18 Burst results for "Nicole Turner Lee"

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:48 min | 5 months ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"No. I don't know. But first, let's do the numbers. Now industrials, up 216.6%, 35,970 on this Friday for the blue chips. But NASDAQ ascended 113 points about 7 10%, 15,630 S&P 500 picked up 44 9 10% 47 and 12 for the 5 days gone by the Dow advanced 4% that has that gained 3.6% S&P 500 added 3.8%. That is its best week since February. Movie theater chain AMC entertainment gave back 6.8% today SEC filings yesterday showed the sale of more than 300,000 shares by the CEO who last month said this was going to happen as part of a state planning. You should always pay attention to those planned sales when you hear about sales buy CEOs. That's all I'm saying. Speaking of cinemas, they've been slow to recover as we know Bloomberg reports today that more than 600 theaters are still closing nearly two years into the pandemic. Steven Spielberg's highly anticipated remake of west side story officially released today is expected to dance to the top of the box office, made it $800,000 in preview screenings yesterday. I have decided whether I want to go see it. Bonds, they barely budge. Deal down the tenured Tino at 1.48% you're listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is supported by UK G to be a powerfully productive business, you need powerfully happy people. Two leaders in workforce management and HR have joined forces to become UK G, ultimate Cronos group. UK G creates comprehensive HR solutions designed to make employees happier and build more meaningful connections within your workforce. They've even done that for themselves, being recognized as one of the top places to work and EKGs 12,000 employees help thousands of businesses build better cultures every day. When you're ready to make your people happier, UK is ready to work for you. UK G our purpose is people. You've been hearing about new investors week and now it's coming to a close time is running out to make your first gift to marketplace go twice as far. Please help us make the most of this special match from the investor's challenge fund, won't you? Your donation right now will have double the impact supporting all the people who make marketplace happen every single day. It'll only take you about three minutes. I promise, go to marketplace dot org slash donate or click that link in the show notes. This is marketplace. I'm Kai, risd. There are changes coming to the way businesses in New York City can hire. Starting in 2023 companies there aren't going to be allowed to use artificial intelligence to screen job candidates unless the technology in question has gone through an audit to check for bias. There are laws in Maryland and Illinois to address the potential for algorithmic discrimination in hiring. And the federal equal employment opportunity commission has a working group to study at marketplaces making mccarty corino has more. The Internet has made applying to jobs easier than ever, but also less humans, as Joseph fuller at Harvard Business school. When you open the faucet, all of a sudden a lot of applications started coming in. When no one's going to hit print 250 times. So most big companies use some sort of automated recruiting system. Narrowing the candidate pool using algorithmic filters. If you don't have this, you're out. If you don't have that, you're out. Anything from years of experience to your word choices. Companies are also increasingly using automated video interviews, says Lindsey Cameron at the Wharton school. And it's sort of monitoring your tone and your facial expressions and you know the depth of quality of your responses as best as it can, which though creepy isn't necessarily bad, she says, automated systems have the potential to bypass some human biases. But too often, bias is just built into the text as Nicole Turner Lee at the brookings institution. Computers are programmed by humans. They come with the same values, norms, and assumptions that humans hold. Amazon reportedly scrapped the AI recruiting system, it was using a few years ago over concerns about gender bias. She says the algorithm was trained on historical data about successful candidates. And because the data was trained on men, it kicked out any resume that suggested a woman's name, a woman's college or a woman's extracurricular activity, like the women's lacrosse team. Likewise, facial recognition software can disadvantage people with darker skin when algorithms are trained on white faces. Turner Lee says there needs to be greater oversight to make sure AI complies with civil rights law. I make mccurdy carino for marketplace. The federal emergency management agency released its new strategic plan this week. The word climate appeared 93 times in the document this year, which is 93 more times than it appeared in fema's last strategic plan and the Trump administration. Fema is known, of course, for responding to climate events. Hurricanes and floods, you know the rest. Now though, it's all about preparing for him as marketplaces Samantha fields reports. Fema is probably most known for all the work it does after natural disasters. But it truly has always been about helping people before jeering and after. Victoria Salinas is associate administrator for resilience at fema. And she says with the changing climate, that part of our mission of truly working before there's something to respond to has taken a greater importance, a greater focus. Fema also has more money now for pre disaster projects. The agency got $6.8 billion in the infrastructure Bill that it will use to help communities around the country mitigate their risk. It really does represent a tremendous potential pivot point for our national resilience. A lot of that money Selena says is intended for low income communities. Elizabeth zimmermann at the emergency management consulting firm IEM says that is another big shift. So looking at those underserved areas that might get some help when it comes to disaster recovery. I'd say very little help when it comes to pre disaster mitigation. In the last four years, fema says there's been what it calls a change in disaster operations tempo, especially due to wildfires and hurricanes. Jeff slag at the national center for disaster preparedness at Columbia University says there are two ways of dealing with that reality. One is continue to put more and more into what you do after the disaster strikes. Or put the money in before a disaster strikes. And there's increasing data available showing the value of investment in preparedness. Fema's own data, he says, shows that every dollar spent on mitigation.

UK AMC entertainment ultimate Cronos group fema federal equal employment oppor mccarty corino Joseph fuller Lindsey Cameron Tino Steven Spielberg Nicole Turner Lee CEOs
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"To be not the product of the technology but enabled by technology dr turner lee. Thank you so much for joining us and we hope that you'll do it again. Oh always a pleasure. Thank you for having me. That was dr nicole. Turner lee of the brookings institution. Her podcast is called tech tank. Sometimes on the show we get the opportunity to highlight people who identify a problem in a specific industry and set out to solve it. In very specific ways polly irungu the founder of black women photographers a global community and directory of black women and non binary photographers. It started just over a year ago when in the middle of covet in a newly ignited rachel reckoning polly tweeted out a link to a go fund me to raise relief. Funds for black women photographers. She distributed that cash to seventy people and the group now has seven hundred members who the biggest thing is like. I'm trying to create those opportunities and resources. That i wish i had when i first started when i first stove into the world of photography fortunately is still very white male dominated industry and so some of the resources within black photographers include krantz exhibitions per fuller views. Events in workshops in toxin trainings. All for free am religious. Turner close the gaps of equity in the little industry at large. But also just for me. When i first started as a photographer. During my undergrad at university of oregon any other black tigers let alone black women photographers and trying to get my foot in the door. Within the world of journalism and catastrophe was just way too hard just so many barriers within this industry for me. I'm just trying to solve as many as i can. Polly was born in kenya. Grew up in. Kansas and her family moved to oregon when she was in high school. Struggling to adjust to a new state and school she was encouraged to join the yearbook. Which is where. She fell in love with storytelling. She also worked at mcdonald's to.

dr turner lee dr nicole Turner lee polly irungu brookings institution polly rachel krantz fuller university of oregon Turner Polly kenya Kansas oregon mcdonald
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

05:33 min | 7 months ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"Just the latest revelation about the tech industry. A former facebook employee named francis hogan blew the lid off of what she says are the social media. Companies decisions to choose prophets overdoing. What's best for its users. My next guest will help us. Examine the real impact of a lack of regulation in tech dr nicole. Turner lee is the director of the center for technology innovation and a senior fellow at the brookings institution dr turner lee. Welcome to our body politic. Oh thanks for having me. We're going to start by chopping it up about facebook. So whistle blower francis hogan went on sixty minutes to talk about company documents that she took an has shared with the sec and other members of government and the media and it shows what she says is a pursuit of profit regardless of toxic effects on teens and other users of different facebook products then within days the facebook we'd of sites and platforms went down twice now is this a critical inflection point for the company. So there's a couple of things to sort of dissect from this conversation that happened on capitol hill and what. We're learning about facebook as a platform in general first and foremost..

francis hogan dr nicole Turner lee center for technology innovati dr turner lee facebook sec capitol hill
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"High speed internet safe to say has become pretty essential to our lives especially during the pandemic and yet many americans struggled to get it. The government has mapped internet access for years. But those maps have overestimated that access so congress task the federal communications commission with making better ones. The first results came out this month. A map showing mobile coverage from four of the biggest wireless carriers but mapping out wired broadband is still in the works. Meanwhile congress is poised to pass the infrastructure bill which could allocate sixty five billion dollars to improving broadband in the places that need it. Most nicole turner lee researches technology access at the brookings institution. She says the new mobile data is valuable since about fifteen percent of americans especially young and low income ones. Need it to get online. You'd be surprised by the number of people that were actually on their smartphones calling into zoom calls. We need to do a job. Where we actually tap into the full plethora of assets that are available on how people get connectivity without that we may again place our bets on one technology over the other and we need to continue to really thrive for technology neutral environment so that we're able to assess what works best for particular communities ever particular consumers and when it comes to the infrastructure plan we could end up with sixty five billion dollars to spend on broadband. But do you think that these sort of better wired maps will be finished in time to know the best places for that money to be spent the fact that will have the money to spend and we could spend it in targeted places where people need it. The most places were poverty abounds and people have to choose between broadband and bread. I hope that we can do this in a way. That at least sheds light on some of our broadband. Desert's at least and we're not necessarily started with places that we know we've already placed our beds on. It's now time to take stock and and make sure we're moving forward again to build upon coverage competition capacity. This is a pretty unprecedented amount of investment. That we're looking at you. Think it's worth waiting for the maps to get more information before we deploy it you know. I don't think we need to wait. Being on the internet matters in this society and when you're not connected you're being foreclosed on on a variety of economic social implications. We need to get this right. This has been more than two decades of the digital divide has been around. It's only been fourteen months sixteen months that people have she heard about it. It's time to actually move forward. We may have to come back and make some corrections or perhaps not spend out all the money so rapidly so we can ensure that. We're making calibrated decisions that do not result in overbuilding or do not bypass huge swath of people who are sitting there digitally silence simply because we didn't know that they weren't connected nicole. Turner lee is a fellow at the center for technology innovation at the brookings institution and now for some related links molly woods spoke to. Fcc acting chair. Jessica rosenthal russell about the efforts to update and improve coverage maps. One thing they're working on is adding metrics about internet speeds to these maps partially using crowd source data from their own speed testing app. We've got a link to that up at our website. Marketplace tech dot org. If you want to provide your data and see how it compares and we want to hear from you for a story. We're talking about tomorrow about microsoft's internet explorer. It seems to be dying a slow death but do you still use it. Do you remember when you first got it. Do you love it do you hate it. Do.

nicole turner lee congress brookings institution federal communications commiss government Turner lee center for technology innovati molly woods Jessica rosenthal russell nicole Fcc microsoft
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

03:26 min | 10 months ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"We're going to tackle a topic that fits more naturally into our traditional definitions of infrastructure broadband and even though providing broadband involves physical infrastructure pipes tunnels polls. We are still a very long way for making it accessible and reliable to millions of americans. So let's start at the beginning understanding that america has always had some kind of communications infrastructure. We began with written communication with the founding of the united states post office this actually predated our constitution and made its way into the constitution. And then ben. Franklin oversaw its creation as a head of department for a short while. That's all been second appearance in the series which i think makes him our founding father of us infrastructure in the mid eighteen hundreds. We saw a new communication technology taking off in the united states. Late thousands of miles of telegraph lines to speed the transmission of communication. Then in the early nineteen hundreds radio transmission enters the scene and suddenly were able to transmit audio communications instead of just text but radio spectrum is finite and so this is where we start to see government regulations in nineteen twenty seven. We had the radio act. Establishing that radio waves are public property and that means that radio stations have to have licenses from the government in order to use that spectrum. The government did decide not to charge stations for the use of this property. And we're also seeing the dramatic growth of telephone communications and suddenly the federal government realizes growth is the name of the game when it comes to communications and they need a new way to govern wire radio telephone communications so they pass the communications act of nineteen thirty four which creates the federal communications commission. And here's the language from that bill. About what the fcc is supposed to do it for the purpose of regulating interstate and foreign commerce and communication by wire and radio so as to make available so far as possible to all the people of the united states a rapid efficient nationwide and worldwide wire and radio communications service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges for the purpose of the national defense for the purpose of promoting safety of life and property through the use of wire and radio communications and for the purpose of securing a more effective execution of this policy by centralizing authority heretofore granted by law to several agencies and by granting additional authority with respect to the interstate and foreign commerce and wire and radio communications this is hair by created a commission to be known as the federal communications commission which shall be constituted as hereinafter provided which execute and enforce the provisions of this act so we have telegrams radio transmission an ever-growing telephone network and then in the nineteen eighties. We start to see computer networks communicating with one another nicole. Turner lee senior fellow governance studies and director of the center for technology innovation at the brookings institution. Many of us can think about the early days of telephones and how the early days of telephones were really our communication artery. Coming off of the telegraph telephone really transformed our communications infrastructure. While after the breakup of the baby bells we began to see something called modems which some folks might remember as aol. You got mailed that then transition to copper.

united states federal communications commiss united states post office Franklin ben federal government Turner lee center for technology innovati brookings institution aol
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning distance learning in the pandemic. Highlights of problem that experts have warned about For years. Some students have good access to the Internet. And others do not. It's called the digital divide. Many districts are about to start the school year with Mohr distance learning. So how can they narrow that Divide? Rachel Martin spoke with Nicole Turner Lee, who studies it. When you look back at those two, sometimes three months that that students in this country were doing distance learning what what worked and what didn't You know, I think generally I am in agreement with some of the folks that have looked at this short period of time is ah, somewhat of an abject failure for our Children. What worked was that you know, schools had the attention of their households to figure out what to do during a time of crisis. What didn't work was at schools were not necessarily all ready to move to an online solution, particularly when they assess the equity challenges of who had broadband and who did not. We know that they were probably about 12 to 15 million students that did not have access at all. And in those households that were low income, they were proud. About 32 35% of those students who did not have access to multiple devices. So what now? How do we make that better? You know, I think it's important for schools to sort of put together what I call a 21st century remote access blueprints. What we found out from schools is that they had very little data about who was connected with in their districts or around the proximity of the school. I think once they have that data, and they determined that, you know. Hey, this provider is in our community. Maybe that provider doesn't have access to on open hot spot. Then it's up to the school district. To start thinking about that. What do we do about those blind spots? So example in in ST Louis that didn't think about the fact that many of their students on free or reduced price lunched lived in public housing. And so as a result of that, there was never a conversation to go directly to the public housing property manager and say, Hey, can you open up an unlicensed WiFi hot spot so that our kids who live here can get access? Instead, we saw schools and libraries become what some have now coin digital parking lives where people would pull up because the library fortunate was able to bolster its signal, and schools were able to broadcast out their wireless, maybe three or 400 feet. It. Is that really sustainable? I mean, just seems totally untenable. Tohave. These families you know, crammed with their kids in a car in a parking lot of a library to just do their basic homework assignments. Oh, no, I agree. I think that at first it was exciting, but it gets old. We have to look at where these blind spots were in the last 2 to 3 months and reimagine education re Imagine learning communities can we actually take a bacon space and, Ah, you know a small storefront retail community and actually bring a classroom. Or to classrooms to that space to keep those youth sort of together, right? Can we actually think about partnering with a non profit organization or church that maybe in the middle of a rural, urban or suburban community where kid does not have access to walk to a local library and maybe create a mesh network in that sense? What do you need from the federal government To make that happen? You know, I'd like to think that moving forward. We may think about a national appropriation the same way we think about our food nutrition centers right and how we give food to the needy through the staff program or the town of program. The challenges you know, those are all very partisan in terms of changes in leadership affect that, But we need to do something different to ensure that when we have these types of Breakdowns that schools are not sort of running around themselves, trying to figure it out by themselves that they can tap into resource is that allow them to solve these types of problems. Nicole turn early with the Brookings Institution. She studied digital divides an education for decades. We so appreciate your time in perspective on this. Thank you. Thank you Feel much. Poland's conservative incumbent President Andre Duda has won a second term. It was a bitterly fought election and the opposition might well dispute the results here's asked me Nicholson Speaking to journalists this morning, Poland's electoral commission announced that Andre Duda received 51.2% of the vote, narrowly beating Rafael Tarkovsky, who got 48.8%. Votes is still being counted, but the electoral commission says any variation and numbers will be slight and won't alter the final outcome. Judah greeted supporters in the early hours of this morning. Duda enjoys the backing of Poland's governing right wing Lauren Justice Party. He led a campaign heavily dominated by homophobia rhetoric in which he promised to defend quote Catholic family values. His opponent, Rafay Trickovski, is mayor of Waterfall, Poland's capital and largest city of 80 comes out both girl. Appearing before supporters he didn't concede as a pro European who's culturally more liberal. Trajkovski's campaign promised to unite the country by bringing back balance and tolerance to Polish politics. Under Duda, the governing right wing Lauren Justice Party can continue strengthening its grip on the court system and public media policies that Trickovski pledged to veto as the results reflect Poland's presidential campaign was exceptionally divisive Duda who denounced the LGBTQ rights movement as an ideology worse than communism. Garnered support from the government and the Catholic Church. State television also sided with Duda, alleging that Schakowsky does not have polish interests at heart. And it revived Poland's fraught history of anti Semitism, accusing him of promoting Jewish concerns. Trajkovski's party, the opposition Civic Platform Group, says it's looking into potential cases of electoral misconduct. Such as registration problems. A missing postal banish papers for NPR news. I'm as me, Nicholson been burned. Thank you for listening to us on your local member station. You can.

President Andre Duda Poland NPR News Nicole Turner Lee Lauren Justice Party Nicholson Steve Inskeep Noelle King ST Louis school district Trajkovski Rachel Martin federal government Mohr property manager Brookings Institution
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

"Look, it's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning distance learning in the pandemic. Highlights of problem that experts have warned about For years. Some students have good access to the Internet. And others do not. It's called the digital divide. Many districts are about to start the school year with Mohr distance learning. So how can they narrow that Divide? Rachel Martin spoke with Nicole Turner Lee, who studies it. When you look back at those two, sometimes three months that that students in this country were doing distance learning what what worked and what didn't You know, I think generally I am in agreement with some of the folks that have looked at this short period of time is ah, somewhat of an abject failure for our Children. What worked was that you know, schools had the attention of their households to figure out what to do during a time of crisis. What didn't work was at schools were not necessarily ready to move to an online solution, particularly when they assess the equity challenges of who had broadband and who did not. We know that they were probably about 12 to 15 million students that did not have access at all. And in those households that were low income, they were proud. About 32 35% of those students who did not have access to multiple devices. So what now? How do we make that better? You know, I think it's important for schools to sort of put together what I call a 21st century remote access blueprints. What we found out from schools is that they had very little data about who was connected with in their districts or around the proximity of a school. I think once they have that data, and they determined that, you know. Hey, this provider is in our community. Maybe that provider doesn't have access to on open hot spot. Then it's up to the school district. To start thinking about them. What do we do about those blind spots? So example in in ST Louis that didn't think about the fact that many of their students on free or reduced price lunched lived in public housing. And so as a result of that, there was never a conversation to go directly to the public housing property manager and say, Hey, can you open up an unlicensed WiFi hot spot so that our kids who live here can get access? Instead, we saw schools and libraries become what some have now coin digital parking lives where people would pull up because the library fortunate was able to bolster its signal, and schools were able to broadcast out their wireless, maybe three or 400 feet. It. Is that really sustainable? I mean, just seems totally untenable. Tohave. These families you know, crammed with their kids in a car in a parking lot of a library to just do their basic homework assignments. Oh, no, I agree. I think that at first it was exciting, but it gets old. We have to look at where these blind spots were in the last 2 to 3 months and reimagine education re Imagine learning communities can we actually take a bacon space and, Ah, you know a small storefront retail community and actually bring a classroom. Or to classrooms to that space to keep those youth sort of together, right? Can we actually think about partnering with a non profit organization or church that maybe in the middle of a rural, urban or suburban community where kid does not have access to walk to a local library and maybe create a mesh network in that sense? What do you need from the federal government To make that happen? You know, I'd like to think that moving forward. We may think about a national appropriation the same way we think about our food nutrition centers right and how we give food to the needy through the stat program or the town of program. The challenges you know, those are all very partisan in terms of changes in leadership affect that, But we need to do something different to ensure that when we have these types of Breakdowns that schools are not sort of running around themselves, trying to figure it out by themselves that they can tap into resource is that allow them to solve these types of problems. Nicole turn early with the Brookings Institution. She studied digital divides an education for decades. We so appreciate your time in perspective on this. Thank you. Thank you Feel much. Poland's conservative incumbent President Andre Duda has won a second term. It was a bitterly fought election and the opposition might well dispute the results here's asked me Nicholson Speaking to journalists this morning, Poland's electoral commission announced that Andre Duda received 51.2% of the vote, narrowly beating Rafael Trickovski, who got 48.8%. Votes is still being counted, but the electoral commission says any variation and numbers will be slight and won't alter the final outcome. Judah greeted supporters in the early hours of this morning. Duda enjoys the backing of Poland's governing right wing Lauren Justice Party. He led a campaign heavily dominated by homophobia rhetoric in which he promised to defend quote Catholic family values. His opponent, Rafay Trickovski, is mayor of Waterfall, Poland's capital and largest city. Chaturvedi comes out both Appearing before supporters he didn't concede as a pro European who's culturally more liberal. Trajkovski's campaign promised to unite the country by bringing back balance and tolerance to Polish politics. Under Duda, the governing right wing Lauren Justice Party can continue strengthening its grip on the court system and public media policies that Trickovski pledged to veto as the results reflect Poland's presidential campaign was exceptionally divisive Duda who denounced the LGBTQ rights movement as an ideology worse than communism. Garnered support from the government and the Catholic Church. State television also sided with Duda, alleging that Schakowsky does not have polish interests at heart, and it revived Poland's fraught history of anti Semitism, accusing him of promoting Jewish concerns. Trajkovski's party. The opposition Civic Platform Group, says it's looking into potential cases of electoral misconduct such as registration problems. A missing postal banish papers for NPR news. I'm as me Nicholson in bundles. Thank you for listening.

President Andre Duda Poland NPR News Lauren Justice Party Nicole Turner Lee Nicholson Rafael Trickovski Steve Inskeep Noelle King ST Louis school district Trajkovski Rachel Martin federal government Mohr property manager Catholic Church
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning distance learning in the pandemic. Highlights of problem that experts have warned about For years. Some students have good access to the Internet. And others do not. It's called the digital divide. Many districts are about to start the school year with Mohr distance learning. So how can they narrow that Divide? Rachel Martin spoke with Nicole Turner Lee, who studies it. When you look back at those two, sometimes three months that that students in this country were doing distance learning what what worked and what didn't You know, I think generally I am in agreement with some of the folks that have looked at this short period of time is ah, somewhat of an abject failure for our Children. What worked was that you know, schools had the attention of their households to figure out what to do during a time of crisis. What didn't work was at schools were not necessarily ready to move to an online solution, particularly when they assessed the equity challenges of who had broadband and who did not. We know that they were probably about 12 to 15 million students that did not have access at all. And in those households that were low income, they were proud. About 32 35% of those students who did not have access to multiple devices. So what now? How do we make that better? You know, I think it's important for schools to sort of put together what I call a 21st century remote access blueprints. What we found out from schools is that they had very little data about who was connected with in their districts or around the proximity of a school. I think once they have that data, and they determined that, you know, Hey, this provider is in our community. Maybe that provider doesn't have access to on open hot spot. Then it's up to the school district to start thinking about that. What do we do about those blind spots? So example in in ST Louis that didn't think about the fact that many of their students on free or reduced price lunched lived in public housing. And so as a result of that, there was never a conversation to go directly to the public housing property manager and say, Hey, can you open up an unlicensed WiFi hot spot so that our kids who live here can get access. Instead, we saw schools and libraries become what some have now coin digital parking lots where people would pull up because the library fortunate was able to bolster its signal, and schools were able to broadcast out their wireless, maybe three or 400 feet. It. Is that really sustainable? I mean, just seems totally untenable. Tohave, these families crammed with their kids in a car in a parking lot of a library to just do their basic homework assignments. Oh, no, I agree. I think that at first it was exciting, but it gets old. We have to look at where these blind spots were in the last 2 to 3 months and reimagine education re Imagine learning communities can we actually take a bacon space and, Ah, you know a small storefront retail community and actually bring a classroom. Our two classrooms to that space to keep those youth sort of together, right? Can we actually think about partnering with a non profit organization or church that maybe in the middle of a rural, urban or suburban community where kid does not have access to walk to a local library and maybe create a mesh network in that sense? What do you need from the federal government To make that happen? You know, I'd like to think that moving forward. We may think about a national appropriation the same way we think about our food nutrition centers right and how we give food to the needy through the stat program or the town of program. The challenges you know, those are all very partisan in terms of changes in leadership affect that, But we need to do something different to ensure that when we have these types of Breakdowns that schools are not sort of running around themselves, trying to figure it out by themselves that they can tap into resource is that allow them to solve these types of problems. Nicole turn early with the Brookings Institution. She studied digital divides in education for decades. We so appreciate your time and perspective on this. Thank you. Thank you. Film us. Poland's conservative incumbent president Ahn Drea Duda has won a second term. It was a bitterly fought election and the opposition might well dispute the results here's asked me Nicholson Speaking to journalists this morning, Poland's electoral commission announced that Andre Duda received 51.2% of the vote, narrowly beating Rafael Tarkovsky, who got 48.8%. Votes is still being counted, but the electoral commission says any variation and numbers will be slight and won't alter the final outcome. Duda greeted supporters in the early hours of this morning. Doodah enjoys the backing of Poland's governing right wing Lauren Justice Party. He led a campaign heavily dominated by homophobia rhetoric in which he promised to defend quote Catholic family values. His opponent, Rafay Trickovski is mayor of Waterfall, Poland's capital and largest City Ave. Becomes our both appearing before supporters he didn't concede. As a pro European who's culturally more liberal. Trajkovski's campaign promised to unite the country. Bringing back balance and tolerance to Polish politics. Under Duda, the governing right wing Lauren Justice Party can continue strengthening its grip on the court system and public media policies that trick off so he pledged to veto As the results reflect Poland's presidential campaign was exceptionally divisive. Duda, who denounced the LGBTQ rights movement as an ideology worse than communism, garnered support from the government and the Catholic Church. State television also sided with Duda, alleging that Schakowsky does not have polish interests at heart, and it revived Poland's fraught history of anti Semitism..

Ahn Drea Duda Poland Nicole Turner Lee Steve Inskeep Noelle King ST Louis Lauren Justice Party Rachel Martin federal government Mohr Brookings Institution Trajkovski property manager Tohave Catholic Church
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faces Congress

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faces Congress

"Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill right now and he's facing a tough audience from disinformation and hate speech to a collection content is companies under pressure plus today he'll need to give specifics on Facebook's plan for a new digital currency and here tech correspondent Shannon bond has the story and I should note that Facebook is one of NPR's financial supporters the last time mark Zuckerberg testified at a congressional hearing he was under fire over whether a political consulting firm use the private information of Facebook users as part of an effort to sway the twenty sixteen election a year and a half later that immediate crisis has passed but Facebook is under even more pressure and scrutiny today democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren says Facebook has too much power I say it's time to break them up let's enforce the anti trust laws yes mark Zuckerberg I'm looking at you this started as a place for college students to find each other but now it has become the world's most influential social media site and a crucial place for politicians to reach voters along the way it's become vulnerable to misinformation manipulation propaganda critics say Facebook needs to take more responsibility now that it's so big there is a kind of a denial of just how sweeping that role is and the real harms that the platform can have on vulnerable communities communities of color without adequate guardrail someplace that's the need to give to a former justice department official she now heads up the leadership conference on civil and human rights many of her concerns will be front and center today Facebook has been accused of enabling discrimination through its ad tools the US department of housing and urban development is sued Facebook over this issue the federal agency says Facebook let advertisers show or hide housing ads from users based on their race or where they live Nicole Turner Lee is a fellow at the Brookings Institution center for technology innovation in the case of Facebook what I think we're seeing is that the tool is being used in ways I think that they did not plan for this book says it is stop letting advertisers target ads for housing jobs and credit to people based on their ethnicity or where they live and just yesterday it pledged one billion dollars for affordable housing in California but Facebook wants to go further into people's lives and soccer Berg will have to defend his plans for a new global digital currency libra leaders worry it could be used for illegal activities like money laundering or define terrorism the currency is still in the theoretical stages but it's already in jeopardy just in the past couple of weeks some crucial partners including visa MasterCard and PayPal have dropped out entirely lever sounds dead on arrival Michael tractor is an analyst with Wedbush securities I don't think Facebook could pull it off without the support of all of the different banking and credit your credit card processors payment processors I just don't think that they have the wherewithal to actually do it themselves beyond the headline topics members of the house financial services committee will get to ask soccer Berg about everything else on their minds to what is the company doing to stop election interference is a bias against conservative says some politicians claim what is that politicians lie in ads there may even be questions about whether Facebook should be broken up as it was with Warren is calling for a scenario soccer Berg round the rejects Facebook on the defensive and lawmakers eager to pile on there could be

Mark Zuckerberg Facebook CEO One Billion Dollars
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

"A new digital currency and here tech correspondent Shannon bond has the story and I should note that Facebook is one of NPR's financial supporters the last time mark Zuckerberg testified at a congressional hearing he was under fire over whether a political consulting firm use the private information of Facebook users as part of an effort to sway the twenty sixteen election a year and a half later that immediate crisis has passed but Facebook is under even more pressure and scrutiny today democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren says Facebook has too much power I say it's time to break them up let's enforce the anti trust laws yes mark Zuckerberg I'm looking at you this started as a place for college students to find each other but now it has become the world's most influential social media site and a crucial place for politicians to reach voters along the way it's become vulnerable to misinformation manipulation propaganda critics say Facebook needs to take more responsibility now that it's so big there is a kind of a denial of how sweeping that role is and the real harms that the platform can have on vulnerable communities communities of color without adequate guardrail someplace that's the need to give to a former justice department official she now heads up the leadership conference on civil and human rights many of her concerns will be front and center today Facebook has been accused of enabling discrimination through its ad tools the US department of housing and urban development is sued Facebook over this issue the federal agency says Facebook let advertisers show or hide housing ads from users based on their race or where they live Nicole Turner Lee is a fellow at the Brookings Institution center for technology innovation in the case of Facebook what I think we're seeing is that the tool is being used in ways I think that they did not plan for this book says it is stop letting advertisers target ads for housing jobs and credit to people based on their ethnicity or where they live and just yesterday it pledged one billion dollars for affordable housing in California but Facebook wants to go further into people's lives and soccer Berg will have to defend his plans for a new global digital currency libra leaders worry it could be used for illegal activity like money laundering or define terrorism the currency is still in the theoretical stages but it's already in jeopardy just in the past couple of weeks some crucial partners including visa MasterCard and PayPal have dropped out entirely Lieber sounds dead on arrival Michael tractor is an analyst with Wedbush securities I don't think Facebook could pull it off without the support of all of the different banking and credit your credit card processors payment processors I just don't think that they have the wherewithal to actually do it themselves beyond the headline topics members of the house financial services committee will get to ask soccer Berg about everything else on their minds to what is the company doing to stop election interference is a biased against conservative says some politicians claim what is it that politicians lie in ads there may even be questions about whether Facebook should be broken up as Elizabeth Warren is calling for a scenario soccer Berg round the rejects Facebook on the defensive and lawmakers eager to pile on there.

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anti trust laws yes mark Zuckerberg I'm looking at you this started as a place for college students to find each other but now it has become the world's most influential social media site and a crucial place for politicians to reach voters along the way it's become vulnerable to misinformation manipulation propaganda critics say Facebook needs to take more responsibility now that it's so big there is a kind of a denial of how sweeping that role is and the real harms that the platform can have on vulnerable communities communities of color without adequate guardrail someplace that's the needed due to a former justice department official she now heads up the leadership conference on civil and human rights many of her concerns will be front and center today Facebook has been accused of enabling discrimination through its ad tools the US department of housing and urban development is sued Facebook over this issue the federal agency says Facebook let advertisers show or hide housing ads from users based on their race or where they live Nicole Turner Lee is a fellow at the Brookings Institution center for technology innovation in the case of Facebook what I think we're seeing is that the tool is being used in ways I think that they did not plan for this success at a stop letting advertisers target ads for housing jobs and credit to people based on their ethnicity or where they live and just yesterday it pledged one billion dollars for affordable housing in California Facebook wants to go further into people's lives and soccer Berg will have to defend his plans for a new global digital currency libra leaders worry it could be used for illegal activity like money laundering or define terrorism the currency is still in the theoretical stages but it's already in jeopardy just in the past couple of weeks some crucial partners including visa MasterCard and PayPal have dropped out entirely Lieber sounds dead on arrival Michael tractor is an analyst with Wedbush securities I don't think Facebook could pull it off without the support of all of the different banking and credit your credit card processors payment processors I just don't think that they have the wherewithal to actually do it themselves beyond the headline topics members of the house financial services committee will get to ask doctor Berger about everything else on their minds to what is the company doing to stop election interference is a bias against conservative says some politicians claim what is that politicians lie in ads there may even be questions about whether Facebook should be broken up as Elizabeth Warren is calling for a scenario soccer Berg round the rejects Facebook on the defensive and lawmakers eager to pile on.

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KCRW

"Laws yes mark Zuckerberg I'm looking at you this started as a place for college students to find each other but now it has become the world's most influential social media site and a crucial place for politicians to reach voters along the way it's become vulnerable to misinformation manipulation propaganda critics say Facebook needs to take more responsibility now that it's so big there is a kind of a denial of how sweeping that role is and the real harms that the platform can have on vulnerable communities communities of color without adequate guardrail someplace that's the need to give to a former justice department official she now heads up the leadership conference on civil and human rights many of her concerns will be front and center today Facebook has been accused of enabling discrimination through its ad tools the US department of housing and urban development is sued Facebook over this issue the federal agency says Facebook let advertisers show or hide housing ads from users based on their race or where they live Nicole Turner Lee is a fellow at the Brookings Institution center for technology innovation in the case of Facebook what I think we're seeing is that the tool is being used in ways I think that they did not plan for this book says it is stop letting advertisers target ads for housing jobs and credit to people based on their ethnicity or where they live and just yesterday it pledged one billion dollars for affordable housing in California but Facebook wants to go further into people's lives and soccer Berg will have to defend his plans for a new global digital currency libra leaders worry it could be used for illegal activity like money laundering or define terrorism the currency is still in the theoretical stages but it's already in jeopardy just in the past couple of weeks some crucial partners including visa MasterCard and PayPal have dropped out entirely Lieber sounds dead on arrival Michael tractor is an analyst with Wedbush securities I don't think Facebook could pull it off without the support of all of the different banking and credit your credit card processors payment processors I just don't think that they have the wherewithal to actually do it themselves beyond the headline topics members of the house financial services committee will get to ask soccer Berg about everything else on their minds to what is the company doing to stop election interference is a biased against conservative says some politicians claim what is it that politicians lie in ads there may even be questions about whether Facebook should be broken up as Elizabeth Warren is calling for a scenario soccer Berg round the rejects with Facebook on the defensive and lawmakers eager to pile on there.

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king in Washington DC and I'm David green in Culver city California good morning the top US diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor told lawmakers yesterday that he believed there was a shadow foreign policy operation in the trump administration led by the president's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani Taylor also said the administration made military aid to Ukraine contingent on investigations that would help president trump politically in other words a quid pro quo the White House continues to deny this and after Taylor's testimony dozens of Republicans took to the house floor to slam Democrats over the impeachment inquiry let's begin our coverage with NPR White House correspondent Tamera Keith morning ten good morning okay so William Taylor's testimony what did we learn about what he's describing is these informal channels for foreign policy so what we know is from his opening statement fifteen pages at a very detailed timeline of conversations that he had with various people in both the formal and informal channels of foreign policy as relates to Ukraine and he builds a case that president trump one of the president of Ukraine president the Lynskey to state publicly and this is important because it would help the president politically to state publicly that his country would investigate but the twenty sixteen election and a Ukrainian gas company linked to former vice president Joe Biden's son and what he says is that for a time the informal system and the and the formal traditional system we're going in the same direction they were both at it in the best interests of the United States but then there came a time when they split when they diverge and he says that he felt that the relationship between the United States and Ukraine was being undermined by this your regular informal channel of US policy making and by the withholding vital security assistance for domestic political reasons that was a quote well that that sounds like the very quick pro quo that president trump has been denying explicitly so how is the White House responding to this testimony well they say there still is no quid pro quo a seventy Grisham the press secretary put out a statement saying that the president has done nothing wrong and quote this is a coordinated smear campaign from far left lawmakers and radical unelected bureaucrats rage waging war on the constitution she also called the politically motivated and said that today was just more triple hearsay that was but she said of of Taylor's testimony it's worth pointing out that Taylor is a long time diplomat has been giving giving service to this country for fifty years starting with west point serving in Vietnam and has served in administrations both Republican and democratic administrations going back to Reagan so house Republicans last night held what they call a floor speech rally to oppose the impeachment inquiry of it it sounds like some at least are are really sort of ramping up the defense the present that's right and the president wanted that defense and so the these Republican members went to the floor gave these one minute speeches decrying the fact that this was happening behind closed doors and saying that it needs to be done out in public at that that it simply isn't fair and and isn't due process and your way of correspondent Tamera Keith forces morning ten thanks so much really appreciate it you're welcome that's when it comes to president trump and Ukraine here's another interesting development both The Washington Post and The New York Times are reporting that Russia's president Vladimir Putin may have used Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban as something of a proxy to influence president trump's perception of Ukraine trump over the objection of some key advisors met Hungary's leader in may he also spoke with Vladimir Putin by phone around that time and let's talk about all this with someone very familiar with this region Stephen Peiffer among his other diplomatic posts was former US ambassador to Ukraine joins us this morning about Sir welcome good morning so can you take us through the logic here what might Vladimir Putin have been trying to do well I think if you look at vitamins and as he looks at Europe he's looking for weak spots he sees one in prime historical and hungry but he's also worked out on the Greeks leadership on the Italian leadership and his goal here is to weaken institutions such as the European Union in the case of Mister or bar he's also played on the Ontarians because their tensions have been tensions between hungry in Ukraine over questions like these quitting like which law and the Hungarians have been blocking develop means developments in the NATO Ukraine relationship that's very much of the Commons likely so maker just it was a what would Putin's motivation of been if this reporting is true and that he he tried to use or bond in a way to to to plant sort of negative perceptions of Ukrainian president from here well you've now had Russian aggression against Ukraine for more than five years it began back in the early twenty fourteen with Russia's seizure of Crimea and then you've had discontinuing simmering conflict in eastern Ukraine that which the Russians are provoking the Russians are providing weapons and funding for in in some cases breaking into the Russian army it's claimed more than thirteen thousand lives so to the extent that Russia has this military campaign going on against Ukraine designed to weaken you crave a designed to distract you claim to the extent you can conduct a second front by having countries such as hungry starting the developments relationship between quitting NATO that all fits together so putting would benefits I mean from something like what has been alleged a about president trump withholding military aid from Ukraine whatever the presence motivations may have been I mean that that is something that that Russia would certainly benefit from very much so I mean the military assistance to Ukraine serves two purposes first it gives me crazy military capabilities that the claims prove probably could not protect themselves but second it's very important as a political message a political signal of American support for Ukraine and anything that Putin can do to help we can add it to the extent that Mister or barn in his conversation with president trump was trying to undercut American support for Ukraine that place very much to the Kremlin to gender explosive allegations yesterday in the impeachment inquiry from William Taylor the acting US ambassador to Ukraine very specific laying out what what he suggested was something of a procrit pro quo you you're good friends with them right what did you think of his testimony I I've known bill Taylor for more than twenty five years if he said it happened it happened and I think it's very clear we knew we'd seen it's actually for his testimony but he makes it very clear in great detail that there was a quid pro quo that in addition to the official American policy that investor Taylor was conducted a key that was intended to dance American national interests plus a trumpet outsourced to Giuliani this other efforts which was designed to advance the president's personal put the quickest and those two Jedi's keep very much of the conflict former US ambassador to Ukraine Stephen pie for speaking to us this morning I think so much your time investor thank you very today Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg goes to Capitol Hill to testify before a house panel and he will face a tough audience from disinformation and hate speech to how Facebook is policing its election content his company is under scrutiny and that's even before Facebook give some specifics on its plan for a new digital currency and peers tech correspondent Shannon bond has been looking into some of the issues facing soccer Berg and we should note Facebook is one of in Paris financial supporters the last time mark Zuckerberg testified at a congressional hearing he was under fire over whether a political consulting firm use the private information of Facebook users as part of an effort to sway the twenty sixteen election a year and a half later that immediate crisis has passed but Facebook is under even more pressure and scrutiny today democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren says Facebook has too much power I say it's time to break them up let's enforce the anti trust laws big yes mark Zuckerberg I'm looking at you this started as a place for college students to find each other but now it has become the world's most influential social media site and a crucial place for politicians to reach voters along the way it's become vulnerable to misinformation manipulation propaganda critics say Facebook needs to take more responsibility now that it's so big there is a kind of a denial of how sweeping that role is and the real harms data platform can have on vulnerable communities communities of color without adequate guardrail someplace that's the need to give to a former justice department official she now heads up the leadership conference on civil and human rights many of her concerns will be front and center today Facebook has been accused of enabling discrimination through its ad tools the US department of housing and urban development is sued Facebook over this issue the federal agency says Facebook let advertisers show or hide housing ads from users based on their race or where they live Nicole Turner Lee is a fellow at the Brookings Institution center for technology innovation in the case of Facebook what I think we're seeing is that the tool is being used in ways I think that they did not plan for this week says it is stop letting advertisers target ads for housing jobs and credit to people based on their ethnicity or where they live and just yesterday it pledged one billion dollars for affordable housing in California but Facebook wants to go further into people's lives and soccer Berg will have to defend his plans for a new global digital currency libra leaders worry it could be used for illegal activity like money laundering or define terrorism the currency is still in the theoretical stages but it's already in jeopardy just in the past couple of weeks some crucial partners including visa MasterCard and PayPal have dropped out entirely leader sounds dead on arrival Michael tractor is an analyst with Wedbush securities I don't think Facebook could pull it off without the support of all of the different banking and credit your credit card processors payment processors I just don't think that they have the wherewithal to actually do it themselves beyond the headline topics members of the house financial services committee will get to ask soccer Berg about everything else on their minds to what is the company doing to stop election interference is a bias against conservative says some politicians claim what is it that politicians lie in ads there may even be questions about whether Facebook should be broken up as Elizabeth Warren is calling for a scenario soccer Berg round the rejects with Facebook on the defensive and lawmakers eager to pile on there could.

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

09:58 min | 3 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Shaping up to be a bit of an intriguing. See squabble in the telecommunications industry, we learned yesterday morning that the Federal Communications Commission is probably going to approve the long-awaited twenty six billion dollar get together of sprint and T mobile, the department of Justice, it was reported yesterday afternoon ish might have other ideas. But if it does get done the companies would become the second-biggest wireless company after Verizon, the FCC prove as require a couple of concessions including a commitment to help narrow the digital divide in rural America, so marketplace. Megan McCarthy Krino has more now on the benefits and also the challenges of expanding next generation broadband known as five G speeds up to one hundred times faster than current wireless service, five G networks have the potential to revolutionize how we use technology Tienanmen vehicles that talk to each other drone farming. Next iteration Telehealth applications like heart surgery from a distance -ticipant magin Brookings Institution. Fellow. Nicole Turner Lee says these advances could be particularly beneficial to rural communities where jobs in population have been dwindling. We've got to do something to break the chain of social isolation and find ways to import services. According to the FCC more than thirty percent of rural residents don't have fixed broadband and about fourteen million don't even have four G on their phones. Seriously? There's some people that have no g right? And the conditions that led to this digital divide. We'll also make five GE challenge says Sharon strove, a communications, professor at UT Austin, you need to deploy more technology, that's costly. And it takes talent T mobile and sprint promised to build five G networks for eighty five percent of rural areas in three years, just like other wireless systems that requires miles of fiber, optics antennas. But more of them closer together without a large customer base. It becomes cost prohibitive. Dan Hays, a telecommunications adviser with Pedo. You see says companies with then have to charge extremely high rates to cover their costs. In rural areas is a lot of investment in a market, where most people are interested in paying less not more for their wireless service, the FCC chairman warned of serious consequences. If the companies failed to deliver on their commitments. I Megan McCurdy Carino for marketplace, long haul trucking. It's a lot of attention. When the subject of Thomas vehicles comes up, as in it's entirely possible. A whole lot along haul. Truck drivers mud eventually be out of a job and on that point possible milestone today, the US postal service, which I tell you is an underwriter. This program is working with a San Diego, driverless technology startup called too simple to deliver letters and packages on interstate highways across the southwest. Marketplace Jack Stewart has more on with post office might be up to. And what might eventually mean for all those long haul truckers. The US PS trial is just five round trips between results. And texas. And if you happen to be on the same road, you're not going to see an empty cab on a big rig. They'll still be a human ready to grab the wheel in case something goes wrong. Chuck prices running the trial for two simple operating long haul trucks over large distances requires teams of drivers that have to share the vehicle cab for long hours of time. It's very hard to recruit drivers to do that. The US says its long-term goal in autonomous trucking is to save money and speed deliveries was still a long way from realizing the promise of driverless cars being worked on by the likes of Waymo Uba and tesla. Michelle Avery head of autonomous and of mobility for the World Economic Forum says that trucks might get SUNA because routes a simpler and mole repetitive. If you can reduce the ask on the computer or the artificial intelligence, then you have a better chance of it coming to market faster in Interstate's, a great places for that the American trucking association. Reckons shortage of up to sixty thousand long-haul drivers right now. But it's chief economist Bob Castillo says there are also some regulatory issues to be sorted before robots can take the wheel, for example. We need a national framework for this technology right now. It's a state by state basis. Meanwhile too simple says it'll have a commercial version of its driverless technology, ready by twenty twenty three. I'm Jack Jew from mice. Elizabeth whole. No, not that Elizabeth home. She of theranos infamy. This one was a style reporter for the Wall Street Journal for ten years. So she knows where she speaks fashion wise. She's also an avid Instagram or with a particular focus on the British Royal family, and what, what they wear says about brand message and how the royals want to in a way sell themselves. It's a story thinks she does on Instagram called so many thoughts. Now we have had Elizabeth on the program a bunch of time. So when we found out she was going to be in LA we convinced her to swing by Elizabeth homes. I am. So glad to have you in the studio. It's great to have here. So tell me what so many thoughts is so many thoughts is my Instagram stories commentary on the fashion, and branding of the Royal family, and we'll get this right out there. You're a Royal aficionado you. I mean you like to watch them and and just do a longtime early enthusiast enthusiast. Is that what you're all right? But, but more the point, tell me what these women specifically because you do have thoughts on, on Harry and will as it were. But, but they're, they're not germane right? You, you believe that these women are saying something in terms of brand, and the marketing of the family and, and representation as it were what they wear. Yes. And what I what I say, you know, a lot of people ask me, why do you care so much about what they're wearing a lot of times? I mean, most people in this world will never see a Royal in person, but what we. We all see the minute they step out of a car is what they're wearing and they use that as a tool, they use that as a messaging tool to promote certain causes to lend their support in different ways. And I think more so than even celebrities. They see what they wear as a tool to spread. The Royal brand me, an example, and, and well, I'm going to give you an example, Megan, an Harry when they presented Archie, you had thoughts on what she was wearing that day. Yes. So a lot of people thought for sure she was gonna wear Jiangxi, which is, you know, her sort of Goto designing. And what she stepped out in was a white trench stress by grace, Wales runner who is a up and coming British menswear designer, and that was such a moment to give that worldwide stage to a lesser known name who is by racial, and I thought that was a wonderful moment. The there's another reason I wanted to talk to you, which. Something I saw in so many thoughts while ago follower, as you know, and it's and it's this thing called dressing for the slide show which I didn't understand until I sort of, you know, hung in there with you and, and tried to get some sense of what it was. What does that mean? And what does it matter very interesting when Megan hit the scene? They announced their engagement, and she was doing sort of public appearances, and you can kind of piece together the style messaging, slowly. But if you look at sort of progression of her outfits after the Royal wedding was a series of blush dresses. They sort of built on one another blush color blush. The all right. Pink, if you will, and they had striking similarities in sort of their silhouettes in their cuts and what it became was the brand of Megan. She's building her brand within the Royal family. And if you look back, so more recently like you said, the birth of baby Archie when they resented him, she was in white trench stress. If you remember November twenty seventeen you'll remember? When they announce their engagement, she was wearing a white trenchcoat. And so, when, when she got married, she was, obviously, in a white dress when they announced the pregnancy, she stepped out in a white dress. So these are four huge moments of her on the stage, all in white and today, you know, the media puts together slide shows and montages. And it makes for very aesthetically pleasing presentation, but also gives her sort of these moments where she's defining her style and defining who she is. In her brand within the family that are very visible, and consistent completely intention. Oh, yes. That's what I come back to with the royals all the time. Very little that happens coincidently, or by accident with the whales. This is all sort of managed, it credibly carefully and choreographed precisely, and I think that's what makes it worthy of dissection. Do you suppose anybody tells the Queen shoes thing? Well, you know, the clean secret, right? She wears those very bright colors. She does that for two reasons, one so that everybody in the crowd can see her from far away and two so that her security can keep tabs on her. So she wears head to toe in shade. So that when she's up on that balcony in lemon yellow person who's way in the back and still see where she has shell so only black shoes and carries a black bag and win, Meghan Markle had her first solo engagement with the Queen. She wore black shoes and carried about saying smart. That's so smart. It's all intentional Elizabeth home. Gimme the I should know the Instagram handle off top my head. What is in e homes, homes, she's on Instagram, so many thoughts, check it out. It's, it's actually completely fascinated. Thanks.

Elizabeth whole Federal Communications Commiss Megan royals US Royal family Megan McCarthy Krino Brookings Institution Archie Harry Verizon Megan McCurdy social isolation Nicole Turner Lee T mobile Dan Hays Jack Stewart Instagram
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They're shaping up to be a bit of an interagency squabble in the telecommunications industry. We learned yesterday morning. Ish that the Federal Communications Commission is probably going to approve the long-awaited twenty six billion dollar get together of sprint and T mobile, the department of Justice, it was reported yesterday afternoon. H might have other ideas. But if it does get done the companies would become the second-biggest wireless company after Verizon. The FCC approval does require a couple of concessions including a commitment to help narrow the digital divide in rural America. So marketplace's Megan McCarthy Corinna has more now on the benefits and also the challenges of expanding next generation broadband known as five G with speeds up to one hundred times faster than current wireless service, five G networks have the potential to revolutionize how we use technology Thomas vehicles that talk to each other drone farming next iteration Telehealth applications like heart surgery from a distance me. Magin Brookings Institution. Fellow, Nicole Turner Lee says these advances could be particularly beneficial to rural communities, where jobs and popular. Have been dwindling. We've got to do something to break the chain of social isolation and find ways to in-court services. According to the FCC more than thirty percent of rural residents don't have fixed broadband and about fourteen million don't even have four G on their phones. Seriously? There's some people that have no g right? And the conditions that led to this digital divide. We'll also make five G and challenge says Sharon strove, a communications,.

Federal Communications Commiss Megan McCarthy Corinna Brookings Institution Nicole Turner Lee Verizon social isolation T mobile department of Justice Sharon America Thomas five G twenty six billion dollar thirty percent four G
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:07 min | 3 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"A privacy Bill? Start with Brett. Start with your last question. I it's this is a really interesting one because it seems like more than most issues that we've seen around the country and in DC over a number of years. It seems like there's quite a bit of momentum from lots of different parts of the political spectrum and many different stakeholders that something needs to be done that we need to establish a new framework a new set of institutions, maybe maybe legal institutions Bret Swanson next wave of our digital future on the other hand. So that it would argue for possibly getting something done on the other hand, we all know that the political environment is extremely difficult. And so I guess if I had to weigh those two things. I might be hope hopeful on the first account. I in the end, I think I'd have to say, it's probably unlikely. So what would you if you had? Congress locked in a room. Okay. What would you? What's the one thing? You would tell them about practicing. If you don't wanna tell them anything. It's okay. We're gonna go ahead. I think that there's a misunderstanding of consumers concerned about privacy. This notion that everybody the vast majority of consumers are like oh, my privacy shot. So I don't really care what what companies do with my data. I think that's just wrong. And the polling shows that's wrong. And even the younger generation who I think there's a perception that their concerns about privacy are are very low on the hierarchy of overall concerns. I think that's wrong too. And the data really backs that up so I would tell congress this is really important to consumers across the board. I read some data sixty eight percent of consumers want congress to do something including younger consumers. So that's the first thing. The second thing is I think to pick up on Rob's point about accountability, hold companies accountable when a massive hack happens, let's say two s PG or Marriott or at a you're a healthcare provider and a lot of your data has been given over to God knows who. There have to be consequences and less companies are held accountable, and we've got a very aggressive finding regime in in Europe. Now, I think we have to talk about something that's serious, and it companies will take seriously. So that they step up and protect our data. And so far there really the consequences are very minor to companies that allow themselves to be hacked. So just to clarify Shelley seems to enjoy. Saying things that I didn't say what I said was not that eighty percent are in different. I said ten percent aren't different eighty percent are sort of in the camp of. Yeah. I worry about this. But I'm not gonna freak out about it. And yes, when you survey Americans, they say, they would like more protection, we just we just did a survey on our website where we Americans and by the way, almost every survey, including the pew serrate. They don't ask about trade offs. Who would like to be able to watch TV with no commercials. I would. But then I wouldn't have TV because they have no money. So there's a tradeoff there when you ask what about a trade off? You get a very different answer. Eighty percent of Americans say they would like online service collect data support dropped by fifty three percentage points when respondents were asked whether they would whether they would allow enable online services to collect less data. If it meant paying a small monthly fee for the service. There's the trade off, and we can't ignore that those trade offs for there to Mike sort of simple one thing if I were to tell a member of congress. Combine the two into one. I would say preempt the states while you worry about unintended consequences. What did you just say preempt? Okay. While you worry about unintended consequences. 'nother show has pretty people are really loved the web these days after GDP are password, virtually every single stupid website, you go to makes you press on this really stupid cookie. Notification. You enjoy that great. You're unique. I don't know anybody. I hate it. Almost every website you go to now you have to click a cookie sheets. There was a study. We did. And it showed that when you just add up all the cost by companies small companies in Europe to comply with their cookie notification law and the time wasted consumers two point three billion dollars annually. Do we really want that? So part of it is look at these unintended consequences. Sort of well-intentioned. Oh, lets people know there's a cookie being placed which nobody does anything except click. Yes. Cost two point three billion dollars in Europe. That's an unintended consequence. Okay. So one thing for congress. Oh, Michael, you know, that's hard for me. Put it in one sentence. You can stand by me. I would say that congress needs to say consumer focused I in so whatever privacy legislation should be consumer focus platform neutral, and I would say in understanding various limits. Engage a stakeholder process. I think it would be very difficult for congress. Go in there and say, okay, we're going to solve this without having other civil society companies in others at the table to sort of discuss what that looks like will we have privacy legislation in this congress. We hope so. Telecom policy in policies, always been bipartisan we've seen great things come when congress works together. Cross the I'll do this spectrum policy being one example where you know. Now, the airwaves that we're enjoying have come through a bipartisan congress, Nicole Turner, Lee. We'll take this issue of privacy. Seriously, move a little bit beyond the hype of what happened. I think Sally points it out when Zaka Berg was here in all the hype around Cambridge Analytica there's been other breaches after that we have to remember so potentially we should see a congress that looks at the whole picture and moves to actually just put in place really tight privacy legislation. If we don't other states will. What what strikes me on listening to today's panel is how far we've come. Okay. Even over the last year, if we'd had a panel like this a year ago. It would have had a very different flavor to it. I think there is consensus on the need for national privacy legislation. There's less consensus. I think on how we should frame the trade offs as an economist. I wake up in the morning, and I think trade offs, and it's very hard for me to sit of see how we can have this discussion without it part of the problem for me with the European discussion and. And. It was extremely well. Intentioned. We we were in Europe a lot talking to a lot of people was extremely well intention, but there was an absolutism to it. That was very difficult to understand. And that in some sense, you know, in terms of wine have growth wanka have job creation that we need to think in terms of trade offs. And we need to have interns think in terms of a vigorous discussion. Vigorous debate about this. And so let me give the panelists one minute each for their final words. Michael just to go back to your previous question. I'd say if I had one thing to tell legislators, it would be humility. So let's work on this very important issue. Lets us tablets this new framework to bolster the trust of our citizens in this very important part of the economy, but let's not mess up. This thing this digital engine that has been such a great driver of economic growth, and that has so much promise for all those other parts of the economy that have not yet benefited. But that can if we allowed to go forward. So I say don't lose sight of the of the promise as we as we develop this new framework. Well, I agree with Bret that we've got a tremendous engine of innovation here in this country. And we don't wanna slow that down. Unnecessarily? So I think we have some good models to look at. We've got the California. Is it too aggressive is it too tough. And will it stifle innovation? We have GDP are is that the kind of the horror show that has been portrayed by some folks out there. Just too aggressive at opt in is is just a dead letter. And it's gonna it's gonna slow down the engines of innovation, and I would like congress to roll up their sleeves and say now is the time to develop a comprehensive legislation. Let's look at some of the models and how they're rolling out states. Other states have. Breach notification and data security statutes, I think we've got lots of good models out there. Let's try to find get our hands around the best one as we as as we put this legislation together, but we should pass some framework federal legislation on data security. We should do it. Now. Sallee greenberg. Earlier today on Capitol Hill. I would argue or suggest that any efforts be evidence based. As opposed to emotion based a lot of evidence out there about actually what the impacts are various rules, what people actually want encouraged congress to be thinking about that evidence. In a bipartisan rational way, the second point would be. You know what I find? So troubling about where many of the privacy advocates are on this is we're poised right now through this. Pretty incredible wave of innovation around the data economy where healthcare you talk to people who are at NIH or others who were involved in this what we're called rapid learning networks around healthcare and the excitement around that is palpable that we are going to be able to make more progress in the next twenty years because of the ability to use big data same thing in education. We know very little about what works in education, but using data analytics are is super super important way. Transportation a whole set of parts of our economy where data analytics is going to drive innovation and it's very profound way. And I would argue there's an extra serious risk that the Bill that will come out of congress is going to shut that down is too strong, constrain it significantly, and that we're just gonna have less of all of those traumas, and no one's gonna. No, we missed it. Because it was like, oh, well, we didn't see it. So what did we lose the riskier is that? We're gonna lose the promise going forward in the future. If we do too much. That's not to say, we shouldn't have a baseline set of comedy central. I was just gonna say Ditto to what everybody else has said. And I think if for congress to go forward, they have to recognize that the train has already left the station that this is not a conversation that we need to go back. There's great data. There's been conversations in evidence about privacy rules a row that against started in two thousand nine this is not something that has to start from scratch in terms of baseline. We now have evidence of what other countries are doing. So I think this is a great exercise. I think that congress should look at with a mix of yes, how do we pay attention to consumer harms emanate from this new digital ecology? But how do we also look at the opportunities that in many respects can help close some of that digital divide. Well, I want you to all give a big hand to the panelists on data privacy day..

Congress Europe Bret Swanson Michael Brett Shelley Marriott Rob Mike California Sallee greenberg Cambridge Analytica Nicole Turner Sally NIH Zaka Berg
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:01 min | 3 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I completely agree with rob on that point. Although if I could just say this on the privacy policies, I think it's important though, when I was at the joint center for political economic studies, we ran a a literal translation of privacy policies that companies probably a better. Now, the one of the privacy. I won't say the company you had to have a J D to read it. And I think we still have people who look at these privacy policies and do not understand anything that's in them. So we have to be very careful about how we're actually giving that information and disseminating that to people who are not necessarily always literate in this in this new digital just on that point one of the things that we proposed in our big report on what legislation should include having a requirement that all privacy policies are in machine. Readable form would go a long long way to six sixth grade reading I would say meeting level, I mean, machine readable. Yeah. I know where she readable. So basically, you're having. After that would then basically inter interrogate the of website, you're going to you would put your preferences and requirements in that would interrogate the privacy policy of the website. You're going to early thing. And it would come back with a red light. Green light yellow light. You don't no way you're going to be able to read all the comp even if they're simple. So, but if we mandated by law that these were machine readable, you would have a flourishing of apps that would basically be the protector. The consumer. I'm gonna ask a related question at this point. I think about algorithms transparency. And whether or not we're that sort of fits into a national privacy legislation. We I think we have a paper coming out shortly Brookings on this. I think I have a lot of work on this. I think it's harder. It gets more complicated. We're sitting up here debating privacy policies. Imagine trying to get consumers understand the way algorithms work, and the connections that exist between those algorithms in the inferences that come from the data that you're providing those now micro and macro targeted attack. It becomes very difficult. I think the key thing is people have to understand what algorithms are. So the same way we talked about years ago digital literacy, and we still talk about digital literacy, we need to talk about algorithms literacy, so that people can see what they're inputting comes out with these outputs. And I mean, if we're talking about and again, I do caution us of putting this into any new federal privacy legislation because unfortunately, half of the universe. Does not understand this. They're noxious when they come back because you're presents show up. Your preferred Cologne perfume shows up. You don't think anything about it? Right. Until like, I said earlier you're marketed predator. Ori services products. Then you want to know how did we get here? And so I think this is a conversation through a Multistakeholder approach Anna conversation, I believe with policymakers data scientists social scientists we should actually discuss to make sure that we actually get people to see how this actually works before we could actually look at mandated policies like we're looking at privacy policy. Nicole Turner Lee that'd be a mistake to include a and now because it is so new it is evolving so quickly, and there's very little understanding other my colleague Josh is led our work on that. And we've we argue for is we need an AI accountability regime. You talk to data scientists. And if you impose explain ability you by definition, make a algorithm stupider because the more complex it is the more effective. It is the more simple. It is the less effective is as a general rule. So I think we need to hold a user's people companies are organising using we need to hold them accountable. That there isn't bias that the results that are there the right results. But explain ability, I think it would have a deleterious effect on a innovation. Robert atkinson. I'll just jump in and say what does that mean to hold them accountable. How are we holding them accountable? Well, the short answer is. Encourage you to read Joshua's forty page report. The modest short answer is that they're testing that says if. If you say this does this then it has to do that. You don't need to know how it's doing it. I don't know how my car works. Assorted do but I don't really I have no idea how this works. Does does what it says it's going to do? That's what I mean. You don't have to go under the hood to be able to set up an accountability regime. That's very different than going under the hood. And saying, oh, I think you've used the wrong waiting on that coefficient. I would it used a point four. Yeah. I agree. And this is why this is one reason even though I agree. It shouldn't be included in privacy legislation that in general the standards. And. Principles based approach is better than the prescriptive approach for things. Exactly. Like this. There's no way that you can right. Algorithms into illegal regime. That would be worth anything today. Let alone worth anything couple of months from now. And that's again, why I think we should focus on the the consumer welfare because if there is some algorithm that is is is harming people than we can do that. And hold them accountable. So let me ask you a broad question at this point. What is actually two part question. What is the one thing you wish legislature at congress is going to be discussing privacy this year? Okay. Obviously. Okay. What is the one thing? You wish legislators would understand about privacy as they do this discussion and connected to that. Perhaps. What does he is? You think we could actually get to bipartisan agreement on.

rob Cologne J D congress Ori services Nicole Turner Lee Robert atkinson Anna AI Joshua Josh
"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:02 min | 3 years ago

"nicole turner lee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Appreciate the innovation that comes in each area. Because we'll always be putting picking winners and losers. The privacy debate. Generally, I think everyone in here, a general consensus, we want our privacy protected, and I would say just third for the interest of time that I think it's important as we look at the E U what they've done we recognized that this was in the Matt planning for six years, and they just put it to adapt shit since then technology has evolved any federal privacy legislation that comes out today. We should already make the assumption. That is not going to fly to the new technology tomorrow. We need to be clear about that. There's going to be new technology that's going to go even a step further. And I appreciate colleagues out there again who have been drafting. Privacy bills to fourth put before congress. There are ways to address online discrimination. Do privacy information. We could probably if we know how people's information is being used we could probably tackle issues related to algorithmic bias surveillance predictive analytics that are discriminatory. But what we don't know at this point is how do we continue the innovation of connected cars and other new technologies without reversing reverse engineering. Made respects those innovations because of privacy implications. We don't want that. That's what the GDP are might land up. Having even though they have a section where they are not pushing back against those things, but I think in this country, and I'll close with this where Clinton Gore and others essentially made the internet free in an environment of reciprocity where we give our information exchange for fee services. It's important that we move down this path of new innovation without putting in privacy protections that legislate or regulate. For future innovators because we don't know what those are. And so I would just m there Michael with regards to my comments that there's a lot to talk about. But I think in my opinion, we need to start with some baseline federal privacy legislation. Rules. Nicole Turner Lee with the Brookings Institution. Tastic as you see we have a diversity of views here in a lot to chew on. Let me start by asking the panelists. They broad question that touches on topics. We've already hit. GDP? The EU in some ways is a laggard in digital innovation. They're not there's a lot of stuff going on there. But overall. I think that most. European analysts would agree with that on the other hand, they're trying to be a leader in digital regulation. Should we view them as a good model for our legislation? Or should we go in a different direction? Yes, sir. You're right that I think it's fair to say. Bret Swanson American Enterprise Institute, it's very fair to say that. On a relative basis, you know, the US has been sort of the center of the internet innovation. Let me ask you just feel free. Incidentally, if you have any comments about things, the other have said feel free to address them directly, sir. Absolutely. I will. Yeah. Europe has lagged the US as far as internet innovation. Broadly over the last couple of decades. And there's always a trade off between intentions and results. Right. I think and let me just broadly. Emphasized the innovation side of the equation in my original comments. But let me say too. I think in the US despite a lot of amazing things the internet is brought us and a lot of innovation. I think a lot of US companies, and the US government fact has sort of dropped the ball over the last couple of decades. I think many companies were their own worst enemies. So they weren't their own friends right in the sense of getting out head of the curve as far as building systems communicating with consumers and building that trust. And now, they're reaping those results, and I think the US government to I think a lot of us sort of always assumed that they were doing lots of things to protect us as far as data security and stuff, and we sort of realized now that they weren't. And so I think you've seen even in the last couple of months you've seen some major cases that the DOJ is brought. Against the hackers from multiple different countries private and government faced. So I think we're sort of catching up now. Let me just say that as a criticism of our system so Europe, you may say that their intentions are good in trying to build this system of trust for the new world. My view is that they're the actual legislation is just way over prescriptive, and that it will lead to the same type of lagging dynamism that they've seen for the last couple of decades. So it's always a straight off between intentions and outcomes. And I think. My view is that we follow them with their intentions in saying that this is an important thing to get right that we have this conversation and that we take action. But I would. Not go down the European road in the particulars. Two points on that one. Is that the GDP? To effect in may of two thousand eighteen so we have a good experiment that we can look at as we think about and get our arms around federal privacy legislation here. So I don't know if there's a cause and effect that you were referencing. They haven't been as innovative in the last twenty or thirty years, but the GDP are hasn't gone into effect. Who's only been in effect six seven months, so Sally Greenberg. On that point. Secondly, I can't help. But. Be amused. By the fact, that after the Cambridge Analytica hack where invasion of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg came to congress this building actually testified before the house commerce committee and said we want to adopt the GDP PR Facebook wants to adopt the prescriptions, and the the overall framework of the GDP are, and that's has evaporated that whole concept has not really been picked up. And so I'm wondering why he was so enthusiastic and Facebook with sewn disaster then and now we're jumping all over the GDP are so. Third point it's aggressive. But I think we have an opportunity to see how it unrolls, and if it provides a kind of protections that consumers wine and by the way. Respond to Rob's comment that there's really for the vast majority of data breaches, there's no harm consulta. Okay. Well, you can restate what you said what I heard you say is in most cases, there's very little provable harm restate, it whatever way you want. That's what I heard. And and my my sense of of that is that consumers really disagree with that pew found in September of two thousand sixteen. There's lots of survey data out there that sixty eight percent of internet users believe that current laws are not good enough in protecting people's privacy. Forty one percent of Americans had dealt with fraudulent charges on their credit card. Fifteen percent of notice have have had their social security, number stolen. We've seen. Lots of we've seen lots of fraud related to us. Social security numbers passport information. I happen to be an SP g member. So when Marianne SPG got hacked five hundred million records, I was very upset about that. They have my passport information my date of birth mall. My cell phone numbers. My Email address to me that's real harm. And I don't know what they're doing with it precisely. But we know that a lot of bad actors are up to a lot of bad things with our our data. So I think we have to quantify harm maybe in a different way than the way you described it, rob. And I'll let you. Take it to correct. Correct me. Correct statement if I miss characterize what she said. What I clearly said was that we have to differentiate between privacy policies and cybersecurity hacks or data breaches on the former. I would argue there's been virtually no harm. Does anybody really care that Google knows my search terms or does anybody really care the Amazon knows what I buy. I don't think from those situations. There's been any discernible actual harm. I also said very clearly there are many many cases of actual discernible harm from data breaches two completely different. Things thing is. Yes, absolutely. We need stronger data breach laws, but I'll just leave it at that. Just they're two different things. I would argue by the way, everybody's sort of puts all this faith in a really strong law. Cambridge analytical was operating under very strict European privacy laws, which they broke laws do not prevent crime. They only allow you to enforce. So the notion somehow that if we had had GDP are you wouldn't have had Cambridge Analytica just false. Shelley's point about GDP are has only been into effect a few years. A few months. That's true. But for a decade or more going all the way back to the two thousand and two e privacy law Europe has had a stricter regime, then the US and that again looking at the scholarly evidence. Unbiased completely independent guy only evidence that has had a demonstrable and causal effect on the ability to make money for startup or for an internet company, and that has had a negative effect on innovation. I really wish California hadn't done what it did. Because there's such a pressure. Now, I really wish we could wait for years because in four years it will be crystal clear how much harm GDP are has done to the European digital economy. And I worry that. Well, you can't really see it yet. So we're going to rush in and try to do something similar. Lastly, Mike to your point. I would look at this as there's three cars rolling down the highway in race, China Europe and America in digital race China the cars, no governance. There's no guidelines just driving down the road hitting things and maybe going to crash fundamentally care because their citizens have no rights. Our cars are driving down pretty fast. But with a lot of barrier. A lot of guardrails maybe a few more needed. But you know, we're going down there pretty fast and the Europeans were going a little slower than we are. And then they pass PR which essentially like throwing a large anchor out the back of the car slowing the car down to about half the speed. So yes, if we want to go down that path we're going to end up where they lower digital car. And personally, I don't want that. Robert Atkinson with information technology and innovation foundation. Okay. So I want to answer the GDP our question, but rob Buchanan trouble because you're between Sally. And I for a minute. Nicole Turner question. So I actually want to say to the point of like harm. I think there is harmed is disputable harm. When it does come to data breaches because I see harm, particularly as we have this federal privacy conversation when people are incarcerated longer because there are algorithms that basically suggests that they should be disappointed. He pulled data that is publicly available to a compass. Algorithm that contributes to that I see harm when even though I'm shopping on certain ecommerce sites that somehow because it identifies it I'm a single mother that I get predatory loan vehicles. And I get categorized in certain ways. And that's not an essay who I am. But that brings hard because I go rather than going for the ten percent credit card interest rate. I'm now targeted the thirty six percent interest rate Alitalia's when he was at the fed tastic experiment five years ago before we even talked about artificial intelligence machine learning to say that our personal private information was being misused when she showed. The centennial website of the omega psi fraternity. And as we watched it adds came up marketing arrest record, get your arrest record for free black men. And while you're there get a high interest credit card there is harm there. And it's harmed that is contributing to I think two systems systemic discrimination. And we've got a inequality. We gotta deal with that. So I'm sorry. I got with Sally, I think both are actually I get my credit card hack twice a year. You know, and it's easy for me to replace my credit card than it is for me to go back and tell somebody stop sending me alone product, just because I'm a black woman period now on duty PR, I would say we can't GDP are. I do think it's been really interesting discussion since GDP has been adopted with regards to how do we adapt it? And I think we have to be cautious in the United States is say, oh, here's a model that actually is framing data sharing and giving people empowering people with their own personal information again in a cultural context where the Europeans have a different connection to the personal data versus the people United States where it is different. They're much more protectionist China on the far end of protectionism. But in our case here in the US. I think the GDP are sort of oversteps. I think what we have come to see as is reciprocal exchange of our personal information. I think they're great intentions as it was previously stated with GDP our overall we needed something like that to sort of flat us in the face. I totally regret that we were totally behind in this conversation. Even though we started earlier in codifying rules, and but there's good stuff. You know? There's this right. And we've seen it happen. Among American companies, the right to be notified of the cookies that are actually scroll anything all of us in the US despite not being in Europe received those notifications at the end of website. There's something out data portability or deletion from certain platforms where it gets very tricky. The right to be forgotten doesn't work in the United States. If you're a sexual predator. If you're somebody with a pass credit history that does not go away from the internet..

US Europe Sally Greenberg China rob Buchanan Facebook congress Clinton Gore EU DOJ Brookings Institution Nicole Turner Lee California American Enterprise Institute Michael Bret Swanson fraud Cambridge Cambridge Analytica