new jersey on line six david why why don't we have a compromise and makes daca eight category in the raised that where it's unbearably merit quite system so everybody comes in the thing weight built seeking legal status and they have to come in just like everybody else mother countries that way we do with chain migration and the legal lottery we have to raised up but then docket has navy say at twenty five had point a twenty five point had start out of one hundred point system to not all of them will get n because they don't have enough point but they'll time in the same way as everybody up and make a part of a razor now i've that sounds great to me there is not a republican i can think of who would be in favour of that though maybe tom cotton but i don't even think he i don't know i mean sure he would be in favour that the earth let me just aides were it not for president trump i mean if hillary clinton were president let me just tell you this and and david again you make a great point if hillary clinton the president republicans would have rolled over and they would have done daca amnesty in february last year but foward democrat you are lenzi you are but david alewine think about that the only thing stopping an amnesty with nothing for border security is donald trump if it were not for donald trump we would already have given amnesty too the daca and probably to a lot of those three point six million dreamers and to their parents and chain migration would continue and the visa lottery i mean none of this would have been changed so i don't think that there's the you know mitch mcconnell is not going to say two hundred thousand of the eight hundred thousand have to be sent back to their home countries there he is no republican that's going to deport the the daca people no republican you know what i was thinking about when i was flying back from california on saturday i was thinking about these individuals who have been arrested.

director hillary clinton david alewine donald trump california nih francis collins tom cotton president mitch mcconnell
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Patients at the nih clinical center but the agency would not admit new patients unless the nih director francis collins deemed that medically necessary so that's an answer for you appreciate it let's go to david in new jersey on line six david why why don't we have a compromise and make dhaka and eight category in the raised that where it's america blake merit points system so everybody comes in the thing way bill seeking legal status and a half its man in just like everybody else from other countries that way we do with trained migration and the vehicle lottery and we have the raised uh but then docket has maybe say at twenty five point a twenty five point had star out of one hundred points system to not all of them will get end because they don't have enough point but they'll time in the same way as everybody else would make a part of the razor i've that sounds great to me there's not a republican and i can think of who would be in favour of that though be tom cotton but i don't even think he i don't know i mean sure he would be in favour that the earth let me just aides were it not for president trump i mean if hillary clinton were president let me just tell you this in in david again you make a great point if hillary clinton the president republicans would have rolled over and they would have done daca amnesty in february last year but foward democrat you are lenzi you are but david hale think about that the only thing stopping an amnesty with nothing for border security is donald trump if it were not for donald trump we would already have given amnesty too the daca and probably to a lot of those three point six million dreamers and to their parents and chain migration would continue and the visa lottery i mean none of this would have been changed so i don't think that there's the you know mitch mcconnell is not going to say two hundred thousand of the eight hundred thousand have to be sent back to their home countries there he is no republican that's going to deport the the daca people no republican you know what i was thinking about when i was flying back from california on saturday i was thinking about these individuals who have been arrested.

director dhaka hillary clinton david hale donald trump california nih francis collins america president mitch mcconnell
"nih clinical center" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"nih clinical center" Discussed on WCTC

"Patients at the nih clinical center but the agency would not admit new patients unless the nih director francis collins deems that medically necessary so that's an answer for you appreciate it let's go to david in new jersey on line six david hi what do we have a compromise and make dhaka and eight category in the raised back where it's america blake merit quite system so everybody comes in the same way built seeking legal status and a half to come in just like everybody else mother countries that way we do with chain migration and the vehicle lottery after raised back but then docket has maybe say a twenty five had point a twenty five point start other one hundred points system to not all of them will get and because they don't have enough point but they'll time in the same way as everybody up and make a part of the raise up now i've that sounds great to me there's not a republican i can think of who would be in favour of that though maybe tom cotton but i don't even think he i'm i sure he would be in favour of that the earth let me just aides were it not for president trump i mean if hillary clinton were president let me just tell you this and and david again you make a great point if hillary clinton the president republicans would have rolled over and they would have done daca amnesty in february of last year but foward democrat you are lenzi you are but david alewine think about that the only thing stopping an amnesty with nothing for border security is donald trump if it were not for donald trump we would already have given amnesty too the daca and probably to a lot of those three point six million dreamers and to their parents and chain migration would continue.

director dhaka hillary clinton david alewine donald trump nih francis collins america tom cotton president