19 Burst results for "Nicole Muse"

"nicole muse" Discussed on No Chaser with Timothy DeLaGhetto

No Chaser with Timothy DeLaGhetto

07:46 min | 3 months ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on No Chaser with Timothy DeLaGhetto

"So I still don't I'm not exactly sure what they're asking. I don't know either because you can be like you've never. Slaving if you're talking about six. Calling sleigh might be the first thing. Is You well. Yeah, especially if you'RE A do. Never never really slave damsel. Slow was. Somebody was like I'm about to slay you. Are we do I get my into the outfit for Dragon. Would Slavin's murder. First of all. Over happy about it, but if you say like this latest, push right up. On kilkare! which would be a whole nother approach by the way that this question is phrased? I don't know what he's actually talking about a large Abreu. Logic allowed brill. Brill Ayla, or if it's girl Ayla, see now they're now. Used what are we talking? Who are we talking about? He somewhere in it. Does it say he? No, no, what vice you have twenty, four, twenty five year old that never slade, and his awkward as fuck and Personal Life, but when working is the most social person ever these questions from Patriot. This is really confusing, because okay. If you're a woman and you're saying that you haven't slade like you're not killing, you're not getting dressed up. You're not going out. You're not being social. Then that's one way I. This is really hard. Imagine them listening to this. Six. Because look either way you use the context is. Yeah How we going to get this right? I ASSUME SEX WE'RE GONNA. Twenty, five so. Therefore swimming sex where suming that this is a a man because I feel like. Like, women don't slated dig guys. Wouldn't use that innocence. I don't want to tell women what they can and can't do. You can slay Dick's. down. About to slay that day, nope, seed even comes off a little. You know actually that might be good. That'd be cool. If, she said I'm a slayer dragging. Danielle freaky. That's all I mean less turned on by that one, but if you're into that kind of stuff and it's. Ok, okay. Let's pretend it's a guy. Let's pretend to sex. Okay, let's go all. Twenty, five never never never smashed. And awkward in personal life, but when working the most social person ever okay The. then. I'm just trying to think. I think about the people who our who are the most also at work writing and those people are usually really good. Like communicating flirting because I, feel like some of the best. Like easiest ways to hook up with people casually is people that you know every day you see every day like school work, someone that you're comfortable with, and you have a relationship banter with then it's kind of easy to segue into. Yeah, we should kick in. Even. I'm kind of a real I'm very social work. Wise if I'm in work, mode I have no problem doing whatever saying it's good, but in my personal life I am not the most social have an extremely small group, and I don't like large groups of people. If I'm not working, yes, saying yeah, okay. If you're social work solely for the purpose of working and you don't actually like the people you're being social with. Yeah, this is going to be hard, but if you enjoy the people you're working with and your social there and I'm assuming you mean social with in the workplace. Or. Could they mean social for work at completely different? Fueling. There's levels because they can go multiple Wade, if you, if you want to become more social in your personal life, then you can start hanging out with people from work and a lot of the friends that I've made. I worked with I. Rarely Meet People. That I haven't worked with. Okay, so here's the thing. If a patient as they can come back and write a nuclear. Question they're gonNA, be here next month. I'll say this if there's no clause in your. Back. Your back or in your contract at work says you can't for Nangle with people in work. On track your social dare in Chatou Smash Work Related People. If you already know how to be social with them, even though that is frowned upon. As long there's no call right right? I got you got. You got you not in your back, but in your contract. Clause. Just write us again. Please please clarify that. Okay. I'm saying. Never scooped. Is that. No never. Never got my swam. Looking? A girl. We're like. Why is your voice over the? Judge me but. I. I, think we got time for one more. Nicole Muse X. for everyone nickel nickel news in this season of your life. How have you learned to manage the friendships? That once were super tight, but no longer give off the energy you deserve with all. That's going on right now. In Our world, I, clearly see the friendships that support me and the things that affect me and the ones that just want me around, but I'm stuck on how to act accordingly without seeming like the asshole in the relationship That's actually a very well worded question. Thank you, yeah. I got I got to read it again to myself. do you WANNA start it. I don't think I can because I. Don't have the issue. For us because? This. Probably more of a me question. Okay, you guys have had this same group of friends who so long. For me during this time it's been meantime I had to work on myself. I realized why some of the relationships weren't listening because I wasn't reciprocating what they needed out of it. And if you feel, people are off and people's energies are off. You can either address it depending on how close you are so that you can just dead that awkward energy that's happening, but you cannot feel bad for meeting to do what's best for you because if you're a shitty friend there you're. You're not helping somebody else out, and if you're honest about hey, I need to work on right now. This friendship is not beneficial on both ends. I can't give you what you need because. It's a relationship and you have to be okay. Sometimes you can reconvene I sent out. I had to follow. People recently because I did not like who they were around, and when it was constantly in my face, I found myself being bitter when I shouldn't have been so I wrote them, and I said Hey. It's all love. I'm taking a step back from some of my social media activity. Here's my number. Contact me this way because right now. This is just not healthy for me and everybody understood because that's a mature way to handle something like. Yeah, let's not you gotTa do this for me and I'm not trying to build up animosity which happens normally. You gotta walk away. Communicate it. Yeah, man! I feel that I think at the end of the day. It's important that you. Are. Like straight up with how you feel in certain situations with certain people. Like I like you said I have my very close..

Brill Ayla brill sleigh Slavin murder slade Abreu Nangle Danielle Dick's. Wade Nicole Muse
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"Sounds like an earlier Sigler may be all wrapped up in the cerita area. Eastbound ninety one at Bloomfield. It's seven oh, seven this is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The US fight against the Taliban is not over. But the man known as the American Taliban is free in the fall of two thousand one not long after nine eleven Afghan forces allied with the United States captured John Walker Lindh. He's been in a US federal prison for seventeen years until he was released today earlier, we spoke with NPR national security correspondent Hannah Allam and asked how an American at that time ended up in Afghanistan. Yeah. He grew up in California and around age sixteen. He became interested in a slum ends up converting, and then with his parents permission, he sets off to study Arabic and to slam in Yemen. And then Pakistan, and then he crosses in tough ghanistan and things get really murky he sympathized with the Taliban, 'cause goes off to join them ends up at a training camp where at one point he even met Osama bin Laden. Yeah. This was before nine eleven but definitely after other Al Qaeda tax on US interest. How did you end up in US custody after the United States struck back for nine eleven and Afghantistan? Right. Well, in November, two thousand one Lind was captured by the Afghan Northern Alliance. He's questioned by CIA officers who are on the ground. And then moments after his question this big prisoner revolt unfolds. One of those agents Mike Spann was killed the revolt, put down and in this long and bloody ordeal Lynn gets shot in the leg. But he doesn't end up as one of only eighty six of several. Hundred telephone prisoners to survive. So this is interesting. We've got a guy who served seventeen years of a twenty year sentence. He's out on good behavior, can't hold them any longer, but it's unusual because normally prisoners of war would be prisoners of war until the war is over, then you let them go. But now you have a sort of endless war against terror groups, aren't there, multiple people like John Walker Lindh, who were supposed to get out at some point certainly, you know, he was he sometimes called, detainee, number one in the so-called war on terror. And now in a way he's parolee number one and is it going to be a test case for for, you know, several people who are going to be released in the next four or five years. I spoke to Michael Jensen. He's a researcher at the start center to terrorism research center at the university of Maryland. And he talked about this, this is this is what he said, a wave, that's coming at us right now that we are not currently prepared to deal with. So my hope with the Lynn case is. Is that people look at it carefully assess what his risks in what his needs are? We use that as a foundation to build on for future releases. So, you know, we need to move quickly on this. It's it's in the next four years. We're gonna have a hundred of these individuals that were trying to reintegrate back into US communities. Wow. One hundred. That's right. And Jensen said there is no national plan no strategy in place to deal with this. So there's a scramble now to come up with one. We'll if Lind is the test case, let's think this through. He gets out today. There's still a battle against the Taliban and other terror groups house, the United States going to deal with him. Yeah, absolutely. He he'll get out and he has a probation period of three years. And so in that time, he'll be watched very closely really restricted access to the internet. Pretty much everything he does online for the next three years has to be signed off on by his parole. Officer, always monitored the same way that parents may monitor their kids only more. Extremely right, much more extremely. There's also travel restrictions and other sort of, you know, the normal restrictions for people on probation. But really with with Lind, the extra restrictions on the internet are to prevent him from becoming an online recruiter. For extremist groups Hannah. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Hannah alum, the jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations and Danielle Chesler reports. Brittany Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. Laundering here. Washer dryer standard its beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and a green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter, Erla Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare, there, her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing. We're looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always like, in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea of, you know, we may go down here for year. We don't like it, then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey in Illinois, and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach. He starts money actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as university career counselor opportunities for black, folk the south in that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron in Durham, North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left the south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that we got the Harlem renaissance, and Toco blues. These are all a part of the story of the great. Gration as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more connections than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian Tom Hinchey, it says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing is especially an issue for African Americans. It requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many. African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where wages have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis at one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night and a special education teacher during the day. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it used. Any says raising two daughters as a single mom on a teacher salary, has forced her into a sixty five hour workweek a couple of days later. I join her morning routine. Well flushing here. It's still dark as she gets ready to drive her daughter to school hard, part is just make sure I get out, actually I get up in the morning. That's the hard part. Then shocking actually drive there. Mus- Dennis owns her townhouse in a middle class neighborhood called university city and the value of her home has increased in recent years, but our Texas have gone up, too. As mused Dennis streams to make a living Britney Smith. The Detroit transplant is not as overextended she and her husband both work jobs, they love and they have just one child, she feeds her daughter era, a pouch of organic, sweet potatoes here. I am a transplant that come has come down here enough taken advantage of all these opportunities..

United States Charlotte Taliban Brittany Smith North Carolina NPR Lind Hannah Allam John Walker Lindh Michael Jensen Steve Inskeep American Taliban Lynn Rachel Martin Detroit California Sam South Carolina Bloomfield
"nicole muse" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Support for this NPR podcast. And the following message come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox seeing, and instead of closing this Memorial Day weekend may twenty fourth and twenty fifth. The UPS store is doing another thing altogether. Opening the UPS store every anger for small business, and of course shipping. The jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations NPR's Danielle Czeslaw reports, Britney Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. Here. Washer dryer your standard. It's beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and a green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter, Erla Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare. They're her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing. We're looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea. If you know, we may go down here for a year. We don't like it, then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey in Illinois, and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach. He starts Monday actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as a university career, counselor opportunities for black folks, the south, and that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron endure North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left the south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that Hobie got the Harlem renaissance and Chicago blues. These are all a part of the story of the great. Gration as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more connections than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian Tom Hinchey, it says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing is especially an issue for African Americans. It requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many. African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where wages have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis at one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night and a special education teacher during the day. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make us. Dennis says raising two daughters as a single mom on a teacher salary, has forced her into a sixty five hour workweek a couple days later. I join her morning routine flushing, it's still dark as she gets ready to drive her daughter to school hard, part is just make sure I get up actually I get up in the morning. That's the hard part. Sure, I can actually drive there. Mus- Dennis owned her townhouse in a middle class neighborhood called university city and the value of her home has increased in recent years, but our Texas have gone up, too. As mused Dennis strains to make a living. Brittany smith. The Detroit transplant is not as overextended she and her husband, both work jobs. They love and they have just one child, she feeds her daughter era, a pouch of organic, sweet potatoes here. I am a transplant that come has come down here enough taken advantage of all these opportunities. Now, some of it may be too. I have an education insane from a husband, but also it made me actually my husband and I had to look at ways that we can help bridge, the gap the structural issues that keep many African Americans unemployed or underpaid are difficult to fix but a strong economy opens more paths to success. And that's the experience of the Smith, family and millions of other African Americans who are starting new lives in the south Daniela, Chaz low NPR news Charlotte.

Charlotte Britney Smith North Carolina Dennis NPR South Carolina Detroit Sam Mecklenburg county North Carol United States Danielle Czeslaw Nicole muse Ohio Jessica baron Harlem
As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:33 min | 1 year ago

As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

"Support for this NPR podcast. And the following message come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox seeing, and instead of closing this Memorial Day weekend may twenty fourth and twenty fifth. The UPS store is doing another thing altogether. Opening the UPS store every anger for small business, and of course shipping. The jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations NPR's Danielle Czeslaw reports, Britney Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. Here. Washer dryer your standard. It's beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and a green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter, Erla Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare. They're her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing. We're looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea. If you know, we may go down here for a year. We don't like it, then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey in Illinois, and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach. He starts Monday actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as a university career, counselor opportunities for black folks, the south, and that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron endure North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left the south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that Hobie got the Harlem renaissance and Chicago blues. These are all a part of the story of the great. Gration as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more connections than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian Tom Hinchey, it says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing is especially an issue for African Americans. It requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many. African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where wages have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis at one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night and a special education teacher during the day. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make us. Dennis says raising two daughters as a single mom on a teacher salary, has forced her into a sixty five hour workweek a couple days later. I join her morning routine flushing, it's still dark as she gets ready to drive her daughter to school hard, part is just make sure I get up actually I get up in the morning. That's the hard part. Sure, I can actually drive there. Mus- Dennis owned her townhouse in a middle class neighborhood called university city and the value of her home has increased in recent years, but our Texas have gone up, too. As mused Dennis strains to make a living. Brittany smith. The Detroit transplant is not as overextended she and her husband, both work jobs. They love and they have just one child, she feeds her daughter era, a pouch of organic, sweet potatoes here. I am a transplant that come has come down here enough taken advantage of all these opportunities. Now, some of it may be too. I have an education insane from a husband, but also it made me actually my husband and I had to look at ways that we can help bridge, the gap the structural issues that keep many African Americans unemployed or underpaid are difficult to fix but a strong economy opens more paths to success. And that's the experience of the Smith, family and millions of other African Americans who are starting new lives in the south Daniela, Chaz low NPR news Charlotte.

Charlotte Britney Smith North Carolina Dennis NPR South Carolina Detroit SAM Mecklenburg County North Carol United States Danielle Czeslaw Nicole Muse Ohio Jessica Baron Harlem
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"United States captured John Walker Lindh. He's been in federal prison, seventeen years, and is to be released today. NPR national security correspondent, Hannah Allom is covering the story, which has many implications could morning. Good morning. An American end up in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban. Well, it's certainly an unusual case Lind was born into a Catholic family in DC. His dad was a lawyer at the Justice department. Yeah. He grew up in California and around age sixteen. He became interested in this slum ends up converting, and then with his parents permission, he sets off to study Arabic and dislodge him in Yemen. And then. Pakistan. And then he crosses in tough ghanistan and things get really murky he sympathized with the Taliban, 'cause goes off to join them ends up at a training camp where at one point he even met Osama bin Laden. Yeah. This was before nine eleven but definitely after other Al Qaeda attacks on US interest. How did you end up in US custody after the United States struck back for nine eleven and Afghantistan? Right. Well, in November, two thousand one Lind was captured by the Afghan Northern Alliance. He's questioned by CIA officers who are on the ground. And then moments after his question this big prisoner revolt unfolds. One of those agents Mike Spann was killed the revolt, put down and in this long and bloody ordeal Lynn gets shot in the leg. But he doesn't end up as one of only eighty six of several hundred Taliban prisoners to survive. So this is interesting. We've got a guy who served seventeen years of a twenty year sentence. He's out on good behavior. Can't hold him any longer, but it's unusual because normally. Prisoners of war would be prisoners of war until the war is over, then you, let them go. But now you have a sort of endless war against terror groups, and aren't there, multiple people like John Walker Lindh, who was supposed to get out at some point certainly, you know, he was he sometimes called, detainee, number one in the so-called war on terror. And now in a way he's parolee number one and is it going to be a test case for for, you know, several people who are going to be released in the next four or five years. I spoke to Michael Jensen. He's a researcher at the start center said terrorism research center at the university of Maryland. And he talked about this. This is this is what he said, a wave, that's coming at us right now that we're not currently prepared to deal with. So my hope with the Lynn case is, is that people look at it carefully assess what his risks and what his needs are we use that as a foundation to build on for future release? So, you know, we need to move quickly on this. It's it's in the next four years. We're going to have a hundred of these individuals that were trying to reintegrate back into US communities. Wow. One hundred. That's right. And Jensen said, there's no national plan no strategy in place to deal with this. So there's a scramble now to come up with one. Well, if Lind is the test case, let's think this through. He gets out today. There's still a battle against the Taliban and other terror groups house, the United States going to deal with him. Yeah, absolutely. He he'll get out and he has a probation period of three years. And so in that time, he'll be watched very closely really restricted access to the internet. Pretty much everything he does online for the next three years has to be signed off on by his parole. Officer, always monitored the same way that parents may monitor their kids only more extremely right, much more extremely. There's also travel restrictions and other sort of, you know, the normal restrictions for people on probation. But really with with. Lynne's. The extra restrictions on the internet are to prevent him from becoming an online recruiter for, you know, extremist groups Hannah. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Hannah alone. The jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations and pears Danielle Chesler reports. Brittany Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. This laundry room here. Washer dryer your standard its beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and a green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter Erla. Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare. They're her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing. We're looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea of, you know, we may go down here for year. We don't like it, then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Illinois and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach. He starts Monday actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as a university career counselor opportunities for black folk. The south in that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron endure North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left the south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that we got the Harlem renaissance and Toco blue. These are all a part of the story of the great bike ration-, as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back baron says migrants tend to have higher education and more. Connec. Actions than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian, Tom Hinchey. It says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing is, especially in issue for African Americans. It requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where wages have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis. At one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night and a special education teacher during the day. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it used. Any says raising two daughters as a single mom on a teacher salary, has forced her into a sixty five hour workweek a couple of days later. I join her morning routine. Well flushing, it's still dark as she gets ready to drive her daughter to school hard, part is just make sure I get out, actually get up in the morning, that's the hard part making sure I can actually drive there. Mus- Dennis owns her townhouse in a middle class neighborhood called university city and the value of her home has increased in recent years, but our Texas have gone up, too. As mused Dennis strains to make a living. Brittany smith. The Detroit transplant is not as overextended she and her husband both work jobs, they love and they have just one child, she feeds her daughter era, a patch of organic, sweet potatoes here. I am a transplant that come has come down here enough taken advantage of all these opportunities..

Charlotte United States Brittany Smith Taliban North Carolina Lind John Walker Lindh NPR Hannah Allom Michael Jensen Lynn Detroit Yemen Justice department Afghanistan California Sam South Carolina Osama bin Laden
"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We took a bold risk, because we still needed to raise all the money we normally would, but in fewer days, thousands of listeners donated, but we still came up short article if you didn't get a chance to give your contribution right now will make a difference contribute at WNYC dot org, or call one eight three seven six WNYC and thank. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The US fight against the Taliban is not over. But the man known as the American Taliban is going free in two thousand one not long after nine eleven Afghan forces allied with the United States captured John Walker Lindh. He's been federal prison, seventeen years and is to be released today. NPR national security correspondent, Hannah Allom is covering the story, which has many -plication morning. Good Morning America end up in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban. Well, it's certainly an unusual case Lind was born into a Catholic family in DC. His dad was a lawyer at the Justice department. Yeah. He grew up in California and around age sixteen. He became interested in a slum ends up converting, and then with his parents permission, he sets off to study, Arabic and slum in Yemen, and Pakistan. And then he crosses in tough ghanistan and things. Get really murky. He sympathized with Tele. 'cause goes off to join them ends up at a training camp where at one point he even met Osama bin Laden. Yeah. This was before nine eleven but definitely after other Okita tax on US interests end up in US, custody after the United States struck back for nine eleven and Afghantistan. Right. Well, in November, two thousand one Lind was captured by the Afghan Northern Alliance. He's questioned by CIA officers who are on the ground. And then moments after his questioned this big prisoner. Revolt unfolds. One of those agents Mike Spann was killed the revolt, put down and in this long and bloody ordeal Lynn gets shot in the leg. But he doesn't end up as one of only eighty six several hundred telephone prisoners to survive. So this is interesting. We've got a guy who served seventeen years of a twenty year sentence. He's out on good behavior, can't hold them any longer, but it's unusual because normally prisoners of war would be prisoners of war until the war is over, then you let them go. But now you have. Have a sort of end this war against terror groups and aren't there, multiple people like John Walker Lindh, who were supposed to get out at some point certainly, you know, he was he sometimes called detainee, number one in the so-called war on terror. And now in a way he's parolee number one and is going to be a test case for for, you know, several people who are going to be released in the next four or five years. I spoke to Michael Jackson. He's a researcher at the start center to terrorism research center at the university of Maryland. And he talked about this, this is this is what he said wave that's coming at us right now that we're not currently prepared to deal with. So my hope with the Lynn case is, is that people look at it carefully assess what his risks in what his needs are. We use that as a foundation to build on for future release. So, you know, we need to move quickly on this. It's it's in the next four. Years. We're gonna have a hundred of these individuals that were trying to reintegrate back into US communities. Wow. One hundred. That's right. And Jensen said, there's no national plan no strategy in place to deal with this. So there's a scramble now to come up with one. Well, if Lind is the test case, let's think this through. He gets out today. There's still a battle against the Taliban and other terror groups house, the United States going to deal with him. Yeah, absolutely. He he'll get out and he has a probation period of three years. And so in that time, he'll be watched very closely really restricted access to the internet. Pretty much everything he does online for the next three years has to be signed off on by his parole. Officer, always monitor the same way that parents may monitor their kids only more extremely right much more extremely. There's also travel restrictions and other sort of the normal restrictions for people on probation. But really with with Lind, the extra restrictions on the internet are to prevent him from becoming an online. Cruiser for extremist groups Hannah. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Hannah alum, the jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations and Paris. Danielle Chessel reports Britney Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. This laundry room here washer dryer standard its beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter Erla. Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare. They're her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always like, in the top five it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte, so they made the move. We did have the idea. We may go down here for a year. We don't like it. Then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Illinois and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at health insurance company doing community outreach starts Monday, actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as university career counselor opportunities for black folks, the south, and that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron endure North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left this out to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that the Harlem renaissance, and Toco, blue as are all a part of the story of the great Bank ration-, as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more. Actions than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian, Tom Hanshin, says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing, especially in issue for African Americans. It requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where we just have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis. At one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night, and especially teacher during the day. I'm what I call over.

Charlotte United States Lind North Carolina NPR Taliban Britney Smith John Walker Lindh Hannah Allom Steve Inskeep American Taliban Rachel Martin Lynn Osama bin Laden Sam South Carolina Afghanistan America Justice department
"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The US fight against the Taliban is not over. But the man known as the American Taliban is going free in two thousand one not long after nine eleven Afghan forces allied with the United States captured John Walker Lindh. He's been in federal prison, seventeen years, and is to be released today. NPR national security correspondent, Hannah Allom is covering the story, which has many implicates morning. Good morning. I'm an American end up in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban. Well, it's certainly an unusual case Lind was born into a Catholic family in DC. His dad was a lawyer at the Justice department. Yeah. He grew up in California and around age sixteen. He became interested in this Lomb ends up converting, and then with his parents permission, he sets off to study, Arabic and slum in Yemen, and Pakistan. And then he crosses in tough ghanistan and things. Get really murky he sympathized with the Taliban 'cause goes off to join them ends up at a training camp. For at one point he even met Osama bin Laden. Yeah. This was before nine eleven but definitely after other Al Qaeda tax on US Centric. How did he end up in US custody after the United States struck back for nine eleven and Afghantistan? Right. Well, in November, two thousand one Lind was captured by the Afghan Northern Alliance. He's questioned by CIA officers who were on the ground. And then moments after his questioned this big prisoner revolt unfolds. One of those agents Mike Spann was killed the revolt, put down and in this long and bloody ordeal Lynn gets shot in the leg. But he doesn't end up as one of only eighty six of several hundred telephone prisoners to survive. So we don't have to strange situation Hannah in that normally, if you had a war, the war would end at some point, you have prisoners of war, they'd be released because it doesn't matter anymore. But we're in this kind of forever war against terror groups. John Walker Linda service time in prison. He's seventeen years in prison. He's getting out on the other side in the war still goes on. Is this a larger problems going to happen again again? Certainly, I mean he's one of a wave of prisoners who are going to be released in the next three four, five years. And these are, you know, he's he was accused of supporting the Taliban others are involved in this. Molly militant group shebab others are al-qaeda and early ISIS cases. So certainly, he's just one of a mix of people who are going to be getting out, and there's really no no national strategy or plan to deal with this issue in terms of monitoring and rehabilitation, and that's a concern for counterterrorism. What are you hearing from experts about this? Well, they say there's a scramble going on to come up with to come up with a plan. Okay. Well, let's talk about John Walker Lindh specific case then because you've got this guy he's getting out today. It's an early. Really, right? Does he get the walk free? Can he decide what he wants to do with rest of his life? Not really at least not for the first three years. That's when he's on probation. He's not gonna waltz out of prison. Sometimes he's been called detainee number one. And in a way, his now parolee number one in the so-called war on terror. Because he's, he's among the liquid said the first of this wave that are it's going to be coming out. So, yeah, he won't be able to search online without without being monitored internet. Restrictions. Absolutely people put on their kids, only maybe an extreme way. That's right. I mean, they really don't want him to become an online recruiter for extremist causes. So he's going to be really restricted on the internet. He can't communicate online in any language other than English. He's got to be careful about who he associates with. And then there's a mental health component with valuations, and counseling. And that's the part where, you know, they're hoping that he can be re rehabilitated because once those three years are up. They can't watch him for the rest of his life, and thanks so much. Thank you. Hannah. The jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing an opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations and Danielle Chessel reports. Brittany Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. Wondering here washer dryer standard its beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and a green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter, Erla Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare, there, her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea of, you know, we may go down here for year. We don't like it, then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and nila and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach starts Monday, actually, so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as a university career, counselor opportunities for black folk the south, and that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron in Durham, North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century. Millions of African Americans left this south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that we got the Harlem renaissance and Toco blues as are all a part of the story of the great. Gration as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more connections than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian, Tom Hanshin, says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing, especially in issue for African Americans it requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many. African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where wages have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole muse. Dennis at one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night, and especial education teacher during the day, I'm what.

Charlotte United States Taliban North Carolina Hannah Allom John Walker Lindh NPR Brittany Smith Lind American Taliban Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Afghanistan Osama bin Laden South Carolina Sam Justice department Mike Spann CIA
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"Jessica hopper loss notes, we explore music. Untold stories and this season we're looking at artists legacies. Do they hold up just feel like it's objective firing women embarrassing? You seventeen years old. You can't just write it off as being seventeen years old. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. Thomas real seven, this KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The US fight against the Taliban is not over. But the man known as the American Taliban is going free in two thousand one not long after nine eleven Afghan forces allied with the United States captured John Walker Lindh. He's been in federal prison, seventeen years, and is to be released today. NPR national security correspondent, Hannah Allom is covering the story, which has many implications. Good morning. Good morning out. An American end up in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban, while it's certainly an unusual case Lind was born into a Catholic family in DC. His dad was a lawyer at the Justice department. Yeah. He grew up in California and around age sixteen. He became interested in this Lomb ends up converting, and then with his parents permission, he sets off to study, Arabic and dislodge in Yemen, and Pakistan. And then he crosses in tough ghanistan and things get really murky he sympathized with Taliban, 'cause goes off to join them ends up at a training camp where at one point he even met Osama bin Laden. Yeah. This was before nine eleven but definitely after other al-qaeda tax on US intra. How did he end up in US custody after the United States struck back for nine eleven and Afghantistan? Right. Well, in November, two thousand one Lind was captured by the Afghan Northern Alliance. He's questioned by CIA officers who were on the ground. And then moments after his question this big prisoner revolt unfolds. One of those agents Mike Spann was killed the revolt, put down and in this long and bloody ordeal Lynn gets shot in the leg. But he doesn't end up as one of only eighty six of several. Hundred help on prisoners to survive. Well so, so, so we not have to strange situation Hannah in that normally, if you had a war, the war would end. At some point, you have prisoners of war, they'd be released because it doesn't matter anymore. But we're in this kind of forever war against terror groups. John Walker Linda service time in prison. He's seventeen years in prison. He's getting out on the other side in the war still goes on this larger problems going to happen again, again, certainly I mean, he's one of a wave of prisoners who are going to be released in the next three four, five years. And these are, you know, he's he was accused of supporting the Taliban others are involved in this. Molly militant group shebab others are al-qaeda and early ISIS cases. So certainly he is just one of a of a mix of people who are going to, to be getting out, and there's really no no national strategy or plan to deal with this issue in terms of monitoring and rehabilitation and. You know. So that's a concern for counterterrorism. What are you hearing from experts about this? Well, they say there's a scramble going on to come up with to come up with a plan. Okay. Well, let's talk about John Walker Lindh specific case than because you've got this guy, he's getting out today. It's an early really. It's right. Does he just get to walk free? Can he decide what he wants to do with rest of his life? Not really at least not for the first three years, that's when he's on probation, his not gonna waltz out of prison. Sometimes he's been called detainee number one. And in a way, his now parolee number one in the so-called war on terror. Because he's, you know, he's among this liquid said the first of this wave that are it's going to be coming out. So, yeah, he won't be able to search online without without being monitored internet. Restrictions absolute people put on their kids, only maybe extremely, that's right. I mean that they really don't want him to become an online recruiter for extremist causes. So he's going to be really restricted on the internet. He can't communicate online in any language other than English. He's got to be careful about who he associates with. And then there's a mental health component with valuations, and counseling. And that's the part where, you know, they're hoping that he can be re rehabilitated because those three years are up. They can't watch him for the rest of his life. Thanks so much. Thank you. The temporary Hannah along. The jobless rate in the United States is at a near fifty year low. So all this month NPR's looking at what that means for workers, and communities, many African Americans are seeing opportunity for better jobs and cheap housing in the south and Charlotte, North Carolina is one of their destinations and pears, Danielle, tesla reports Brittany Smith shows me around the house. She and her husband bought on the outskirts of Charlotte. Wondering here washer dryer standard its beige house with brick facade. There's a front porch and a two car garage and green front lawn. She holds her fifteen month old daughter, Erla Smith grew up, mostly in Detroit, six years ago. She struggled to find a fulltime job in healthcare. They're her then boyfriend Sam was a career counselor at a college campus, that was closing or looking at what cities are growing for young professionals in Charlotte was always like, in the top five, it helped that Smith's father had moved back to North Carolina about two hours away from Charlotte. So they made the move. We did have the idea of, you know, we may go down here for a year. We don't like it. Then we can always go home, this Smith's are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg county North Carolina. The African American population here has ballooned by sixty four percent since two thousand some people come from neighboring counties in north and South Carolina. But thousands are coming from Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Illinois and other cities in the south are seeing similar growth, including Houston, Atlanta Tallahassee and Columbia South Carolina Smith. Thirty two is about to begin a new job at a health insurance company doing community outreach. He starts Monday actually so very quick turnaround. But yet starts Monday her previous job was similar it was a dream job. She says, but the new position pays better and has more responsibility. Sam now her husband found work in Charlotte to as university career counselor opportunities for black folks, the south, and that have never been in the same sentence. Demographer Jessica baron in Durham, North Carolina says throughout much of the twentieth century millions of African Americans left the south to escape racial discrimination, and lack of opportunity that we got the Harlem renaissance, and Toco blues. These are all a part of the story, the great. Gration as manufacturing dried up in the rust belt services tech and finance expanded in southern cities, African Americans started coming back, Barron says migrants tend to have higher education and more connections than African Americans who remained in places like North Carolina for generations. The job market for African Americans over the past two years is the best ever unemployment is at six point seven percent. Although it's double the rate for whites Charlotte, in particular, is booming the city has seen eight straight years of job growth, but as the tide has risen here, it has not lifted all boats equally. Charlotte historian, Tom Hanshin, says decades of segregation and redlining have given African Americans in Charlotte, fewer opportunities to buy homes and build wealth. Affordable housing, especially in issue for African Americans it requires special effort to overcome it because special effort created and in Charlotte. Many. African Americans work in industries, like hospitality and retail where we just have stagnated that mirrors the national trend where wages have grown more slowly for African Americans than any other group. I meet, Nicole mused. Dennis at one of two jobs. She works as bar manager at night and a special education teacher during the day. I'm what.

Charlotte United States NPR North Carolina Taliban Hannah Allom John Walker Lindh Brittany Smith Lind Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin American Taliban Jessica hopper South Carolina Sam Thomas al-qaeda Osama bin Laden Justice department
"nicole muse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I think echoes the feelings of a lot of Americans why why they're not celebrating. Right. And, you know, when we talk about inflation that sort of measures the, the rise in the price of consistent basket of goods over time. But one of the things your your guest Alexi was talking about was the say the shifting of some costs from an employer onto workers. Whether it's you know, they're having a shoulder, a higher share of their healthcare cost. Or maybe they're, they're the employers old contribution, their retirement has gone away or it's shifted from defined benefit to define contribution plan. Or, or maybe there's no retirement plan at all, Tim Taylor. Who's the the head? Of the union local in Cheboygan represented. Kohler workers who managed to chip away at the, the two tiered wage scale successfully last year. He says, you know this is about bargaining for it. Nobody gives it to you. The, the owners of corporations are not inclined to share anything with the work any, a penny more with the workforce, and they need to, to keep the workforce there. And so it's it is very much about how the economic pie is, is divvied up. And for much of this recovery a lot of the pie was going to the owners of the companies and, and now we are starting to see workers grabbing a little bit more. But it's it's, it's a it's you gotta grab. You know, and that's and that's about power. I mean that's about. That's a and whether that's you know, a a, a low unemployment rate is one way to boost workers. Bargaining power collective bargaining can be another the a lot of policy. Choices can can shape that as well. I'm going to make a plane here that workers are going to have to take back some of that wealth your you will see a rise in labor movements across the country. The, the, the strikes, the teacher strikes, in recent years, within the last year in red states. Tell a an interesting tale of what's going to happen, if those benefits of a strong, a quote unquote, strong economy aren't passed down to everyday workers, because, yes, we're talking about racial differences, and regional differences. But everyone is feeling the pinch of this Konami. That is not. Distributing resources equitably. Well, I mean to me, it just makes me think. Again, as we you know, we talk about this daily in the news are we doing a disservice by constantly, not talking about Scott's an NPR series because they're going in indepth here, but on a daily basis in the news, just throw out him unemployment numbers. And like we're not what good is understanding that number for not also understanding, the fundamental insecurities people feel even in this full employment market. And there's a reason why we bring on a communist and an and people who are in the ivory tower to talk about this stuff. Because in, in a small way, they're protecting that establishment of distributing information. Yes, we need to talk about wages, much more. We need to talk about regional differences. We need to talk about racial differences. We just can't throw out this blunt object of unemployment rate. It really doesn't make much sense when you're going to the ground and so I I'm. All four making sure that we project other points of the, the, the story because if we don't we're really doing the public disturbance NPR series, will you hear voices like Charlotte resident Nicole muse? Dennis, she's a single mom raising two daughters on a teacher salary. Sometimes, she works, sixty five hours a week, having taken a second job as a bar manager at night when I call over implied, I have two jobs, and I'm still just trying to make it in meet the needs at half for myself and my family. Let's Charlotte resident Nicole muse. Dennis Scott Horsely got about a minute left here to go just want to give you a shot at telling us a little bit more about what NPR series has in store for us. Well as you've ended up we are trying to go a little bit behind the, the headline numbers here, and look at a little bit more of the what that means in people's actual lives..

Nicole muse Dennis Scott Horsely NPR Tim Taylor Alexi Konami Cheboygan Kohler ivory tower Charlotte sixty five hours
"nicole muse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The country, and Missouri lawmakers passed a near total ban that will now go to the governor over the weekend. President Trump tweeted that he is quote strongly pro-life, but he did list a few exceptions, including rape. And in. Incest, the Alabama law forbids abortion. Even in those cases, twenty twenty democratic candidates have been quick to speak out against Alabama's measure. Here's democratic presidential candidate Senator Kirsten gillibrand on the campaign trail into or two. Win the presidency. Must answer in Italy. Where does this issue are twenty me now is Republican strategists, Scott Jennings? And democratic consultant Maria Cardona good morning to you both. Good morning. No, al. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United is one all of our hard-fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on, I think what the president was doing was reaffirming the longstanding mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republicans see is. Is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor northern Virginia or New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone to the fringe, extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand that Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Well, yeah, he suggested that the Alabama measure goes too far, but this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for the Republican, they disagree about this? Right. What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats state actors have gone too far. Their presidential candidates have accepted that fringe extreme position. And Republicans actually have a leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think there's going to be a key issue in the twentieth century Maria. Let me turn this over to you is there room in the stomach. Critic primary for differing views on the question of abortion. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates are going to need to take a hard line on support for abortion rights? I'll I definitely think that all the candidates will express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That's actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled surpreme court law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks, then that is a living being that a woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with that is that so many women don't even know. They're pregnant by six weeks. He's the so called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that a woman should have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislators that are passing these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty election-related with the chore? Well again, I think that. It depends on Republicans. I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose, because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's well being Scott Jennings quickly turn this over to you how important in two thousand twenty very important. I think President Trump's leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years. Prolife voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They are excited about what the party is doing. They're excited to vote. And I think President Trump's going to have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Graham. So how tight is this tight labor market right now, it is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going. Take us to Ames Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggled to find and keep good help. We last your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share it. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to Iowa despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opportunities in other parts of the country like where where the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Danielle Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina. Both newcomers and some longtime residents like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by. And when I call over employed, I have two jobs, and I'm still trying to make it unemployment among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. We'll see we've been talking about full employment for a while. And yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about resemble women coming back into market, sometimes fulltime, sometimes the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers like Christopher Dickerson say. Not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are. I don't care as long as you come to work every single day. Give me everything. Give me over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. What is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked new contract that phases out that two tiered wage scale, you could tell there was a lot of happy people. A lot of them production went up people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth. Their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something. All right. One of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR that, Oregon, you'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's Scott Horsely, thanks. You're welcome. All right. Robert Smith is a billionaire investor and philanthropist. He gave a commencement speech this weekend at Morehouse college, and he gave something else to Smith had already pledged to gift of one point five million dollars to the historically black college in Atlanta. And then he said this. Fuelling your bus. Got the alumni over.

Republican party President Trump president NPR Democrats rape Scott Jennings Alabama Scott Maria Cardona Ames Scott Horsely Iowa consultant Senator Kirsten gillibrand Atlanta David Graham Missouri Democratic Party
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"The presidency. Must answer definitively. Where does the issue are joining me now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Democratic consultant Maria Cardona, good morning to you both. Good morning. No, al. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United is one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on, I think what the president was doing was reaffirming the longstanding mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable and to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republicans see is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor northern Virginia or in New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone to the fringe, extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand. That Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Well, yeah, he suggested that the Alabama measure goes too far, but this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for they disagree about this? Right. What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats stayed actors of gone too far. Their presidential candidates have accepted that fringe extreme position. And Republicans actually have leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think there's going to be a key issue in the twenty electric Maria. Let me turn this over to you is there room in the democratic primary, for differing views on the question of abortion. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates are going to need to take a hard line on support for abortion rights? I'll I definitely think that all the candidates will. Express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That is actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled Precourt law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks than that is a living being that a woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with that is that so many women don't even know they're pregnant by six weeks. He's the so-called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that a woman should. Have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislatures that are passing, these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty luxury? Let me start with you chore. Well, again, I think that depends on Republicans, I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's wellbeing. Scotch endings quickly turn this over to you how important in two thousand. Twenty very important. I think President Trump's leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years. Prolife voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They are excited about what the party is doing. They were excited to vote. And I think President Trump's going to have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Griffin. So how tight is this tight labor market right now, it is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going. Take to Ames, Iowa which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggled to find and keep good help. We last your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to Iowa despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opportunities in other parts of the country like where were their opportunities right now? People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina. Both newcomers and some longtime residents like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. We'll get we've been talking about full employment for a while. And yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about, for example, women coming back in the job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say. Not anymore and care. What your background is? I don't care where you came from. I don't care what color you are. I don't care as long as you come to work every single day. Give me everything. That's give me over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. What is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phase out that two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up, people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth. Their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something. All right. One of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place..

Republican party president President Trump Maria Cardona NPR Scott Jennings Scott Ames rape Democratic Party consultant Iowa North Carolina David Griffin Ken US Christopher Dickerson Virginia
"nicole muse" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why oh you and you MD dot com. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David green. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places on my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help. We lashed your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to I'll despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country, like where we're the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Danielle Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working. Fifty five hours a week and just barely getting by. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. Well, Scott, we've been talking about full employment for a while and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about, for example, women coming back in the job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you. Come to work every single day. Give me everything. That's gimme over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines, rather than from the ranks of the unemployed, what is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation yet for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phases out. That two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something or one of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR dot Oregon. You'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's, Scott Horsely. Thanks. Got. You're

NPR Scott Horsely Ames North Carolina David green Nicole muse Dennis US university of Maryland squarespace Google Christopher Dickerson Elizabeth Kopetski David Iowa Atlanta Danielle Czeslaw Jim zarroli
America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:29 min | 1 year ago

America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why oh you and you MD dot com. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David green. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places on my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help. We lashed your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to I'll despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country, like where we're the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Danielle Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working. Fifty five hours a week and just barely getting by. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. Well, Scott, we've been talking about full employment for a while and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about, for example, women coming back in the job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you. Come to work every single day. Give me everything. That's gimme over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines, rather than from the ranks of the unemployed, what is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation yet for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phases out. That two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something or one of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR dot Oregon. You'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's, Scott Horsely. Thanks. Got. You're

NPR Scott Horsely Ames North Carolina David Green Nicole Muse Dennis United States University Of Maryland Squarespace Google Christopher Dickerson Elizabeth Kopetski David Iowa Atlanta Danielle Czeslaw Jim Zarroli
"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The presidency must user Italy where the on this issue are twenty now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Democratic consultant Maria Cardona. Good morning Chia. Both good morning Noel. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United as one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can in will win on, I think what the president was doing was reaffirming the longstanding mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republicans see is. Is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor north of genu-, or in New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone to the fringe, extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand that Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Well, yeah, he suggested that the Alabama measure goes too far, but this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for they disagree about this? Right. What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats state actors of gone too far. Their presidential candidates have accepted that fringe extreme position. And Republicans actually have a leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think that's going to be a key issue in the twentieth century Maria. Let me turn this over to you. Is there room in the democrat? Attic primary, for differing views on the question of abortion. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates are going to need to take a hard line on support for abortion rights? I definitely think that all the candidates will express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That's actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled supreme court law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks than that is a living being that woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with is that so many women don't even know there. Pregnant by six weeks. The so called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that a woman should have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L. These are Republican legislatures that are passing these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans, and that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty luxury? Let me start with you chore. Well again, I think that. Depends on Republicans. I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose, because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's wellbeing. Scotch endings quickly turn this over to you. How important in twenty twenty very important. I think President Trump's leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years, pro-life, voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They are excited about what the party is doing. They're excited to vote. And I think President Trump's going to have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for. Job, or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Grimm. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager, Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help, we last your head a call from a restaurant down street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share it. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country like. Where where the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. We'll see we've been talking about full employment for a while. And yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened. Is that? People who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about example, women coming back into job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you come to work every single day. Give me everything. Give me over the last couple of years. David about seven in ten new people finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. What is all of this main for people's paychecks? I mean for a while. We kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's a specially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround, I spoke with Courtney haring, who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked new contract that phases out that two-tiered wage scale, you could tell there was a lot of happy people. A lot of them production went up people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth. Their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something. All right. One of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR that, Oregon, you'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's Scott Horsely, thanks. You're welcome. All right. Robert Smith is a billionaire investor and philanthropist. He gave a commencement speech this weekend at Morehouse college, and he gave something else to Smith had already pledged to gift of one point five million dollars to the historically black college in Atlanta. And then he said this. Fuelling your bus. Got the alumni over there. And this is the challenge to you. Alumni, this is my class twenty nineteen..

Republican party president President Trump Democrats NPR Scott Scott Jennings Maria Cardona rape Scott Horsely consultant Atlanta Democratic Party David Grimm Ames Chia Noel Ken
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"To win the presidency must answer Italy where the issue are twenty me now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings. And democratic consultant Maria Cardona good morning to you both. Good morning Noel. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United is one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on, I think what the president was doing was reaffirming the longstanding mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable and to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republicans see is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor northern Virginia or New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone to the fringe, extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand. Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Well, yeah, he suggested that the Alabama measure goes too far, but this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for the Republic they disagree about this? Right. What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats stayed actors have gone too far. Their presidential candidates have accepted that French extreme position. And Republicans actually have a leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think that's going to be a key issue in the twentieth Maria. Let me turn this over to you is there room in the democratic primary, for differing views on the question of abortion. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates are going to need to take a hard line on support for abortion rights? I'll I definitely think that all the candidates will. Express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That's actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled supreme court law, as it is today, the problem with what might good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks than that is a living being that a woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with that is so many women don't even know they're pregnant by six weeks because you the so-called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that a woman should. Have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislatures that are passing, these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty election really start with you chore? Well, again, I think that depends on Republicans, I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's wellbeing Scott Jennings quickly, turn this over to you how important in two thousand. Twenty very important. I think President Trump's leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years. Prolife voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They are excited about what the party is doing. They are excited to vote. And I think President Trump's going to have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Gray. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but it's really tight in some places my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going. Take to Ames, Iowa which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggled to find and keep good help. We last your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share it. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even the wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to a despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country like where where the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina. Both newcomers and some longtime residents like Nicole mused Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. Well, Scott, we've been talking about full employment for a while and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about, for example, women coming back into job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers like Christopher Dickerson. Not anymore. Care what your background is. I don't care where you came from I don't care what color you are. I don't care as long as you come to work every single day and give me everything. That's give me over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. Well, what does all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phase out that two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up, people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth. Their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something. All right. One of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR dot org. You'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's, Scott Horsely. Thanks cut. You're welcome. All right. Robert Smith is a billionaire investor and philanthropist. He gave the commencement speech this weekend at Morehouse college, and he gave something else to Smith had already pledged to gift of one point five million dollars to the historically black all men's college in Atlanta. And then he said this opinion.

Republican party president President Trump NPR Scott Jennings Scott Maria Cardona Scott Horsely rape consultant Atlanta Democratic Party David Gray Ames Noel Ken Italy governor Cuomo
"nicole muse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Win the presidency must answer. Where does this issue are twenty me now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings? Democratic consultant Maria Cardona, good morning to you both. Good morning Noel. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United is one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on, I think what the president was doing was reaffirming the longstanding mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable and to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I on the democratic side. What Republicans see is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor north of for genu- or? In New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone to the fringe, extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand that Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Well, yeah, he suggested the Alabama measure goes too far, but this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for they disagree about this? Right. What it means for the Republican party is that the president says our agenda, and so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats state actors have gone too far. Their presidential candidates have accepted that fringe extreme position. And Republicans actually have a leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think there's going to be a key issue in the twenty alleged Maria. Let me turn this over to you is there room in the democratic primary, for differing views on the question of abortion. Or do you think all twenty plus? Candidates are going to need to take a hard line on support for abortion rights. I definitely think that all the candidates will express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That's actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled Precourt law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions. They say that by six weeks, then that is a living being that woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with is that so many women don't even know they're pregnant by six weeks. He's the so-called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing? Doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that woman should have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislators that are passing these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty real start with you chore? Well, again, I think that depends on Republicans, I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for. Women's right to choose because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's wellbeing Scott Jennings quickly, turn this over to you how important in twenty twenty very important. I think President Trump's leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years, pro-life, voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They are excited about what the party is doing. They're excited to vote. And I think President Trump's going to have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some. People who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Griffin. So how tight is this tight labor market right now, it is tight across the country, but it's really tight in some places NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that makes people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help last, your head, a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country like where where the opportunities right now. People moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North. Carolina, we've seen an influx of workers from up north looking for better jobs. And also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole mused Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. Well, we've been talking about full employment for a while, and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? The look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured. Back in, we number stories in our series about, for example, women coming back into job market. Sometimes full-time sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background.

Republican party president President Trump Scott Jennings Maria Cardona Democrats Scott NPR Democratic Party rape Ames consultant Noel Ken Christopher Dickerson US governor Cuomo America
"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The presidency. Must answer definitively where the issue are twenty me now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Democratic consultant Maria Cardona. Good morning Chia. Both good morning Noel. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United as one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on. I think what the president was doing was reaffirming belong standing mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable and to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republican. See is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor north of Anchorage, Inya, or in New York with governor Cuomo when they've gone into fringe extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand that Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Yeah, he suggested the Alabama measure goes too far. But this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for they disagree about this, the Republican, right? What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats state actors have gone too far their presidential candidates has accepted that fringe extreme position and Republicans actually have leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think that's going to be an issue of the twenty election. Maria. Let me turn to you. I wonder if there is room in this democratic primary for pro-life voices. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates will take a hard line pro choice message? I'll I definitely think that all the candidates will express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position that actually mainstream American position, the majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained settled print court law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks than that is a living being that woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with that. That so many women don't even know they're pregnant by six weeks. He's the so called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that woman should have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislators that are passing these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty lection really start with you? Chore. Well, again, I think that depends on Republicans, I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose because that is about families, and that is about families and American women's wellbeing scotch endings quickly turn this over to you. How important in twenty twenty very important. I think President Trump leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party. I think after feeling like they were left in the wilderness for eight years, pro-life, voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They're excited about what the party is doing. They're excited to vote. And I think President Trump's gonna have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Gray. So how tight is this tight labor market right now is tight across the country, but it's really tight in some places NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that makes people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help last, your head, a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough. Ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to a despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country like where where the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel says low spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make unemployment among African Americans. David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it still near. Double the national average. We'll we've been talking about full employment for a while. And yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about a women coming back into job market. Sometimes full-time sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers like Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you come to work every single day. Give me everything. Give me over the last couple years. David about seven in ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. What is all of this main for people's paychecks? I mean for a while. We kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages weren't really keeping pace. With inflation. For a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phases out that two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy people. A lot of them production went up. People are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something. All right. One of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place all this week. On the radio, you can also find it at NPR that, Oregon, you'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's Scott Horsely. Thanks. You're welcome. All right. Robert Smith is a billionaire investor and philanthropist. He gave a commencement speech this weekend at Morehouse college, and he gave something else to Smith had already pledged to gift of one point five million dollars to the historically black college in Atlanta. And then he said this. Fuel in your bus. I've got the alumni over there, and this is the challenge to you. Alumni, this is my class twenty nineteen..

Republican party president President Trump NPR Democrats David Gray Scott Scott Jennings Maria Cardona consultant Scott Horsely rape Democratic Party Atlanta Chia Noel Ames Ken
"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on KCRW

"The presidency. Must answer definitively. Where does the issue are twenty me now is Republican strategist Scott Jennings? Democratic consultant Maria Cardona, good morning to you both. Good morning Noel. Good morning, Scott. Let me start with you. I wanna read a bit more from the president's tweet because it was very interesting. He goes on to address people on the right saying, quote, we must stick together and win for life in twenty twenty if we are foolish, and don't stay United is one all of our hard fought gains for life, Ken and will rapidly disappear. Is this an issue that Republicans can win on? I believe it is an issue that Republicans can and will win on, I think what the president was doing reaffirming the standing mainstream position of the Republican party, and that is to be the pro-life party, but to be reasonable to accept the exceptions of rape, and incest, I think on the democratic side, what Republican. See, is that when state legislatures or state actors such as governor northern Virginia or in New York with governor Cuomo, when they vaunted a fringe extreme their national party has adopted that what President Trump was doing with stepping in to make sure people understand that Republicans are the same pro-life reasonable pro-life party. They've always been. Yeah, he suggested the Alabama measure goes too far. But this is a Republican led legislature. So what does that actually mean for they disagree about this, the Republican, right? What it means for the Republican party. Is that the president sets our agenda? And so you saw him reaffirming the Republican party's longstanding position on abortion to have the exceptions. I think the core difference here is when Democrats state actors gone too far their presidential candidates has accepted that fringe extreme position and Republicans actually have a leader that is rejecting that fringe extreme position. I think that's gonna be key issue in the twentieth. Maria. Let me turn to you. I wonder if there is room in this democratic primary for pro-life voices. Or do you think all twenty plus candidates will take a hard line pro choice message? I definitely think that all the candidates will express very definitively their support for women's right to choose. That's not a hard left position. That is actually mainstream American position. The majority of the American people agree with Roe versus Wade, and believe that it should be maintained as settled print court law, as it is today, the problem with what my good friend Scott is saying, is that all of the bills, most of the bills that are being introduced in state legislatures today are to the extreme right? Because they don't allow for a lot of these exceptions, they say that by six weeks than that is a living being that a woman cannot do anything about if even her life is in danger. The problem with. Is that so many women don't even know they're pregnant by six weeks? He's the so called heartbeat. Exactly. And so what the Republican party is doing is that they are going against what the mainstream of America is against even what mainstream a lot of Republican women believe that woman should have a right to choose. Which is why this issue, I believe is going to be a losing one for Republicans because Democrats are now going to be able to paint them all with these heartbeat bills with these extreme right wing bills, that don't even allow for an exception of rape, or incest, and even though President Trump says that he doesn't side with those like you said, no L, these Republican legislatures that are passing, these bills in many states, and the Democratic Party is going to be able to lay all of these bills at the foot of Republicans. And that's exactly what they're going to be doing less question for you both with everything else going on in this country. And there's a lot. How important do you think the issue of abortion can be in the in the twenty twenty election-related with you? Chore. Well, again, I think that depends on Republicans, I think that clearly Democrats are going to continue to fight for women's right to choose because that is about families. And that is about families and American women's wellbeing Scott Jennings quickly, turn this over to you how important in two thousand twenty very important. I think President Trump leadership on this is going to set the tone for the Republican party, I think, after feeling like they were in the wilderness for eight years, pro-life, voters feel like they finally have a president that is allowing them to be full participants in our national politics. They're excited about what the party is doing. They're excited vote, and I think President Trump's gonna have those voters again when he's on the ballot next November democratic consultant Maria Cardona Republican strategist Scott Jennings. Thank you both so much. Thank you. Well, thank you. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David Gray. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but it's really tight in some places NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager, Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help last, your head, a call from a restaurant down street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough for. Ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country like where where the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Daniel Czeslaw spent some time talking with American workers in North Carolina. Both newcomers and some longtime residents like Nicole mused Ennis. She's a single mother of two who says she's working sixty five hours a week and just barely getting by. When I call over employed, I have two jobs, and I'm still trying to make unemployment among African Americans. David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. We'll we've been talking about full employment for a while, and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about women coming back in the job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you come to work every single day. Give me everything. That's give me over. Over the last couple years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines rather than from the ranks of the unemployed. What is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at this series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked new contract that phase out that two-tiered wage scale, you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up, people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth. Their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something or one of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR that, Oregon, you'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's Scott Horsely. Thanks. Got you welcome. All right. Robert Smith is a billionaire investor and philanthropist. He gave a commencement speech this weekend at Morehouse college, and he gave something else to Smith had already pledged to gift of one point five million dollars to the historically black college in Atlanta. And then he said this. Fuel in your bus. I've got the alumni.

Republican party president President Trump NPR Democrats Scott Jennings David Gray Scott Maria Cardona rape Scott Horsely consultant Atlanta Democratic Party Noel Ames Ken US
"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"nicole muse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The presidency. Must answer definitively where issue that is New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand. Who, of course, is one of the democratic presidential candidates. So how will Democrats answer, NPR political correspondents got detro- is covering the presidential campaign, Scott, good morning. Good morning. What is the proposal from Jill brand? Who's the candidate? We just heard. Yes. She's one of several candidates who've been focusing on this in the last few weeks in midst this increased focus. You're hearing a couple relatively new policies from gillibrand and other Democrats running for president, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, and others are talking specifically about passing federal laws codifying protections from Roe versus Wade. And other supreme court rulings there's a real concern from them that increasingly conservative, federal court would overturn Roe v. Wade, you're also hearing a Jila brand, and Bernie Sanders among other candidates being much more explicit than we've heard before about the role that abortion would play in their federal court. Appointments both are saying, I would not appoint a supreme court judge or a federal judge who would not uphold Roe versus Wade is really interesting in the idea of legislation is interesting since one historic criticism of Roe versus Wade. Is that the courts made this change that didn't go through the regular political process? And so now effectively, some Democrats are saying, let's run it through the process. What else are Democrats say, well, and I think the fact that they're explicit you saying that this would be a litmus test is another way that Donald Trump has changed the way that people talk about how they would be president and how people would act as president because this has been an implicit thing before I would likely do it. But no, I wouldn't have a direct conversation about it. Now, you have Jill Brandon Sanders saying no, this is a key thing. And I would talk about it with my point teas, but you've had candidates going to states like Georgia, and Alabama talking about this, urging their supporters to give donations to groups like pant Planned Parenthood, the NPR politics, podcast recently interviewed south bend, Indiana. Mayor Pete Buddha. Judge here's what he said about. This or you have here is an agenda that is radical. That is out of step with what most Americans, even Americans in conservative states believe is the right thing to do is disturbing. I think it amounts to an assault on freedom. So you have the Democrats using these new laws to frame, the Republican party is being out of step with what the majority of Americans want. And you've seen some Republicans be a little uncomfortable with these new laws, Kevin McCarthy. The, the house minority leader says the Alabama law specific goes further than he believes over the weekend. President Trump implied that as well saying that he has a an agenda that opposes abortion rights, but that he still supports exemptions for, for cases of rape, or incest, or the health of a mother, the president tweeted, if we are foolish and do not stay United as one all of our hard-fought gains for life can and will rapidly disappear. That's the president over the weekend, Scott. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR congressional correspondent, Scott detro-. Okay. The United States is at or near full employment. At least that's what economists call it the idea of zero unemployment, literally everyone working is very unlikely because people do change jobs. But the current rate of three point six percent is getting closer to that. It's the lowest level in nearly fifty years. So what are these numbers, really mean for people looking for jobs for people looking for raises NPR chief economic correspondent, Scott Horsely is here to tell us got good morning. Good morning. How tight is the labor market when the unemployment rate is three point six percent. Well, it's, it's pretty tight across the country with that rate, but Steve's really tight in some places in Ames Iowa. For example, it's only one and a half percent. While NPR's Jim zarroli visit aims to find out how employers are coping there, and he spoke to restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski, who says it's a real struggle. We lashed your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have. Enough. Ourselves wages are going up in Ames, but they are still having trouble attracting workers, even though I was a real nice place to live. Steve, they're just not many people moving there. We do find other parts of the country, though, where people are moving to take advantage of new opportunities. For example, places like Atlanta Tallahassee Charlotte North Carolina. Have all seen an influx of workers. Many of them coming from up north, looking for better jobs, more affordable housing for African Americans in particular. This is kind of a reversal of the great migration. We saw in the twentieth century NPR's Daniel, Daniel Czeslaw, spent some time in North Carolina talking with African American workers, both newcomers and longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis Dennis Dennis's, a single mother of two whose working sixty five hours a week. She says she's just barely getting by I'm, but I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it. The unemployment rate among African Americans is low by historical standards. But at six point seven. Percent. It's still nearly twice the national average. Also, we just heard someone say they're Scott, she's working two jobs and still just trying to make it with suggests the jobs are not paying quite so well compared to her expenses. How is it that employers are managing not to massively raise wages, and still finding people to hire one thing that has happening is that people who had been out of the job market, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in by the near full employment. Magnet and employers are getting more creative about tapping into that hidden workforce, as a result of groups that had been on the margins in the past or also finding more opportunities people with disabilities. For example, or a prison record things that might have been disqualifying in the past are not anymore says Christopher Dickerson, I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are. I don't care as long as you come to work every single day and give me everything give me over. For the last couple of years. Steve about seven in ten new people finding job. We're coming off the sidelines not from the ranks of the unemployed. But statistically, does this really mean higher wages for the people who already have jobs for a lot of very long economic expansion expansion wages, did not move very much. They've just barely kept pace with inflation, but that is finally starting to change. We're seeing wages pick up at accelerate and that's especially true for people at the bottom of the income ladder, which is encouraging. There's no question, workers have more negotiating power. Now, one thing we're looking at is collective bargaining and the demise of two tier wage scales that some unions, grudgingly, went along with during the great recession Scott. Thanks so much shit. You're welcome. NPR's Scott Horsely. Okay. Who won the game of thrones? We finally know. This show rap last night after eight seasons and fans had a strong reaction to the finale, which is not unexpected given the show's rabid.

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