31 Burst results for "Nietzsche"

The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 1 d ago

The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

"Say, let's be honest. No one gets canceled for abandoning their children. Betraying their country, or committing any number of indecent immoral or criminal acts. No, today in America, there really is only one unforgivable sin and that is to deviate from the accepted script when speaking of protected protected identity groups. It is to say something whether intentionally or not that either offense protected identity groups or that the elites find offensive on their behalf, and before that paragraph, you wrote something that just like clicked and it's so true because we did a whole we did a whole segment with your colleague, doctor Khalil Habib on Nietzsche, and I kept trying to find where it is, but you could just share with the audience, Nietzsche said that every society has something you don't make fun of. A piety that you don't, can you explain that please? Yeah, at the heart of every society is something at which it is your categorically forbidden to laugh. And so if you think about it, you know, humor, comedians at their best are subversive. Because look, I see humor comes in one of two varieties. Either it's kind of slapstick absurd you fall on a banana. Or you make fun of things you're not supposed to make fun of. So look at the recent brouhaha with Dave Chappelle. You know, he is touching one of the pies that the claims of the transgender are sacred and holy. You know, even in his first show, you may be too young. I don't know if you remember that Dave Chappelle show when it was on. I do. He did, there was one skit. I won't say what it was, but it was incredibly politically incorrect. But it was hilarious. He was quite subversive. I mean, he made fun of black people, not in a malicious way he's black. But we're not allowed to laugh today. You know, you know, how many women does it take to change a lot to screw in a lightbulb? That's not funny. That's kind of the view, and then you could say the same thing for days for black people, you name it. So the central piety in America is pertains to the protected aged identity groups. We're not allowed to laugh, we're not allowed to contradict them, the claims made on their

Khalil Habib Heart Of Every Society Dave Chappelle Nietzsche America
How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

"Way to really look at nietzsche's works is sort of two categories. He's got some that. I would call. Sort of a wrecking ball approach. They're really designed to clear the deck so to speak younger will be an example. It's a very destructive. Book is primarily focuses on destroying the prejudices of of the Of the philosophers. You know trying to push nationalism out and make way for some new horizon. Zero fish tug would be sort of more of a constructive work. Okay so it necessarily follows his other works and endure deir through strove what he essentially wants. The obermann mentioned simply means the overmanned can be translated as superman but it's it mart Accurately overmanned and the question is over. What and essentially in network over the nihilism that has engulfed europe and so he has this image of a tight rope walker who stretches a wrote across an abyss and he wants to cross it meaning wants to carry civilization over this abyss that he falls and dies doesn't have the spirit necessary to lift europe up and so what so. What the uber. Mitch is designed to invoke or inspire our men who see the problem of modern europe as essentially nihilism. We've we there's nothing meaningful left in man's life anymore. I mean when you think about how pop culture most likely has more influence over most people's lives today than say god or family our country you can see need just point. The three things had historically always been A portal through which human beings can gain some sense of continuity or meaning have been replaced essentially bigest the market and so the overman is designed to connect a link between this world and something over the nihilism of contemporary contemporary europe. And sort of serve as a bridge to some kind of ideal

Nietzsche Europe Walker Mitch
Is God Dead? Making Sense of Nietzsche with Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Is God Dead? Making Sense of Nietzsche with Dr. Khalil Habib

"Back by popular demand doctor khalil habib from the beacon of the north the last college. How college is meant to be hillsdale. College you guys can find all things hillsdale. Charlie for hillsdale dot com doctor. Great to see you again. Likewise charlie how you doing. I'm doing great. So i asked you this question right before we got started which actually is a perfect segue into the type of philosophy that nietzsche helped advance or birth. Which is who knows what the truth actually is. How do you pronounce nietzsche either some nietzsche but my teachers always referred to him as So well that's i guess it's the truth isn't it's all real. That's that's the point. That's what i was getting to is. What difference does it make right. It's whoever has more power determines how to pronounce his hard to understand german name. So let's start with it. Is god dead professor. And where did that question come from. Well it took to be a paradox. Because as anyone knows of god by any reasonable definition is eternal so the idea that god is dead is just a paradoxical statement in mutuals intending to get us to reflect on what what he means by that and what he means by that is. He's dead in the hearts and minds of europeans. And what that essentially suggests is that the belief in god existence of god rests on the opinions of the faithful and in the same context in which you see that phrase uttered Major says that god has been replaced by the newspaper. And if you wanna think about what that means when you contrast god who is eternal who gives us a transcendent ideal port which we can aim and be dutiful towards with the newspaper which is essentially ephemeral. What essentially saying is that. The modern world has shifted away from a longing for eternity in greatness in some capacity to here now get immediacy of one's sensations in to the just newspapers to the ephemeral and he thinks that that diminishes man's longing for greatness ultimately impoverishes civil

Hillsdale Khalil Habib Nietzsche Charlie
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Every soldier that was deployed in world war. One was actually given nietzsche And the german front and so they read this idea of the importance of the will which we're going to get into and this idea of becoming the superman or the overman or the uber manche and then they come back to kind of war torn germany and these ideas kinda laid the philosophical trans Foundation four hitler's most popular speech the triumph of the will. And if you read that speech it sounds a lot like nietzsche's ideas so let's let's work our way backwards from there and so can you just give us some biographical context of who this guy was and how he was able why he published ideas at the time that were so different than some of the metaphysics and philosophy. That was considered to be the consensus. Well he was a prodigy. Who's obviously a german philosopher. He died in nineteen hundred at a very young age of was teaching philosophy. He was trained as a philology which means essentially somebody who studies languages in price to think about their meaning and in one of his works. that gay homo. He tells us that he essentially abandoned his post as a professor so that he can become dot and what he meant by that is that he was horrified by what he describes as buddhism for europe which is just code for certain kind of nihilism. You believe that. Europe in particular has lost its capacity in meaning any kind of sense of identity and he was looking to try to inspire certain aspects of european instance that he thought could still breed some kind of idealism or transcendent that was transcendence that was just essentially close to being buried For example industrial era through strength in a very famous speech entitled the last man speech he is characters. Few strokes mentioned that our soil is still thick enough to perhaps a plant a grants Tree some kind of some kind of the ideal but it's getting a increasingly more difficult to find anyone in the world interested in anything beyond just a here

nietzsche desta bacon newton plato Lisa Nietzsche darwin Di mitch
Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

"Every soldier that was deployed in world war. One was actually given nietzsche And the german front and so they read this idea of the importance of the will which we're going to get into and this idea of becoming the superman or the overman or the uber manche and then they come back to kind of war torn germany and these ideas kinda laid the philosophical trans Foundation four hitler's most popular speech the triumph of the will. And if you read that speech it sounds a lot like nietzsche's ideas so let's let's work our way backwards from there and so can you just give us some biographical context of who this guy was and how he was able why he published ideas at the time that were so different than some of the metaphysics and philosophy. That was considered to be the consensus. Well he was a prodigy. Who's obviously a german philosopher. He died in nineteen hundred at a very young age of was teaching philosophy. He was trained as a philology which means essentially somebody who studies languages in price to think about their meaning and in one of his works. that gay homo. He tells us that he essentially abandoned his post as a professor so that he can become dot and what he meant by that is that he was horrified by what he describes as buddhism for europe which is just code for certain kind of nihilism. You believe that. Europe in particular has lost its capacity in meaning any kind of sense of identity and he was looking to try to inspire certain aspects of european instance that he thought could still breed some kind of idealism or transcendent that was transcendence that was just essentially close to being buried For example industrial era through strength in a very famous speech entitled the last man speech he is characters. Few strokes mentioned that our soil is still thick enough to perhaps a plant a grants Tree some kind of some kind of the ideal but it's getting a increasingly more difficult to find anyone in the world interested in anything beyond just a here

Philosophical Trans Foundation Nietzsche Germany Europe
"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

03:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

"We'll talk about this built in crisis of molly in a world where people get their depictions of reality from a series of moving pictures on the screen. We'll talk about the creation of meaning for the eyes of nietzsche passages from his book. The anti christ and what an observer of him might take away from a lifetime of his writing as someone who was never in the business of creating some systematized method for people to follow but maybe a good question to leave with today that will get us thinking in that direction something. Nietzsche talks about only very briefly. He mentioned how he plans to expand on this in-depth in the future and another book but ultimately never does leaving a lot of people to speculate about where he would have taken this. And who knows. Maybe somebody out there. Listening to this will be the one to write about it. But the point is if what we've been talking about here so far has any validity. Nietzsche at one point talks about how. It's this will to truth or this imperative towards objectivity that's leading to all these problems and that if anybody's gonna try to offer an alternative system. Which again he is not trying to do. But if someone did try to subvert the dominant narrative of the aesthetic ideal it would have to call into question one of the most fundamental things that people just blindly accept the value of truth as an goal in our social systems seems kind of difficult to imagine a system that calls into question the value of truth but when nietzsche invites us to do is to just consider the fact that we already have things in place that do this in other realms. He gives the example of art. And here's what he's getting at. When kanye west comes out with a new album. That album is not released as a refutation of cardi b.'s. Work when a new tv. Show out you. Don't sit there and say okay. Okay yeah that show is true. I was wrong before about last season. And don't get me started on that other. Show that totally false now. As far as i'm concerned nietzsche is saying that art is a for a more meaningful. Human expression is currently being made depicting reality from a particular perspective to be appreciated on grounds. That have nothing to do with staking a claim to the truth. You don't hate yourself for liking the music you listen to and you don't hate other people around you for thinking other music better look if the legitimacy were the meaning of a belief really came down to whether or not it. We're actually true than most people wouldn't believe anything in this world. So what are we actually trying to accomplish in our social systems and is this old ideal of a stable truth in dissatisfaction with the natural world where people see themselves as nietzsche says in the world but not of the world we feel almost too good for this world we have to transcend it in some way. Is this false ideal. Just continuing to make people self hating disoriented stagnant and miserable where they actually are and if it is what he's asking is could there be a counter ideal out there. Can we imagine a system built on a foundation of accepting the fact that reality is unstable and rather than living in denial of that fact could we asked the question that fascinated niche all throughout his work. What kind of natural philosophy might we be able to create. that's an affirmation of life and not a renunciation of it much more on that in a week. Thank you for listening. I'll talk to you next time.

nietzsche Nietzsche molly kanye west
"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

05:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Why not have compassion. What's again nature would want us to look at this from a slightly different perspective. How about this whole idea that we should feel sympathetic. Pity for anybody experiencing any level of suffering before we get to sold on that idea. Let's make sure to remember the fact that suffering is built into life itself. there's no escaping it and for every desperate helpless victim out. There are ten thousand people suffering in less extreme ways. We're having Pity for them might actually do more harm than good. It might just prolong their suffering or even make suffering contagious as he says in one passage. We've all met people like this in our lives more than that though he wants to ask. What is the natural next step when we're being compassionate towards someone's plight in life well. It's usually to try to actually do something in an attempt to help that person nature would probably want to ask. That isn't a bit arrogant in most cases for you to assume that you are the one to help this person not only the possibly condescending assumption that you know what's best for this person but also that you are qualified to even help them just because somebody is suffering in needs help doesn't mean that your the best one for the job like if someone's appendix bursts and they need surgery and they're lying on the ground doesn't mean that you throw on a covert mask. Grab a steak knife from your kitchen and get to work. What just because that makes you feel better. I had to at least try. Would say no sometimes trying to help someone who's suffering when you're not qualified for the job can just end up hurting the more or hurt you or hurt the people around you to mention nietzsche says it may rob them of an opportunity to turn something seemingly negative into skills that will help them in the future maybe robs him of the satisfaction they might otherwise have had if they solve the problem themselves..

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"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

05:22 min | 2 weeks ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on Philosophize This!

"What did the idea of goodness or virtue look like in these cultures. We'll typically in these cultures being virtuous did not mean that you appealed to a select group of behaviors. Predetermined for you chiseled into stone somewhere. Usually nietzsche says the virtues. People embodied corresponded with whatever social class. They found themselves in in which virtue serve them within it now simultaneously there was a hierarchical structure to society that oppressed most of the people. The higher social classes were made up of people that embodied virtues that served them and their social positions. If you're a warrior maybe you embodied the virtue of courage or pride if you were in the political realm maybe you were power-seeking or cunning. If you were king maybe were greedy or strong. The point is just notice that all three of these at the very least are willing to undermine the interest of others for the sake of their own desires meanwhile on the other side of this hierarchical structure where people that were oppressed and had very little ability to do anything about it so on this side you see people mainly adopting the virtues of self sacrifice. They are humble meek grateful for whatever they have. They don't need anything else in life and as a result being strong or powerful isn't really something these people care too much about. They care more about helping their neighbor. Altruism and hierarchies haven't exactly been very kind to someone in this place so they're usually proponents of egalitarian. Ism these virtues make up what nature refers to as a slave morality. They are exactly the kind of things you'd expect someone to value if embedded into the social structure now given enough time. Nietzsche says what you'd also expect them do is to start hating their oppressors and the people that embodied virtues that serve them in the higher social classes so if we think of this dynamic as a sort of battlefield of moral intuitions the oppress social class..

nietzsche Nietzsche
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"It's <hes> essentially invention simple end up at the present day where the full complex cetinje negative effects of socrates them and polling christianity. All being as is now holding to pieces and we are also evermore inundated with an i Kind of technological scientific consciousness. That is rapidly. Disenchanting the world stripping away all of the <hes> number shing an insulating inciting an existential sense insulating conceptions of supernatural end miracle grace inside fourth that we have joined up to this point so nature than understands himself of diagnosed the reason for this so-called full or declined but also then to charlestown the redeeming way forward and so we have the text specs Which is intentionally explicitly written as a product but also initiatives quasi gospel type language gospel or is the fifth gospel. So we have a great redeemer distress. Who if we want to point out parallels With the transfiguration of christ Crust goes up the mountain and he's transformed while to throw the very beginning of the book Retreats from the world into a mountain cave onto these hot transforms nature says explicitly and then being filled to the brim in the filter. Overflowing with this knowledge this gift. He wants gifted to the human rights and goes down. Just as christ goes back down the mountain to undergo. He's pasha into gift redemption to the human race. Well so does that destroyed in his own way Descend into the valley to carries fire to human beings so these passengers off only incidentally intellectual think they are they effective on instinctive of degradation and rehabilitation of gift and thanksgiving and so forth and so on essential to both christianity and other religions and niche this nature seeks nations seeks continually to subdue them to reclaim them for an imminent this worldly purpose as opposed to trans as a c. A deficient or slanderous transcendent. Oswald warranty purpose jamie part lecturer in philosophy at the australian catholic university in sydney and as i mentioned earlier jamie's currently working on a forthcoming book with the title. Nietzsche and pascal transfiguration despair and the problem of existence. So keep an eye out for that and diffused like to listen to the program again. Nora any about poss- programs then go to the philosophy zayn web sought for streaming and download links all subscribe to the philosophy zone podcast. I'm david rutledge. You can find me on twitter and l. time at david p zone and our hope. You can join me again next week.

charlestown jamie australian catholic university Oswald sydney Nora david rutledge david p twitter
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

02:59 min | 3 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"This is also a foreshadowing of the glory that believes will attain once risen reigning with christ. So ron core of christian living christian practice is the fact that you now must undergo a transformative practice at live a spiritual transformation that he's directed toward the glory that will belong to those who arisen and who rain the christ off the dislikes. The second thing is i. Think the potential repeated transfiguration experiences as it were embedded within that lifelong practice of spiritual transformation. So this is a this is a transformation metamorphosis within the last also a believer so given that each believer is in this lifelong process of transformation when the believer undergoes periods of suffering trial. There is always left open. The understanding there is always place the understanding but actually one is suffering. Because this is the pass through each one becomes spiritually metamorphosed and so just pull back a little bit when we look at the transfiguration of christ from this point of view. I think understanding that it allows us a window into what's christian beliefs. Doubts believes we understand. I think much more deeply. Why for example makes us such a catastrophe. The dot has died as these claims the sunny and also we understand a more deeply. I think how niche in cells coopting and subtracting tuli elements of transfiguration bat. We enjoyed previously culturally under christianity. For example is that something that he's consciously doing. Do you think sort of recasting a christian myth for a secular age. Yes i think he is. That's exactly what he's doing. Personally i think to approach nature with any other by respectful. Critical view of his relationship to christianity is is mistake because so much about nature becomes is brought out through his critical and indeed highly emotional and lifelong appreciation of relationship with christianity. But it's impossible to get a a deep cross than what each is doing. Very pong us. Apparently up..

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"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

04:44 min | 3 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"I mentioned idea the transfiguration that we enact sounds creative acts of around will and for nature Who was of course. My straightforwardly of risa he needed a new book. He needed something that would lead bind to life. He struggling with the desire to carry on but he also had a such a powerful sense of his own mission talks the he enacted the transfiguration as philosophy and so the philosophers. Nietzsche she says in the press of the Figures lights and she says the philosophy role is on her own experiences good and bad and transforms them into the and flying most of what concept but also of started living and so he he needs to enable. He meditated new book and he wrote one and she very quickly. And this becomes the first part of the spokes artist so in that sense this entanglement with lisa really demonstrates how disconnection of philosophies transfiguration process was something that nietzsche leaves himself and which is nothing if it is not understood and practiced as a concrete disciplining. This is the philosophers zone. I'm david rutledge my guest. This week is a niche specialist and lecturer in philosophy at the australian catholic university in sydney. His name is jamie pob. We're talking about nature and the art of transfiguration. And if compensation is ringing your bell then you should definitely keep an eye out for jaime paz forthcoming book nature and pascal transfiguration despair and the problem of existence transfiguration of course recalls a central event in the new testament in the gospel. Three of the gospel narratives. Can you tell me about that. What do we refer to. What part of the story do we refer to when we talk about the transfiguration of christ yet. Now this is really. I think fascinating and once we close out. What's going on here with the translate chrysler seeking trucks and extraordinarily illuminated points of view. What nietzsche you've actually up to So christ takes. A couple of his disciples at a sentence amounted and top of the mountain. He is transformed into light He is transparent and the description of this event varies slightly across three gospels but he space or his clothes or whatever am becomes a supernatural bryant. Said bryson anything on us and During this experience moses and elijah appear and speak with christ and one of the subjects. Again i think is luke Specifies that he's speaking about what he is about to go through the torture and execution of the price is about time to go and then a cloud appears and voice agendas voice of god declares that this is some innumerable fees and The sideways terrifies. But then suddenly. This extraordinary experience is suddenly over and christie says. Don't be afraid just me. So from that point the narrative of christ tights him through the return to jerusalem and the various events that lead up to the crucifixion. Now think as acidity if we can pull out she thinks that actually going on with his transfiguration need will help us understand what nature is attempting to do so. We have this event. In the gospel that allows the reasons of the gospels to lintz this cycle body of glory the glory which christ brings and which he already possesses has to into into service passion..

david rutledge jamie pob jaime paz risa australian catholic university nietzsche lisa sydney chrysler bryson elijah luke christie jerusalem lintz
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Look the world's in the face as it is without falling into despair. His answer to that is philosophy. But it's a particular take on philosophy philosophy practice as what he goes the art of transfiguration. What's he getting it there. Well first of all what does he mean by transfiguration we can think of two protons transfiguration experience. There are those which are happy to if you like from without so much think of pabst the paradigm experiences such transfiguration which would be for love. There's also that those kind of transformative experiences that come through big moved by for example then there those transfiguration experiences that we initiate selves. Everybody's capable all this talk of transfiguration but nonetheless. The him sunday philosophy is we can sink a philosophy of nietzsche concede as i kind of living process whereby the philosopher transforms her experiences. Good and bad. renders them into something that enable was Lies to not feel worthwhile and worth continuing with. Don't which enables experiences of joy and gratitude to be had however much life hurts so really. This is a your response to the next in life. that means that we do not simply enjo- the painted experiences. The are subject to that. Were able to take a couple of position. Living point of view on the negative experiences that opened up the possibility of being grateful for being alive the next finding joy in existence so an essential part of this trends fomative transfiguration of process philosophy as the all. The transfiguration is the this joy and gratitude really cannot come as the expense of the character of existence excel mean by that is the. He's committed to the idea that the negative life suffering says muslim explained by reference to transcendent. No must be moralize than and be. Viewed as the result of principle posten original sin and so folks and also that we we have to maintain the negative in life as negative as it was so we must seek to pretend that life doesn't contain such features the negative is not intrinsic feature of lies..

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"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"If i asked you to give me a famous quote from friedrich nietzsche you'd be very likely to say god is dead and you'd be right. That is a very famous quote from nature. But it's also a much misunderstood. It's up taking the main that nature some sort of nineteenth century. Version of richard dawkins. What god is dead means is something along. The lines of god is ridiculous and christianity is ridiculous and let's just throw this whole embarrassing episode of human history and the bean and move forward towards golden new dawn of secular reason. Well in fact nature was an impassioned critic of christianity of course but his work was also deeply influenced and informed by it. And today we're going to be looking yet. A key concept in niches lafi. That explicitly connects him to a key moment in the christian narrative of redemption the concept of transfiguration very simply put nature stops the problem. Humans a driven by thirst for knowledge but given the nature of the will find ourselves in knowledge of that world and particularly knowledge of ourselves is not for the fainthearted. It can lead us to despair. Ebb and this is where transfiguration comes in which is a process of turning the bad stuff into the good stuff but without denying its underlying nature as bad stuff. So that's a pretty dodgy explanation but fortunately on joined this week by someone who can do a better job of his name is jamie pob. And he's a lecturer in philosophy at the australian catholic university in sydney the absolutely fundamental important concept in nature mature thought is that the passion knowledge this kind of craving to know the nature of our experiences in reality but it brings with it. Its own set of the problems. Seeing through what nietzsche considers to be the hitherto effective but now increasingly moribund ways of conceiving of ourselves coming ever mole powerfully and penetratingly to understand ourselves as really the massive questions and problems that we always already have been But which at least the last christian epoca's..

lafi friedrich nietzsche richard dawkins jamie pob australian catholic university sydney nietzsche
Interview With Kriss Akabusi

Physical Activity Researcher

05:49 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Kriss Akabusi

"Welcome everyone this is the meaningful sport. Podcast and i your host nodong gotten meaningful. Sport is a serious of discussions on the why and how involvement is sport than physical activity can be an important part of a life worth living. If you are interested in the theme you might also want to check out meaningful sport dot com there. You can find podcast. Show notes read a blog and access many resources for further explorations of meaningful sport. I'm very honored to introduce today's guest. He's an olympian motivational speaker. And a business on. He achieved three olympic medals as well as world european and commonwealth titles during his really outstanding athletic career but he's also widely known as a tv personality and inspirational speaker. Mary interestingly for the theme of our podcast today he's drawn to existential philosophy. And how it can help us in making sense of our lives and today he has a to join me for a discussion to explore meaning and meaningfulness of sport again. I'm very delighted to introduce chris. Akabusi nb com. chris. Excited i'm thankful for you to join me for today's discussion. No thank you so much for that women's deduction and i most definitely very happy to be here. I never take any meeting. Wanted all in the grandeur of life and somebody who i didn't know full six weeks ago via talk media with had discloses of such and i really take that encounter really portslade especially when i think of heavily people out his club. Seven point six billion and laws in this moment and picked up stopping to speak to noah and up shoe her own learn more about myself and about what is to be a been. So yeah a a really great to be you. Yeah i think when when we got in touch and we realized that we both have this interest in existential philosophy so we exchanged some thoughts on on nietzsche's philosophy and that would be something that has inspired you to think about life as well. I guess one of the things That would be nice to start out with like in my blog. For example i have some quite critical remarks on elite sport and and pointing out some of the problems in sport and and rightly so you mentioned certainly an elite sport. we also have this life-affirming feature something that need chef. For example would who would certainly see s s valuable things for human life. So let's start exploring these ideas a little bit. So i'd be delighted to hear a little bit about how you are thinking about your athletic career at elite level and a new meaning of sport in in your own life. Yeah so mean. Spokes has been a massive massive impact. Amman experience of being in the world's there are few sections A thing couplets Apple automata souljah in my early twenties From soldiering in the british rb two elite athletics and being an athlete in what i was going to be spectacles evidently special evidence unique the editing window think politics but it is so much in the glare of the public when you become a class athletes old you do is in the clay of the public specifically when you are entering the Compete on a day on an hour determined by somebody else. They tell you to get ready for that day. All the young people. 'cause athetics is a involvement that is provided a performance level by young people. Twenties thirties came for that day. And it's a do or die moment when influence as well. Who are you you got. Can you deliver. And you're gonna cool yourself together and it would've you associate come together in that moment to to deliver and ethically win. Has that laced met garland around their neck that will be people that found Vanquish a maybe forty fifty sixty people constantly below you. You try to make that final old. Who had been anquished and as a matter statement about yourself. and kennedy. You have a sense of self worth and meaning By that can also evacuate.

Akabusi Nb Chris Olympic Nietzsche Mary Spokes Amman Apple Garland Kennedy
Team Secret Cleans Up At Esports Awards

We Say Things - an esports and Dota podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN

05:14 min | 11 months ago

Team Secret Cleans Up At Esports Awards

"Team secret for the e sports awards that i did not watch at all They one team of the year. They won player of the year which was nisha and coach of the year. Which is hain. is that all correct syndrome. Correct what do you think of that. So teamster again no. Ti this year and other other games have had the kind of their big tournaments some of them at least league for example but secret essentially winning the last. If you wanna take out the last few weeks has been seven plus money. I wanna say eight events in a row. Yeah seven months. They want everything just winning. Literally everything would you. I mean obviously our daughter bubble. So we're gonna agree right. The doda words everything. i would agree with. I don't know if i would put nietzsche's player of the year. I think it's hard to pick one. Yeah but he would definitely be one other candidates right. So i mean as it always is with these multi game award shows right. It's easy for us to say that these are great choices because we don't follow the other games that are part of it nearly as much to be honest with you. I don't even know which games are eligible to win in the sports category. If it's dodo leagues he has go rainbows. Six call of duty. Like i don't know what games are included in this is. It's hard to imagine another team in any game being as dominant the secret where this year. I think that's fair to say like you need to basically when everything right and not only that but the competition needs to be tougher which is unlikely once again because of corona because you know arguably secret even had a really tough region to play and while this was happening wasn't like it was just free easy wins because the region was week or something still tons of teams so it's super impressive I'm happy coaches got a bit more recognition so gretz to heen as well. I think he's really elevated this team to the next level they just started owning after he joined. I feel like it made a pretty big difference at least down the stretch Ceo good stuff. The thing about these awards shows though is. I don't know how much stock to put in the general. It's always cool for the teams to get recognition like this But i wish maybe it was a little bit more transparent a little more defiant. How we're going to segue into this next kind of mini topic of what do you think of award shows for e. sports in general because from my perspective i'm used to watching the oscars. I don't really watch a lot of other award shows at all but the oscars. I watch every single year. It's an event you know it's fun to watch. Even if i hate all of the movies which is sometimes the case that they just pick like the criteria just doesn't make sense to me sometimes like these artsy fartsy like movies will sometimes win for no reason. According to me but again like what criteria are they using. I don't know maybe you just don't have any taste. No that's definitely. I love in bruges. It's a great movie. Don't try to get out obligation. But what do you think from east perspective because when you look at the movies just as you know. Let's just do a one to one here. It's pretty clear. Even without knowing the exact criteria it's movies of this category but for east. There's just it feels like it's not as black and white. There's just so many different games. What is even considered an e sport. Technically speaking like. I don't even know the answer that question. That's the thing i mean. I guess the analogy of the comparison is really good though because in movies. There's also like it's super subjective. Right like what do you consider. A good movie is very different. From one person to the next head would be considered true. I suppose what it's defined as an eastport is a game that yeah but how many how big of a following doesn't need to have how significant to the price does need to be if i host a tournament in prague for one hundred bucks on eastport best escort because then then a lot of things could have won but now i i don't know what the criteria is and i think that's what we're probably agreeing on right now is that Maybe maybe are transparent about it. I just haven't seen it. I'm not saying that's not the case But yeah. I don't even know what sport is because like you said if it's just money than short that's anything could be in eastport if it needs to be x. amount of player base and have tournaments consistently running like whatever the case may be but either way. I like the idea of it. The fact that this is. I believe the fifth year in a row that their continued to do it is cool people show up to the event. There were ranked tuxes. They're trying to make it. That's where i don't like it. Actually they're trying to make it to. I don't know if mainstream is the right word but they're just trying too hard to copy everybody else like just let people show up in fucking sweatpants like were gamers man. Nobody wants to wear a goddamn suit. Unless you're a fucking psychopath syndrome okay. Being honest a lot of people do like dressing up on occasion. I think they don't like having to wear a uniform. It's like that all the time but for special occasions i think people like to do something extra like but honestly now that you it. I think it would be super cool if our award shows had people show up and team jerseys of their favorite team instead of in tuxes right. I think it'd be cool

Gretz Nisha Oscars Nietzsche Eastport Bruges Prague
Interview With Yahia Lababidi

Spark My Muse

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Yahia Lababidi

"Welcome everybody sparked by muse. And today i have a guest. Yahia la vida de. I hope i didn't mess that up too badly beautiful. Who is a writer. An egyptian who's come to america as a young adult eight critically acclaimed books of poetry and prose. he's an authorised an sas and most recently he sent me revolutions of the heart literary cultural and spiritual which is just a treasure trove of little gems. Some smaller pieces some slightly larger pieces and to begin speaking about it. It's hard to know where to choose at this banquet table where to pick but you so much for joining me for the podcast. Thank you for having me over here in new to and also. I want to make sure that we tell listeners about this book being the book for january. Twenty twenty one and meeting up with you in february on the third for a book club. Discussion and fighting. That'll be really fun. What's nice is that it's recorded so anytime someone wants to come back. And listen or it can be embedded on your webpage even or or any web page. Yeah it could be revisited and enjoyed over and over you define aphorisms as what is worth quoting from the souls dialogue with itself and you also say that you hope that might serve as a form of peace offering and bomb in these troubled times and for people who are not quite aware or quite. Have a handle on what aphorisms are. Perhaps you can just explain that a little bit and then speak about what that offers us today. Well it's it's basically it has currency without being recognized for what it is so anything when people have these quotes or inspirational sayings or even what they call it. A witty wise one liners. That's an aphorism if if it doesn't have a name attached to it and it's a maximum or proverb in the assuming some great sage cited then it's an another category of instruction but but enough for them. They're certainly more people who are aware of what they are. And who use them consciously now than when. I began writing them. Let's say thirty years ago at this point as a teenager. When i don't think anyone even knew what that meant but i grew up reading. People like braun. Nietzsche and blake and kafka and pascal who tended to write in offer 'isms and they basically i mean wild has some definitional skar wild about how he had some existing a phrase. I do not presume to some olives in a frozen any of my offers. But it's this. It's this idea of trying to encapsulate a great conversation. And that's why. I define it as a competition with the souls conversation with itself really so you go off. You're thinking about something dreaming meditating possibly weeks years even and then at some point. There's one line that you can extract from all that that can stand alone by itself that will be a key or a door or window or invitation for a complete stranger to have that conversation with themselves so a good aphorism doesn't in my understanding of it at least in everyone's got their own definition is just as suggestion or you to sort of the spark your own conversation With with your with your soul so to speak. And that's why. I really appreciate reading Books of aphorisms where there's few on the page and a lot of blank space because it's understood that they are in need of diluting the way you dilute. It is by bringing in everything you know. Suspect you know we're just breathing alongside it

America Kafka Nietzsche Braun Pascal Blake
Hollywood's Newest Babies

Bob Sirott

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood's Newest Babies

"Here is the breaking new baby news. Yeah, we've got Let's see Kevin Hart and his wife and Nika. Welcoming. Ah, new baby girls, three Children now two girls and a boy and Kevin Hart's family. Donald Glover welcomed a new son, his longtime girlfriend, Michelle White on the sun, both doing very well and also usher. On his girlfriend, Jen. Geo Nietzsche welcomed a new baby girl and, well, this isn't Ah, celebrity birth. I just wanted to also mention That a baby female Masai giraffe was born at Disney's Animal Kingdom the other day, and I just think this is interesting. Ah, newborn. Weighing in at £156.6 feet tall. That's a painful birth right there. And then mother will tell you that's a painful birth right there.

Kevin Hart Michelle White Donald Glover Geo Nietzsche Nika JEN Disney
"nietzsche" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"It's because there is ample envy and. They brought a be they would win at all costs. Ice Nana's. Winning old coast. Reid deserve it. That doesn't happen in sports and maybe that's not a problem of the cheating cheating in sports. I'm not. You know categorically opposed to perform enhancement drugs posted abuse of them. Yes. But. while. At least able to take the same kinda these. Than they would be the same level. The all ideas for APP needs to be more or less equal, and no one takes an advantage off context. The other ones don't add that about to drive. So as long as you can maintain that as let's say I don't it's not possible but hypothetically speaking all athletes in my game. They took the same PD right. So they are at the same level. No problem with that. But now when PD's are illegal. Some athletes take those they give them an advantage of depending on the con- export in some sports. It matters more than others in swimming for instance, but win a minute second, right it could matter. And they they take them at the advantage on. Basically they didn't really deserve it because they did not a fight. On the conditions. So. I think the nature would be opposed to these abuses is the cheating or becoming a winner cheating? No no no way over over him on. DONDER cheap to be that media that means you're not really over human. I mean you re they champion you gotTa fake champion. So I I don't think you can't be it will resume on or anything over. By, cheating or by going these. Behind the scene things. yeah. You just have to be strong. Judah simple and when with the the things that you have rather than the things that you don't have. Yeah. So let's stop there and let's let's take the concept of over human which is. Very. Central to Nietzsche's thought. What isn't over human for Nietzsche and? How do you become an over human in sports? The top one. Mistaken August tougher more difficult than the first one. Let's let's start with the easier one. We all get..

Nietzsche Reid DONDER Judah
History of Atheism

5 Minutes in Church History

04:21 min | 1 year ago

History of Atheism

"On this episode Five Missing Church history, we are trying something a little different usually talk about things within theism and we were very much interested into theistic tradition. But today, let's talk about the opposite of that and the history of atheism. Well, you could say atheism goes all the way back to the very beginning a back to the garden. You can say it goes back to the psalms. Isn't it psalm fourteen verse one that says the fool has said in his heart, there is no god. But what we're talking about on this episode is the history of Atheism in the modern world as an English term. The first time we see it is in the middle of the fifteen hundred s, but we see especially in the modern world of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. If we look at today's landscape, the latest poll I saw goes back to twenty fourteen, but it says that just under three percent of Americans claim to be atheists. Now, if you throw into that category, the so called Nuns, these are folks with no religious. Affiliation and really no religious inclination. Then we're up in the twenty percentile you might call them practical atheists. So we've got confessing atheists and practical atheists where do they all come from? Well, back in the seventeen twenty s we find an atheist, but he seems to be a literary creation is Tom Puzzle and this figure Tom Puzzle a fictional literary creation which show up in the pages of various magazines in the colonies and he would be used from time to time to comment on current events or to add some color to current events. But what we really find in the seventeen hundreds and into the eighteen hundreds is the precursor to atheism, which is deism. So theism of course believes in God who created the world, a god who is active in sustaining the world see ISM has with the idea of sovereignty in providence that God is controlling his universe controlling. As R, C sproul would say every single molecule there are no maverick molecules and also very active in the lives of people and in his universe through the doctrine of Providence God is intimately involved not only in creating the world but sustaining the world and bringing it to fruition and fulfilment of his good pleasure as theism. deism removes God from the daily life and removes God from actively involved in sustaining creation. God sort of creates the earth sort of like you start a top rate and you get it spinning then you just let it go. Well. That's what God did. He created the world and then he just lets it go. He's a little removed. That's DEISM. A precursor to atheism in what we see in the nineteenth and twentieth century as deism floats around especially in the academy and gained traction among the sort of intellectual and philosophical class we see the various philosophical schools that promote atheism. We see this in Europe and we see it in America. We see it didn't thinkers like Frederick Nietzsche who come to the conclusion that God is dead and we killed him that we have arrived at a point in the modern world, where God is no longer tenable thesis and out of that comes a very desperate despairing dark philosophy and worldview called Nielsen. We see it in some of the schools of thought that her apparently more sophisticated in the twentieth century we see it in the logical positive ISM and in some of those more scientific or properly, we should say scientism worldviews that want to reduce everything that is knowable to what is observable by the five senses and so creation the act of creation God himself, the transcendent world, the spiritual world, the world of faith all of this is outside of the. Realm of science according to scientists, and so God is not part of that equation. Well, that's a brief sketch of the history of atheism and I think we're taking right back to psalm fourteen one. Aren't we? The fool has said in his heart, there is no god.

Tom Puzzle ISM C Sproul Frederick Nietzsche Europe Nielsen America
5.1 magnitude earthquake hits North Carolina, most powerful in the state since 1916

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

5.1 magnitude earthquake hits North Carolina, most powerful in the state since 1916

"An earthquake has shaken much of North Carolina Charlotte resident Nietzsche. Thomas spoke to Wsoc starless. We were laying down and all of a sudden we hear this big tremble. It trembled our house, and then it shook our bed, and we was like What in the world was that I don't know what it was, the National Weather Service in Greenville said. The 5.1 magnitude temblor struck Sparta at 807 A m local time Sunday. Following a much smaller quake several hours earlier. The weather Service says it was the largest earthquake to hit the state since 1916 What a magnitude 5.5 quake occurred near Skyland. There were no immediate reports of any injuries, but some water damage to buildings in Sparta was

National Weather Service Sparta Wsoc Starless North Carolina Skyland Thomas Greenville
Alice Vincent: Rootbound

On The Ledge

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Alice Vincent: Rootbound

"Really nice to have you back on the show. You a very early guest as I remember talking about balcony gardening. That was a long time ago. Now it's going to be two years ago but you back on the show to talk about a couple of things but the thing I wanted to talk you out. I is your lovely new book. Rebound rebuilding a life. Which is a super cover half to say props on the cover because it's very lush and leafy and this I think is caught the imagination of lots of people who given the current inserts pandemic cliche phrase here the current situation that we're in the unprecedented situation as caught people's imagination. Just tell me a little bit about the books about and how it all came about well. It certainly wasn't written with a pandemic in well. Nobody wants to log book right now. I guess called select back you know I think if the Incessantly of all the losses of the pandemic book being released in it is definitely not on that list. It came as kind of it wasn't like I wake up one day like I'm going to write a memoir. I in for the UNINITIATED. The book deals with a number of things but it essentially examines how humans go to ground times of traumatic events and Tabula NSS and I examined kind of Autho generations that have kind of discovered plants for themselves in the ways in which they do alongside this narrative of a year of my life my late twenties when the Paul. If I thought my life was taking Off The tracks and kind of turned to dust I guess and when During which discovered gardening as a means of coping really kind as a writer. I started to write about Shit. You knew six eight months a year off to the fats and eventually it kind of appeared that match she. Maybe it could be a book. `and plants for me have always been the the bronx that make themselves interesting to me. The ones that have stories not how I learn. Prompt names blunt facts. Whatever tiny amount booking got from learning the the origins stories of APLOMB and so into we've these narratives of plant stories with of my iron on. It's all about I. Guess the relative therapy. That gardening brightened. Things gave me at time when else much did really now. You are a classified as of menu. I'm not a millennial laughing comparably about the old than you tell me about being a millennial implants because a lot of cliches out there on the interwebs about individuals in their house plums but very positive that generation. How does that kind of Cliche make you feel? And is there a way to bypass that to get to the natural number of truth? About how millennials are interacting with Lance. Such a good question so I've had quite lots of people generously talk to me. About rebound they think. The whole thing about houseplants and I think that might be because of the cover. It's very kind of botanical Indoorsy plenty cover of it but it's not about hospital is about the need for the outdoors in it's about this constant searching the outdoors in nevertheless acknowledges the same many people my age Discovering houseplants was a kind of gateway to gardening widely. And there's nothing wrong with brilliant and I think I think to answer your question about how this cliches help make me feel. I mean I think it's such limited understanding. I definitely think there is a grain of truth. It's a trend and I'm sure as you investigated on your brilliant podcasts. It's a trend that For Lots of reasons is very established on brings a lot of people joy but it's also representative of a wider need to engage with the soil with the ground with growing things with Nietzsche. Because my argument that kind of making the book is the those born after nineteen eighty in grew up in subsequent years. We were the first generation to grow up with the Internet with first generation to grow up to to grow without the the lost generation throughout without the Internet's on my childhood which was one of being outside. It was also very much one of being. Sit Down this is Microsoft Windows Ninety Five. This is your game boy. This is Yoda smartphone. This is Messenger. We learnt launched using really really quickly relearned to cultivate a reliance upon instant gratification. Is it any wonder that we get to adulthood in with desperate to slow down and gardening offers the opportunity to so I think that's very interesting point? I mean I think your your windows. Ninety five was probably my Zanex eighty-one loading games on a tape player. Probably like the only person in. He's he's listening to this inexperience. Remember that experience. But

Lance Indoorsy Writer Representative Nietzsche
Someone Used a Chain Saw to Make a Melania Trump Statue. Few Were Impressed.

BBC World Service

01:32 min | 2 years ago

Someone Used a Chain Saw to Make a Melania Trump Statue. Few Were Impressed.

"A wooden statue of melania trump is cool is to controversy following its unveiling in her hometown in Slovenia the work by U. S. artist Brad Downey has been described as a disgrace by some local people god alone a reports from Slovenia's capital live G. ana the town of say a neat Sir is generally proud that they can claim Maloney at trump is one of its own but it sometimes has a funny way of showing it local all designs of market to the variety of goods labeled First Lady ranging from slippers to sausages there's also a restaurant which serves as president burger featuring flyaway cheese hat so perhaps the wooden so that you on the banks of the river Sava should be taken in that spirit it depicts the former fashion model in a bold blue dress and matching boots but have figure is lumpen rather than elegant she waves a club like wooden faced in the direction of saying it's a castle into being shaped face sports a distinctly disgruntled expression these locals were not impressed it's not okay it's a disgrace that's what I have to say Nietzsche more but this could be done better only put those in the mail on it though it doesn't look anything like Malone yeah it's a Smurfette US artist brand Downey said he was inspired by the mythical figure echo he was punished for concealing his uses infidelity he commissioned Slovenian chainsaw maestro Aliso paths to call of the sculpture from a tree

Slovenia Brad Downey Maloney Donald Trump Nietzsche U. S. President Trump Malone United States
Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

FT News

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

"Notre the Brazilian cosmetics company, that owns the body shop recently agreed to by Avon products in an all stock deal that values the US group more than two billion dollars Vanessa holder talks to Andrew Japan about the man behind the tour and his plans for the company. Andras you interviewed keenly, L, Nietzsche's, billionaire chairman, after the format precision, did he ten you why he decided to acquire? Here's a they began seriously to consider it with the decision to acquire the body shop in two thousand seventeen from loyal. Last. Gene was gonna key in days percent, Lamerica, dune. Novem. And in this clip, he told me one day he realized that the company was president his company was president ten percent of the world's market, but it was another ninety percent. And as a long-stablished company with a good reputation, links to the rainforest Tura, who they well-placed to expand worldwide what the details of the on acquisition and most of the benefits for each side, which we know it was a two billion dollars. All stock deal to buy Evan and Tudor will learn about seventy percent of the combined group while the remainder would be owned by Avon shareholders. And in the deal has been in the works for few months, but in a to expects that would yield more than ten billion dollars in annual growth for the combined group and this mainly, thanks to access to more than two hundred million clients, worldwide Avon, pioneered, the direct selling modeling cosmetics embodied by its doorstep Avon lady sellers. But it has lost market share at the rise of social media marketing, how does this compare to new? Chirs business model. And one of the main differences is not is very focused on the environment in the sense what you were saying about the latest sellers. They're quite similar. I mean to also use direct sales they call them consultants not sellers. But they say now that after the deal together, they will have six point three million of then where would Mr. Neo formed a close relationship with body. Shop's, founder, Neath Roddick was an environmental campaigner. What kind of character is he and what did they have in common but his quite awful? And he c in Brazil, they friendly phases capitalism match like an eater audibles in the UK. He wants told me he grew on vanita Roddick, because both were looking to build a new capitalism were companies help to build a society. So in the light of that, what's the company's relationship with the Amazon day. And what a mystery house ecological credentials. Well, the relationship is quite strong. The comp. Resources some of its room materials from the Amazon seeds plants fruits, whose oil and sense can then be extracted for beauty products. They are has been an environmentalist for quite a while. And he was even the running mate to environmentalist candidate. Marina Silva in the two thousand ten presidential thing deserve. Always throw. Now keep it as advocate. Go. See year produce sound vessel. He told me the company was more committed now than ever to help save causing JAMA's and in view of the growing threat, and it is facing under the presidency of jailable scenario to what extent does not terrorists still use Amazon purchase like Arlen sense. Knits, beauty products. It's about twenty percent of the products. Use Amazon was ingredients at the moment. Why is the Amazon? Particularly important for him, personally his father was from the Missourians state of. But I when I saw him, he told me that actually he developed his environmentalist credential in this passion for the environment later in life. But seeing how many wonders that resume have specially when he came to the environment as you mentioned misleading has also been involved in Brazilian politics. Does he have real influence? And could he play a role in persuading, the both narrow government cherish its forests rather than cutting them down? Well, there was something very hard to do, especially because he doesn't want to get involved in party politics ever again. He told me he said, he's very concerned about the threats posed to the rainforest by the current administration. And so he's raising awareness through business in the civil society me, he's a board member of the Brazilian found for biodiversity the worldwide are funded in Brazil, and he also founded something called least tour you which focus on promoting the. Green economy as colon Avon isn't known for its eco friendly products. What's the chance that this will be an attempt to spread this ecological nature of the neutral brands? I mean, there could be a spillover effect problem is, I mean now the four companies have as that they bought from this trillions in two thousand thirteen the voter shop and Tony seventeen and now wave and although Avon will be the bigger brand is probably going to get something from both mature and the body shop in its, let's say DNA sometime in the medium-term said, both companies even an insurer big operations in Brazil how's that game to work what we have to think that the tour group now they own full brands between those, you pretty much have all the segments because as is quite high end the voters shows like let's say wants to down below that. And so there's no Tudor. Plus, Tuesday's let's say they have they ABMC covered bridge in the first three brands and now with Avon they will cover the. See entity so pretty much. We'll have the whole vertical chain, no, no, Brazil. But what are they go and Avon's faced lot of challenges? Do you think Notre will be able to turn that around? I mean they manage to more or less do so with the body shop. I mean it was quite a bumpy road with even is much bigger companies, manage their really focused on expanding into Asian markets with all the brands, especially with mature neighbors. So they mentioned specifically they were looking at Indonesia, and India. So those are very big markets. They had a good chance of and

Amazon Avon Products Brazil Avon Vanita Roddick Andras President Trump Gene United States Marina Silva Chairman Vanessa Holder Nietzsche Indonesia UK Jama
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"My daughter. My daughter has to you know, my daughter has a snow day in this polar vortex. Right. And I can be pissed off about that. And think oh, jeez. I'm not going to get worked on where I can go out and do something beautiful with her. It is up to me, and those are little that's that's the wiggle room. I'm talking about it. Do you wanna dig yourself in igloo with your daughter, or do you wanna be pissed off all day that you have to you know, that you're not getting. The work done that you think you need to do. I love it. So. Yeah. Look for those wiggle room throughout life. That's the thing. I think a lot of people look at Nietzsche, and yet you get through something grandiose and giant and big 'cause he talked. He talked a big game. But if you look at his life, I mean, he wrote some philosophy some books. They like, you have changed the way we think, but he kind of he was he read a lot he walked he slept. I mean, he didn't do too much. But he still had that idea that was there that they strive for. Now, he's deeply human like he's deeply human at the same time. He's striving after something deepen transcendent. And I think that that's what we need to remember because oftentimes life is so mundane and like. It's so boring and Nietzsche says we are wasting our lives if we just are satisfied with this. But you don't necessarily need to go. I learned that you don't need to go to the Alps in order to break out of that. And I don't think that I'm going to be going to the Alps again. You can just build an igloo with your daughters. Yeah. Honest. I mean, it sounds stupid. But it's it's it is true. I think well, John this has been a great conversation where can people go to learn more about the book in your work? Well, the publisher is far Strauss and drew. But honestly, I think a lot of the pieces that I've written in the New York Times and the Los Angeles review of books lately have resonated with these questions the book is out in the UK next month. And I think that I'm gonna be posting a number of interviews through the BBC and ABC in the next couple of months, but I really do appreciate the chance to talk to you. Thanks so much. It's been a pleasure. Thanks again. My guess there's John keg. He's the.

Nietzsche John keg Alps publisher ABC BBC New York Times Strauss UK Los Angeles review
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I mean, honestly, I think I look back on the decision to go again, and my partner Carol still says to me she goes, you know, like that was the smartest and dumbest thing we have ever done. And she's right. And because I think what I wanted to see when I initially went back was if I could sort of live as intensely as I did when I was nineteen could I still climb the same mountains. Could we still and the answer is an unequivocal? No like, you can't do that especially when you have a wife and child, and so what what I tried to come to terms with is growing up. In other words, I had to take the gondola to the top of the mountain with with Becca and Carol instead of hiking up by myself, and instead of being angry or resigned to this fact, the challenges too. Own up to it to see if you can love it, even the frustration of it. So I didn't know what I was gonna find. But what I found was honestly an appreciation for the amorphous tea, which I didn't have is a nineteen year old. Right. You becoming who you are which is out. This point your middle aged guy with a wife and a kid. Yeah. That's right. And and honestly, the the point of impart of part of this is to give an interpretation of Nietzsche that allows one or allows a reader to see Nietzsche's brilliance in leading us into middle age. Usually, he's regarded as the quintessential juvenile philosopher nineteen year olds or drawn to him. But you're supposed to get out of it when you turn twenty five or thirty, but I think Nietzsche provides resources for us to really think through our lives as we move toward death. And I think that that's what the book is about. So no, yeah. I think so I'm I'm thirty six I'm approach. Ching middle age, and you notice. Yes, opportunities start closing down. Right. You there's some things you can no longer do because of simply just time or your have responsibilities and for a lot of people that can be they have that sort of moments. Like, oh my gosh. They have midlife crisis. They do these crazy things, but Nietzsche would say, no, you know, chill out. Yes. Things are closing in your opportunities are going down maybe a bit. But you still have a bit. You have you have the choice to to love it to embrace it. But also, they're still wiggle room within those parameters. Yeah, that's right. I mean that wiggle room is especially important. So I mean Nietzsche talks a big game about being a he's calls himself a, hyper boron or rather? He says a hyper Burien are like these mythical creatures that live up at the top of mountain like frost, covered, you know, ice covered mountains Nietzsche was never this person ever, a he was generally pretty sickly is especially when he's writing these words, and it's. Hope that you have a little bit of wiggle room to be the, hyper Borey and in your mundane life. In other words, see if you can wiggle yourself free, even within the sort of heb itchiness of your life. And I think that that's a really interesting sort of an, you know, value added to reading each as a forty year old on. I'm just on the brink of forty like we talked about Nietzsche's Uber mentioned this classic Overman, this ideal of individual freedom, and it's very appealing to a nineteen year old or to a twenty one year old, and what is interesting is that it just it it fits so well with their natural like with their natural sense of bigger. Maybe the benches better is more is more useful to those of us who have forgotten their free impulses. In other words may who have hit forty or fifty. Maybe the Uber mentions a lingering promise that we can be. Otherwise than we currently are. And I think that that's what needs gives us this report. Yeah. When you're twenty one it's not really hard to stri when you're fifty it becomes harder. But so it's there like, oh, I can still do that. There's a possibility. Right. Exactly. And I think we forget about the mad possibilities of life as we get older. But we have to remember that the mad that the mad possibilities of life. Don't necessarily involve the same types of actions as they did when you were nineteen the mad possibilities could be okay..

Nietzsche Carol partner Becca Burien Overman nineteen year twenty one year forty year
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And when you're running long distances anything for me anything over ten miles. I wanna stop like there's a part of me that wants to stop. And just continuing to go is an exercising of the you know is an exercise of the will and Nietzsche thought that we come to know ourselves through those sort of moments. So that sort of is a quick answer your question. Yeah. Is it also while you're there? It sounds like you were having some mental health issue. I mean, there was a moment. You're on the cliffs, you stare down over cliff, and you're thinking what if I could jump? I think everyone's done that at some point where you know, you're driving on coming traffic with just swerved. But do you think something else was going on? What do you think you were kinda descending into the abyss with while you were hiking with Nietzsche? I mean when Nietzsche's says to you, you must have the strength to ask forbidden questions. He's also saying like the most forbidden question is the question. Why why bother doing anything why bother getting up in the morning why? And when he's strips. I mean when he's strips traditional answers away from you that why can be very scary. So for example, if my minister, or if my rabbi, or if my mother or father are no longer the guiding forces of my life than what is I mean, KOMO who sort of inherits the existential mantle from Nietzsche, KOMO writing a minute. The the nineteen forties says there is but one serious philosophical question. And that is suicide he doesn't mean to bum. You out is just saying to you. What's the point of life is life worth living? And I think coming up with really good answers to that question is difficult earliest it was for me. Sometimes it still has. No. Yeah. I think everyone has that has had those moments where they're like laying in bed at night. And like what what am I doing? What what what am? I like this just like a what what the heck am I doing? And I think that Nietzsche allows you to voice those concerns, which is good. But it can. Also, be very disturbing. Now. You might ask yourself. Why is it good? I think the row is better on this. He says I don't want to get to the end of my life. And discover that I haven't lived, and I think that that the scariest part of death is getting to the end and discovering that you haven't lived and one of the hardest parts is to get to the end. And then look back and think oh my God. What was I doing with all of my time? I didn't have that much of it mandate. I squander it. And I think Nietzsche wakes us up when he asks us to ask forbidden questions. He's trying to wake us up to help us of that, you know, that end of life, right? Well, another thing he came up with sort of a thought experiment to get you thinking about that as eternal return. Yeah. That's right. And so he says to you. He says imagine that in your loneliest of loan. Lease a demon comes to you and says that this moment this very moment. And all things you will have to. Live over not once not twice, but an infinite number of times. And then he asks the demon asks would this idea crush you? Or would it elevate your soul and most of the time? I think it crushes us the idea that I'd have to redo this moment again, exactly the same way. An infinite number of times is terrifying. Think about all the time. You're stuck in traffic or all the time that you're you know, in a bad relationship, you'd have to live that over infinitely so Nietzsche's asking us to own up to life with a type of radical responsibility. In other words, can you live your life as William Butler Yeats says and do it all again live and play it again like play it again Sam? And I think that that's a challenge that many of us would do well to sort of face up to then y'all start about you'd mentioned earlier more Foty like this love of fate that kind of walks hand in hand with that idea as well. Yeah. So I mean for for a long period of time..

Nietzsche KOMO William Butler Yeats Sam
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I mean, I'm curious have you what do you think it is it about walking in your own experience where we're gonna get phenomena logical? Sure your own experience of walking. Why do you think it it blends itself well to philosophy or thinking through ideas, that's great? I mean one thing is that walking is the most primary way of orienting ourselves in the world. So I mean when you walk through woods, or when you walk through a city your feet are doing something for you. In other words, they're they're allowing you to explore the world, we usually don't even think about it. But when you go on a real walk. You realize you're exploring the world, which is in fact what I think philosophy is meant to do as well. So that's one ask. The other aspect is. When you walk you get to get away. In other words, we have so many habitual or mundane moments are in our life philosophy rather walking allows us to escape if for only a little while like we make fun of you know, pedestrian as a word that we usually use to describe the most boring aspects of life, but maybe we should be pedestrians. Like another words, maybe we should just. Walk a little bit more get out of our get out of our you know, in the house ruts. So I think that's another aspect. No. I like the others at Leiden for Salvatore. Abu Llandough like it is solved by walking. You know? You got a problem? You just go for a walk, and you might not get the answer there. But usually I do because your brain is sort of resting and then insights, come right? That's right. And I mean, it doesn't have to be something for a long time. I thought that walking and hiking had to be this sort of heroin exercise of masculine power, and has I've gotten gone grey, slowly, gone, gray. I realized that this is a sort of futile pursuit like you are. It you can push yourself. And I guess there is some sort of benefit to that. But I think the real difficulty is to come to terms with the ways that you can't always exert yourself. So also on that first trip to Switzerland. When you're hiking were Nietzsche height. You're also doing some like extreme forms of fasting. What was going on? What were you hoping to do with that? Yeah. This is a moment in the book where I'm like among gonna write this time. I really gonna write this and I did. So when I was nineteen I was writing about the ascetic ideal. The ascetic ideal is the idea that we have the power to deprive ourselves of things. And in fact, that this is a form of self control fasting is like a perfect example of the Sediq practice Nietzsche has a criticism of the ascetic ideal. When it's placed in the context of Christianity, if you think about the. Priest or the one who fasts on in Christianity. They're typically thinking that they're going to fast in order to well, go to heaven or in order to be you know, sainted or something Nietzsche doesn't believe that anything that that story is actually pretty destructive. But what I noticed about Nietzsche's life is that he was not he did not have an unvanquished relationship with food. It was difficult for him to eat yet stomach problems. So when I went to Switzerland I wanted to play around well at first I was playing around with it. But it turns out that fasting is pretty addictive, and we we talk about men typically as fasting and women as having anorexia. But I think that's pretty stupid distinction. I I mean straight up I just had an had a pretty serious eating disorder, which I think many wrestlers and many swimmers which I was one and upwards, and I came back and came back from Switzerland. Have been struggling with an eating disorder the rest of my life. Wow. So you mentioned, you know, he needs to wasn't a fan of the aesthetic ideal within the context of Christianity. But he he did see like what what value? Did he see in it? Then if he didn't think it will you don't do it to sanctify yourself. Yeah. I mean, this idea of what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, I think that Nietzsche was suggesting that we come to understand our limits through forms of very extreme practice, and this is the exercising of the will to power oftentimes, a if you think.

Nietzsche Switzerland Abu Llandough anorexia heroin Salvatore
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And they said, you know, what you've never been out outside of central Pennsylvania. You should go to Switzerland. You should go quote hike with Nietzsche. That's how the journey sort of began. So you went on this. You went to Switzerland to dig deeper into new job. Let's talk about Switzerland. What role did Switzerland play each's life, particularly Italians basil or basil will bustle was the town where Nietzsche became the youngest tenured professor in full Adji. The study of languages bustle actually was a place that he escaped into the mountains. And then in eighteen eighty and then from eighteen eighty one eighteen eighty six he spent his summers in a very small town called sills Maria on the Italian border. And he stated a boarding house, which is now a museum, and my professors, Doug, and Dan had contacted the museum and had arranged for me to stay there on this first nineteen year old journey, and I stayed there for nine weeks and hiked the trails that Nietzsche had hiked. It was also the place where Nietzsche he basically escaped the sort of conventions of academic philosophy from bustle and began to write books that at the time seemed unconventional to the point of craziness, but really transformed contemporary philosophy. So looks like the spokes are through stra beyond good and evil. The these books were penned not not in an office. But in in the hills outside of souls, bran so you've mentioned that Nietzsche winter to hike. He was a Walker like he even wrote about walking. What would it need to say about walking? Yeah. He said, look he said many things one of. Which was the only thoughts worth having are the ones that you have on your feet. I judge a thought on its ability to walk in other words to carry its own weight a Nietzsche when when he first got there and many on many occasions through his early state in sills Maria would hike seriously, he had a favourite mountain out corvette or his corvette. But through his later life. This walking became more of a way of you know, it was more strolling rather than hiking because his health was so bad, and he would take companions many of whom were women and many of whom are a couple of whom were Jewish in other sort of misconception about Nietzsche's that he's a misogynist straight misogynist that he that he hates women and that he's an anti Semite. Well in the in the hills around sills Maria, he spent a lot of time with feminist end with a Jewish woman. I mean, he comes out of this long line of philosophers that you know, thought. On their feet. So Aristotle Aristotle had a school of thought known as the peripatetic the walkers Russo said that his study was in fact, his walking trail, and then there's thrown I mean, he was like this epoch Walker. There's to your wife, I think he's an expert in Kant guy like people would supposedly with you would set their clocks to his walking schedule. He that's right. And I mean, I've often pooh-poohed so Immanuel Kant lived in Koenigsberg a part of Prussia and people would joke around in Koenigsberg that you could see the sort of philosopher stroll the same time every day. And I always thought that this was a, you know, a Nietzsche thought that this was a reflection of constipated mind that you would never like you would just do the same thing over and over again. But the more I get into adulthood, I think maybe this is the best that some of us can do like I like we're not going to the outs. A lot of us are not going to be Alps. Right. Maybe we should just go. For a little walk like, Kant and Khan. I think has I mean Carol has helped me see this that Kant has the idea of what he calls a purposeless purpose on his walks. He thinks that we should embody a purposeless purpose when we're trying to experience art or beauty or the sublime because usually our life is filled with these purposes that, you know, we raise children, or we, you know, have a house or we buy stuff. Those are real purposes was was rare about Khan's walks as they give him just a little space to have a purposeless purpose. And I think that's something useful in our sort of rat race of life. We're.

Nietzsche Immanuel Kant Switzerland Walker Maria Pennsylvania Aristotle Aristotle Khan Koenigsberg professor Adji Prussia Russo Dan Doug Carol nineteen year nine weeks
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Philosophers you read stuff in. It's like sometimes very bizarre. These aphorisms is revolt. Speaking about, you know, Zara sutra and things like, that's what was how'd you describe each philosophy? Sure. I mean, it's very that's it's a hard question. So I think Nietzsche is trying to create a philosophy thinking give us a sense of meaning in the absence of the traditions that I mentioned earlier, so what he would like us to do is to understand that the that the death of God actually allows us to live and living is not just an issue of reason. It's an issue of passion. It's an issue of art. And so the that leaf then comes through in his philosophy in is philosophy. Ralph WALDO Emerson says one day. Possibly will be done by poets Nietzsche envisions that or is trying to embody that. So when we think about the form of Nietzsche's philosophy. We see poetry. We see aphorism we see songs drama, and what niche is hoping is that we actually see it as a philosophy of life. He says that the point of life is to make our lives, like pieces of art, and he tried to embody that in his writings. So it doesn't come across as a straight argument or as a rational discourse. Because he says that an Ijaz suspects that human beings don't just live by rational discourse alone. They live by gut instinct, and they live by aesthetic were artistic experience. And so by forming a philosophy that is as you say unconventional. He's he's trying to tap into those. You know, those ways of understanding that irrational part, he uses the God icies right is sort of that that represents that irrational part. Of humanity. That's right. I mean, and so each envisions a culture that balances the denomination and the Appalachian the Appalachian being this call to order and the Dineen being the sort of darker instinctual impulse. And he says that the best cultures are those that can have a balance between the two, and if we think and have a balanced between the two in the same experience. That's what he thinks is so unique about Greek tragedy, for example. So you mentioned Ralph WALDO Emerson there as I've read Nietzsche I've found similarities between what he was doing. What the transcendental lists were doing? What do you think the similarities there? Yes. I mean Nietzsche's reading Emerson through the eighteen sixties, and he says that Emerson is his good friend because of his deep would need to Kohl's Scepsis the where the gives us skeptical in other words, Emerson's doubt about conventional forms of morality is doubt about conventional or traditional. Ways of being and I think that that's a similarity. I also think there's a similarity with Emerson's sort of drive toward individualism and self reliance, which we see in nature..

Nietzsche Ralph WALDO Emerson Dineen Kohl Ijaz one day
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Out our show notes AM to IS slash kick. That's K A dot IS slash k. John cake. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me. So you are philosopher what kind of philosophy. Do you specialize in? So my background is in American flaws feed nineteenth century European philosophy two types of loss fee that actually American pragmatism, especially says that philosophy should be judged on the basis of its practical consequences in other words, how law speaking matter to individuals in their communities how how basically philosophy can make a difference in life. Okay. So that's like William James was a pragmatist. That's right. Yeah. So is and basically there was the sense in the second half of the nineteenth century that philosophy risked jeopardising its own relevance. Basically by retreating the ivory tower, and that it needs to basically down again in the world. Well, okay. So you wrote a book about the pragmatist mercantilist view, which is great. But you got a new book out called hiking with Nietzsche? Now Nietzsche's interesting characters kind of doing something similar to the transcendental lists the pregnant is trying to make philosophy alive right before we get into your relationship with Nietzsche. Let's talk about this guy. Because I think a lot of he's a very controversial figure. He's misunderstood. What do you think? Are the biggest misconceptions about Frederick Nietzsche? Yeah. No. That's a great question. I'm glad that you asked. So I mean Nietzsche is probably the gateway for many many mostly nineteen year old men into philosophy. And that was the case for me. He's also the most misunderstood philosopher of the nineteenth and twentieth century, maybe of all all loss fee. So I mean when we think about Nietzsche, we think about the bumper sticker slogans God is dead. And also what what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, and I think that one of the misapprehensions or the misunderstandings of Nietzsche is that when he says God is dead. He's rejoicing over this. Fact, he's not in fact, he sees the facts that we can no longer believe in traditional forms of meaning so religious political familial he thinks that during the nineteenth century those forms of meaning have kind of gone down the toilet. And that's what he means. When he says God is dead. He's not rejoicing. What what what he's saying is in the absence of these forms of traditional meaning making. What are we going to do with our lives, and they actually sees it as a crisis? So he might be an atheist in a certain way. But he's not he's certainly not a rejoicing atheist. The second sort of misunderstanding is that Nietzsche was an anti Semite. Or is the darling of the alright Nietzsche was not an anti Semite his sister, Elizabeth was and that's how he became acquainted so intimately with the Nazi party in the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties. And then in our collective memory today. But that wasn't the case in Nietzsche's day. In fact, he talks about Nash. Nationalism and antisemitism as a type of bovine nationalism type of cow ish nationalism, which he was not a fan of. So I think those are the two main sort of misunderstandings. But unfortunately, that's the way the many of us understand each today. Yeah. I think he was a friend with Wagner with the guy wrote music, and he was an anti Semite and Nietzsche that's kind of one of the reasons why ended his friendship with them. Right. Right. So I mean, the the primary reason that Nietzsche ended his friendship with Wagner is that Nietzsche had a very close relationship with a man by the name of Paul Ray. And Paul Ray was ju and Wagner spread a very nasty. Rumor about Nisha he said that Nietzsche's difficulty with is is could be attributed to masturbation, and his masturbation could be attributed to his fear of women, and that is fear of women could be traced to homosexuality that he was sharing with Paul Ray. And that was a rumor that basically Nietzsche. Never forgave. And that that ended the relationship the I'd probably would forgive people spreading false rumors of batch either. So what kind of philosophy was each doing because it's different from say Plato or Aristotle or more analytic?.

Frederick Nietzsche Paul Ray John cake William James ivory tower Wagner Nash Elizabeth nineteen year
Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

Talking Tech

13:56 min | 3 years ago

Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. It's Jefferson Graham of USA today. Listen to the weekend edition of talking tech. Now, I really sat down with Peter chic off and Lloyd out list. Who are the guys who do the epic rap battles history videos YouTube to get like four billion us fourteen million subscribers series of spinning in NAFTA successful and just about two years ago. They took a break they've had it. And now they're arrested in the comeback with a new video that features Alon must taking on Mark Zuckerberg. I'd like to invite you to listen to more of our conversation. We ran the initial part yesterday. This is more of the extended chat talking about their favorite characters. How they got started and their cake on that seven year old kid who's making twenty two million dollars a year on YouTube, a have a listen to nice, Peter and epic Lloyd from the epic rap battles. To both of you have favorites that you've done over the years. Yeah. Who? I my favorite is an old one from season one. It's no Polian. Dynamite versus Napoleon Bonaparte. It's just it's memories for me. Because I think it's both of us that are strengths sort of Pete as like a more sort of nerdy settled character. Yeah. And I'm like, this giant French guy, and the beat was made by very old friend of ours who sort of very nostalgic of both Peten is this guy named Eddie from Milwaukee. I love his name is Eddy, I've beat so get a guy named Eddie. So that's my favorite. My favorite's the philosophers, we did eastern philosophers versus western philosophers. So it was Nietzsche's Socrates Voltaire versus sunsuits lot suit and Confucius, and we we decided that battle. There's a website that was made by some fans that has a little chat room minute. And I was in there one day just talking to them about suggestions. And we kinda came up with that together. And then we all sat down and tried to write it, and it was. Really hard. It was a, but we got there, and we had squabbling in between philosophers in their style. And they started fighting amongst themselves loss I do. And I liked the way it turned out a lot. So that's my favorite told everybody how you guys get started doing this. This is five years ago. Twenty ten is when we did the first battle. A Pete, and I met in nineteen ninety nine something like that we met in Chicago, we actually met freestyle rapping on a porch at a party amongst improvisers. Loyd was big in the imprompt community. I was nude the umbrella community in Chicago. And then Lloyd actually hired me Lloyd end his partners hired me and to do improv improv. I call it mission improbable, and we have a theater in Santa Monica called west side comedy. And at the time. It was just a touring improv group sorta like whose line is it anyway on the road, and we were expanding and bringing bringing on new towns people and people, and I just sort of clicked right away. And then we tore together for a couple years, and we do like, improv comedy shows like Iowa State community college at noon, and then the next day would be like Michigan state at ten to twenty five hundred people. So is this crazy experience, and we always kind of little songs and wrapped together here and there, and then yeah, it was made our way out to California. And I got my first. You remember the Emek? American emek. Not the I MAC, computer. Correct by maybe. Yes. Okay. So had I got an Email back, and I got a little pro tools inbox. And I was just starting to learn pro tools. Loyd had rap songs. I was working on acoustic songs, but Loyd had written these rap songs, and he had these beats by this guy named Eddie that that Milwaukee. Yeah. And we basically learn how to cord rap songs together. So we were in my apartment in Chicago in the closet. Loyd was in a vocal booth. And I was just like learning as we went. So he brought the music and the wraps. I brought the Emek and we figured it out. And that was also when we started learning how to edit together because mission improbable needed a new trailer. And I remember I got paid with the hard drive, and it was like a seventy two gig seventy two gig. I really needed pay. All edit this video for you guys can keep hard-drive afterwards. And I did. And I think I still have that hard drive. I wonder if anything's on it. So that that's how are. Partnership started. And then you made a video we made a video, but this was pre YouTube. This was all kinds of stuff. And then, you know, we we stayed in touch and stayed friends would move to LA state and Chicago, and then I came out LA to perform his theater and his wife's university LMU. Yeah. And then she owns a she owns it. Yeah. Octagon? Mrs loyola. She was a good activties director. So she put me essentially, and then I was writing sketches and music for different internet companies not doing that. Well, and Louis got an Email of people looking for talent to write and do stuff, and he recommended me. And I dish ind ended up being this YouTube company that I got a job at called maker studios and that ended up being the start of the YouTube revolution. And I was there. So you made it video with maker impulsive. I made all I made I wrote songs for makers while I was brought on as a songwriter. And then I was encouraged to develop series and stuff and experiment on my own and Lloyd came over and had this idea from a stage show where you take two celebrities, and they wrap out all I was like that would make a really good video. Let's do it. And so I used all my resource days at maker. We got a camera person and editor and a green screen, and we made this rap battle between John Lennon and Bill O'Reilly and it did. Okay. Yeah. It did. Okay. Enough to do a second one, which was Darth Vader vs Adolf Hitler. And that one did great. And so that in two thousand eleven it was like, okay. I think this is what we're going to do we've been trying to figure out. I was trying to figure out what it was going to do since nineteen ninety four and all sudden two thousand eleven figured it out. And so there went videos every day you work on videos every day. Correct. Shoot him every day. Everything branched off from there when you have a YouTube show. That's that big for me. You know, there was it was was sort of the flagship show, but it was able to bleed into other things we made a behind the scenes channel Pete had his own channel. He had a Monday show, and he had, you know, different videos. I had a little different series and everything would sort of trickled down from that main battle. So what started out as one battle a month turned into one battle with the BTS video maybe twos. Sometimes another show on my little side channel and p do Monday show, maybe a picture song. And and it rapidly got expanded sort of horizontally, and and this are sort of ascension that word. Yeah. Are essentially kind of happened at the same time that YouTube exploded with popularity as well. So it wasn't like there was a couple of generations of other YouTubers before us that had done a lot of stuff when we could like look at them as a model. It was all sort of very new to us, which I think is why we got so tired. After six years of it. We weren't sick of it. We were just exhausted because it sort of blew up so fast. And then and then there was no there was no model for it. Really? So how do we feel being back? Good. Yeah. Yeah. We have a totally different approach to it live healthier as far as you know, not wasting much time working more efficiently. We're able to hire our own team. So they report directly to us the world's working with people that we work really well with and just trying to be more efficient more effective pace ourselves a little bit. I don't make eight to fifteen videos a month any more. So I just focused on making the battle one battle of on. I think that's what we're looking at. Yeah. When we when we start up in the spring, and I think that's what we're going to. That's our goal is really good to, you know, there was a multitude of different things that we had to learn how to do when when we first became successful in twenty ten and. A lot of them were more complex than just making a video. A lot of them was like, how do you? How do you an iphone? How to Pete knife function sort of managed people, and how do we manage within a system? And how do we like, you know, communicate well and inspire other people that work for us, and that was all kind of new for us in that capacity. So taking a break and stepping away from it. And then coming back with like some fresh eyes has been I feel really excited about it. That's where I'm at. Yeah. The tech stuff is kind of. Crept up in quality to it's it's a little easier work. We're on all Dobie software now, and it's just it's a nice workflow things work efficiently. We know how to use things. Computers are faster you're talking to premier and after. Yeah. And and back in the day, we were Switzerland between final cut and after sometimes for some stuff and sending it here sending it back. Now, we have a pretty nice little tight workflow. We got a bunch of computers, and you know, how to use them when doing battles. Loyd. You have podcast a podcast. I do on Wednesdays at noon called kings of influence, which is really cool. The comedy theater is the place where is the comedy club Dione, and I'll perform there, and you know, teach teach there, and I I hang out with my wife and my dog and the cat, and yeah, stay very busy. And when you're not battling. Yeah. I don't do much. You you raising your daughter the family thing. That's okay. It's nice for me. But even that like, I pretty much just sit with her and talk with her. I try not to leave the house if I don't have to particularly on a day when it's raining, so unusual. We're talking in LA today where it's actually boring. It's like two days a year that. Yeah. And we forget what it's like, it's good. I see I got into gardening to getting into all kinds of domestic hobbies. So I like the ring let me ask you this. Forbes just came out with their annual list of the highest paid YouTube performers people always love reading this thing. Everyone performer is seven years old. Ryan toys review. Right. He's got within everyone channels can bring in twenty two million dollars in two thousand eighteen seven years old seven years old mom's pocketing money, but if it's a safer as college, right? I mean, how many times do you? Do you have to go to college? So tell tell us is being a youtuber in two thousand eighteen really that lucrative. No. I mean, it can be. But I mean, we we make Tim vehicles a year that are that cost quite a bit to make. And they they're not twi- commercials. Not yet anyway until we hook ups and toy commercials. It can be you know, there's there's definitely money there. And we we started making videos just as YouTube was turning on monetization. So we really ridden up and then down during the ad Pakalitha era of YouTube where advertisers were fleeing like crazy. And now, it's kind of stabilizing. It's just like anything. There's you know, there's one or two basketball players who make that much. Right. And then there's a lot of people who play basketball don't. And I think you tubes about the same way. Can you? If you're you were there at the beginning. But just people are listening now and say, hey, I. I put up my videos on YouTube. But I, you know, I I have a theater, and I could do a live show Chemi kid is it too late. No, I think that everybody there. I don't think that that platform has changed so much that the basic tenants of hard work have gone away. If you work hard and do good work, and I think YouTube is is skewing towards a consistency a consistent amount of work that is on a consistent basis. There's definitely a whole equipped. He was saying like a whole blue-collar class of entertainers on YouTube digital entertainers that. Yeah, you're not making twenty two million dollars a year, but you can make a living, and there's every reason to feel encouraged to do that. But the whole like Goldstrike type thing people ask us a lot of times. Like, how do you make a viral video? And that's like asking how to find a grain of sand on the desert. You know, it's it's the there's a million different ways to do it. I think you have to do good work and you have to do it consistently. And I think there's. A lot of people out there who are ready to do that you see a lot of people reading the news and just jumping and during your chase Vons. Right. Stop really how it works. Right. It's like you decide to do like like, I mentioned, you know, I started doing this in in the early nineties. I didn't make any money on it until the late two thousand tens. It's just a matter of of believing in what you wanna do obviously still possible since that young man wasn't even alive when YouTube turned on monetization. So it's still possible. You know, it's a massive massive platform. You know, I think kids kids videos are doing very well. I have a niece of nieces, but I was watching YouTube with my one niece, and she just watched the same toy video nineteen times in the same afternoon, which is probably. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day listening to talking tech, please subscribe to talking tech on apple podcasts. Please favorite show on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks. Everyone listening.

Youtube Loyd Lloyd Chicago Pete Jefferson Graham LA Eddie Milwaukee Napoleon Bonaparte Peten USA Polian Confucius Santa Monica California Peter Mark Zuckerberg Alon Basketball