21 Burst results for "Nietzsche"

"nietzsche" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:12 min | Last month

"nietzsche" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Heritage power, Dell's what the historical, too cold, a tunnel recurrence or the eternal return attempt to will everything that happens to you and everything that happens around you to will, as though it's exactly what you wanted. Exactly what you would have affirmed in the first place after this trick my car to meet Ya WanNa transfigure the meaning of the suburbs to actually make it a meaningful life to live in the suburbs. It's Roth at improbable project, but notice. In the one, the historic nature sorta realize in his own life, and he's own philosophy I wanNA talk about a couple of other writers, the feature in the story and talk about you know what they're. Well. That's the role is in a and I. Guess You mentioned Dostoyevsky and? Becomes Consumed by the idea. Tell us something more about Dostoevsky in this story, Yeah! Me In bodies, a Christianity which elaborately find in western Christianity to me is distinctly Orthodox. Form. Christianity which I suppose in in many ways resemble Franz. If it's easy that sort of Christianity, Christianity which. Looked to the natural world, nukes to animals and birds looks to plants and flowers, and finds in them some evidence of supposed grace with all the divine something of that kind is almost a panatheist and Christianity. At least that's how I, understand. Dostoevsky I'm always thinking of industrial work was a character. The idiot and the idea of dusk is in his novel. The idiot. He's going to embody a pure human being someone someone. Christ, like some. Kind of Messiah what's fascinating by Dostoyevsky is that he doesn't allow this idiot his redemptive role. He's not simply a reborn Jesus because whatever the idiot of the. Novel and his name, the novelist Prince Mishkin whenever Prince Michigan the idiots of the novel, every comes into a new situation. Things seemed to go wrong. Things seem to fall apart. His very presence destabilizes the world, and far from redeeming the world, the idiot leads to a double murder and to the insanity of the idiot. He goes back to live in a in a mental institution..

Dostoevsky Dostoyevsky Roth Dell Prince Mishkin Prince Michigan murder
"nietzsche" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:18 min | Last month

"nietzsche" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They're very racist in Wokingham particularly anti Semitic, they could not stand the working classes and was snubbed. So is someone who I suppose. Field is snobbery in some way. Once upon a time, he was a nerd, but he's been rescued from his nerd and buys a bunch of friends. He's been pulled out of the computer. Computer Room he someone who the beginning of the novel is very shy, and retiring, but undergoes or religious transformation, a spiritual found summation need the comes rather like a character from Dostoevsky. He reads the book Egypt, which is pretty much the first cookies ever read in his life to read Dostoevsky's novel and drawing inspiration from it. He becomes very spiritual rather like fathers. And brothers Karamazov. He someone who's capable of veteran profundity, so move really transform the novel as my characters do because they're all moving away from the will to nothingness to some kind of affirmation it off is the affirmation through music in polar eventually affirmation of love. Love is the affirmation of general spirituality. took. A. Little atoms. I'm not Danny today I'm talking laws. and. We took it about his latest novel nature in the Burbs. And so lots will come onto Neto Nietzsche's embodiment and a teenage boy at the score at the beginning of the novel, he tans up from a private school, joins school, and and becomes friends with with this group. This group full. Tell us how you've embodied need him in the body of a teenage boy in the novel well. Someone I wanted to capture as a so as to credit fellow, someone who's ATR move from the comprehensive school in which he finds himself for the beginning of the novel nature, someone who has real school people around a real hatred of the suburbs. He's from a fee. Paying school is called a foul college. An awful now crucially hit was not someone from wealth. His father was a teacher at the school and his father. Someone that Nietzsche McCartney. Describes the mystic the father has died, and the family have to move away from the school. They've lost that grace and favor home. They've lost nature scholarship, and each himself has been ill for a couple of years. Mentally ill and need to then has to go to the local comprehensive singed his sixth form studies, so he's about seventeen, eighteen, older, naturally, maybe nine, hundred twenty by the time the novel begins. He's two years out. Time in the suburbs he's had a kind of what would you call it? A vision of some kind? He had an experience to the suburbs which is very profound. The idea of nature is the suburbs are the place in which northern has actually become incarnate in everyday existence, not the first time in human history is. Is the very way which people live to my car to Nietzsche things, the historical nature as A. Of what my cat to me to find around him in contemporary woking in the suburbs, and what need to find around him in Wokingham is a mediocre form of life. Life turned upon life, but even he finds this needs to also thinks that life working in that live in the suburbs is kind of test of you undergo this test. If you're able to live in Wokingham and ask that you live nowhere other than in Wokingham, if you're able to consider, the life might only ever been woke. Human Doing Wokingham things to welcome people if you can. Can stand the thought that maybe you can break the hold of nine of them in this Mike..

Wokingham Dostoevsky Neto Nietzsche Nietzsche McCartney Danny Egypt woking
"nietzsche" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:47 min | Last month

"nietzsche" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"There's very deep analysis of processes, but he he wasn't so much of a physical tinker type guy I it was very abstract and do you think What do you think about the will to power? Do you think? What do you think drives humans as is it Oh, an unholy mix of things I. I don't think there's one pure simple and elegant objective function driving humans. But by any means, what do you think If, we look at. I know it's hard to look at humans in an aggregate, but do you think overall a good? Or do we have both good and evil within us that depending on circumstances depending on the whatever can can can To the top good and evil or. Very ambiguous complicated, and in some ways, silly concepts. But if we we could dig into your question from a couple of direction so I think if you look in the evolution. Humanity is shaped both by. Individual selection and what biologists would call group selection by tribe level selection right. So individuals selection has driven us in a selfish DNA so that each of us does to certain approximation what will help us propagate our DNA to to future generations. That th-. That's why I've got four kids so far in the and probably that's not the last one. On the other hand, I like ambition. Tribal groups selection means humans in a way will do what what will advocate for the persistence of the DNA of their whole, their whole tribe or or their their social group, and in biology you have both of these like a and you can see an ant colony or beehive. There's a lot of group selection in in in the evolution of social animals on the other hand. A big cat or some very solitary animal, a lot more bias individuals. Selection humans are an interesting balance and I think this reflects itself in what we would view as selfishness versus altruism to to to some extent. So we just have both those objective functions contributing to the the makeup of our brains, and then as Nietzsche analyzed in his own way another of in different ways I, mean we abstract that says what we have both good good and evil with within us, right because a lot of what we view as evil. Is really just. Selfishness alive. What we view as good is altruism which means during doing what's good for the for the tribe and on that level, we have both of those just baked baked into us, and that's that's how it is, of course. There are psychopaths and sociopaths and people who. Get gratified by the suffering of others and that's That's that's a different thing. Yeah. Those are exceptions but I. I, think I I corps. Were not purely selfish. We're not purely altruistic we are a mix and that's That's the nature of it and we also have. A complex constellation of values that are just. Very. To our evolutionary history, like we we we love waterways and mountains. The ideal place for the house in the mountain overlooking the water right and. You know we care a lot about our our kids and we care a little less about our cousins and even less about our fifth cousins..

Nietzsche
Alice Vincent: Rootbound

On The Ledge

05:34 min | 2 months ago

Alice Vincent: Rootbound

"Really nice to have you back on the show. You a very early guest as I remember talking about balcony gardening. That was a long time ago. Now it's going to be two years ago but you back on the show to talk about a couple of things but the thing I wanted to talk you out. I is your lovely new book. Rebound rebuilding a life. Which is a super cover half to say props on the cover because it's very lush and leafy and this I think is caught the imagination of lots of people who given the current inserts pandemic cliche phrase here the current situation that we're in the unprecedented situation as caught people's imagination. Just tell me a little bit about the books about and how it all came about well. It certainly wasn't written with a pandemic in well. Nobody wants to log book right now. I guess called select back you know I think if the Incessantly of all the losses of the pandemic book being released in it is definitely not on that list. It came as kind of it wasn't like I wake up one day like I'm going to write a memoir. I in for the UNINITIATED. The book deals with a number of things but it essentially examines how humans go to ground times of traumatic events and Tabula NSS and I examined kind of Autho generations that have kind of discovered plants for themselves in the ways in which they do alongside this narrative of a year of my life my late twenties when the Paul. If I thought my life was taking Off The tracks and kind of turned to dust I guess and when During which discovered gardening as a means of coping really kind as a writer. I started to write about Shit. You knew six eight months a year off to the fats and eventually it kind of appeared that match she. Maybe it could be a book. `and plants for me have always been the the bronx that make themselves interesting to me. The ones that have stories not how I learn. Prompt names blunt facts. Whatever tiny amount booking got from learning the the origins stories of APLOMB and so into we've these narratives of plant stories with of my iron on. It's all about I. Guess the relative therapy. That gardening brightened. Things gave me at time when else much did really now. You are a classified as of menu. I'm not a millennial laughing comparably about the old than you tell me about being a millennial implants because a lot of cliches out there on the interwebs about individuals in their house plums but very positive that generation. How does that kind of Cliche make you feel? And is there a way to bypass that to get to the natural number of truth? About how millennials are interacting with Lance. Such a good question so I've had quite lots of people generously talk to me. About rebound they think. The whole thing about houseplants and I think that might be because of the cover. It's very kind of botanical Indoorsy plenty cover of it but it's not about hospital is about the need for the outdoors in it's about this constant searching the outdoors in nevertheless acknowledges the same many people my age Discovering houseplants was a kind of gateway to gardening widely. And there's nothing wrong with brilliant and I think I think to answer your question about how this cliches help make me feel. I mean I think it's such limited understanding. I definitely think there is a grain of truth. It's a trend and I'm sure as you investigated on your brilliant podcasts. It's a trend that For Lots of reasons is very established on brings a lot of people joy but it's also representative of a wider need to engage with the soil with the ground with growing things with Nietzsche. Because my argument that kind of making the book is the those born after nineteen eighty in grew up in subsequent years. We were the first generation to grow up with the Internet with first generation to grow up to to grow without the the lost generation throughout without the Internet's on my childhood which was one of being outside. It was also very much one of being. Sit Down this is Microsoft Windows Ninety Five. This is your game boy. This is Yoda smartphone. This is Messenger. We learnt launched using really really quickly relearned to cultivate a reliance upon instant gratification. Is it any wonder that we get to adulthood in with desperate to slow down and gardening offers the opportunity to so I think that's very interesting point? I mean I think your your windows. Ninety five was probably my Zanex eighty-one loading games on a tape player. Probably like the only person in. He's he's listening to this inexperience. Remember that experience. But

Lance Indoorsy Writer Representative Nietzsche
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"I think I think I'm going to take four more questions only because I'm running out of brain and I don't WanNa say stupid things or stupider things that I've already said so so thank you for the talk in the beginning of your lecture. You talked about how society needed this kind of dreamlike religious base. So we don't go between left and right violently and we can kind of have this base and then you also said you admire Nietzsche for kind of Chopping down these these ideological dogmatic weeds coming up from the base of Christianity I was wondering how what your thoughts are on how society can have this kind of religious space without having these kind of dangerous ideologies that can spring up once in a while. That's what I'm trying to figure out. No really I mean that really. That's the serious answer to that question. You know I mean the reason that I'm GonNa Admire of niches. Because he was the spirit of his time. So that's a good way of thinking about it. It's not like nature killed God. It's the nature gathered. What was in the air and articulated incredibly profoundly so he put his finger on the spot and now doing so. He announced the problem. And once you announced the problem then maybe you can come up with a solution because you can't solve a problem unless you know what it is the fact that he made it so stark and so clear was horrifying in some sense but at least we know where we stand and so since then I would say particularly with many ways particularly with the work of Yoga and everything. That's come out of that. Which is a deeper study of mythology and its meanings and we've been trying to address the issue that needs you brought up and trying to solve the problem. The problem is something like the reunification of the spirit of mankind. Something like that. Well slogging through it man. Now that's that's why you're all here at least in part so we'll see how far we can get by. At this rate we'll get to like the twelve verse. That's the all.

Nietzsche
Someone Used a Chain Saw to Make a Melania Trump Statue. Few Were Impressed.

BBC World Service

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Someone Used a Chain Saw to Make a Melania Trump Statue. Few Were Impressed.

"A wooden statue of melania trump is cool is to controversy following its unveiling in her hometown in Slovenia the work by U. S. artist Brad Downey has been described as a disgrace by some local people god alone a reports from Slovenia's capital live G. ana the town of say a neat Sir is generally proud that they can claim Maloney at trump is one of its own but it sometimes has a funny way of showing it local all designs of market to the variety of goods labeled First Lady ranging from slippers to sausages there's also a restaurant which serves as president burger featuring flyaway cheese hat so perhaps the wooden so that you on the banks of the river Sava should be taken in that spirit it depicts the former fashion model in a bold blue dress and matching boots but have figure is lumpen rather than elegant she waves a club like wooden faced in the direction of saying it's a castle into being shaped face sports a distinctly disgruntled expression these locals were not impressed it's not okay it's a disgrace that's what I have to say Nietzsche more but this could be done better only put those in the mail on it though it doesn't look anything like Malone yeah it's a Smurfette US artist brand Downey said he was inspired by the mythical figure echo he was punished for concealing his uses infidelity he commissioned Slovenian chainsaw maestro Aliso paths to call of the sculpture from a tree

Slovenia Brad Downey Maloney Donald Trump Nietzsche U. S. President Trump Malone United States
Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

FT News

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

"Notre the Brazilian cosmetics company, that owns the body shop recently agreed to by Avon products in an all stock deal that values the US group more than two billion dollars Vanessa holder talks to Andrew Japan about the man behind the tour and his plans for the company. Andras you interviewed keenly, L, Nietzsche's, billionaire chairman, after the format precision, did he ten you why he decided to acquire? Here's a they began seriously to consider it with the decision to acquire the body shop in two thousand seventeen from loyal. Last. Gene was gonna key in days percent, Lamerica, dune. Novem. And in this clip, he told me one day he realized that the company was president his company was president ten percent of the world's market, but it was another ninety percent. And as a long-stablished company with a good reputation, links to the rainforest Tura, who they well-placed to expand worldwide what the details of the on acquisition and most of the benefits for each side, which we know it was a two billion dollars. All stock deal to buy Evan and Tudor will learn about seventy percent of the combined group while the remainder would be owned by Avon shareholders. And in the deal has been in the works for few months, but in a to expects that would yield more than ten billion dollars in annual growth for the combined group and this mainly, thanks to access to more than two hundred million clients, worldwide Avon, pioneered, the direct selling modeling cosmetics embodied by its doorstep Avon lady sellers. But it has lost market share at the rise of social media marketing, how does this compare to new? Chirs business model. And one of the main differences is not is very focused on the environment in the sense what you were saying about the latest sellers. They're quite similar. I mean to also use direct sales they call them consultants not sellers. But they say now that after the deal together, they will have six point three million of then where would Mr. Neo formed a close relationship with body. Shop's, founder, Neath Roddick was an environmental campaigner. What kind of character is he and what did they have in common but his quite awful? And he c in Brazil, they friendly phases capitalism match like an eater audibles in the UK. He wants told me he grew on vanita Roddick, because both were looking to build a new capitalism were companies help to build a society. So in the light of that, what's the company's relationship with the Amazon day. And what a mystery house ecological credentials. Well, the relationship is quite strong. The comp. Resources some of its room materials from the Amazon seeds plants fruits, whose oil and sense can then be extracted for beauty products. They are has been an environmentalist for quite a while. And he was even the running mate to environmentalist candidate. Marina Silva in the two thousand ten presidential thing deserve. Always throw. Now keep it as advocate. Go. See year produce sound vessel. He told me the company was more committed now than ever to help save causing JAMA's and in view of the growing threat, and it is facing under the presidency of jailable scenario to what extent does not terrorists still use Amazon purchase like Arlen sense. Knits, beauty products. It's about twenty percent of the products. Use Amazon was ingredients at the moment. Why is the Amazon? Particularly important for him, personally his father was from the Missourians state of. But I when I saw him, he told me that actually he developed his environmentalist credential in this passion for the environment later in life. But seeing how many wonders that resume have specially when he came to the environment as you mentioned misleading has also been involved in Brazilian politics. Does he have real influence? And could he play a role in persuading, the both narrow government cherish its forests rather than cutting them down? Well, there was something very hard to do, especially because he doesn't want to get involved in party politics ever again. He told me he said, he's very concerned about the threats posed to the rainforest by the current administration. And so he's raising awareness through business in the civil society me, he's a board member of the Brazilian found for biodiversity the worldwide are funded in Brazil, and he also founded something called least tour you which focus on promoting the. Green economy as colon Avon isn't known for its eco friendly products. What's the chance that this will be an attempt to spread this ecological nature of the neutral brands? I mean, there could be a spillover effect problem is, I mean now the four companies have as that they bought from this trillions in two thousand thirteen the voter shop and Tony seventeen and now wave and although Avon will be the bigger brand is probably going to get something from both mature and the body shop in its, let's say DNA sometime in the medium-term said, both companies even an insurer big operations in Brazil how's that game to work what we have to think that the tour group now they own full brands between those, you pretty much have all the segments because as is quite high end the voters shows like let's say wants to down below that. And so there's no Tudor. Plus, Tuesday's let's say they have they ABMC covered bridge in the first three brands and now with Avon they will cover the. See entity so pretty much. We'll have the whole vertical chain, no, no, Brazil. But what are they go and Avon's faced lot of challenges? Do you think Notre will be able to turn that around? I mean they manage to more or less do so with the body shop. I mean it was quite a bumpy road with even is much bigger companies, manage their really focused on expanding into Asian markets with all the brands, especially with mature neighbors. So they mentioned specifically they were looking at Indonesia, and India. So those are very big markets. They had a good chance of and

Amazon Avon Products Brazil Avon Vanita Roddick Andras President Trump Gene United States Marina Silva Chairman Vanessa Holder Nietzsche Indonesia UK Jama
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Is what you most need. We'll be phone where you least one look like so you so you look at the darkest possible place in the strange thing is is that's where you discover the light contend with how terrible the world is you find out. What is exactly terrible? But there's something in you that beckons to you to adopt a mode of being that's that transcends that and that you can do that. And what that means is that no matter, regardless of how terrible the reality is the thing that allows you to transcend is more powerful than that. And that's. Unbelievably optimistic vision. And I do believe that I do believe not only did it's true. I also believe that we actually know it's true. And so the first bit of evidence for that would be the reaction that you have to the people that you love, but here's another bit of evidence. So, and this is something that I've been this idea that I'd been honing one of the things I've noticed when I've been addressing crowds because I listen to the reaction of the crowd, and I'm really interested in those periods where it's dead silent where you could hear pin-drop because that means everybody's moving as if movement will disrupt what's happening. And so that's an indication that something of significance is happening. Everyone seems to be doing it at once. So it's maybe it's delusional. But but probably not well, you never know. But it doesn't seem to be. And so one of the things that I've noticed is that audiences now go dead silent whenever I talk about responsibility. And I've thought about that a lot and I think there's a. And twelve rules for life. If it's about anything about responsibility. It's really about that. But it's about responsibility for a very specific reason that's societas with. Meaning I would say so we've already laid out the first axiomatic structure description of life is suffering. So made worse by malevolence, which is good thumbnail sketch of human history in some sense, or at least the negative elements of human history. What do you have to set against that? We think well, let's take a look at that. See the problem with most moralizing, which is you should accept responsibility. Right. You should be a good person. There's a kind of finger waving element to it. And there's no explanation. It's like thirty has imposed this requirement on you, and perhaps the requirement is legitimate. But there's no explanation for why. So I've been trying to come up with an explanation for why? And because it's a lot easier to get people to what would you say people are much more motivated, if they know. Why they're doing what they're doing Nietzsche said he who has a why can bear anyhow? And so, that's lovely. And it's the how is how are you going to trudge through the catastrophe of life? Let's say with with with head held high. So that you can stand up straight with your shoulders back. How are you going to do that? And the answer has to be well, you have to find something worthwhile to do in the face of that. And that's the why it's okay. So where do you find your Y? And well, we said one answer is in the people that you love. And so you have your family members, you have your children, and you do your best buy them. But there's responsibility in that, especially with parents with children, right, heavy responsibility with children, perhaps the most the heaviest of responsibilities, but people also generally think. Yeah. But that that's it's worth it. And I've certainly noticed that with my own kids that of course, they're heavy responsibility. Not least because there so fragile north lease because you can have a walloping influence. On them for harm, right? Which is kind of a terrifying thing. Nord least because it's up to you to show them the proper pathway forward. Like, it's on you, man. No doubt about it and children make that absolutely crystal clear like.

Nietzsche
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"My daughter. My daughter has to you know, my daughter has a snow day in this polar vortex. Right. And I can be pissed off about that. And think oh, jeez. I'm not going to get worked on where I can go out and do something beautiful with her. It is up to me, and those are little that's that's the wiggle room. I'm talking about it. Do you wanna dig yourself in igloo with your daughter, or do you wanna be pissed off all day that you have to you know, that you're not getting. The work done that you think you need to do. I love it. So. Yeah. Look for those wiggle room throughout life. That's the thing. I think a lot of people look at Nietzsche, and yet you get through something grandiose and giant and big 'cause he talked. He talked a big game. But if you look at his life, I mean, he wrote some philosophy some books. They like, you have changed the way we think, but he kind of he was he read a lot he walked he slept. I mean, he didn't do too much. But he still had that idea that was there that they strive for. Now, he's deeply human like he's deeply human at the same time. He's striving after something deepen transcendent. And I think that that's what we need to remember because oftentimes life is so mundane and like. It's so boring and Nietzsche says we are wasting our lives if we just are satisfied with this. But you don't necessarily need to go. I learned that you don't need to go to the Alps in order to break out of that. And I don't think that I'm going to be going to the Alps again. You can just build an igloo with your daughters. Yeah. Honest. I mean, it sounds stupid. But it's it's it is true. I think well, John this has been a great conversation where can people go to learn more about the book in your work? Well, the publisher is far Strauss and drew. But honestly, I think a lot of the pieces that I've written in the New York Times and the Los Angeles review of books lately have resonated with these questions the book is out in the UK next month. And I think that I'm gonna be posting a number of interviews through the BBC and ABC in the next couple of months, but I really do appreciate the chance to talk to you. Thanks so much. It's been a pleasure. Thanks again. My guess there's John keg. He's the.

Nietzsche John keg Alps publisher ABC BBC New York Times Strauss UK Los Angeles review
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I mean, honestly, I think I look back on the decision to go again, and my partner Carol still says to me she goes, you know, like that was the smartest and dumbest thing we have ever done. And she's right. And because I think what I wanted to see when I initially went back was if I could sort of live as intensely as I did when I was nineteen could I still climb the same mountains. Could we still and the answer is an unequivocal? No like, you can't do that especially when you have a wife and child, and so what what I tried to come to terms with is growing up. In other words, I had to take the gondola to the top of the mountain with with Becca and Carol instead of hiking up by myself, and instead of being angry or resigned to this fact, the challenges too. Own up to it to see if you can love it, even the frustration of it. So I didn't know what I was gonna find. But what I found was honestly an appreciation for the amorphous tea, which I didn't have is a nineteen year old. Right. You becoming who you are which is out. This point your middle aged guy with a wife and a kid. Yeah. That's right. And and honestly, the the point of impart of part of this is to give an interpretation of Nietzsche that allows one or allows a reader to see Nietzsche's brilliance in leading us into middle age. Usually, he's regarded as the quintessential juvenile philosopher nineteen year olds or drawn to him. But you're supposed to get out of it when you turn twenty five or thirty, but I think Nietzsche provides resources for us to really think through our lives as we move toward death. And I think that that's what the book is about. So no, yeah. I think so I'm I'm thirty six I'm approach. Ching middle age, and you notice. Yes, opportunities start closing down. Right. You there's some things you can no longer do because of simply just time or your have responsibilities and for a lot of people that can be they have that sort of moments. Like, oh my gosh. They have midlife crisis. They do these crazy things, but Nietzsche would say, no, you know, chill out. Yes. Things are closing in your opportunities are going down maybe a bit. But you still have a bit. You have you have the choice to to love it to embrace it. But also, they're still wiggle room within those parameters. Yeah, that's right. I mean that wiggle room is especially important. So I mean Nietzsche talks a big game about being a he's calls himself a, hyper boron or rather? He says a hyper Burien are like these mythical creatures that live up at the top of mountain like frost, covered, you know, ice covered mountains Nietzsche was never this person ever, a he was generally pretty sickly is especially when he's writing these words, and it's. Hope that you have a little bit of wiggle room to be the, hyper Borey and in your mundane life. In other words, see if you can wiggle yourself free, even within the sort of heb itchiness of your life. And I think that that's a really interesting sort of an, you know, value added to reading each as a forty year old on. I'm just on the brink of forty like we talked about Nietzsche's Uber mentioned this classic Overman, this ideal of individual freedom, and it's very appealing to a nineteen year old or to a twenty one year old, and what is interesting is that it just it it fits so well with their natural like with their natural sense of bigger. Maybe the benches better is more is more useful to those of us who have forgotten their free impulses. In other words may who have hit forty or fifty. Maybe the Uber mentions a lingering promise that we can be. Otherwise than we currently are. And I think that that's what needs gives us this report. Yeah. When you're twenty one it's not really hard to stri when you're fifty it becomes harder. But so it's there like, oh, I can still do that. There's a possibility. Right. Exactly. And I think we forget about the mad possibilities of life as we get older. But we have to remember that the mad that the mad possibilities of life. Don't necessarily involve the same types of actions as they did when you were nineteen the mad possibilities could be okay..

Nietzsche Carol partner Becca Burien Overman nineteen year twenty one year forty year
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And when you're running long distances anything for me anything over ten miles. I wanna stop like there's a part of me that wants to stop. And just continuing to go is an exercising of the you know is an exercise of the will and Nietzsche thought that we come to know ourselves through those sort of moments. So that sort of is a quick answer your question. Yeah. Is it also while you're there? It sounds like you were having some mental health issue. I mean, there was a moment. You're on the cliffs, you stare down over cliff, and you're thinking what if I could jump? I think everyone's done that at some point where you know, you're driving on coming traffic with just swerved. But do you think something else was going on? What do you think you were kinda descending into the abyss with while you were hiking with Nietzsche? I mean when Nietzsche's says to you, you must have the strength to ask forbidden questions. He's also saying like the most forbidden question is the question. Why why bother doing anything why bother getting up in the morning why? And when he's strips. I mean when he's strips traditional answers away from you that why can be very scary. So for example, if my minister, or if my rabbi, or if my mother or father are no longer the guiding forces of my life than what is I mean, KOMO who sort of inherits the existential mantle from Nietzsche, KOMO writing a minute. The the nineteen forties says there is but one serious philosophical question. And that is suicide he doesn't mean to bum. You out is just saying to you. What's the point of life is life worth living? And I think coming up with really good answers to that question is difficult earliest it was for me. Sometimes it still has. No. Yeah. I think everyone has that has had those moments where they're like laying in bed at night. And like what what am I doing? What what what am? I like this just like a what what the heck am I doing? And I think that Nietzsche allows you to voice those concerns, which is good. But it can. Also, be very disturbing. Now. You might ask yourself. Why is it good? I think the row is better on this. He says I don't want to get to the end of my life. And discover that I haven't lived, and I think that that the scariest part of death is getting to the end and discovering that you haven't lived and one of the hardest parts is to get to the end. And then look back and think oh my God. What was I doing with all of my time? I didn't have that much of it mandate. I squander it. And I think Nietzsche wakes us up when he asks us to ask forbidden questions. He's trying to wake us up to help us of that, you know, that end of life, right? Well, another thing he came up with sort of a thought experiment to get you thinking about that as eternal return. Yeah. That's right. And so he says to you. He says imagine that in your loneliest of loan. Lease a demon comes to you and says that this moment this very moment. And all things you will have to. Live over not once not twice, but an infinite number of times. And then he asks the demon asks would this idea crush you? Or would it elevate your soul and most of the time? I think it crushes us the idea that I'd have to redo this moment again, exactly the same way. An infinite number of times is terrifying. Think about all the time. You're stuck in traffic or all the time that you're you know, in a bad relationship, you'd have to live that over infinitely so Nietzsche's asking us to own up to life with a type of radical responsibility. In other words, can you live your life as William Butler Yeats says and do it all again live and play it again like play it again Sam? And I think that that's a challenge that many of us would do well to sort of face up to then y'all start about you'd mentioned earlier more Foty like this love of fate that kind of walks hand in hand with that idea as well. Yeah. So I mean for for a long period of time..

Nietzsche KOMO William Butler Yeats Sam
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I mean, I'm curious have you what do you think it is it about walking in your own experience where we're gonna get phenomena logical? Sure your own experience of walking. Why do you think it it blends itself well to philosophy or thinking through ideas, that's great? I mean one thing is that walking is the most primary way of orienting ourselves in the world. So I mean when you walk through woods, or when you walk through a city your feet are doing something for you. In other words, they're they're allowing you to explore the world, we usually don't even think about it. But when you go on a real walk. You realize you're exploring the world, which is in fact what I think philosophy is meant to do as well. So that's one ask. The other aspect is. When you walk you get to get away. In other words, we have so many habitual or mundane moments are in our life philosophy rather walking allows us to escape if for only a little while like we make fun of you know, pedestrian as a word that we usually use to describe the most boring aspects of life, but maybe we should be pedestrians. Like another words, maybe we should just. Walk a little bit more get out of our get out of our you know, in the house ruts. So I think that's another aspect. No. I like the others at Leiden for Salvatore. Abu Llandough like it is solved by walking. You know? You got a problem? You just go for a walk, and you might not get the answer there. But usually I do because your brain is sort of resting and then insights, come right? That's right. And I mean, it doesn't have to be something for a long time. I thought that walking and hiking had to be this sort of heroin exercise of masculine power, and has I've gotten gone grey, slowly, gone, gray. I realized that this is a sort of futile pursuit like you are. It you can push yourself. And I guess there is some sort of benefit to that. But I think the real difficulty is to come to terms with the ways that you can't always exert yourself. So also on that first trip to Switzerland. When you're hiking were Nietzsche height. You're also doing some like extreme forms of fasting. What was going on? What were you hoping to do with that? Yeah. This is a moment in the book where I'm like among gonna write this time. I really gonna write this and I did. So when I was nineteen I was writing about the ascetic ideal. The ascetic ideal is the idea that we have the power to deprive ourselves of things. And in fact, that this is a form of self control fasting is like a perfect example of the Sediq practice Nietzsche has a criticism of the ascetic ideal. When it's placed in the context of Christianity, if you think about the. Priest or the one who fasts on in Christianity. They're typically thinking that they're going to fast in order to well, go to heaven or in order to be you know, sainted or something Nietzsche doesn't believe that anything that that story is actually pretty destructive. But what I noticed about Nietzsche's life is that he was not he did not have an unvanquished relationship with food. It was difficult for him to eat yet stomach problems. So when I went to Switzerland I wanted to play around well at first I was playing around with it. But it turns out that fasting is pretty addictive, and we we talk about men typically as fasting and women as having anorexia. But I think that's pretty stupid distinction. I I mean straight up I just had an had a pretty serious eating disorder, which I think many wrestlers and many swimmers which I was one and upwards, and I came back and came back from Switzerland. Have been struggling with an eating disorder the rest of my life. Wow. So you mentioned, you know, he needs to wasn't a fan of the aesthetic ideal within the context of Christianity. But he he did see like what what value? Did he see in it? Then if he didn't think it will you don't do it to sanctify yourself. Yeah. I mean, this idea of what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, I think that Nietzsche was suggesting that we come to understand our limits through forms of very extreme practice, and this is the exercising of the will to power oftentimes, a if you think.

Nietzsche Switzerland Abu Llandough anorexia heroin Salvatore
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And they said, you know, what you've never been out outside of central Pennsylvania. You should go to Switzerland. You should go quote hike with Nietzsche. That's how the journey sort of began. So you went on this. You went to Switzerland to dig deeper into new job. Let's talk about Switzerland. What role did Switzerland play each's life, particularly Italians basil or basil will bustle was the town where Nietzsche became the youngest tenured professor in full Adji. The study of languages bustle actually was a place that he escaped into the mountains. And then in eighteen eighty and then from eighteen eighty one eighteen eighty six he spent his summers in a very small town called sills Maria on the Italian border. And he stated a boarding house, which is now a museum, and my professors, Doug, and Dan had contacted the museum and had arranged for me to stay there on this first nineteen year old journey, and I stayed there for nine weeks and hiked the trails that Nietzsche had hiked. It was also the place where Nietzsche he basically escaped the sort of conventions of academic philosophy from bustle and began to write books that at the time seemed unconventional to the point of craziness, but really transformed contemporary philosophy. So looks like the spokes are through stra beyond good and evil. The these books were penned not not in an office. But in in the hills outside of souls, bran so you've mentioned that Nietzsche winter to hike. He was a Walker like he even wrote about walking. What would it need to say about walking? Yeah. He said, look he said many things one of. Which was the only thoughts worth having are the ones that you have on your feet. I judge a thought on its ability to walk in other words to carry its own weight a Nietzsche when when he first got there and many on many occasions through his early state in sills Maria would hike seriously, he had a favourite mountain out corvette or his corvette. But through his later life. This walking became more of a way of you know, it was more strolling rather than hiking because his health was so bad, and he would take companions many of whom were women and many of whom are a couple of whom were Jewish in other sort of misconception about Nietzsche's that he's a misogynist straight misogynist that he that he hates women and that he's an anti Semite. Well in the in the hills around sills Maria, he spent a lot of time with feminist end with a Jewish woman. I mean, he comes out of this long line of philosophers that you know, thought. On their feet. So Aristotle Aristotle had a school of thought known as the peripatetic the walkers Russo said that his study was in fact, his walking trail, and then there's thrown I mean, he was like this epoch Walker. There's to your wife, I think he's an expert in Kant guy like people would supposedly with you would set their clocks to his walking schedule. He that's right. And I mean, I've often pooh-poohed so Immanuel Kant lived in Koenigsberg a part of Prussia and people would joke around in Koenigsberg that you could see the sort of philosopher stroll the same time every day. And I always thought that this was a, you know, a Nietzsche thought that this was a reflection of constipated mind that you would never like you would just do the same thing over and over again. But the more I get into adulthood, I think maybe this is the best that some of us can do like I like we're not going to the outs. A lot of us are not going to be Alps. Right. Maybe we should just go. For a little walk like, Kant and Khan. I think has I mean Carol has helped me see this that Kant has the idea of what he calls a purposeless purpose on his walks. He thinks that we should embody a purposeless purpose when we're trying to experience art or beauty or the sublime because usually our life is filled with these purposes that, you know, we raise children, or we, you know, have a house or we buy stuff. Those are real purposes was was rare about Khan's walks as they give him just a little space to have a purposeless purpose. And I think that's something useful in our sort of rat race of life. We're.

Nietzsche Immanuel Kant Switzerland Walker Maria Pennsylvania Aristotle Aristotle Khan Koenigsberg professor Adji Prussia Russo Dan Doug Carol nineteen year nine weeks
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Philosophers you read stuff in. It's like sometimes very bizarre. These aphorisms is revolt. Speaking about, you know, Zara sutra and things like, that's what was how'd you describe each philosophy? Sure. I mean, it's very that's it's a hard question. So I think Nietzsche is trying to create a philosophy thinking give us a sense of meaning in the absence of the traditions that I mentioned earlier, so what he would like us to do is to understand that the that the death of God actually allows us to live and living is not just an issue of reason. It's an issue of passion. It's an issue of art. And so the that leaf then comes through in his philosophy in is philosophy. Ralph WALDO Emerson says one day. Possibly will be done by poets Nietzsche envisions that or is trying to embody that. So when we think about the form of Nietzsche's philosophy. We see poetry. We see aphorism we see songs drama, and what niche is hoping is that we actually see it as a philosophy of life. He says that the point of life is to make our lives, like pieces of art, and he tried to embody that in his writings. So it doesn't come across as a straight argument or as a rational discourse. Because he says that an Ijaz suspects that human beings don't just live by rational discourse alone. They live by gut instinct, and they live by aesthetic were artistic experience. And so by forming a philosophy that is as you say unconventional. He's he's trying to tap into those. You know, those ways of understanding that irrational part, he uses the God icies right is sort of that that represents that irrational part. Of humanity. That's right. I mean, and so each envisions a culture that balances the denomination and the Appalachian the Appalachian being this call to order and the Dineen being the sort of darker instinctual impulse. And he says that the best cultures are those that can have a balance between the two, and if we think and have a balanced between the two in the same experience. That's what he thinks is so unique about Greek tragedy, for example. So you mentioned Ralph WALDO Emerson there as I've read Nietzsche I've found similarities between what he was doing. What the transcendental lists were doing? What do you think the similarities there? Yes. I mean Nietzsche's reading Emerson through the eighteen sixties, and he says that Emerson is his good friend because of his deep would need to Kohl's Scepsis the where the gives us skeptical in other words, Emerson's doubt about conventional forms of morality is doubt about conventional or traditional. Ways of being and I think that that's a similarity. I also think there's a similarity with Emerson's sort of drive toward individualism and self reliance, which we see in nature..

Nietzsche Ralph WALDO Emerson Dineen Kohl Ijaz one day
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Out our show notes AM to IS slash kick. That's K A dot IS slash k. John cake. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me. So you are philosopher what kind of philosophy. Do you specialize in? So my background is in American flaws feed nineteenth century European philosophy two types of loss fee that actually American pragmatism, especially says that philosophy should be judged on the basis of its practical consequences in other words, how law speaking matter to individuals in their communities how how basically philosophy can make a difference in life. Okay. So that's like William James was a pragmatist. That's right. Yeah. So is and basically there was the sense in the second half of the nineteenth century that philosophy risked jeopardising its own relevance. Basically by retreating the ivory tower, and that it needs to basically down again in the world. Well, okay. So you wrote a book about the pragmatist mercantilist view, which is great. But you got a new book out called hiking with Nietzsche? Now Nietzsche's interesting characters kind of doing something similar to the transcendental lists the pregnant is trying to make philosophy alive right before we get into your relationship with Nietzsche. Let's talk about this guy. Because I think a lot of he's a very controversial figure. He's misunderstood. What do you think? Are the biggest misconceptions about Frederick Nietzsche? Yeah. No. That's a great question. I'm glad that you asked. So I mean Nietzsche is probably the gateway for many many mostly nineteen year old men into philosophy. And that was the case for me. He's also the most misunderstood philosopher of the nineteenth and twentieth century, maybe of all all loss fee. So I mean when we think about Nietzsche, we think about the bumper sticker slogans God is dead. And also what what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, and I think that one of the misapprehensions or the misunderstandings of Nietzsche is that when he says God is dead. He's rejoicing over this. Fact, he's not in fact, he sees the facts that we can no longer believe in traditional forms of meaning so religious political familial he thinks that during the nineteenth century those forms of meaning have kind of gone down the toilet. And that's what he means. When he says God is dead. He's not rejoicing. What what what he's saying is in the absence of these forms of traditional meaning making. What are we going to do with our lives, and they actually sees it as a crisis? So he might be an atheist in a certain way. But he's not he's certainly not a rejoicing atheist. The second sort of misunderstanding is that Nietzsche was an anti Semite. Or is the darling of the alright Nietzsche was not an anti Semite his sister, Elizabeth was and that's how he became acquainted so intimately with the Nazi party in the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties. And then in our collective memory today. But that wasn't the case in Nietzsche's day. In fact, he talks about Nash. Nationalism and antisemitism as a type of bovine nationalism type of cow ish nationalism, which he was not a fan of. So I think those are the two main sort of misunderstandings. But unfortunately, that's the way the many of us understand each today. Yeah. I think he was a friend with Wagner with the guy wrote music, and he was an anti Semite and Nietzsche that's kind of one of the reasons why ended his friendship with them. Right. Right. So I mean, the the primary reason that Nietzsche ended his friendship with Wagner is that Nietzsche had a very close relationship with a man by the name of Paul Ray. And Paul Ray was ju and Wagner spread a very nasty. Rumor about Nisha he said that Nietzsche's difficulty with is is could be attributed to masturbation, and his masturbation could be attributed to his fear of women, and that is fear of women could be traced to homosexuality that he was sharing with Paul Ray. And that was a rumor that basically Nietzsche. Never forgave. And that that ended the relationship the I'd probably would forgive people spreading false rumors of batch either. So what kind of philosophy was each doing because it's different from say Plato or Aristotle or more analytic?.

Frederick Nietzsche Paul Ray John cake William James ivory tower Wagner Nash Elizabeth nineteen year
Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

Talking Tech

13:56 min | 1 year ago

Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. It's Jefferson Graham of USA today. Listen to the weekend edition of talking tech. Now, I really sat down with Peter chic off and Lloyd out list. Who are the guys who do the epic rap battles history videos YouTube to get like four billion us fourteen million subscribers series of spinning in NAFTA successful and just about two years ago. They took a break they've had it. And now they're arrested in the comeback with a new video that features Alon must taking on Mark Zuckerberg. I'd like to invite you to listen to more of our conversation. We ran the initial part yesterday. This is more of the extended chat talking about their favorite characters. How they got started and their cake on that seven year old kid who's making twenty two million dollars a year on YouTube, a have a listen to nice, Peter and epic Lloyd from the epic rap battles. To both of you have favorites that you've done over the years. Yeah. Who? I my favorite is an old one from season one. It's no Polian. Dynamite versus Napoleon Bonaparte. It's just it's memories for me. Because I think it's both of us that are strengths sort of Pete as like a more sort of nerdy settled character. Yeah. And I'm like, this giant French guy, and the beat was made by very old friend of ours who sort of very nostalgic of both Peten is this guy named Eddie from Milwaukee. I love his name is Eddy, I've beat so get a guy named Eddie. So that's my favorite. My favorite's the philosophers, we did eastern philosophers versus western philosophers. So it was Nietzsche's Socrates Voltaire versus sunsuits lot suit and Confucius, and we we decided that battle. There's a website that was made by some fans that has a little chat room minute. And I was in there one day just talking to them about suggestions. And we kinda came up with that together. And then we all sat down and tried to write it, and it was. Really hard. It was a, but we got there, and we had squabbling in between philosophers in their style. And they started fighting amongst themselves loss I do. And I liked the way it turned out a lot. So that's my favorite told everybody how you guys get started doing this. This is five years ago. Twenty ten is when we did the first battle. A Pete, and I met in nineteen ninety nine something like that we met in Chicago, we actually met freestyle rapping on a porch at a party amongst improvisers. Loyd was big in the imprompt community. I was nude the umbrella community in Chicago. And then Lloyd actually hired me Lloyd end his partners hired me and to do improv improv. I call it mission improbable, and we have a theater in Santa Monica called west side comedy. And at the time. It was just a touring improv group sorta like whose line is it anyway on the road, and we were expanding and bringing bringing on new towns people and people, and I just sort of clicked right away. And then we tore together for a couple years, and we do like, improv comedy shows like Iowa State community college at noon, and then the next day would be like Michigan state at ten to twenty five hundred people. So is this crazy experience, and we always kind of little songs and wrapped together here and there, and then yeah, it was made our way out to California. And I got my first. You remember the Emek? American emek. Not the I MAC, computer. Correct by maybe. Yes. Okay. So had I got an Email back, and I got a little pro tools inbox. And I was just starting to learn pro tools. Loyd had rap songs. I was working on acoustic songs, but Loyd had written these rap songs, and he had these beats by this guy named Eddie that that Milwaukee. Yeah. And we basically learn how to cord rap songs together. So we were in my apartment in Chicago in the closet. Loyd was in a vocal booth. And I was just like learning as we went. So he brought the music and the wraps. I brought the Emek and we figured it out. And that was also when we started learning how to edit together because mission improbable needed a new trailer. And I remember I got paid with the hard drive, and it was like a seventy two gig seventy two gig. I really needed pay. All edit this video for you guys can keep hard-drive afterwards. And I did. And I think I still have that hard drive. I wonder if anything's on it. So that that's how are. Partnership started. And then you made a video we made a video, but this was pre YouTube. This was all kinds of stuff. And then, you know, we we stayed in touch and stayed friends would move to LA state and Chicago, and then I came out LA to perform his theater and his wife's university LMU. Yeah. And then she owns a she owns it. Yeah. Octagon? Mrs loyola. She was a good activties director. So she put me essentially, and then I was writing sketches and music for different internet companies not doing that. Well, and Louis got an Email of people looking for talent to write and do stuff, and he recommended me. And I dish ind ended up being this YouTube company that I got a job at called maker studios and that ended up being the start of the YouTube revolution. And I was there. So you made it video with maker impulsive. I made all I made I wrote songs for makers while I was brought on as a songwriter. And then I was encouraged to develop series and stuff and experiment on my own and Lloyd came over and had this idea from a stage show where you take two celebrities, and they wrap out all I was like that would make a really good video. Let's do it. And so I used all my resource days at maker. We got a camera person and editor and a green screen, and we made this rap battle between John Lennon and Bill O'Reilly and it did. Okay. Yeah. It did. Okay. Enough to do a second one, which was Darth Vader vs Adolf Hitler. And that one did great. And so that in two thousand eleven it was like, okay. I think this is what we're going to do we've been trying to figure out. I was trying to figure out what it was going to do since nineteen ninety four and all sudden two thousand eleven figured it out. And so there went videos every day you work on videos every day. Correct. Shoot him every day. Everything branched off from there when you have a YouTube show. That's that big for me. You know, there was it was was sort of the flagship show, but it was able to bleed into other things we made a behind the scenes channel Pete had his own channel. He had a Monday show, and he had, you know, different videos. I had a little different series and everything would sort of trickled down from that main battle. So what started out as one battle a month turned into one battle with the BTS video maybe twos. Sometimes another show on my little side channel and p do Monday show, maybe a picture song. And and it rapidly got expanded sort of horizontally, and and this are sort of ascension that word. Yeah. Are essentially kind of happened at the same time that YouTube exploded with popularity as well. So it wasn't like there was a couple of generations of other YouTubers before us that had done a lot of stuff when we could like look at them as a model. It was all sort of very new to us, which I think is why we got so tired. After six years of it. We weren't sick of it. We were just exhausted because it sort of blew up so fast. And then and then there was no there was no model for it. Really? So how do we feel being back? Good. Yeah. Yeah. We have a totally different approach to it live healthier as far as you know, not wasting much time working more efficiently. We're able to hire our own team. So they report directly to us the world's working with people that we work really well with and just trying to be more efficient more effective pace ourselves a little bit. I don't make eight to fifteen videos a month any more. So I just focused on making the battle one battle of on. I think that's what we're looking at. Yeah. When we when we start up in the spring, and I think that's what we're going to. That's our goal is really good to, you know, there was a multitude of different things that we had to learn how to do when when we first became successful in twenty ten and. A lot of them were more complex than just making a video. A lot of them was like, how do you? How do you an iphone? How to Pete knife function sort of managed people, and how do we manage within a system? And how do we like, you know, communicate well and inspire other people that work for us, and that was all kind of new for us in that capacity. So taking a break and stepping away from it. And then coming back with like some fresh eyes has been I feel really excited about it. That's where I'm at. Yeah. The tech stuff is kind of. Crept up in quality to it's it's a little easier work. We're on all Dobie software now, and it's just it's a nice workflow things work efficiently. We know how to use things. Computers are faster you're talking to premier and after. Yeah. And and back in the day, we were Switzerland between final cut and after sometimes for some stuff and sending it here sending it back. Now, we have a pretty nice little tight workflow. We got a bunch of computers, and you know, how to use them when doing battles. Loyd. You have podcast a podcast. I do on Wednesdays at noon called kings of influence, which is really cool. The comedy theater is the place where is the comedy club Dione, and I'll perform there, and you know, teach teach there, and I I hang out with my wife and my dog and the cat, and yeah, stay very busy. And when you're not battling. Yeah. I don't do much. You you raising your daughter the family thing. That's okay. It's nice for me. But even that like, I pretty much just sit with her and talk with her. I try not to leave the house if I don't have to particularly on a day when it's raining, so unusual. We're talking in LA today where it's actually boring. It's like two days a year that. Yeah. And we forget what it's like, it's good. I see I got into gardening to getting into all kinds of domestic hobbies. So I like the ring let me ask you this. Forbes just came out with their annual list of the highest paid YouTube performers people always love reading this thing. Everyone performer is seven years old. Ryan toys review. Right. He's got within everyone channels can bring in twenty two million dollars in two thousand eighteen seven years old seven years old mom's pocketing money, but if it's a safer as college, right? I mean, how many times do you? Do you have to go to college? So tell tell us is being a youtuber in two thousand eighteen really that lucrative. No. I mean, it can be. But I mean, we we make Tim vehicles a year that are that cost quite a bit to make. And they they're not twi- commercials. Not yet anyway until we hook ups and toy commercials. It can be you know, there's there's definitely money there. And we we started making videos just as YouTube was turning on monetization. So we really ridden up and then down during the ad Pakalitha era of YouTube where advertisers were fleeing like crazy. And now, it's kind of stabilizing. It's just like anything. There's you know, there's one or two basketball players who make that much. Right. And then there's a lot of people who play basketball don't. And I think you tubes about the same way. Can you? If you're you were there at the beginning. But just people are listening now and say, hey, I. I put up my videos on YouTube. But I, you know, I I have a theater, and I could do a live show Chemi kid is it too late. No, I think that everybody there. I don't think that that platform has changed so much that the basic tenants of hard work have gone away. If you work hard and do good work, and I think YouTube is is skewing towards a consistency a consistent amount of work that is on a consistent basis. There's definitely a whole equipped. He was saying like a whole blue-collar class of entertainers on YouTube digital entertainers that. Yeah, you're not making twenty two million dollars a year, but you can make a living, and there's every reason to feel encouraged to do that. But the whole like Goldstrike type thing people ask us a lot of times. Like, how do you make a viral video? And that's like asking how to find a grain of sand on the desert. You know, it's it's the there's a million different ways to do it. I think you have to do good work and you have to do it consistently. And I think there's. A lot of people out there who are ready to do that you see a lot of people reading the news and just jumping and during your chase Vons. Right. Stop really how it works. Right. It's like you decide to do like like, I mentioned, you know, I started doing this in in the early nineties. I didn't make any money on it until the late two thousand tens. It's just a matter of of believing in what you wanna do obviously still possible since that young man wasn't even alive when YouTube turned on monetization. So it's still possible. You know, it's a massive massive platform. You know, I think kids kids videos are doing very well. I have a niece of nieces, but I was watching YouTube with my one niece, and she just watched the same toy video nineteen times in the same afternoon, which is probably. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day listening to talking tech, please subscribe to talking tech on apple podcasts. Please favorite show on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks. Everyone listening.

Youtube Loyd Lloyd Chicago Pete Jefferson Graham LA Eddie Milwaukee Napoleon Bonaparte Peten USA Polian Confucius Santa Monica California Peter Mark Zuckerberg Alon Basketball
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"For example, when you go lift weights, lift weights that are little heavier all the time. And as a consequence, you develop yourself physically and you turn into who you could be turned into more than you are. Okay. So if you face fears a little bit at a time, fears and challenges, and you do that voluntarily, then you become more than who you are. Okay. Now, let's recast that in archetypal language and make it into a kind of ultimate so. So if you wanna become everything that you could be, then you look into the abyss itself, which is the darkest place that you can possibly contemplate. And that would be the terror of more mortality on insanity and of suffering. And of malevolence. All of those would be like looking into hell, I suppose, to some degree. And then by voluntarily doing that, then you call upon the strongest part of yourself to respond and the strongest. Of yourself is symbolized as the sleeping farther nested inside the beast. And so the fundamental truth when you look into an abyss is that you don't see the abyss if you look long enough, it's like the answer to Nietzsche's conundrum. If you look long enough into abyss, an ambitious than the abyss looks into you. It's like, well, if you look long enough into an abyss past, when the abyss looks into you, you see who you could become in the form of your of the great ancestral figures nested inside the catastrophe of life, and then you can join them so to speak. You can incorporate that and become stronger, and you do that partly by taking on the challenge voluntarily and that informs you because you learn when you take on challenges fallen terribly. But you also do that as a consequence of psycho physiological transformation. Because when you place yourself and challenging situations, let's say the abyss is the archetype of the ultimately challenging situation. Then you turn on new genes in your nervous system in in your..

Nietzsche
"nietzsche" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on KGO 810

"For the no our topic is maxine waters and friedrich nietzsche the recent maxine waters something of the flying monkeys is making me act out in ways i hate acting like a witch i think is is that what that expression means i think name it's making me act outweighs i hate namely quoting nietzsche who i have managed to avoid for forty five years how did i lose my cool you ask slowly at first then all at once just this morning favorite expression to would be shamed stormtroopers quote beware that when fighting monsters you do not yourself become a monster so i think this screaming at the huckabee woman in the restaurant then chasing across town and then the reaction to it is the most important thing happening in in the country i really do it could be it could be the american capacity to forget something huge and move on forty eight hours later is enormous and knows no bounds so whether this will have a lasting effect i don't know but it doesn't have to be that this incident is it's this the fact that it happened and people are reacting the way they are that's not going away that's not a news story that's in our culture now and i think it's the most important thing in america right now interesting it is absolutely going to lead the violence rob goes on the degree of prejudice intolerance and discrimination being called for by maxine waters is a job is jawdropping in foreign excess of anything i ever saw from the that adversaries too late for advice though soft heads seemed to be protected by an oily substance that repels classic german philosophers but can still be penetrated by thirty style german mob rules that's right my friends i'm playing the nazi card nazi oh rob you're better than that why i got a montage of celebrities playing the nazi card on various cable news channels of beautiful that that shows you how you end up with the with the screaming at the restaurant thing as tucker carlson pointed out on his fox show last night once you've settled on the fact that your opponents are nazis will then yes any sort of resistance is okay correct any restraint on your part any not becoming a monster on your part is no longer a call for you don't have to worry about that so very liberating to name your opponents as nazis let's see moving along matt rights i can't remember if this came up during all of the right hand coverage did we discuss vp joe biden being kicked out of a bakery by conservative baker and twenty twelve i have no memory of that somebody google ad i don't know i don't remember that pretty conservative on some stuff but not also but i wouldn't kick joe biden out he's a nice old fella well i don't think anybody should be kicked out of anywhere based on their political views more importantly did we discuss the conservative establishment media celebrating said baker paul ryan brought the guy stage at a campaign rally to celebrate him okay i need to know more the camp of shut up and do your job but this righteous indignation for sarah huckabee sanders sanders seems a little hypocritical in light of that event so in two thousand twelve owner of a cookie shop turned down the opportunity to serve vp joe biden the right embraced them as their small business hero according to this new york daily news article wouldn't give them a cookie is that the trump no cohiba you he made the decision because of conviction and principle well i don't agree with that well yeah shut up and do your job moving along you may recall patricia who is job hunting in portland and mentioned that part of the online application process you're supposed to disclose your marital status in the choice was.

maxine waters friedrich nietzsche forty eight hours forty five years
"nietzsche" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"The no our topic is maxine waters and friedrich nietzsche the recent maxine waters summoning of the flying monkeys is making me act out in ways i hate acting like a witch i think is is that what that expression means i think so name it's making me outweighs i hate namely quoting nietzsche who i managed to avoid for forty five years how did i lose my cool you ask slowly at first then all at once just this favorite expression to would be shame stormtroopers quote beware that when fighting monsters you do not yourself become a monster so i think this screaming at the huckabee woman in the restaurant then chasing her across town and then the reaction to it is the most important thing happening in in the country i really do i could be it could be the american capacity to forget something huge move on forty eight hours later is enormous and knows no bounds so whether this will have a lasting effect i don't know but it doesn't have to be that this incident is it's this the fact that it happened and people are reacting the way they are that's not going away that's not a news story that's in our culture now and i think it's the most important thing in america right now interesting it is absolutely going to lead the violence rob goes on the degree of prejudice intolerance and discrimination being called for by maxine waters is a job is jawdropping in foreign excess of anything i ever saw from the supposed adversaries too late for advice though soft heads seemed to be protected by an oily substance that repels classic german philosophers but can still be penetrated by thirty style german mob rules that's right my friends i'm playing the nazi card nazi oh rob you're better than that i get a montage of celebrities playing the nazi card on various cable news channels so beautiful that that shows you how you end up with the with the screaming at the restaurant thing as tucker carlson pointed out on fox show last night once you've settled on the fact that your opponents are nazis will then yes any resistance is okay correct any restraint on your part any not becoming a monster on your part is no longer a call for you don't have to worry about that so very liberating to name your opponents as nazis let's see moving along matt rights i can't remember if this came up during all of the red hand coverage did we discuss vp joe biden being kicked out of a bakery by conservative baker in twenty twelve i have no memory of that can somebody google at i don't i don't remember that pretty conservative on some stuff not also but i wouldn't kick joe biden out he's a nice old fella well i don't think anybody should be kicked out of anywhere based on their political views more importantly did we discuss the conservative establishment media celebrating said baker paul ryan brought the guy on stage at a campaign rally to celebrate him okay i need to know more the camp of shut up and do your job but this righteous indignation for sarah huckabee sanders sanders seems a little hypocritical in light of that event so in two thousand twelve owner of a cookie shop turned down the opportunity to serve vp joe biden the right embrace him as their small business hero according to this new york daily news article wouldn't give them a cookie is that the no he made the decision because of conviction and principle well i don't agree with that well yeah shut up and do your job moving along you may recall patricia who was job hunting in portland and mentioned that part of the online application process you're supposed to disclose your marital status in the choice was choices.

maxine waters friedrich nietzsche forty eight hours forty five years
"nietzsche" Discussed on The Thrive Global Podcast

The Thrive Global Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on The Thrive Global Podcast

"I think there are a lot of really great lessons in it and some good ways of being i don't know that all the stories are necessarily factually true or tactically but i believe you know i believe in their good message and of the rules by which we should live as human beings in society and that particular scripture means a lot to me because you know there's been a lot of things that have happened in my life which could easily be excused for me weeping all the time you know that i could live my life is a weeping person in that people would say okay i understand yes of course you should weep but i won't you know i don't and my joy comes out all of the time and i'm trying to teach my daughter that joy and so part of yes the easter celebration is that philosophical idea about rising from the dead iva quote on my twitter which is about the phoenix rising you know to quote from nietzsche it's the same kind of thought that you have to burn your own ashes in order to rise again and for hugh perhaps the toughest rising was literally after death which is the death of your husband peter yes yes yes in fact there have been two very significant deaths the i was actually the death of my first daughter which was that she was born and died in the same day which for you know as i think about is like you know we have a word for when you lose a parent or parents you become an orphan right we have a word for when you lose a spouse a widow or widower but there's no word for the person who loses a child and i don't know if it's because the grief is so.

twitter peter nietzsche hugh
"nietzsche" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nietzsche" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Of all people the philosopher friedrich nietzsche famously wrote he who has a why to live four can bear almost any how the question is where do you find the why there are many competing answers to questions such as does my life have meaning or why do i hurt or why can't we just get along or is they're any hope for the world and even m i loved finding the why is the subject of the secret battle of ideas about god by jeff myers the head of summit ministries in some ways the secret in the title is a bit of a misnomer myers isn't talking about a conspiracy or stealth campaign waged by nefarious actors what he's talking about is how different world views shaped the way people including christians think about these questions without people being aware of that influence these different world views offer different answers to the question what is life about one worldview says that life is about control in particular control of nature and the created order not as stewards but in furtherance of our desires the second taking its cue for marks is dialectical materialism reduces all of life's questions to economic arrangements the third says that life is about context that is it denies that truth with a capital t exists instead there's only what people with power can trick the rest of us into thinking the fourth says that life is about consciousness what myers has in mind is what chuck colson used to call god kits not just the new age stuff of countless caricatures but also the more sophisticated variety peddled by the likes of oprah winfrey the fifth worldview looks at the disorder of the modern world and insists that life is about while thankfully actual jihadists are rare in the united states europeans through bitter experience have learned about the appeal of this world view to alienated young men.

friedrich nietzsche jeff myers chuck colson oprah winfrey united states