17 Burst results for "Nicole Rothwell"

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

03:22 min | Last month

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"The infrastructure of this country and it's connected to the other issue which is people in central america are being displaced because of environmental crisis. And so they're coming here. And then helping to rebuild. Which is very honorable bidault. It's like a crazy insane which cycled and before we wrap today's show. We do wanna take a moment to recognize the twentieth anniversary of september eleventh. Which is this saturday. And we're feeling we're feeling it like everything changed twenty years ago on september eleventh for all of us very personally. If you were impacted i send my my heart out to you for those of you. Who lost family or friends in these wars. Whether you're iraqi your afghani or serving in the us military and giving your life you know we're thinking of you and i think it's up to all of us who you're to really think about nine eleven and what we're going to do that. What they're going do is on our shoulders. And yeah the last two episodes of it got into a lot of this. It was really beautiful. Very powerful latino. Usa also dropped a beautiful episode. I say producers. They've been working so hard the last couple of weeks with you. It's too beautiful way to like add to the granny that in to this conversation exactly and that is it. We all have a good. I need that in a little grain of sand to add to the conversation about what we all do with this. Nine eleven memorial is nine eleven moment for us so with that i might anal horsa. And i'm hillary lorella. Remember go to apple podcasts. To rate and review us eight. Nobody's it out there You could also listen to us on pandora spotify wherever you get your podcasts. On check us out on the web at in the thick dot. Org follow us on twitter on instagram in the pick. Show us on facebook and tell your friends and family to listen. Scorching lease in the figures produced. Newer saudi harsher mahatma and our new york. Women's foundation ignite fellow. lisa. Selena's would editorial support from mike sergeant charlotte mansion and nicole. Rothwell our audio engineering team. Stephanie lebow julia. Crusoe liaison damron and gabriella. Baya's our digital editor is louis lou. Thanks to betty's.

bidault central america hillary lorella Usa Women's foundation apple mike sergeant charlotte mansion twitter facebook Selena Stephanie lebow julia lisa Rothwell new york damron nicole Baya gabriella louis lou
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:31 min | Last month

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Let's move on to our final segment which we call allowed the my nausbaum also the last one before you go so rose remember you and i of course we know that before nine eleven there was nothing like the department of homeland security. We were talking. This george w bush department of fun of it because it was like what and then they changed immigration naturalizations service became immigration customs enforcement right ice. That's some of the clear ways in which nine eleven impacted you know forever. This country because department of homeland security should be dismantled and ice needs to be reframed but it happened because of nine eleven so and of course my god finally the troops are leaving afghanistan. The us longest war when they made a promise. It's for a couple of years. Don't worry going you're one gene done. How many hundreds of thousands of people down so little accomplish which. I told you having been in afghanistan that this was not gonna work. Thank you this show was gonna fly. He saw that a long time ago. The actually rose. Yeah yeah it was so clear this going anyplace so then rose. I know right now. Like i said i'm feeling a lot of frustration about the state of the world. You know. i don't usually ask rose these questions. But so how are you feeling about a path forward. How do you see a path forward from this. And from i suppose healing and even in terms of our reporting and how we are trying to be better journalists so path forward rose take us. There are four money out. You have to look at the past understand the president. You know there's always this history repeats itself thing and our career has proven that to be true because it is you know so shocking to see how america can often take something that's beautiful and turn it into something that's really ugly. People came together after september eleventh. And the next thing you know it you have the department of homeland security and are not just in afghanistan which loom logical but in iraq. And here we are. We're repeating things again and again and again and it's really disheartening. Onto the trump administration. How things that were pretty good. Were turned into things that were pretty damn bad you know where. People's goodwill is set aside and our worst intentions are brought to the surface so i think that the path forward for us is that we need to not wait for tragedy to strike for we unveil the monster within We need to report every single day. The crushing realities of what is happening in this country and our relationships with each other and our relationships around the world because bringing light into that darkness is the only hope we have of not ending up in that place again. I'm feeling that looking back. I mean me your last thought on this because you know when people hear about is only what nineteen years older isis only was formed after two thousand and one. I mean think about that. Yeah and they're all over the border and they're still aren't any mexicans flying planes into buildings as far as i can tell you. Yeah that's what i'm saying. So like frame this one for me. As we closed down his rosset i think as journalists. We are training the next generation for them to understand how to think critically and to not fall into the traps of the use of propaganda and manipulation which we now are under very clearly. The united steen's was doing this. I am so glad that when we were preparing our coverage at four in the thick and team usa. One of my producers called me. And i happened to be driving. It was we had to squeeze it in. And i was driving in. My daughter was with me and rose judah had to hear the whole story. She had no place to go because we were in the car together and she heard and she as a little girl judah would say a mom there. You go again with september eleventh. Because i was getting traumatized. Yeah i think. Now they're kind like damn okay now. We can have the perspective to understand how these created hatred against muslims hatred against the other hatred against immigrants hatred against latinos mexicans. Exactly so i'm with rose. As journalists doubled down tell the stories continued. Do not silence and make them tell. These stories. Got so naqoura croissant. Like make sure that the kids are listening to you because it can't be that we now have so many people around who don't remember this. Yeah so long as the two of you are here. And i'm so glad we recorded this and rose and mighty we keep doubling down so rose arce executive producer at soledad. O'brien productions. Wow wow wow thank you so much for joining me on in the thick thank you so much thank you thank you rose love you love you back lorella horsa and before we end today's show we want to let you all know about a special upcoming episode on our sister podcast latino. Usa that is going to air this friday september tenth. It's also going to be about the impact of september eleven and its aftermath. And we're gonna talk about how the us immigration policy was like forever changed in terms of also attitudes towards immigrants in the twenty first century. You know like what we said. The department of homeland security which we don't need by the way and ice all of this as a result of september eleventh and we're going to be talking about it on a special edition of letting usa and maria. It's been so gratifying. To watch the work that you can putting into this episode with our fabulous latino usa producers. Well you know what. It's a really important moment for our listeners. Many of whom are young and we love that. So i definitely want to let you all know that this is going to be a beautiful conversation. It's gonna make you think a lot about what we're living through these twenty years and of course we're going to take his family so definitely is how we roll so it's a special episode. You don't wanna miss it. It's going to drop this. Friday september tenth and this episode was produced by our new york. Women's foundation ignite fellow. Lisa selena's and remember good apple. Podcast a rate and review us got to give this one five stars. I mean where do you hear a conversation. Like this about nine eleven. Also you can listen to in the thick on pandora spotify and wherever you get your podcast. Check us out on the web at in the thick dot. Org follow us on twitter and instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook. And tell your friends in the thickest produced by noor saudi archana hotter and lisa. Salinas are new york. Women's foundation ignite fellow with editorial support from mike. Sergeant and nicole rothwell are fabulous audio. Engineering team is stephanie. Lebow julia russo. The a shot damron and gabriela buyers are digital editor is least luna the music he heard is courtesy of nasional kept z. K records and thanks peres for recording maria in.

department of homeland securit afghanistan us george w bush united steen rose judah rose arce iraq judah Women's foundation Lisa selena maria noor saudi archana hotter new york nicole rothwell apple instagram Salinas Lebow julia russo damron
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

02:25 min | 2 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"You finding joy and hope during these times during these times. I've focused a lot on self care. In terms of respect for myself the respect that half asleep the respect that have for exercise. And i think that throughout this experience gained a new level of appreciation for my own health every day i wake up and i treat it as a blessing and i connect with the people around me in new ways says doctor bianca was saying and i've never been the one to pick up a phone and call someone and i have certainly not in the person that facetime you now become that person where i feel like i have a deeper level of connection with friends outside of social interactions. That are like packed inside of a crowded bar. yeah. I don't know. I've gained a new level of appreciation for the friends that i do have and then when i'm feeling that i need inspiration. I look at these community leaders in these communities that are getting people vaccinated and it is nothing short of inspirational washing. These people go from door to door and explain these concepts. And i use that as motivation to keep me. Well well thank you both of you for sharing your thoughts and your insights a little joy and hope because sometimes it's a simple joys and hopes and blessings and so thank you so doctor bianca. Soda almost pediatrician. Dr daron sutton emergency medicine physician. Thank you so much for joining me on in the thick thank you thank you so much. I'm hillary lose and remember. Go to apple podcast rate and review us because it really really helps also you can now listen to in the thick on pandora spotify. And we're you get your podcast because we're everywhere. Check us out on the web. At in the thick dot org follow us on twitter and instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook until your friends in the thickest produced by newer saudi hotta and our new york women's foundation ignite fellow. Lisa salinas with editorial support from mike sergeant charlotte mansion and nicole. Rothwell our audio engineering team is stephanie. Abo- julia caruso leah shout daman and gabriela buyers digital editor is niece luna the music you heard is courtesy of nasional kept enzi k. records. We'll see you next time in.

bianca Dr daron sutton new york women's foundation hillary Lisa salinas mike sergeant charlotte mansio instagram apple julia caruso twitter Rothwell facebook nicole daman stephanie gabriela luna enzi
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"In the midst of this surge and in our current icu. I work in a twelve bed. Icu all twelve patients. Right now are cova. Did they are all unvaccinated. We do not have a fully vaccinated person in that. Icu and they are young. We are watching not grandparents this time around parents parents with young children. I we have a mother right now. Who has never held her newborn baby. And she's in choice you yes. We watched her meet her baby on facetime. We held the phone up so that she can see her baby for for the first time. And that's heartbreaking. This amount of were trained to deal with death as a nurse and to help people die with dignity when that time comes but seeing this much death day in and day out for this extended period of time it becomes unbearable and the trauma that that gives you It's not something that will just easily go away. Maria that clip. I mean happened mississippi. You were a mississippi last week and because we talked about when you were about to go report and this is going to be latino. Usa later this year. But you were like. Oh my god. I'm going to a place where there's low vaccination rates and what did you find. What were you thinking with all this going on. It wasn't what i was thinking. Who you. It was what i was actually living through I right now. I'm getting daily updates. For a young a fifteen year old girl guatemalan indigenous from mississippi. One of the small towns and she's got oxygen through her nostrils not on a ventilator and she's in the icu. Struggling to live. And i met her neighbors well. So when i was down there. Julio i cannot even tell you because the thing is is that when new york city was the center we were in our apartments and we weren't leaving right so now because of i'm vaccinated and because i actually went to report a mississippi i was actually outdoors like i would say. Ninety five percent of all the interviews happened outdoors but the delta variant it was everywhere every day. Every day that i was there it was like oh. This person tested positive. They can't see you. This person tested positive while these person now is in the hospital every day it was like that just like at the height of the experience while i was living at the height of the epidemic and so the question that i asked on my twitter. Yeah i said. Does anybody have the data the race ethnicity but it would make sense. I mean you know not to put the census in here but the census data came out on thursday and basically said that you know. The united states is less white and more multiracial multiethnic and looking at places like mississippi. It's actually a place where there's an increasing latino population right so you're actually like you were there on the ground and the data supporting that. It's just so interesting. 'cause i've kind of been to mississippi multiple times and so you know i do this on my social media here. I am eating the best. Busey's i now in mississippi and people. I got your audio messages. Saying like i'm having tacos with my producer. Ray like people are like wait. What there are latinos in mississippi so to bring the census into it. Yes the south. I wonder who said this years ago. Listen to this yes. It was actually in two thousand and three when i started reporting about this. When you go. From north carolina to louisiana and everything there it is latino latina centered so those hospital beds are being filled by the people. Now the children of the people who work in the poultry plant. Who are you know painting your houses putting on your roof. You know getting you your pot by the way because you're mississippi massive you know marijuana crops way in the background lumber how you panel your homes. Yeah all of that. And they're invisible and they are continue to be invisible in the intensive care unit in the hospitals. And that's what we're trying to say this. In visibility of being deportable essential and continuing the being sick. That's part of who we are as the united states of america. So i'm having. I'm having a bit of a moment Okay i'm marianne nossa and i'm delaware ella and remember dear listener. We make it yet. We keep it real so dear listener. Remember you can listen to us on pandora spotify wherever you choose to get your podcast on. Check us out on the web in the dot. Org follow us on twitter and on instagram. And in the show like on facebook and tell your friends and family to listen in the thickest produced by saudi harsh hotta and our new york. Women's foundation ignite fellow lisa selena's with editorial support from charlotte mansion. Mike sergeant and nicole. Rothwell our audio engineering team. Is stephanie lebow julia. Peluso shaw damron. And gabriella bias. Our digital editors we do now thanks to peres for recording me the music you heard his courtesy of nasional captains e c k records will see you on our next episode dear listener. It's so great to be back. Thank you to the entire team to jamila to everybody. Forgiving me a little bit of this break to do some more work we miss. You are fridays. We're so happy. You're back on love you and all you.

mississippi cova united states icu Julio Maria Busey new york city twitter marianne nossa Ray louisiana north carolina Women's foundation lisa selena charlotte mansion Mike sergeant stephanie lebow julia Peluso shaw damron
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

15:21 min | 2 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Sped off these in gay. I know so. Just a quick summary. Before i ask our fabulous get some questions personnel. I'm really glad that we can brand that in spanish. Because it's it's just very hard to translate that beauty of that voice but basically what three is saying that she working long days to provide for her children her daughters. This is the part that hit me media. The proof is in the scar in my hands. Scars multiple scars. Yeah multiple scars. You want proof. Here's the proof. She's worked so hard for a country she's just asking for her country to give it back. G also mentioned you know. I'm not raising delinquent kids and everyone's talking about essential workers in quotes anthony. Mijas will show up for us like show up for us. Yeah wow powerful word today now. Talk to us about the need for a pathway to citizenship for farm workers. And how do you feel about the current bill the farm workforce modernization act. How do you feel about it. Well i i'll say look every three and acp. Would orion ludi smooth hurts. Definitely does have. And i think that workers like the dna deserve everything and more right and right now with hr sixteen three. I'll tell you right now. It's a compromise bill but despite the fact that it's compromised pick one is supporting it really what it does is. It creates a earn path to legalization and citizenship. And basically if there's a worker that's been working one hundred eighty days in the agricultural industry within two years prior to the passage of the bill they qualify for this status called certified agricultural workers status some of us call it the blue card for short like i got hit. The school is what a lot of our members call it and with that that basically protects you from deportation and it actually allows people to have ability to travel back and forth dec- family and other countries and basically. It does come with a couple of things though. You have to pay a fine and makes you go through a background check but with the cia. W can basically renew it every five and a half years or if you've been working in agriculture for ten years and you commit to working another four years in agriculture you can qualify for legal permanent residency status. But if you've been working less than ten years you have to work with him for another eight years to qualify for l. pr status and basically once you have l. pr status for a minimum of five years. You can actually apply for citizenship that we're like there's a path but it's a compromise path the parts that were major compromises that were really tough to swallow. But we're like we gotta keep moving forward. Where what you mentioned the one year wage. Freeze another part. That was really hard to swallow on the bill. Frankly was the compromise around e-verify e-verify what it does is it's a database searches government records to verify someone's identity and basically the system has actually been used continue raids and detentions of undocumented immigrants. Because once you're in the system people can find you. One thing i will say is that there's some support there's some folks that are not supporting it and the reason why we did support it was economist rang a little bit similar to what we felt in one thousand nine hundred eighty six when the immigration reforms happened back then ronald reagan and the democratic house republican ronald reagan and democratic house. Right exactly there was division to amongst advocates at that time as well but one thousand nine hundred eighty. Six is the reason why i'm here today. I mean. I think that that was also a transformational policy. That didn't have all the support of all the advocates. And i truly believe. I would not be here today. If it wasn't for my family being able to access a lot of that. I mean the bottom line is that the do not have the votes even with this compromise bill and we know that roughly one point two million undocumented farm workers could be able to benefit from this program and our members you know even though they were like yeah. This is very compromised. But we gotta keep moving and we gotta support it in order to make something happen and this is one of the very few policies that we've seen. That has bipartisan support. It's definitely something that we're going to have to take some heat around with our own community. But i think the we know that this is going to have to be just one step in the bigger picture that we're trying to move forward. I don't know who you're the whole thing where it's just like. Yeah well your farmworker back breaking work but you only did it for only ten. Yeah you got to do more and it's just like how much more do you have to prove which makes me think about that. Rare message being given to our farm workers which is that they are not worthy. Yeah which is untrue. I know normally. What are your thoughts about the bill or about the pathway to citizenship for farm workers. What can you share a pathway. Citizenship is absolutely necessary. It is a game changer. It is a difference for these farm workers and their ability to be able to access aid. I mean even throughout the covert pandemic bombers were among those that are undocumented that were excluded from some of this relief packages that were being passed. These folks that were out there feeding us working throughout the pandemic risking their health and that of their family or being denied aid that they so desperately needed and so for us. We understand that. It's not perfect but we know what a difference it'll make in the lives of these farm workers as we would hear stories of of them leaving bags packed in notes. Posted in neighbors informed. Like if i get picked up by a raid. Can you take care of my kids. Can you pick them up from school. Having to these contingency plans because they were afraid that they would it be able to see their children again and wanted to make sure that their children were case. I didn't have to school with food in their backpacks. I mean this is a huge difference to them to be able to access that and as mentioned from the two point five to three million farmers in this country approximately half are undocumented. So this is such a huge game changer. For the commute to access that sort of help and these folks have experienced decades of traumatizing work conditions economic insecurity violence sexual assault the threats of deportation and so much wilner ability in all of this was just exasperated over this last year because of kobe. Nineteen but this is part of a bigger issue that we're seen as not just farmworkers but farmers are part of essential workers. And that's why which justice for migrant women were one of the founding organizations for the always essential campaign which is a national campaign focus and transforming. What is possible for essential workers as so farmer process. We've mentioned were deemed essential workers by the government throughout the pandemic. But they haven't been treated as such in. This is a one point. One trillion dollar sector in america and so for us were also supportive of the bills. That are out there to be able to provide pathway to citizenship to essential workers. Because that's the struggle that we're seeing across. I mean there's five million undocumented immigrants that made the sacrifices that were part of frontline jobs that were central industries healthcare homecare transportation food production construction and farm workers that were in the agricultural industry and so for as we see as the least we can do for these communities that are part of our society part of our country that we saw how much they contributed and sacrifice. And how important they were to keep us running and so absolutely. We know that all of these may not be perfect on include everything but it does what we need which is provide them with the relief that they need with the access to be able to come out of the shadows and be able to access the help they need and be able to be confident when they go out and raise their hand for some of these abuses at their seeing because that's how they keep them under their thumb. I mean the big thing about agricultural work. That people are not naming. It's all about control. Absolutely they want worker is sacked on all right. Let's move on to our final segment which we call covert coping. So we want to end by recognizing the long history of organizing resistance and mutual care that exists in the farm worker movement. I think for me. I mean cesar chavez like for serious eat grapes furry so many years as a mexican kid growing up in chicago. And that's what it looks like. Across the country people seen and identifying with the farm workers and the movement right so the cove in nineteen pandemic has been really hard more than six hundred thousand from workers were infected with the virus. According to researchers at purdue university still farm workers and advocates step in where the government has fallen short in terms of protecting farmworkers and their physical and mental health so in a year that has really taken such a toll. I just wanted to end. now in. T- my can you talk about how you're coping and how you're also at the same time supporting workers. Yeah we'd like to talk about joy and hope and particularly farm worker joy as a form of resistance so your thoughts and we'll start with you. Norma thank you. It's so incredibly important to be able to find ways to cope as i mention. Farm workers have been some of the hardest hit have been dealing with decades of trauma centuries of trauma indigenous communities whether it was the black slaves and then Indentured farmworkers right down to now. The latin x farm workers that are out there in the fields and all those other communities too. We have pation type. Folks that are out there harvesting fruits and vegetables and all of these folks have had to endure so much out there. We started a healing voices project which we came together with. Nash amendments these little headstart association. Lat next therapy in the evil of glory foundation to create a virtual therapy program for farm workers were able to provide them with that mental health support with being able to teach them with skills on how to be able to make his we. Just kind of just buckle down radio. We didn't have time to feel those feelings. Were real and they felt but we just couldn't have the resources we didn't have the language we have the ability to be able to face and deal with some of these things and unfortunately these traumas got passed down to pass down and before you know it. I'm a twelve year old getting yelled at by this white farmers creating more trauma of my own but we're trying to be able to give farmers away to be able to cope with some of these issues of treating their mental health just as important as where treating the physical health same. Were pushing for those health standards to make sure that farmers are safe in their physical body. We wanna to make sure that we also have an osha. Mental health standard develop this wealth for all workers. Those folks that have been in the frontline. Because as you mentioned we just went through new append dynamic. It's huge and it was traumatic for all of us as of planet. It wasn't even just here in our country. We're providing these sort of resources here at home. I just remind myself of where it came from. Those roots in the work needs to get them there. But i also am so happy that i get to be able to hold my little girl clothes and give lots of hugs and kisses and know that she won't have to go out in the fields the way i did and not have to work the way that i had to work to be able to make ends meet and the fact that i thanks to his vaccination got to go hold my parents after being apart from them for you know year and a half recently and so. That's been beautiful my way of being able to cope with all of this making sure that objecting care of myself We love that. Thank you norma. Raina your thoughts for me. It's been just going back to my roots especially around healing practices. Put a bit shot that lasko people which is where my people come from in truck gone represent me truck and i think a lot of that too is just the integration of odd movie men of movement one of the programs that we have going on at bitcoin based out of the network of our sister organizations is the ana walk program where it's really been based around indigenous healing practices focusing on ancestral wisdom of how we did our planting back in a minute. But they're back in the motherland and putting in different practices of how we utilize medicinal herbs and really a- practices and rituals that we would do when we started harvest and on the personal note to lots of river time. Lots of time and nature. Lots of dancing lucy guy. I think that that's really the thing that brings me a lot of joy and you know one of my happy places is the river. The river is been just one of the most healing places for me and my family. And and i'm really lucky that i get to live in a place right now especially where wildfire season hasn't hit will my county marion county like did last year and just being able to do that on my time that i get to be you know with my family. I'm just saying. Julio nature heels you have heard it from raina lopez. I just want to put it on record. I'm down with rivers. I don't know if i can watch. But i can do rivers whitewater rafting and kayaking and all that so jumping back okay. Do they not. Lopez executive director of p koon and norma florida's lopez chief program officer at justice for migrant women. Thank you so much for bringing it real right here on in the thick and joining julia on me on this episode. Thank you so much. Thank you thank you so much. Money ain't wholesome lorella and this episode was produced by our summer intern. Sarah her shandor. Thank you so watch sarah. How great great word and remember to your listener. Go to apple podcasts. To rate and review us thumbs up to sarah the intern for producing this episode. By starts you can say that yes. It really helps other people to find us. Also you can remember now to listen to in the fake. Wherever you decide to get your podcast on dora spotify check us out on the web at in the thick dot org follow us on twitter and an instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook. And tell everyone you know to listen. In the thickest is produced by saudi harsher hotta and our new york women's foundation ignite fellow. Lisa selena's along with our intern. Sarah her shandor with editorial support from charlotte mansion and nicole. Rothwell our audio engineering team. Is stephanie the boj. Roussel liaison on and gabriella by as our digital editor. Is the music you hurt. His courtesy of nacional kept n. Zeki records and this has a day off. He didn't help you with the recording. Not helping me know it's harsh. It's all harsh studio. Thank you so much for listening dear listener. I'm just like i want the fuck out of this country. I mean after watching a judas into black messiah last night and hearing about how they can't even fucking give them cold fucking water okay. She thinks everyone's tracking her now. I'm like are you fucking kidding me. I hate this country. And then i'm like what am i going. Okay there's no place to of the opinions expressed by the guests and contributors in. This podcast are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of fujairah media or its employees..

democratic house ronald reagan wilner cia anthony headstart association cesar chavez kobe purdue university lasko Norma shandor Nash america chicago raina lopez osha Raina p koon
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Original art is from panama. They wouldn't be noriega down but janata is better about just the opposite and when he looked back is just amazing data. Needless speaking kit from economic zone will be so important to starting reagan opinion. And i love it. I'm so happy man. 'cause you did something that everybody's going to talk about it for years and we are so glad i'm glad man. I'm glad for that he yankee. I'm glad for even queen. I'm glad for all these already making. It went to see my grass randall. I am so glad to and proud of your work is one of the oldies. But there's so many more we're going to hear about in. This system of loud will find out how to get on fire from panama to to the rico to cologne man. That thing took new york by stom- it came to a moment. Where if you wanted to be big plan colombia get of heads big colombian from there. You jump around the world we will take you from sway club. You'll feel demille seek and the peop- at the door to the fancy award. Show they come on stage with the fucking beige pin su Mtv awards stage is different like we ever rides world. We will go behind the scenes of gus. Alina is an idea that literally when we first heard. I almost laughed thing by dan's dot com dot com. Gone back on and give it to you straight about the real shed. The wind down coming guys would go from literally riding the bus to get to the studio to having a bmw overnight and the bmw wasn't enough everybody having a good time momento man about happening. Right here napster. Mp three era was the worst thing like everybody wasn't bankrupt. Everybody all our friends from the beginning. This shit is here to stay out is like this is completely completely completely going to change the landscape of music. But i did back tour group of three friends and bama nine hundred eighty five the toll one in the group of friends rope some knows. Oh sam is against what he said. I'm going to america. He got a scholarship to study new york where his mother was leaving. I'd say to him. You know what you better performance do it you say man. I'm gonna try to do that. And if i make it big you come with me wanting new york frankie chiusano artist name for himself. One day you probably hera. He will call himself handed. We'll see you don't get in brooklyn brewery suddenly and commando marching whatever that might own headed getting. It is considered the father of hananel is like the blueprint. You know what i'm saying you know. He's the one that said it to the next level blew up but get on a plane from panama. Jfk where spanish-language dance revolution is about to take place it's jamaican music produced in new york and performed by latinos so it's like in panorama you get a little bit of it but when you came over here he was more in it you know for all my guy came from new york was All free would they knew mule see said. Hey listen this. Is the new staff next time off over over. Don't now though he's studying home is a spotify. Podcast from food doodo studios. This podcast was written and reported by martin. Bishop and louis guy an edited by sophia lisa. We've held on this episode from albury. From spotify a -secutive producers gina fill back adriana on jessica molina and julio bubble. We're producing hell from dan. Bihar as they did. Produce for food tudo studios by manisha produced by catalina gotta ecclestone airman's walking cutler sandra jagna nicole rothwell and then at you on the production by christiane rada seventy underboss muna's lino and diego ramirez fat checking the sound design and mixing by dini montalban and stephanie. Liberal arts. being don't is way matt's original music by geico. And danny crazy town for the eggleton and info any teluk music supervision by mixing yours truly recorded at studio by emerge and hannah interview allieu courtesy of crystals to a special thanks to god. Go by luis. Ruiz josh lincoln antonio said he'll alejandra martinez sonia flowered.

panama new york janata noriega bmw frankie chiusano randall reagan Alina hananel cologne rico colombia napster dan sophia lisa gina fill jessica molina sam julio bubble
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

06:52 min | 3 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Vinyl segment which we call. That would be the last one before you go last call now. It was definitely strange to see the beautiful and distinguished key and family meeting with somebody who is the opposite of that but who happens to be the president of this country. It was a moment that was missed because actually was never fully translated into english. I wonder why right so. Listen closely to. What gloria guinean. Mona says momma from circus mahyco says to trump in spanish. Yes meet me yes. Historian is historic amnesty on for mundo. Her daughter story is a story of the whole nation is for me how the last one we shall versus miniscus genius. I mean you can hear it you cooker. Whose demeo main news on the eastern tehran saying. Bury emily's salvino sullivan the k. k. Karaoke amelio that nestle is. Ah whose domestic partners historian you partners historian and who when of these so it's actually deep on so many levels because gloria you can see that she's showing respect and deference she says can i ask a final question right and then she says look basically. My daughter comes to me in my dreams. she's history. This is a part of history. But she comes to my dreams and she's telling me that children need to be saved and she's like i'm not sure which children but maybe it's the children at the border and maybe you can help me. Maybe you can help me to understand what children and maybe you can help and do something. Good so in thinking of this beautiful image of vanessa. Speaking to her mother through her jeans about fighting for justice for more than just yourself. I want to end by asking the both of you. What your dreams of adjust world look like. So what in fact could justice for my niece maggie and looked like on a deeper systematic level. We'll start with you gene. Well that's a. that's a tough one. I mean at the very least the independent body for young latinas and young women to be able to report sexual assault in the military independent of their chain of command is at the very very least but i was also struck by that comment in the moment when they're together when she was talking about the children and i think that this is an again an opportunity to draw attention to all the kinds of violences that we're facing and that we're dealing with in the incredible grief and rage and need to change. And to see vanessa family be at the forefront of this. I can't think of anything more american than to really push for st and that was another word that she kept on using over and over again is to really be clear about who st at eleven that the truth and i think we're at a moment of reckoning of truth telling and of justice that vanessa john is just one part of getting us to truth and justice and her mom gloria agian. Take us out pam man. Sorry this is just emotional. It's okay. I'll take a moment bam one thing i wanted just really Foots tom is. The conversation can not only move to reporting in like my question is how are we eradicating and stopping the violence and lurgan has been the most consistent courageous voice on this she actually also said when she was in dc she said. Do you know why we will close fort hood. We will close fort hood for a better future. She said we will build hospitals and schools and housing for veterans living under bridges. She said that. And i share her vision of a more prosperous world where we divest from violence and we invest in communities. I mean i was. An intelligence. analyst has studied counter-terrorism. I know deeply what violence looks like. And i know what the roots of insecurity are and so it was beautiful and healing actually for me to hear glory and share that vision. I also share her vision where she has said until there is justice. Not just for vanessa yen but an actual overhaul of this system that treats rape as an occupational hazard we will not encourage enlistment and women and allies across the country are saying yes we cannot in good conscience encourage our young people to enlist in the military without a mission. That treats people as expendable. I named my project. That's for the people because at the end of the day i hear from countless veterans at no matter what their service story is no matter the reason for joining at the end of the day they wanted to serve people yeah. They didn't want to serve politicians or corporations or false idols. And so we continue our service by fighting for actual change a world that doesn't require destruction to have supremacy deep. Thank you thank you so much. We really appreciate all of your work and vanessa. This one goes out for you. Meet them we're trying to do justice by you and by your family gene up. It is professor of comparative american studies at oberlin. College and pam gumbo salma senior political strategist at the working families. Party and a veteran. Thank you so much for joining me on this episode of in the thick. Thank you so much. Thank you so much money. And i'm hulu rebelo. This episode was produced by our summer intern. Audion goodman remember dear listener. Go to apple podcasts. To rate and review us it really helps. Because where else would you hear a conversation like this also remember you can listen to in the thick on pandora spotify wherever you get your podcast. Follow us on twitter and on instagram. At in the thick show like us on facebook and tell your friends and family to listen in the thickest produced by moore saudi harsh hata. Our new york women's foundation ignite fellow. Lisa selena's and our interned sarah. Her shandor with editorial support from bizarre lot. Managing and nicole rothwell. Our audio engineering team is definitely the bow. Julie brousseau gabriella by an via shaw daman. Our digital editor is lease new. Not thanks to is for recording me the music you heard his courtesy of nasty kept nc k. Records you in our next episode dear listener. Thank you again so much for listening. We really appreciate it..

gloria guinean circus mahyco Bury emily salvino sullivan Karaoke amelio vanessa vanessa john gloria agian fort hood Mona nestle tehran gloria maggie lurgan pam pam gumbo salma tom dc Audion goodman
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

05:10 min | 5 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"All right and our final topic is an immigration update so on tuesday homeland security secretary hundred maiolica sent a memo to agency leaders formerly ending former president. Trump's remain in mexico policy. It's also known as mpp migrant protection protocols which is like what the hell is it. Basically is a policy started in january of two thousand nineteen under trump. that forced some seventy thousand asylum-seekers if not more many of whom are central american and it basically forced these people to stay in mexico just horrific conditions really scary. They were forced to do this. In order to wait impacts go for their. Us asylum cases to courts here. We're not say this is great that you ended remaining mexico but the administration is still keeping in place. Some pandemic related border policies that trump enacted including public health order known as title forty two. That was invoked of twenty twenty last week. Andrew doron and isabella diaz wrote a piece for the marshall project. About how this strict enforcement of this policy has caused hundreds of thousands of immigrants to be immediately expelled at the border including probably many of whom are refugees and has pushed many of these people to attempt multiple crossings. Even riskier routes. I mean when you're desperate you're desperate. Let's just be clear it's never been like. Oh my god. The covid pandemic is coming in from mexico on the southern border. No that's not the case an all the while basically the us border patrol apprehensions have reached the highest monthly levels in twenty years this year. So they are going all out on the border to militarize area stormy at. You've been reporting on this for a long time and on the ground. Tell me a little bit about some of that reporting jamila. It's so sad. I have what's app texts from last night. Missed phone calls from one of these people who is a refugee he. He's been sent back twice to undo us now. He's back in mexico again and he's desperate. I have people who have legit refugee cases but because they couldn't wait any longer because their children were being attacked in government shelters in mexico they came in crossing through however what and now they don't have a case here so it's humanity on the most desperate level and as you know jamie la i'm eating and demanding a lot more from the biden administration. There's an analysis by the marshall projects and mother jones. That showed that in twenty twenty while this policy was placed the death rate for migrants doubled and the number of border encounters requiring rescue operation reached the highest rate in at least a decade. Which just to your point. He has shows the desperation and how it is just increasing under incredible circumstances. Right these are folks who were trying to make this transition in pandemic. let's not lose track of that right. It's so heartbreaking. And that is you know. I think john eleven thirty years. They'll make hollywood movies about jose padilla who crossed and this and that and they're gonna make them into heroes. It's like don't do that. Look at it right now. And i say to our listeners. Look around you because these are the people who are forming our communities so open your eyes and will continue to do our immigration updates. Here at itt. And i'm mighty ena hosa jamila king And remember dear listener. Go to apple podcasts. To wait in us because it really helps remember. You can listen to us on pandora spotify wherever you choose to get your podcast onto day. Check us out on the web at in the dot org follow us on twitter and instagram and in the show like us on facebook and tell your friends and family to listen in the thing is produced by noor saudi harsono. Our new york women's foundation ignite fellow lisa selena's and our turn nicole bassolino with support from charlotte managing and nicole rothwell engineering team. Is stephanie abode. The caruso endless shar digital editor is we do not thanks to roll peres recording me in connecticut..

Andrew doron jose padilla Trump isabella diaz trump nicole bassolino january twice last night twitter facebook twenty years jamie la noor saudi harsono one this year instagram charlotte stephanie abode hundreds of thousands
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

08:09 min | 5 months ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Accessible food system look like it has to start with the shifting of power we have to take the power out of a handful of people that are controlling our food system we have seven point eight billion people on this planet of which the majority of people who grow food are people of color are women and yet we have a handful of white people men mainly controlling full system. So there's definitely has to be a shift in power dynamics putting power back into the hands of communities so when we talk about food justice and food sovereignty. That's what it means is for people now to start having control of land issues where they live controlling how they grow their food. And he's starting having that ownership and it's going to take people with power is like a drug. It is hard for people to give it up and so for me. I'm looking for the next revolution in which people with an communities are starting to come together and understand a powder they have collectively to make change and a lot of that changes with their own dollars an also making sure that the people that they vote in our accountable so there are a lot of mechanisms that are happening now especially with our youth. That are starting to talk about. How entrepreneurship finance literacy wealth building. Social capital communal. Well all these things that are normally talk within our communities must starting to be buzzing and communities of color. So you know. I haven't had a chance to shout out my all time favorite. Tv show which is queen sugar. Which if you want to know about black ownership of farms and it looks like in louisiana. It really helped me to understand. So i'm wondering adrian in terms of the future. How do you hope that food is gonna be used to foster. The conversation around an actual acts of solidarity food is activism by default because food are stories. It's what we come from us. Our elders and our ancestors. And it's also the universal language through which all people can really understand and relate to struggle or oppression or even unity. it's a thing through which like all marginalized community can empower each other relate to each other relief find common ground in those stories than struggles. I always say there. Nothing more red breaking than serving my grandma's best dishes for other Folks while bitching about how sick about white people trying to sell our food cooking us. Latino food as it relates to our cultures is also a mechanism for reclamation. So i'm i'm speaking in terms of social activism in terms of freedom of identity and cultural identity it is a mechanism for reclamation of identity self worth self understanding and a freedom food is everything is the greatest weapon we have to protect ourselves and the greatest weapon. We have to break down walls. Wow food for me. At least and i think it can be for a lot of young generation by folks. Our strongest armor are sharpest weapon and our greatest joy. Because this is the thing that brings us together. And i love it. We should be able to use that to uplift each other all right well. It's the perfect transition because we do want to end with a little bit of joy so let's move on to our final segment. Which in this episode is called binge worthy but the food ish we want to know what dish meal ingredient really saved you during the pandemic. so let's start with. You can well. I would say first of all having communal meals you. I think be able to sit down and have a family meal i think was the high point of the pandemic. Just being able to sit and talk about things i think one thing about. The african american experience is the fact that it's the food that brings us together is the food and family males that have been a tradition in a black community where we sit down and talk about issues that affect our community but also a chance where we can be seen and heard and i think that's that was really really important that got me through the pandemic is again breaking bread with family and having a family meal. Nice love that adrian. Something that you binged during the pandemic that saved you. The i agree with the whole family aspect of something that was you know. We usually look to when we look for. Therapy looked to wit wage to ground ourselves. Unfortunately you know my husband's family's in the uk and my family's further down south so we weren't able to be together at all really so we're really missing. That family connection was the thing that really will hold us together but the one thing that will always do the trick. A mom and dad or grandma isn't around is the food that they use to cook for us when we were kids right right. I've been cooking the hell out of my grandma's mapo tofu it's a sichuanese style. Tofu dish it's spicy. It's got ground meat in it or not. I saw on instagram. I want the recipe bro. It is all over my instagram. Because i can't stop eating it because it's just been missing everybody and just missing that togetherness and being able to have those things that reminded me of her reminded me of them made it feel like there with me so that dish and the other things that we used to eat as kids were really kinda messed in grass. Wow oh man. That's awesome maria. I've been meaning to ask you. What have you been binging on. Well the thing that really. I mean because you know i'm a survivor of cove and i think one of the things that happened to me during covid. Was this very intense relationship with kinds of food. That i needed to have and of course it was hard because there was a pandemic shutdown but i did learn how to make my lead chicken soup like the mexican. I will eat that chicken soup. Nice it just saved me. But i would agree that the other thing apart from popcorn and dark chocolate is my kids started to cook. My son became an extraordinary cook. My daughter has always cooked and so the family meals stuff has really been a beautiful moment. That i'm already starting to miss. Nice okay. julio. What's your binge worthy food edition. I did a lot of grilling but what i would do. After three or four days. All the leftover meets. I would just warm them up again. I know what you're gonna say. Get some thirty. i'm serious. I started putting on the grill. And and i was just like flipping thirteen us and i was cutting up. Cilantro and onion and hot sauce was so funny because at the beginning my wife and my kids would be like. Oh puppy come on. Stop like why are you doing this tacos again. And then i stopped for a month. And i'm like all right too many tacos for everyone. So what happened during the summer. it's like oh poppy. Like are we going to start having tacos again and now i just have tacos for lunch all the time as long as i'm good money so there you go all right. Well thank you so much. Karen washington farmer. Food justice activist and food writer and cook adrian. Chang thank you so much for joining me on me and this food edition of in the thick. Thank you so much. Thank you know hoarser. And i'm hungry. Allah and i'm hungry to this episode was produced by our spring. Inter nicole bassolino. And i'm hungry and remember go to apple podcasts. To rate and review us. Because it really helps you can listen to us on pandora spotify wherever you get your podcast on out on the way at in the thick dot org follow us on twitter on instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook. And tell your friends and family. And i'm hungry in the figures produced by north saudi hot dr new york women's foundation a knight fellow lisa selena's and our internal goals bassolino with editorial support from charlotte man. Gin and nicole rothwell audio engineering team. Is stephanie the boj. Caruso envious shaw or digital editor is not thanks to betty's for recording me. The music is courtesy of nothing about kept c k records. I need the right now with some and meet. I'm so hungry next episode dear listener. Thank you for listening chomp chomp chomp chump chump chump. Yamile there.

stephanie lisa selena Karen washington nicole rothwell Gin facebook betty twitter maria Caruso Chang nicole bassolino Allah uk pandora louisiana thirteen Latino eight billion people thirty
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Maybe we should give the dogs of votes as well. Lost my whole. All of a sudden, all of a sudden areas, like, oh, I hate this show. Yes. So the finale Sunday night, that was the scene where they're fixing the ruling system by making it, an oligarchy. So that was one thing. It's not a good POC show in a lot of ways it never had never happened. But it working like bad to, like real trash. Yeah. All right. So no bullshit. What's your take on this final season? You know, considering that art, including television is often a reflection of society's values, and that game of thrones shows us the issues of whiteness, and male privilege like kind of straight up. And in this case, you know, there are these male writers, who wrote this. So how does this final season reflect on issues of race gender in class and I don't know? White male mediocrity. So I made a joke yesterday that drove on the dragon. He after John snow kills denarius basically drove on. Comes up behind. John John is afraid of the drug on is going to like burn him to death, and he actually burns down the AIA throne, which is like clearly commentary on, you know, how like all of this war and competition for power is ultimately useless than it is fatal and deadly and dangerous and violin. All of these things. One of the things I said on Twitter, which was like a joke, was, I was, I was saying that the way I'm going to interpret this, like whenever I've talked to people as I'm going to be like, that is the throne of white supremacy and systemic oppression and like burn it all down. People were like these two. White male writers were clearly not saying that and I'm like you guys, I know that I'm saying, I'm gonna turn it on its head because I can use this show to me, whatever I wanted to entertainment. So I'm going to leverage the commentary on how rare it was to see anybody of color there whatsoever. We finally got to black characters then one of them was killed. And when they finally wrote into winter fell like they experienced the same kind of racism that they'd experience and twenty. Nineteen America like I'm absolutely going to have these conversations around this show, irrespective of what they did, like I think this was a great example of what happens when the world makes a cultural phenomenon its own right from your Nimes to the jokes to the music to the fandom folks, took this and made it mean what they wanted it to mean throughout every season. And so people were like super mad at me today, and I was like you guys, I was kidding everybody. I stopped really loving the show when they killed the beautiful men of color. He's in one, well, see death rocky the guy flayed album. And I was like season war that guy Carla Van Gogh or whatever he's Drago, how Wendy killed him. I was like mongo. Carla mongo come away. Durango the fact that I just I love Maria to she's like my older sister. She's trying to talk game of thrones with us, and it's not even working and I need to bring in the New York Times reporter who's a big game. Throw nerd? Breaking down Kimmy, your Kimmy, your thoughts on the finale. I mean, I think that they like basically took all the things we knew and loved about every character in, like threw it in the trash. I think they probably should have had two full seasons instead of half one of between seven and eight because the show, does felt very rushed and have really bad writing and also like it wasn't even the results that we got. It was just like I didn't care anymore, like it didn't do the level of emotional work to get to, like big dramatic reveals, and I and I as a viewer was invested. So to be like it felt like a kind of bigger betrayal. It wasn't like something happened that I didn't want to happen, is it. I didn't care the moment when John kill Danny, and I was like, damn like he like her and killed her. And then the dragon and opportunity if I was dragging, I would be like, I want to burn. Happy if Jon snow would burn to Chris. I'm just saying I would have been like good broody good-looking kit Harrington. But this is what I mean drug on was the wisest went out there. He said, look, and I for an eye is not the way to go. I wanted burn down the iron throne that caused all this advocate in the first place. Everybody slept on drug, right? He's the most brilliant, creature there. But what makes me sad is the fact that you can have white male writers, who are performing in mediocre ways, and they're still getting paid shit ton of money. And they're basically, as you said, instead, just basically mediocre in terms of the writing they didn't do what they're supposed to do. And meanwhile, I'm thinking about all the fabulous writers and directors of color, who are out there, and who are getting turned down because all this money was spent to do game of thrones. Sorry to be a Debbie Downer. You're Debbie Downer. I think everybody watched their shit, and you're right. We played. We all got played. We all got played in a way Maria is this martyrs person on this podcast? Do not get played and we all got played. But anyway, Mexican in the room. Anyway. Uh said, Herndon national political reporter with the New York Times. Brittany pack Nate educator and co host of pod. Save the people from crooked media. Thanks to both of you for joining Hulu on me on this edition of in the thick. Thank you so much. Thank you. I'm a wholesome, and I'm Hulu recall Lorella. This is in before we go. This is the final reminder, we're one week away for our third annual live in the thick recording at depaul university in Chicago. That's right. You guys we're gonna be talking about youth activism, next Thursday, may thirtieth with some pretty kick ass guests. Joining us is LGBTQ activist, and actress from one of my favorite TV shows one day at a time Isabela Gomez, also national gun control, youth activists, Ed nut charges will be fine from LA to join us. Plus, we have amazing local Chicago organizers Ugo Kerry, who's a former alderman candidate for the fortieth ward in the city and Cosette Hampton, who's a leader with B Y P one hundred Chicago and we're going to have some spoken word performances in the mix to get all the details and to RSVP and to reserve your free seat. Eight is open to the public go to IT. Live from Chicago twenty nineteen dot event, bright dot com. That's by t t live from Chicago twenty nine thousand nine dot event, bright dot com. I love going to Chicago with somebody I love this event. I can't wait. I'm already figuring out the pizza that we're having so it's gonna happen. So we'll see you soon Chicago see soon Chicago and remember, go to apple podcasts to rate and reviews because this really helps other listeners to find us. And remember, you can now find in the thick on Pandora on Spotify wherever you get your podcast, follow us on Twitter, and on Instagram at in the thick show like us on Facebook and tell your family and friends to listen in to think is produced by Nicole Rothwell. And our New York women's foundation ignite, fellow newer, Saudi our audio engineers, are Stephanie, the bow into the Caruso, the music, that you heard his courtesy of Nazi kept NC K record. We'll see you on our next episode. Thank you so much for listening. Dear listener, I so appreciate it s an Brooks knows bay move. Show. What's

Chicago Twitter New York Times John John reporter Maria Debbie Downer Carla mongo John snow Hulu Nimes depaul university Carla Van Gogh Kimmy Jon snow America apple Durango Facebook Pandora
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Sale. We're gonna do she'll text me and be like I wanna be with Terrell and you guys next time because that's what she did the last time and we had a blast. But listen, thanks again, Terrell. Thank you. I am Terrell Jemaine star. And remember go to a podcast to rate and review is because guys, you know, what it really really helps. And you know, you can also listen to in the thick on Pandora Spotify. Or wherever you get your podcast. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at in the thick show like us on Facebook and tell all your homies to listen in thick in the thick is produced by one Pablo Garnham, and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow and Julia Caruso, our fellow is newer Saudi and all that music that you hear is courtesy of Nasional kept and z k records. We'll see you next time on in the thick. Thank you so much for listening knows Vamanos shouted it out Terrell bringing home. All right later, y'all. You know, what's in my head right now, the Konya in Jay z like I've been listened to. Didn't didn't enter and I just was I two rows like my not that. We're like, Jane, Jay JC. I don't want to be. Yeah, we're rolling. You know, what I mean to say? Trenton center. The opinions expressed by the guests and contributors in this podcast are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of food Tura media or it's employee's.

Terrell Jemaine Stephanie LeBow Pandora Trenton center Twitter Facebook Jay JC Nicole Rothwell Nasional Pablo Garnham Julia Caruso Vamanos Jane
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Chip. Can this regime exist right now in Venezuela, actually, be described as a left leaning regime, a socialist regime? I just came back from Mexico in Mexico City, and that looks more like what Latin American socialism has has taken the form of over the last twenty years than what we see in Venezuela, which could be more authoritarian. So where does the left in Latin America, go from here is this a reckoning for the left, and if so noble should again, how does the left rebuild its movements number one? If this is the left will help the left, frankly, I mean, this is the people on the left who were defending this, really. It is the left's problem because this is never this never been a regime defended by the right as a right wing regime. Whatever it is whatever you wanna call it. It's been defended by people on the left, a socialist as a regime that is seeking, you know, more egalitarian ISM benefits for the poor. And so on essentially kleptocracy. I mean, this is this is a government which is in power to serve its own interests to stay in power to steal as much as it can from the state and everything, you know, take all the benefits that it possibly can from the position that occupies if the left wants to own that then that's really a big problem for the left. It seems to me. So, you know, there is a modern left in not in America. There's a modern left elsewhere in the world. And they have a big contribution to make it will be a real tragedy. If defending us from Yudo people like Boleslaw Nado people like Donald Trump were left to people like nNcholas model. You know, then the really is. No hope. Wow. That's a way to frame it. Yeah. What do you think where the left goes in and let America it's about to do shows? I mean, we've seen this dependence swing because of corruption scandals, and it's it's because when government support able to get him power. They committed many of the same mistakes that conservative governments had their Maost tremendous amounts of control, the put political loyalists, you know, certain key positions that led to corruption led to nepotism to cronyism. And here we are. I believe that of course, when Donald Trump Quaid's socialism. What what's what's being this causing the states? I it's it's preposterous. I also think that there's a new left wing movement in the United States. That's rightfully questioning a lot of the foreign policy decisions of the United States made history. And and really genuinely questioning, you know, what's the what's the US role, for example that America drawing from history. I think that's. Very important. And in that comes from a new generation of democratic socialists were willing to bring this up and put it send stage and say and many of them say in a while, we don't, you know, support by the little while we don't say the Bodo is it's legitimate leader or represents the left inland, America. We we do have to have a debate in this country of what it means to to intervene what it means to sort of orchestrate regime change and why what is the ultimate goal. And I think that's absolutely Jim it position. And I and I support it, and I support that the bait, and I think it's absolutely Jim that said Venezuela. It's not the left is socialism same with. I'm Louis Mexico. You know, you're you're seeing right now the left governing Mexico for the first time, it's modern history. The jury is still out if this question of guava is what is the left? I think left to right feeling but let America I need more is strong institutional store credit institutions in accountability. And this is what's been missing. And everytime. The right or the left come, you know, they come with saviors come with. Messiahs and that's been day. That's been the problem. Li-? Lopez senior editor of global opinions at the Washington Post and Phil Gunson senior analyst with the International Crisis Group and writer on Venezuelan Latin America, thanks so much for joining me. And my amazing guest host all star Amara Jones on in the thick of thanks very much. Thank you. I'm Hulu Lorella. And I'm a March owns. And remember guys, you just gotta go to apple podcast to rate and review us really really helps. Also, you can now listen to in the thick on Pandora Spotify. Or wherever you get your podcast. Follow us on the Twitter and Instagram at in the fix show like us on Facebook and tell all your international politics friends to listen to the show in the thickest produced by one Pablo Garnham, Nicole Rothwell audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow and Julia Caruso, our fellow is you're Saudi the music you heard his courtesy of Nacional kept Z K records. Hey amara. You did a great job. Thank you so much for being on happy to do it. And I didn't know there were so many ways to listen. Yeah. We're everywhere. We're everywhere. So listen, all you in the listeners. We'll see you next time. Thanks for listening knows variables Chow over. God. Did

Latin America Venezuela Donald Trump Amara Jones chip. Mexico Mexico City Donald Trump Quaid Stephanie LeBow cronyism Jim Louis Mexico Yudo US Pandora apple Chow
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"They wanna bring their celebration of the day of the dead here and salsa and dot goes. And the fact that we love to hug and kiss. And we have ensured. One lesson like shout out to every let the next like Twitter profile Facebook profile that had this is not my reality, Mr. Brokaw, and this is my reality. And that's getting attention newsrooms will wake up. I'm also very hopeful like the rest of you. All right. That is a wrap. We wanna thank our all-star Jenny Moe name who's an independent journalist of the native peoples from the Laguna Pueblo nation in New Mexico. Thank you, Jenny N all-star, Terrell Germain star senior reported the root thanks to the both of you for joining me on this edition of in the thick. Thank you for having me again back on the show. Greg be here again, I might anal wholesome, and I'm Hutagalung rela. There's something else. You wanna say, yes, I do because guess what? February twenty-second Sunday valley live in the thick show. It's amazing. We're going to have a great time. The show is sold out. But don't worry about it. You can still be part of the show by sending us your questions and comments. Right. So it's taking place on February twenty-second. So you have a little bit of time. And there's also a wait list because you never know people sign up, and then they're like, no, no kidding aid. So you know, I've already been three or four times. Yeah. So don't be like that. If you get the tickets show up yo, but meanwhile, you can call our hotline it's five O five two two six eight nine seven three. So if you're from the border region, what's one thing that you think people don't hear about or don't know about the border that you love, or that's complicated. And if you're not from the border, what's one thing that you want to know. And try and understand call us and the number again is five oh five two two six eight nine seven three. Remember, dear listener, go to apple podcasts to rate and review as I know that you're like killing really pumped up right now. So do it right now. Because it really helps us also did you know that you can listen to in the fick on Pandora and on Spotify at every place else. Will you get your podcast? Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at in the big show like us on Facebook and tell your family and friends to listen in the thickest produced by quantum Pablo? Garnham and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow and Julia Caruso, our intern is lead the ad. None this stop. Yeah. The music that you heard his courtesy of kept NZC k records. We will see you on our next episode. Thank you, dear listener for making the time to listen. We really do. Appreciate it almost most has Stella proxima. Crooks. Chow?

Twitter Stephanie LeBow Facebook Jenny Moe Terrell Germain Mr. Brokaw Stella proxima Laguna Pueblo New Mexico Hutagalung rela apple Greg Chow fick Pandora intern Nicole Rothwell Pablo Garnham Spotify
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Brokaw. And this is my reality. And that's getting attention newsrooms will wake up. I'm also very hopeful like the rest of you. All right. That is a RAB. We wanna thank our all-star Jenny Moe Nate who's an independent journalist of the native peoples from the Laguna Pueblo nation in New Mexico. Thank you, Jenny N all-star, Terrell Germain star senior reported the root thanks to the both of you for joining me on this edition of in the thick. Thank you for having me again back on the show Greg behavior, I might anal wholesome, and I'm a Lorella. There's something else. You wanna say, yes, I do because guess what? February twenty-second Sunday valley live in the thick show. It's amazing. We're going to have a great time. The show is sold out. But don't worry about it. You can still be part of the show by sending us your questions and comments. Right. So it's taking place on February twenty-second. So you have a little bit of time. And there's also a wait list because you never know people sign up, and then they're like, no, no kidding aid. So you know, I've already been three or four times. Yeah. So don't be like that. If you get the tickets show up, but meanwhile, you can call our hotline it's five O five two two six eight nine seven three. So if you're from the border region, what's one thing that you think people don't hear about or don't know about the border that you love, or that's complicated. And if you're not from the border, what's one thing that you want to know. And try and understand call us and the number again is five oh five two two six eight nine seven three. Remember, dear listener, go to apple podcasts to rate and review as I know that you're like killing really pumped up right now. So do it right now. Because it really helps us also did you know that you can listen to in the fick on Pandora and on Spotify at every place else where you get your podcast. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram in into big show like us on Facebook and tell your family and friends to listen in the thickest produced by quantum Pablo? Garnham and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow and Julia Caruso, our intern is lead. None this stop yet music that you heard his courtesy of cat NZC k records. We will see you on our next episode. Thank you, dear listener for making the time to listen. We really do appreciate it. Those mammals has approx. Crooks. Chow?

Stephanie LeBow Jenny Moe Nate Terrell Germain Laguna Pueblo New Mexico Brokaw. apple Lorella Greg Chow fick Facebook Twitter Pandora intern Nicole Rothwell Garnham Spotify Pablo Instagram
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"This episode of anthropoid was produced an edited by myself REO milkman, Beth durian is our executive producer many, thanks to our guests. This time Jason delone and marina Hosa and our moderator who regard to the writer. We'll see you next time on the next rap on series about gender and sexuality. I am. So glad that we were able to bring that conversation to you. It's just it's the kind of conversations that we need to be having now at this kind of depth and nuance. So again, a special thank you to area. Milkman Jason billion and anthropoid for this crossover collaboration. If you're not a subscriber yet to after pod, he should find them wherever you get your podcast and hit. Subscribe. Of course, please go to podcasts to rate and review to this really helps us also you can now listen to in the thick on Pandora on. Spotify N wherever else you get your podcasts. Follow us on Twitter and on Instagram at in the show like us on Facebook and tell your family and friends to listen in the figures produced by Garnham, Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow. Julia Caruso, our intern is media Mendes stuff yet music that you heard his courtesy of Nacional kept NBC k records. We will see on our next episode of in the Vic, thanks. Oh so much for listening. We'll see you next Chow.

Stephanie LeBow Jason delone Beth durian marina Hosa Jason billion executive producer Julia Caruso Twitter writer Facebook Spotify intern Nicole Rothwell NBC Nacional Chow Garnham
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

05:45 min | 3 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Ship. So no bullshit. What do you want to see in terms of Justice or consequences for our Kelly for him for those who have aided and protected him for the survivors? It's so hard. You know, when people want closure this is like, really hard. There is no closure. It doesn't. But there is something that happens with recognition. But now that there's recognition, you know, there's a lot of conversation about so Justice. So Jimmy let let's start with you. What do you want? Ideally, I would like to see our Kelly dropped from his label. I would like every professional organization and institution that does business with him to cease that immediately from the leaseholders on his studios to concert, venues and managers who work with him and who've booked Tim, I want the girls that are still in his care to be returned to their families. And for they and all the other survivors to get the sort of help that they need to begin their lives again without him. And you know, as somebody who does not believe in the current system of mass incarceration that we have and wants to see something else happened. I recognize that we at this point do not have a system that is designed to rehabilitate and punish offenders, particularly of such crimes as this at this point that works. So I mean in terms of restorative Justice process it cetera. So in lieu of that I'd like to see Robert Kelly Goethe. To prison for a very long time April. I agree with all of that. My first and foremost concern is these young girls and women the the ones that are in his house right now. But also those who have been able to escape or leave and to know that they are getting the mental emotional financial support that they need right because it because it takes a toll on all of you on every facet of your life. So maybe they need new job training, right because they've had to remove themselves. You know, one of them was a was a radio DJ at one point. Well, how do you go back? If that station is still playing his music, right? And so if you can't do that, then what would it what is your new job going to be? And I would also love to see a strengthening of a network for all black female and male survivors of sexual abuse. So that they can find a place to get the real. Sources they need the help the mental wellness improvement that they need because it's not just his victims. Right. There are a whole bunch of folks who are watching this docu series who were triggered because they are either in that situation or recently were and they need to get the help as well. So everything that Jamila said I want him under the jail. I fully, you know, I don't even call it the Justice system anymore because I don't think there is just as mo- more often than not I call it the legal system, and it's broken. But that's what we have. And if you put him away in jail, he will not be able to pray on anyone else. Thank you. Thank you, April for your specificity on what you wanna see in terms of Justice, and for highlighting the voices of the survivors. And what they need. Thank you again, before we end, we just want to assure resource for anyone in need. You can always contact the national sexual assault hotline. It's eight hundred six five six hope. Eight hundred six five six four six seven three. They are confidential. They can give you access to local support. It's available twenty four seven that number is eight hundred six five six four six seven three and Jamila MU writer and public thinker. In critic, April Ryan diversity, inclusion advocate, creator of Oscar so white. Thank you so much for joining who you and me on this special edition of thick. Thank you so much. I might gain a wholesome and I'm over rela. Remember after listening to this special episode, please go to apple podcasts to rate and review is this was such a profound conversation we were able to heal back the onions, so you taking a moment to rate and review as actually helps other listeners to find us. Also, you can listen to in the thick now on Pandora on Spotify. Wherever you get your podcast. You can follow us on Twitter and on Instagram at in the thick show like us on Facebook. And of course, tell everyone, you know, to listen definitely to this episode in the things produced by Garnham and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are Stephanie LeBow and Julia Caruso, our intern is lead the ad Mendez tap. Yeah. The music that you heard his courtesy of dust United kept Enzi k records. Thank you so much for listening. Whoa. This was deep, but we'll see you on our next episode. These. Hey, I appreciate your aging challenge Instagram post. I haven't done. You gotta do. It's fun. I know did you see the one let's rebels posted last night. Sammy Sosa two thousand eight. Eighteen.

Robert Kelly Goethe Jamila Tim Sammy Sosa Instagram Stephanie LeBow Jimmy Oscar apple Twitter assault Facebook Pandora writer Spotify Garnham Mendez intern Nicole Rothwell Julia Caruso
"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nicole rothwell" Discussed on In The Thick

"Contributed to the New York Times and an all star and doing new all-star after just he's very first visit venue Kirk staff writer at the Atlantic. We loved having you on the show. Thank you so much for joining who you and me on in the fick. Thanks. Thanks to my grandma. I'm marina Hosa. And I'm Julia Rica Lorella. Dear listener, I stood this maybe once or twice before. But we'd love you to do us a favor. Can you go to apple podcasts to rate and review as pretty please really really helps us also I know that voice. Ron sounds like a mom voice. Like, I'm about to ask you to do something for us. Mama, mama. I'm gonna totally rate review this show like immediately. Also, he you listen to in the thick now on Pandora on Spotify and wherever you get your podcast. So tell everyone that you know, and follow us on Twitter and on Instagram at in the thick show, and like us on Facebook in the thickest produced by Kwon public Artem and Nicole Rothwell. Our audio engineers are stuffing the boat into the Caruso. Our intern is lead the at an this year the music that you heard it's courtesy of kept Enzi gay records. We will see you on our next episode of into thick on this Friday. Thank you to your listeners for this thing. Chow chow. All right. Listen, you guys. Only rushing you guys because we've only got fifteen more minutes in that studio. And then they're gonna kick you out, and you guys become pumpkins. But listen, I'll record from McDonald's. So sweet we love that.

staff writer Chow chow marina Hosa Julia Rica Lorella New York Times apple Kirk Atlantic Pandora Twitter Caruso Facebook McDonald intern Ron Nicole Rothwell Enzi Spotify Kwon Artem