35 Burst results for "Nicole L"

Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 6 d ago

Why Did Meghan McCain Block Todd Starnes on Twitter?

"Chad McCain was a conservative. How dare you? Oh, really? Well, why would he hire a leftist like Steve Schmidt to run his campaign? Steve Steve Schmidt, the founding member of The Lincoln Project, a former McCain campaign manager. Also, a political analyst for MSD and C? That's exhibit a let's talk about exhibit B Nicole Wallace. A former senior campaign adviser, she was the one who handled Sarah Palin. She was the one responsible for literally bludgeoning Palin in the back with a political knife. And what is she doing now? She's one of the lady host on MSD and C. But the real reason she blocked me is because you see, we have a mind like a steel trap. Here at the Todd stern's radio program, ladies. So we don't forget anything here. And that's why she blocked me. You see, misses Dominic, Meghan McCain. Misses Dominick, she blocked me because I reminded the nation about her daddy's most egregious sin. Would he betrayed every single one of us. He had the power in his hands to kill ObamaCare. And while the cameras were rolling on C-SPAN, what did he do? He looked up at that C-SPAN camera, and he put his, he put his hand in the air. With his thumb exposed, and then he did the big thumbs down. A big blank you to America. That's what he did. All I was doing was asking misses Dominic to explain her daddy's political strategy. But you see, this is what the establishment thinks about all of us. You vote for Donald Trump, you're an irredeemable deplorable. You vote for Donald Trump, you're a Neanderthal.

Chad Mccain Steve Steve Schmidt Lincoln Project Nicole Wallace Steve Schmidt Todd Stern MSD Sarah Palin Mccain Meghan Mccain Dominic Palin Dominick America Donald Trump
Gabby Petito's legacy: $100K gift to domestic abuse hotline

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

Gabby Petito's legacy: $100K gift to domestic abuse hotline

"The mother of Gabby petito is trying to keep her slain daughter's memory alive by making a huge donation to the national domestic violence hotline The Tito's disappearance a year ago brought national attention now her mother Nicole Schmidt is bringing attention to domestic violence I think Gabby's story touched a lot of people And she's saving lives I get people messaging me all the time that they were inspired by her to get out of relationship The Gabby petito foundation is donating $100,000 to the anti violence hotline Authorities say her boyfriend strangled her to death and across country trip her body was found in the outskirts of the grand tetons in Wyoming More than 440,000 callers have sought help in the hotline so far this year about a third from the same time last year New York

Gabby Petito Nicole Schmidt Gabby Petito Foundation Tito Gabby Wyoming New York
Man who stormed Capitol with gun gets longest prison term

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

Man who stormed Capitol with gun gets longest prison term

"The longest sentence so far in the capital riot trials goes to the first person put on trial Guy refits daughter insist her father isn't a violent man The things that he did while he was there I also feel like it wasn't really him It was part of a mob attacking the U.S. capitol January 6 2021 Prosecutors say he was a key member of the three percenters and bent on causing harm especially to House speaker Nancy Pelosi threatening to drag her down the capitol steps by her ankles Ref it the first person to go on trial for the attack was sentenced to more than 7 years in prison His wife Nicole refit says he and others are being prosecuted for their political beliefs There's not gonna be a one 6 or that will not be persecuted for their political ideology Rapid is one of 7 to get a jury trial so far all 7 found guilty Tim McGuire Washington

Nicole Refit Nancy Pelosi U.S. House Tim Mcguire Washington
Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | Last month

Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

"Charlie, my friends all say the founding fathers were slave owners. What do you have to say about that? That is what John says from Pennsylvania. So I've done a, let's say a fair amount of public commentary on this. And I have to thank the great hillsdale college for this, honestly. So look, I went down into the hillsdale online courses, Charlie for hillsdale dot com. You should all check it out. That's Charlie F war hillsdale dot com. And I did the work. A couple years ago, I'd kind of just trip over my words whenever the issue of founding fathers and slavery came up. And I probably had a response that some of you gave like, oh yeah, but we abolished it and that was then and now this was then and this is now. That's not even a proper answer. Because it's not true. The founders all knew what they were doing was wrong. They wrote openly about it. So that doesn't make them hypocrites, it makes them sinners. As the great doctor Larry arn would say. 9 out of 13 a colonies had already abolished slavery by the time the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was hosted in Philadelphia in 1775 by Benjamin Franklin. Thomas Jefferson admonished king George for bringing the Senate slavery into America. In the original draft of the Declaration of Independence. The northwest ordinance, article 6, said that no slaves should be in the new territories. But Nicole Hannah Jones insists that America's true founding was not in 1776 but 1619. Now who is Nicole Hannah Jones? She is the con artist that runs The New York Times 1619 project that your kid is probably learning from right now. Let's play cut one 53. 1619 in August of 1619 is when the first group of 20 to 30 Africans were sold into the Virginia colony. And what the project is basically arguing is that that is actually a foundational to the American story as the year 1776 because nothing would be left untouched by that decision to engage in the institutional slavery. So for those of you listening on podcasts, looks as if she has Elmo on her head. I don't quite understand. That someone went crazy with a dry erase marker. She's this massive orange head of hair. That is very bright. The sunglasses watching that clip.

Charlie Hillsdale Nicole Hannah Jones Hillsdale College Larry Arn Pennsylvania Benjamin Franklin John King George Thomas Jefferson America Philadelphia Senate The New York Times Virginia
Why the Declaration of Independence Is SO Important

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | Last month

Why the Declaration of Independence Is SO Important

"Emma is from New Mexico Charlie loves seeing that Steve smiled in church. Thank you so much. I'm in high school and my friends think America's racist and awful. They're happy to have the time off for July 4th from their summer jobs and from their sports, but they tell me that America is an awful place and we need to turn it over, have a revolution. Can you please help me explain to my Friends why the Declaration of Independence is so important and what exactly happened that day. It's a great question. Emma from New Mexico. And I love speaking at Steve's mother man's church. So let's read it. July 4th, 1776. Now it took three days to actually finish the document. It's really July 2nd that we should be celebrating Independence Day. But they dated it July 4th for a reason. Now, we must understand the time in the circumstances before. The declaration was signed. That this was a bubbling up of many years of the British Empire that needed to pay off war debt. They need to be able to finance their country to raise taxes. And their colonies in India were totally ravaged by, let's just say imperialistic hubris. Went back to Britain, they need to try to finance to kind of basically bridge the revenue short gap. No one in on the aisle wanted to actually pay taxes. They said, let's go tax those colonists. Now remember, before the 1750s or 1760s came around, the first Europeans to come to America and the first Americans came right near 1620. Now, Nicole Hannah Jones makes a big deal out of this, we'll play some tape from Nicole Hannah Jones, the wannabe historian, who does nothing but basically is a, let's say, historical arsonist. To what is true and what is accurate in American history. Of course, there were the first colonies on the eastern seaboard, Jamestown being one of them, then of course the Mayflower got blown off course. That is the creation of the Mayflower compact, which then of course created the first experiment in self government in the new world. For over a 150 years,

Emma New Mexico America Steve Nicole Hannah Jones Charlie Britain India Jamestown
What Is Charlie's Take on Juneteenth?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 2 months ago

What Is Charlie's Take on Juneteenth?

"I saw that turning point USA is not having off as a federal holiday for Juneteenth. Why is that? What is your perspective on Juneteenth? So last year we came out pretty, let's just say publicly against the idea of making Juneteenth a federal holiday. And it's rather clever by the left, you have to admit, Juneteenth, as it is properly understood, of course, is something worthy of appreciation. It is the day the news of Emancipation reached Texas and that news started to spread. That is not at all what's going on here. Let's stop being naive. Let's stop looking at things as they tell them as they are and really what's going on here. What's really going on here is a BLM holiday to try to focus on alleged systemic racism to resurrect a propaganda campaign to try and focus on racial differences and to try and have a point of reference right before July 4th, by the way, intentionally summertime holiday. To have the worst people you could imagine, ibram X kendi being one of them. And Robin diangelo and Nicole Hannah Jones give them a day where they could become incredibly relevant to talk about, well, yeah, of course, Juneteenth was nice, but really we're more racist than ever. That's the exactly the wording they're going to use. It's like, oh yeah, whatever Juneteenth day that what's really going on is Juneteenth is the show that look at systemic racism and inequality and inequity. And some Republicans will say, oh, no, no, you know, Juneteenth is a conservative day because it's about the freeing of slaves. Of course, if we weren't talking about another political movement that wants us to try to have a federal holiday where they can corrupt the American flag done, Tempe Arizona, they took down all the American flags and put up BLM Juneteenth flags and then have an unnecessary unhelpful entire massive propaganda campaign that will be happening on TikTok on Twitter on Facebook on Instagram. All about how races are country is.

Ibram X Kendi Robin Diangelo Nicole Hannah Jones Emancipation BLM USA Texas Tempe Arizona Instagram Twitter Facebook
Democrat Strategist: We Have to 'Scare the Hell out' of Americans

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:22 min | 2 months ago

Democrat Strategist: We Have to 'Scare the Hell out' of Americans

"We're used to seeing people steal and rob and rape and pillage and get away with it because lunatic radical activists don't think people of color should be behind bars. That's what this boils down to, we all know it, we all know exactly what the routine is. So listen to a political analyst on MSNBC named Cornell belcher telling that insufferable Nicole Wallace yesterday what the Democrat party should be doing. Whether or not it be telling women that you know what women, you think you're losing your rights now, what do you think's going to happen if we don't have democracy? You know what African Americans particularly African American men who are showing the lowest motivation to turn out in this midterm, you think things are tough for you right now? Where do you think you're going to stand in a country in America where there's no democracy where they have absolutely no interest or at all and respecting your respecting your respecting your rights? We've got to get these people understand that they've got skin in this game and they've got and they got scared hell out of them because quite frankly Nicole, they should be afraid that we're going to lose our democracy. We got to scare the hell out of them. That's what we got to do.

Cornell Belcher Nicole Wallace Democrat Party Msnbc America Nicole
People Are Defecting From the Left in Record Numbers

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 2 months ago

People Are Defecting From the Left in Record Numbers

"Then? The final phase is the desperation of the left realizing that they control, yes, the institutions, but they do not control the people, that the people are defecting from them in record numbers, that their games and their cutting of corners and their cheating will no longer be honored and them realizing that their ability to control us, their magical spell has faded. You see this as grassroots activists in candidates running for office, they just kind of shrug off attacks. This is happening right now in Arizona where Blake masters is being called a racist by the media and he's like, that's not what I said. I'm not a racist, and basically go take a hike. Other Republican candidates are trying to attack Blake masters here in Arizona by calling him a racist. And that is being super rejected by the conservative base. Where the conservative base is seeing other candidates attack Blake masters here in Arizona and they're like, no, actually don't act like a leftist. He's not a racist because he shared some Facebook article 12 years ago that had 25,000 words that you cherry pick one part of it and he didn't necessarily endorse it, like actually that's a scum like tactic. And it is. And so you're seeing this in every corner, you saw it when they tried to attack JD Vance. Like, oh, he's a racist. Nobody cared. Now let me be very clear. Conservatives actually have a radar for a legitimate racism. That's why we know Nicole Hannah Jones and Robin D'angelo and ibram X kendi and taha nishi coach. We know that they are racist. We know that. But we know that people on our side we referee racism and they don't. There's no place for it in the conservative movement. Doesn't exist. And yet on the other side, they're the ones that built entire political movements around it. And this kind of realization of how disingenuous dishonest and power hungry the left is has empowered us, but they are now going to respond with pure force.

Blake Arizona Jd Vance Nicole Hannah Jones Robin D'angelo Ibram X Kendi Taha Nishi Facebook
Nicolle Wallace: GOP Is the 'Most Extreme Political Org in History'

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Nicolle Wallace: GOP Is the 'Most Extreme Political Org in History'

"Nicole Wallace is a complete reprobate And she of course has found out that she can make a hell of a lot more money Swinging left which is what she's done Cut 8 go I wonder your thought on this characterization of the Republican Party and its current incarnation is the most extreme political organization in history All right let's stop The Republican Party the most extreme political organization in history See those are fighting words She is signaling to the mob to get out there get in people's faces and even get violent Why is it that these hosts are never held to account Nicole Wallace is saying the Republican Party is the most extreme political organization in history in history Now she's clearly one of the stupidest human beings to ever walk on the face of the earth on two feet Which means one day she might be on the view to join the other stupidest human beings to ever walk on earth and with two feet

Nicole Wallace Republican Party
Elon Musk's Devastating Blow to the Global Censorship Regime

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Elon Musk's Devastating Blow to the Global Censorship Regime

"When Elon Musk bar, Twitter, he delivered a devastating blow against the censorship regime. Not only in this country, but really all over the world. And I think it was Nicole Wallace, who said something like those of us who are concerned about disinformation, the anti disinformation group worldwide is really concerned is really disturbed about what Musk has done. And this is the voice of the establishment. Their idea is that we need to have these social mandarins. Not just in America, but around the world. And they all decide, you know, we're not going to, we're going to police the parameters here. We're going to set the fence post, then you can speak, but you've got to operate within the rails that we set up. And they love having this kind of power because for them, it's we are the aristocrats and you are the peasants. And we're going to allow you to speak, but you're speaking kind of at our leisure to the degree that we allow you to. And Elon Musk should have anticipated, and in fact, I believe he has, that there's going to be sort of pushback coming both in the United States and abroad from authorities that like to have this kind of power, even if they're exercising it through surrogates. And the government in many cases is not directly censoring they're telling Facebook to send. So they're telling Google to censor and they were telling Twitter the

Nicole Wallace Elon Musk Musk Twitter United States Facebook Google
Curry, Warriors hold off Jokic, eliminate Nuggets in Game 5

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Curry, Warriors hold off Jokic, eliminate Nuggets in Game 5

"The the the the warriors warriors warriors warriors fire fire fire fire off off off off the the the the nuggets nuggets nuggets nuggets to to to to win win win win the the the the series series series series in in in in five five five five games games games games one one one one oh oh oh oh two two two two ninety ninety ninety ninety eight eight eight eight Denver Denver Denver Denver down down down down three three three three games games games games to to to to none none none none nearly nearly nearly nearly forced forced forced forced a a a a game game game game six six six six but but but but Stephan Stephan Stephan Stephan curry curry curry curry scored scored scored scored eleven eleven eleven eleven of of of of his his his his thirty thirty thirty thirty points points points points in in in in the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth quarter quarter quarter quarter to to to to eliminate eliminate eliminate eliminate the the the the nuggets nuggets nuggets nuggets you you you you for for for for the the the the corners corners corners corners is is is is about about about about can can can can you you you you finally finally finally finally just just just just get get get get it it it it done done done done and and and and get get get get enough enough enough enough stops stops stops stops to to to to speed speed speed up up up the the the game game game a a a little little little bit bit bit put put put some some some pressure pressure pressure on on on and and and we're we're we're able able able to to to do do do that that that obviously obviously obviously everybody everybody everybody contributed contributed contributed as as as a a a as as as a a a fun fun fun some some some way way way to to to finish finish finish the the the game game game Klay Klay Klay Thompson Thompson Thompson and and and Gary Gary Gary Payton Payton Payton a a a second second second each each each added added added fifteen fifteen fifteen points points points in in in the the the loss loss loss Nicole Nicole Nicole you'll you'll you'll catch catch catch with with with thirty thirty thirty points points points nineteen nineteen nineteen rebounds rebounds rebounds and and and eight eight eight assists assists assists DaMarcus DaMarcus DaMarcus cousins cousins cousins added added added nineteen nineteen nineteen off off off the the the bench bench bench the the the warriors warriors warriors face face face the the the winner winner winner of of of the the the Memphis Memphis Memphis Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota series series series in in in the the the second second second round round round Riley Riley Riley on on on San San San Francisco Francisco Francisco

Nuggets Denver Warriors Warriors Warriors Stephan Stephan Stephan Stepha Curry Curry Warriors Klay Klay Klay Thompson Thomps Gary Gary Gary Payton Payton Payton Nicole Nicole Nicole Damarcus Damarcus Damarcus Warriors Warriors Memphis Memphis Memphis Minnes Cousins Minnesota Riley Riley Riley San San San Francisco Francisco Francisco
Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

"Are repulsed by identity politics. And we should be. The politics of trying to put people in different categories based on their skin color is not something that we appreciate or something that we support. Now identity politics is rooted in the idea of trying to let's just say use a word that came in the 1990s, balkanize the American political, the American political landscape. However, there is one part of kind of segmenting of politics, if you will, or the country that I think is very helpful. And that is to look at things generationally. Instead of looking at things based on skin color, I think looking at political dynamics based on age is far more helpful. While I do believe there are differences between men and women, I do not believe there are differences between white people and black people. I don't. I do not believe in racial differences in people who do. We have words for them, racists like Nicole Hannah Jones, or like Robin D'angelo, or ibram X kendi. But I do believe that there's big differences in experiences and let's say things that people have to live through in generational dynamics. So typically, the younger the voter, the more Democrat and the more liberal they are. They tend to be more idealistic utopian, less rooted to the tragedy of life. And not all life is a tragedy, but life could be tough. The first Buddhist principle is life is suffering. I don't quite believe that to be perfectly honest. Life can be full of suffering, but it also can be beautiful and full of joy and love and prosperity. Generational dynamics for me are the most helpful and interesting to look at. And so when we look at Joe Biden's approval rating and we look at who actually is driving the decline of Joe Biden's approval, it's remarkable when we learn that it's younger voters in particular that disapprove of Joe Biden the most.

Nicole Hannah Jones Robin D'angelo Ibram X Kendi Joe Biden
What on the Left Has Grown Stronger in the Past 4 Months?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 months ago

What on the Left Has Grown Stronger in the Past 4 Months?

"I have a legitimate question what on the left has grown stronger in the last four months. Name one thing. The only thing I can name is the amount of illegals that have come into America, the potential population. However, Hispanics are turning conservative and record numbers. So even that it's a little bit blurry. What on the left has grown stronger in the last four months. Since the new year, Pfizer AstraZeneca Johnson & Johnson, they're on the ropes. Disney is down, CNN plus is gone, Twitter is about to be taken over and totally changed, which we know censorship is a fundamental need of this regime. If they're not able to censor they can't exist, they must be able to shut you up, the Democrat party has lower approval ratings than ever before, wire, what, who, what, where is stronger than they were four months ago? I'll tell you who is stronger though. Rogan is more popular than ever before. Tucker Carlson is more popular than ever before. Bill Maher's anti woke, tirades are stronger than ever before. Elon is richer, he might have his net worth as might have gone down by 20 or 30 billion because the stock prices, but Tesla was up 10% since last week, 10%. Our podcast is up amazingly. Our radio program is up. Our social media engagement is up. We can't find spaces big enough at turning point USA to be able to fit all the students that want to come to our events at Berkeley and boulder, meanwhile, I'm not really sure if people are flocking a big numbers, go hear critical race theory, Nicole Hannah Jones, maybe. I don't think so. If you kind of look at these fundamental indicators of where the society is going, Republicans are winning registration wars across the country and desantis wiped out all of the gerrymander gains that California New York tried to do. Desantis basically level the playing field. God bless that man.

Pfizer Astrazeneca Johnson & J America Democrat Party Tucker Carlson CNN Rogan Disney Bill Maher Elon Twitter Tesla Nicole Hannah Jones Berkeley Boulder Desantis California New York
We Should Get Behind Elon Musk, a Great Patriot

Mark Levin

01:21 min | 4 months ago

We Should Get Behind Elon Musk, a Great Patriot

"Nicole Wallace is on MSNBC today Folks I want to remind you that Comcast owns MSNBC Those of you who have Comcast in your homes do the very best you can to get rid of it Look for alternatives I wouldn't say Netflix now because they're dying on the vine as they should And let me take this occasion to say that Elon Musk is one of a handful of billionaires who's actually a great patriot Who actually puts his money where his mouth is It doesn't have a big mouth this guy is not out there bullying people pushing them around Pretending he's somebody who he isn't Conducting himself like some kind of a mobster No I don't know Elon Musk I've never talked to him in my life He's the richest man on the face of the earth And he's an entrepreneur And he's serious about dealing with Twitter And we should get behind regardless of his politics We should get behind him Because he believes in free speech obviously the First Amendment doesn't apply because Twitter is not the government

Nicole Wallace Msnbc Comcast Elon Musk Netflix Twitter
Curry scores 34 points off bench, Warriors lead Nuggets 2-0

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Curry scores 34 points off bench, Warriors lead Nuggets 2-0

"The the the the warriors warriors warriors warriors outscored outscored outscored outscored the the the the nuggets nuggets nuggets nuggets forty forty forty forty four four four four to to to to thirty thirty thirty thirty in in in in the the the the third third third third quarter quarter quarter quarter in in in in route route route route to to to to a a a a one one one one twenty twenty twenty twenty six six six six one one one one oh oh oh oh six six six six when when when when the the the the victory victory victory victory gives gives gives gives Golden Golden Golden Golden State State State State at at at at two two two two OO OO OO OO series series series series lead lead lead lead Stephan Stephan Stephan Stephan curry curry curry curry scored scored scored scored a a a a game game game game high high high high thirty thirty thirty thirty four four four four points points points points off off off off the the the the bench bench bench bench in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three minutes minutes minutes minutes making making making making five five five five threes threes threes threes like like like like when when when when you're you're you're you're forced forced forced forced into into into into a a a a minute minute minute minute restriction restriction restriction restriction it it it it kind kind kind kind of of of of makes makes makes makes the the the the decision decision decision decision a a a a little little little little easier easier easier easier but but but but it's it's it's it's like like like like I I I I want want want want to to to to be be be be out out out out there there there there lay lay lay lay with with with with a a a a casa casa casa casa con con con con a a a a flowed flowed flowed flowed out out out out the the the the game game game game obviously obviously obviously obviously I I I I will will will will be be be be out out out out there there there there and and and and I'm I'm I'm I'm closing closing closing closing you you you you know know know know line line line line up up up up and and and and the the the the big big big big moments moments moments moments or or or or games games games games Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan Poole Poole Poole Poole added added added added twenty twenty twenty twenty nine nine nine nine points points points points and and and and Klay Klay Klay Klay Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson had had had had twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one the the the the nuggets nuggets nuggets nuggets with with with with twenty twenty twenty twenty six six six six points points points points by by by by Nicole Nicole Nicole Nicole you'll you'll you'll you'll catch catch catch catch but but but but he he he he was was was was ejected ejected ejected ejected in in in in the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth quarter quarter quarter quarter game game game game three three three three is is is is Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday night night night night in in in in Denver Denver Denver Denver Riley Riley Riley Riley on on on on San San San San Francisco Francisco Francisco Francisco

Nuggets Stephan Stephan Warriors Warriors Warriors Oo Oo Oo Oo Curry Curry Nicole Nicole Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan Po Klay Klay Klay Klay Thompson T Poole Denver Riley Riley Riley Riley San San San San Francisco Francisco
Politico: Judge Tosses Obstruction Charge Against Jan. 6 Defendant

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 4 months ago

Politico: Judge Tosses Obstruction Charge Against Jan. 6 Defendant

"But here's another one in Politico Judge tosses obstruction charge against January 6th defendant The judge ruled that ambiguities in the federal law required him to narrow the case against Garrett Miller Whose facing multiple felony charges connected to the attack on the capitol The federal judge has thrown out an obstruction charge about breaching the capital on January 6th a ruling that could reverberate across hundreds of cases Under the narrow interpretation judge Nichols ruled defendants can be charged with obstruction only if they directly attempt to affect a document record or other object on quote in order to hamper the ability of Congress to count electoral votes Nicole said that because prosecutors are not alleged that Miller took such direct action rather the department says he simply joined the large mob on January 6th The obstruction charge against and must be dismissed In other words you have to take specific actions Among the people nickel cited to bolsters interpretation as president Joe Biden the judge noted that Biden said the lawn question passed on 2002 following the enron scandal was aimed at making a crime to shred documents

Garrett Miller Nichols Nicole Congress Miller Joe Biden Biden
Is Tipping an American Practice Stemming From the Slave Plantation?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:40 min | 5 months ago

Is Tipping an American Practice Stemming From the Slave Plantation?

"While the latest kind of idiocy in this kind of, it all goes back to slavery contest is the concept of tipping. So think about your tip on Uber driver or you go to a restaurant and leave a tip. You check into a hotel and you tip the doorman. The argument is that's due to slavery. That's an American practice, by the way. You don't see it in other countries, at least not in the same degree. And moreover, if you go back, you find that that slave masters, it was after slavery, supposedly that this kind of tipping practice became widespread in the United States. At least this is the narrative according to Nicole Hannah Jones, and Nicole Hannah Jones makes outlandish statements that basically look like she's just come out of a vodka spree, but it turns out that no, she's picking it up from she reads the kind of far left rival literature and she picks up these kinds of claims and then gives them a sort of patina of respectability by sort of parading this in The New York Times and on her social media feed. So you as Nicole Hannah Jones tipping is the legacy of slavery and she goes, and if it's not optional, then it shouldn't be a tip, but just to include it in the bill. Have you ever stopped to think why we tip? Like why tipping is a practice in the U.S. and almost nowhere else. Now I've said before in the podcast, this is downright stupid. I've traveled pretty much all over the world tipping as universal and stepping in Africa. It's tipping in India. But the historian, the economic historian Philip Magnus, who's been on this podcast. Well, what Magnus has done is he's written a kind of thorough article on this tipping issue, and this is a guy who really knows how to dig. So he finds he finds out that Nicole Hannah Jones got her ridiculous claim about tipping from a kind of left wing activist named saru jama. This woman sounds suspiciously Indian and anyway, she's apparently some kind of a health activist, not really an academic of any kind. And she wrote an article which had a paragraph on tipping in all the other leftist sources of picking up her nonsense. In any event, what magnets really shows is that all of this nonsense about tipping tracing to the aftermath of slavery isn't really true. Tipping goes way back to the Middle Ages. In fact, it's so common that tipping is referred to more than once in Shakespeare's plays Magnus quotes an example from 12th night. He goes on to point out that you have European travelers who are writing, this is in the early 1700s. So obviously long before the end of slavery, either in England or in the United States, and they're talking about the common practice of tipping in inns and in taverns and in restaurants and

Nicole Hannah Jones Philip Magnus United States Saru Jama Magnus The New York Times Africa India Shakespeare England
Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

"I just saw something today on social media and I retweeted it. Nicole Hannah Jones and she goes tipping, dipping is a practice that goes back to slavery. And then she goes on to say, you know, have you ever wondered why tipping is only in America and nowhere else around the world that's because it goes back to the slave plantation. This is basically Nicole had a joke so I'm thinking this is one of the stupidest statements I've ever read. First of all, tipping is universal. I grew up in India, people tip in restaurants all the time. I've been all over Europe, tipping is very common in Europe. So first of all, the idea that tipping is only American is nonsense. Number two? What is Nicole Hannah Jones implying that slavery is a form of forced and unpaid labor? Is she saying that on the plantations it was normal practice for masters to tip their slaves? You know, hey Frank, great job. Excellent service in the field today. Here's 50 cents for your efforts. What? I think historians worldwide are waiting with bated breath for Nicola Hannah Jones to explain and she's not going to explain because that these are people who essentially say stupid things and expect never to be called on

Nicole Hannah Jones Europe Nicole America India Nicola Hannah Jones Frank
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:05 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"It just seems there's this anyway I hate talking about it 'cause it's too it's actually still too much a part of who I just can't, it's too present in my life. Those calls understood. Yeah, so I talk about it and then I go, ah, don't tread into this right now because it's just too emotional, especially with Jean Marc recently and it's just like, ah. I don't want to even put words to it. But I will say I really I loved Stanley and for him to leave the world so suddenly seems it was awful at the same time I loved my father for him to leave the world so suddenly Jean Marc to leave the world so suddenly but suddenly is probably for the person that leaves the yuko oh, okay. Wow, at least there wasn't pain. There's pain for us, but there wasn't pain for you, and I'm very glad there wasn't pain for you. So you're in Australia now helping to take care of your mother. I'm wondering if it's easier than it's ever been, maybe to talk about parent child issues, like your parent now, you probably understand things about how she parented you that you didn't understand when you were a child. And you've made a lot of choices based on your life and about how you were parented about who you're going to raise your children. Has it been comfortable talking about those things now? Yeah, but I meant the place where I'm being given the chance to view the world because of how close we are, my mom is giving me the chance to view the world through an 80 81 year old woman's eyes. That is so beneficial right now. Because she's so cognizant, who she has every faculty, brain faculty, available. So she's, you know, she hasn't lost anything. She hasn't lost any memory, which is fascinating. And she's extremely bright. So she's giving me access because she's also very direct and very honest, and so I'm getting access to the world through her eyes, my mother's eyes, so therefore a part of me almost at 80. What are you seeing? Oh, that's too too hard right now. That's fine. Yeah, but I will be able to tell you that in a few years. I'm seeing a lot. I'm jumping into the psychology and emotional place of that. And it's her perspective, obviously, so there's many different 80 year old perspectives, but it's her perspective and her particular path, but I'm drinking it in. And learning. Nicole Kidman, it has just been wonderful to talk with you. I wish you good health. I wish your mother good health. I wish her well. And thank you, thank you for spending time with us. Thank you for having me. Nicole Kidman stars on the new film being the Ricardo's. Tomorrow I'm fresh air. We'll hear about a disturbing story of civilian deaths in the battle against ISIS. Our guest will be New York Times correspondent David Phillips, who reported on a secret unit in the U.S. Military that picked targets for air strikes, circumventing rules to protect non competence and often killing farmers in their fields and families trying to flee combat. I hope you'll join us..

Jean Marc Stanley Australia Nicole Kidman Ricardo David Phillips New York Times U.S.
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Well, I haven't watched it recently. So I haven't really seen it through my eyes today. Specifically, I have the memory of what it was and it definitely didn't feel like that. That actually was my dress in that scene. That came from my wardrobe because Stanley didn't like any of the other wardrobe choices so he was like, let's go to your house in your closet. You must have a lot of dresses. And I'm like, oh, we're renting the house. I've brought some things with me at Stanley. And so he sat outside and I went into my closet and tried things on and came came out with that beautiful galliano dress, which I still have. And he said, yeah, let's wear that. And I came up with the shot. I said, what about, look, it can drop like this. That's how I can get very fluid how it comes off. Well, that's interesting. So it's a director and an actor working together. Interesting, yeah? When I think of it like that, if you're just joining us, my guest is Nicole Kidman. She stars as Lucille Ball on the new film being the Ricardo's. We'll be right back. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Nicole Kidman. When we left off, we were talking about her role and Stanley Kubrick's 1999 film eyes wide shut. He died 6 days after the screening of the final cut of a heart attack at age 70. It must have been you've talked about how close you became to him, it must have been heartbreaking to lose him just as the work to lose him for permanent just as the work was ending. Yeah. Yeah. I was. It was. I mean, I think I'm pausing for a second because Jean Marc Vale just passed as well. Yeah, and you worked with him on big little lies. Yeah. Yeah. We weren't making anything together, but at this stage. But we were definitely circling things. And I think I'm still probably I received phone calls. That are very shocking and I don't and so I received their phone call about Stanley having faxed him. It was in the time of faxing. He faxed me so. And I was like, oh, should I call him tonight? And I didn't. And then I got the phone call the next morning. And I had my two young children with me and I just dropped the phone and screamed everything you probably shouldn't do in front of two young children, but it was a very immediate response. I was just awful. Awful. Do you think they were frightened by your screaming? I held them and walked them through her just as I've done when my father died and I had my two young goals..

Nicole Kidman Stanley Lucille Ball Jean Marc Vale Stanley Kubrick Ricardo heart attack
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:55 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And opera did, and modern dance did. And literature did, and probably films was the last part of the theater was before that, and then films. Yeah, that's surprising. But quite good to quite good because I circled it because I do think you need all those other influences. And I think the classical training can be very, very helpful. I mean, it is very helpful. It's needed and the things you think are never going to be of any benefit to you turn out to be huge benefit. But it was just, I think the artistic interest and the desire to find the way people express themselves and their voices. And I suppose the connection to ideas and being transported with ideas instantly to emotions to feeling was the way in which I came to being an actor. You work with Stanley Kubrick, on his last film, eyes wide shut. Which was released in 1999. Had you always wanted to work with him? Did you admire his films? I mean, admires two week a word of intoxicated by his films, fascinated by his films, hypnotized by his films. So never not wanted to work with you just never thought I would ever be in a Stanley Kubrick film. I recently interviewed Alan cumming who's also in eyes wide shut and he was saying that when you work with Kubrick like Kubrick could have him do like many, many takes, but every time there was another take, Kubrick would explain why and what he wanted, and he loved he loved that. And he thought he might not have stayed an actor if it wasn't for Kubrick. What did you learn from working with Kubrick? And what was it like for you to do take after take? I mean, I just surrendered to the process, which is probably the best thing. We were there for 6 months, just talking about the script. And hanging out with Stanley in his home with his family and his cats and I was there for a year and a half almost two years doing that. And we were, it was thrilling for me. It was long. It was arduous. You would do a huge amount of takes, then you would get it, then you wouldn't. Cook lunch in the trailers, Stanley would come in and eat pasta, all of these great actors would come and go..

Kubrick Stanley Kubrick Alan cumming Stanley
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Through the window or behind from behind a curtain we'd look. We'd never listen at the door or anything. But in the hospital, yes, we would see things and not get the full story or hear things. We need to take another short break here. Let me reintroduce you. If you're just joining us, my guess is, Nicole Kidman will be right back. This is fresh air. Life kit is like your friend with really good advice. So, can I really be truthful? It's just me and you, right? Well, sure. Let's say it is. Three times a week, life kit is in your feeds with episodes on health, personal finance, personal growth, and so much more. Listen to life kit from NPR. This is fresh air and if you're just joining us, my guess is Nicole Kidman, and she stars in the new film being the Ricardo's, as Lucille Ball. Your mother, as you said, was a nurse educator. Did she identify as a feminist? She did. What did that mean to you as her daughter? Did she talk to you about issues affecting women and women's equality? Always. To the point where we're like, shut up, mom. And I would go and hand out pamphlets for the women's electoral lobby because I was made to. And I was very embarrassed, doing it. What was the women's electoral lobby? Feminist group here. And I would sit in the back of the room sometimes, which was fascinating, actually. And listen to conversation. So I was privy to a lot very early on. But I would also in the same way most kids react to their parents, just be like everybody else don't try to have an opinion that goes against the grain that sort of thing. And then as I got older, I relished it. Then I was grateful for it. You started acting when you were 14. How did you know you wanted to act? I wanted to act, I think, because it was I had so much inside me and I wanted to work since I was I can not remember not wanting to. And I started reading big big novels and I would become the characters and then I started reading plays and I would become the characters. In your mind or would you actually act them out with people? No, never with people, always by myself in my bedroom or in my mind. I've played every role in Chekhov. I've played in your bedroom. In my bedroom. At all different hours, day or night, ibsen. I've played those roles. But I did realize that at some point, that was going to be the only way I was going to play certain roles. And that was going to have to be enough. So, yeah, but that really, I was, I'm so fortunate that I discovered literature early. And that was having parents that read a lot. So I was and also because I have very fair skin. I wasn't allowed to sit on the beach during the midday sun. So I would stay home and everyone else would go to the beach and my mom would give me my book and I would just curl up in my bed and I would read and I was allowed to do that. So that turned out the thing that I was very frustrated though that I couldn't go to the beach. And I'd make a sandwich and I'd get into bed. And I would read and read and read and read and read and little did I know that that was going to lead me to my vocation. Did watching movies lead you to your vocation to movies or television? Less so. That's interesting. Gowrie's did..

Nicole Kidman Lucille Ball Ricardo NPR Chekhov ibsen Gowrie
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:52 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Happens when you're pushed to the limit? And what does it take to go further? I'm Jay Williams, and those questions define my journey to the NBA and beyond. But overcoming limits is something we all have to do. So come with me. As I explore how, with some of the biggest names in sports business and culture, listen to my new show, the limits from NPR. Let's get back to my interview with Nicole Kidman. She plays Lucille Ball in the new film being the Ricardo's. Let me move on to another movie, and this is moulin rouge in which you play. A former please move on to that. I do have a lightness of being. Yeah. So you're a performer and courtisan who sings. I don't want to talk with you about singing. Had you sung professionally before the film? No, I'd sung in a band, you know, when I was a teenager. Oh, you did. What kind of band was it? Just a covers band when we never got a gig. Okay, wait, wait, stop. Let's stop here. What did you cover? I ain't no mountain high enough. Dreadfully. And then, you know, blondie, some blondie tunes. Blondie was my forte. Love blondie. Did you call me? Yes, I did. And had a glass. So there you go. Were you comfortable singing? Or it sounds like you were not comfortable singing, right? I was at first. I was like, yeah. And then I'd hear my voice back and go, oh. Oh, that's disappointing. I like your voice. Would you mind if we played a little bit of I'll fly away from the soundtrack of man? I think you were gonna say, would you mind if we asked you to sing? Oh no, I wasn't gonna do that. But how about if we play some of that track? Sure..

Jay Williams Lucille Ball Nicole Kidman moulin rouge blondie NBA NPR Ricardo Blondie
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I was.

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And it was J. K. Simmons as Fred mertz. So talk a little bit about what you did to get the voice to get the Lucy voice. So I spent two and a half months working to get that voice, just the Lucy voice. No, the Lucille voice. Get that one. Voice. I know. And to get the accent because the quality of the voice is very specific. It's tonally much, much higher than where I speak, but it's much raspier. And it has that slight gravel to it. And then she has a very specific way of speaking her intonations. And her accent. So there's a lot to it. It's complicated. And that particular take that you just heard, that was part of a ten minute take where I then switch back into Lucille in the same take and we shot ten minutes straight where I take all the bandages off. It was like doing theater. And I switched back into the Lucille Ball ball voice where I become like, no, you got to go back. No, that doesn't work. That's not funny. Try this again. It was a high wire act. So what did you have to learn about voice placement about placing your voice in a different range? For the further. The Lucy voice for the lucio Carter is your soft palate. I can get very technical. There's an enormous amount of work that you do to raise your soft palate at the back and you have to not lose your voice because you're straining into a place that you're not usually coming from. So you have to do it in a way where it will last. And so I just learned that where you and then you place it up higher and higher. And I would just learn how to bring it up and he would my dialect coach and I would work on it and work on it..

J. K. Simmons Fred mertz lucio Carter Lucille
"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. My guest is Nicole Kidman. She stars in the new film being the ricardos, a fictionalized version of what happened behind the scenes in one eventful week while Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz was shooting an episode of I love Lucy. The film was written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. Kidman just won a Golden Globe for her performance in the film. In a way she plays two roles as the actress Lucille Ball. She's a powerful woman who understands how comedy works and the kind of comedy she's best at, and knows how to fight for it with the writers and the director. Kidman's voice and physical presence change when she's playing Lucy Ricardo in the episode they're shooting of I love Lucy, which is a recreation of an actual episode of the show. In 2020, Kidman was number 5 on The New York Times list of the 25 greatest actors of the century so far. Kidman also won the best actress Emmy and Golden Globe for her performance in the HBO series, big little lies, which also won an Emmy for outstanding limited series. She was an executive producer. It's part of the work she's taken on behind the scenes, getting more creative control, and creating interesting roles for herself and other women. In 2003, she became the first Australian actress to win an Oscar when she received it for her portrayal of writer, Virginia Woolf, in the hours. The film that made her a star in America, the dark comedy to die for, earned her a Golden Globe in 1996. There's plenty of other awards I can mention like the 2002 Golden Globe for moulin rouge, but let's get to the interview. Nicole Kidman, welcome to fresh air. Thank you so much for joining us. You're speaking to us from Australia. We're with your mother who has had some health issues lately and you're taking care of her. How are you? And how is omicron known in Australia? It's all oats like running wild in the U.S.. It's running wild in Australia..

Kidman Lucille Ball Golden Globe Lucy Ricardo Terry gross Lucy Nicole Kidman Desi Arnaz Aaron Sorkin Emmy The New York Times HBO Virginia Woolf Oscar moulin rouge U.S. Australia
"nicole l" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

"A promotion going on or if that prize is a computer virus for today's tip you can take straight to the bank if you need to take a little break during your work day today. Go to money rehab show on instagram and check out this video of this scam real scam in action. It may help you ask the right questions the next time a scammer comes after you or it may just make you laugh because you can tell how i was really getting my nancy drew on either way. You should check it out on instagram. I won't send you a link. Just in case this money we have is a production of iheartmedia. I'm your host nicole. Lapin our producers are morgan lavoix and catherine law money. Rehab is edited an engineered by brandon. Dicker with help from josh fisher executive producers are manned gashed decoder and will pearson huge thanks to the o. g. money rehab supervising producer. Michelle lamb for her pre production development work and as always thanks to you for finally investing in yourself so that you can get it together and get it all..

"nicole l" Discussed on The Three Questions with Andy Richter

The Three Questions with Andy Richter

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on The Three Questions with Andy Richter

"Is another episode of the three questions with andy richter and i very happy to be talking to my friend. Yvette nicole brown. The emmy nominated yvette. nicole brown. How how about that andy. First of all. I am overjoyed to be here with you. I've missed your sweet little face skin. See i'm looking at it right now and i missed it. I can't believe him emmy nominated. I don't know. I can't believe it because it's it's in black lady. Scott show was guest bought. You did. And i can't imagine that you go it. Because i mean i've done a million guest spots and you don't think oh this is going to get me an emmy nominee never. Yeah and was it a surprise when you got the still surprised today. It's been too and i'm still like was this emmy now. I'm like okay talking about funny. I know i did not go into it going. This is this is going to be the one you know. I knew that it was funny. But listen we. We're journeymen actors. We've been a lot of shows where parts were funny or you know. And and it's been crickets. So i know and it's an listen. It's a small appearance i did. Two episodes edited played the same character for two seasons back to back. And i think my sketches four minutes long so it's surrounded by so many other talented people sketches. Did i think no. I never thought they picked me out of the bunch ever. This is yeah ridiculous a great way. Well fantastic congratulations. And i hope you. I hope you get it. listen. I can't even dream that big but that would be an even bigger surprise right. Well it's also to outline. I can't say nobody. But i certainly did not think when i started to do this for a living and yes and i will also get trophies. Never it's it's like the health fix about that. And then there's this weird and i've always said like the fact that they give awards in this stuff is the weird thing about this to me and it's from having gone. It's from having been on the conan show for so many years getting nominated for writing almost every year for a number of years we got nominated for writing and then we would go with..

emmy Yvette nicole brown andy richter nicole brown yvette andy Scott
"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Okay so it's now time for our weekly segment called asian enough. Confessions formerly known as bad asian. Confessions where we share a time or things that has made us feel that. We're not asian enough although we've done a lot of that already on this episode But it's so that we can all unpack these things together. And i am going to go. I with something that i kinda thought about as we were talking in this conversation so my confession is about how for a really long time in my life even through young adulthood. I did feel this. Need to have a sense of humor to placate other people's feelings about my otherness sir. May and i mean My white friends or even strangers or my friends parents in love parents. A love people's parents. So i would have this inclination to sort of lean into humor and be like. Hey yeh asian friend. i'm the asian friend It's not something. That i still feel ord really do anymore. But it's definitely something that i think that i leaned on to make it easy for everybody But also i think maybe i was really presumptive about the need to do that kind of thing. So that's what. I'm here to invest today in to sit and think about accommodation is like so real. I don't know like. I'll laugh until this uncomfortable moments of me feeling like passes. That's relatable to all right confessions. I've done so many of i feel deep ones. Here's what i've been holding onto when i speak in japanese. I speak in the third person because japanese language is so gendered like there are ways that girls say i am. There are ways that boys say i am. I did not like it. So as a kid i would just refer to myself by my name and i have never grown out of it like i am almost forty in what i'm speed lebanese to like actual respectable. You know like people. Like oh. I just talked to myself about myself in third person. Come love that yeah. I made that choice for yourself. Yeah from a young age because there's so much that we don't think to push back on you know when we're younger but he did. That's i think that's cool. Thanks for sharing both of you. I mean there are like so many moments. I can think of anytime anyone is going on about like. Look i referenced. Before like asian traits or common asian experiences. I'm like well like going to the list like nope. Nope nope i will say like. This wasn't even a negative experience. It was kind of a positive one but like when i started to correspond with my biological sister. I have a sister a full sister. Who was who is also korean-american unlike kneeboard in korea came here but she spent most of her life here and is also what she would describe as very americanized. Whatever that means anyway. When we first started talking it was long distance because we were across the country from each other and we were not ready to leap into like an in person meeting. We pen pals more than anything else. We were both really comfortable in writing so we wrote almost daily to each other for like a year and then like one of our first phone conversations. When we hadn't had many yet she was like. Oh my god you you sound so american like you everything about your voice. In the way you talk to screams like american and like i did feel that moment like oh god like even my sister who did not mean anything cruel but issue was not trying to keep. She was not trying to make me feel any way. And i did not feel bad It was more like. Oh look you've noticed. And i had never before occurred to me that like the way i spoke or moved or talked and she later was like get your body. Language is also very american. It never occurred to me that that could be something that she would automatically pick up on. I share it because it wasn't like a negative experience. Because i love my sister and she loved me it was just oh. I had not thought about that before. That's so interesting. Because i felt kind of a version of that i went to japan because i don't speak japanese and i've always felt like a terrible japanese american person for for not speaking japanese. But i did go once with family in walking through crowds. I felt they can tell they can tell them american. They probably can. I'm i'm scared to without my sister. I'm like i'm gonna need you to come and it's not even about lake language or whatever i just i'm gonna need somebody like i dunno can like pass because it's going to be very obvious to everyone that i can't i mean my birth father's also commented on how american i am and i kind of want to. That's a little bit rich coming from you. Like you know exactly why and like even if i were not adopted like you moved here so i would have grown up here anyway. He he thinks he thinks both my sister. And i are like very slush to. I don't know american. And i'm kinda like well. What did you expect to happen when we moved here and also pleased me for adoption. Now that you've heard our asian enough confessions we want to hear yours. Call us at two one three nine eight six five six five two. That's two one three nine eight six five six five two. And that's a wrap for this episode of asian enough. Thank you to nicole chung for joining us and thank you you out there. You're the one you're the one. I'm talking to thank you for listening. Asian enough is hosted by me january motto and by me tracey brown. Our producer is assault on a poor and our executive producer is abby swanson our engineers mike huffman and original music was composed by andrew. Even special. Thanks to julia turner. Geoff berkshire james reed and matt brennan. This podcast is dedicated to the memory of our founding producer. Line on more and come back next week for another episode of asian enough. We'll be revisiting last year's episode with vice president kamla harris co hosted by myself and asian enough co creator. frank shaun. I've never had an identity crisis. I haven't like literally. I didn't go through some evolution. About who am i. What is my identity. And i guess the frustration i have is if people think that i should have gone through such a crisis and need to explain it but i didn't an remember support your local donut shop. And if you've got that asian discount never take it for granted there. Was this couple who worked at the donut shop. They probably owned it and they used to give me what my friends and i would term asian discount of like i would get a dozen they would throw in an extra like one or two and only happened.

matt brennan abby swanson korea nicole chung mike huffman julia turner japan andrew last year frank shaun next week tracey brown kamla harris both Geoff berkshire james reed today forty korean-american couple
"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

"To asian enough. Here's the rest of our conversation with writer nicole chung or talking about like scary vulnerable things. One of the things you write about in your book is how your parents were instructed by the judge who confirmed your adoption to just quote unquote assimilate you especially now. It's like malaysia and being colorblind and even like melting pot like we think about them in very different ways now in twenty twenty one. What was your reaction when you heard the word. That was used as simulate island surprise. So i was adopted in the early eighties and it wasn't just the judge actually it was also the social worker. Who interviewed them. It was like their adoption agency. It was their adoption attorney. Pretty much everyone. They ever consulted who they would have considered an adoption expert. Who worked in the field told them the same thing Which was it's not really gonna matter her race just sheer kid. And that's that's all that matters. My mother has hilariously sad. Like i thought. At least someone would recommend the book but nobody recommended anything and she was really struck by the word assimilate. I don't think it's a word that my parents would have liked. Come up with on their own but she always remembered it. That was the exact word that judge used just assimilate her everything will be fine. There's nothing in particular you need to worry about. Just because you're white and she's korean. It was just like any old adoption to him. So my reaction to that like growing up. I guess maybe. I wouldn't have questioned it so much because i was raised in a household that i don't really believe in like that. My parents were race blind. You know. I don't believe anybody is but that was like the line and i would say both at home and at school. That was the overwhelming attitude we were presented with. And so i didn't necessarily question that assimilation line when i was younger but of course like when i got older and started reading more than thinking more and like just after also more years of accumulated experience where i knew i knew damn well race was extremely relevant to my life and my experience how other people view me how i myself so i think it was like harder for my my parents to understand and accept that because it is really hard to understand that prejudice or inexperience at yourself. Don't have an it completely. Flew in the face of everything they've been told when they adopted me and end. It's not what they wanted for you to experience. I'm sure either right. Like of course. No apparently still think of their child being hurt by anything in like in my parents case. Either they're feeling was always like we don't care about your race and knowing what race blind no they also didn't care. I was asian. Like i wasn't like their asian daughter. The korean daughter i was just their daughter. I think they just thought because it didn't matter to them like it shouldn't matter to other people. I don't know like i would have these discussions with my mom where she would talk about like relatives of ours like people in her family and she really believed that none of our relatives could be racist. Because we'll all they really cared about is whether you're a good person or not like that was just so much the level on which not just my family but a lot of i think a lot of white people operate where it's all about intentions and even like one to one relationships maybe with people of color not like being aware of being able to discuss more. Systemic mum prejudice. Yeah i think in the eighties so many conversations were relatively naive which we can now see. And i'm thinking about my own parents who never talk to me about race or racism as long as i can remember. They never brought it up. As thing that i might have to confront out in the world you know and it's certainly something that they had experienced themselves but it was literally never talked about and i don't know if that was wishful thinking or some sense of optimism that i would never have to deal with it Which obviously was not the case. But i wonder how do you feel like the conversations around transracial transnational adoption have changed since you first started sort of hearing about it and really most importantly for this conversation where we're not adoptees. What is still missing from the conversations around adoption. that should be looked at now. should be discussed. Yeah i mean. I think one big change. That's easy to point out. Is that at the time. I was growing up. It was not nearly as common for people to talk about ways for adoptive families to really honor include their like birth culture culture of origin within the family. And so these days. I know like there are tons of culture camps their homeland tours families do things like language lessons in cooking classes and all sorts of things. What still harder is having like really frank conversations about race and privilege and like white supremacy in america. I recognize that it's difficult. I think maybe that is an area where there still needs to be really specific. Although ag- i'm not i'm not trying to be prescriptive and i'm not an expert but like there does need to be much more comprehensive training or adoption industry professionals working with prospective adoptive parents. I don't know there are definitely probably some agencies that are better at this than others these conversations. Some of them have actually realized they need. They need help. They need like transracial. Adoptees our voices and they will enlist or even pay us till speak with parents. But you know. I think of that is important but also. I don't know it's not going to reach everybody that it needs to reach because you're going to have to reach every prospective adoptive parents and we know from studies that many white parents don't talk to their kids about racism. It's something parents have colored. Do and we have to or at least like many of us feel we have to so. There's all kind of this gap whether we're talking. Adoptive families are not in terms of who is really talking to their children about the reality and like what's required them like what can look like demand of them Does a really important discussion to have with kids regardless of their race. So you know ever since we started this podcast or listeners have wanted the adopted you experience covered and it really just has home to me. How little there is out there in. The conversation about stephen just sharing individual experiences. Yeah i don't again. I don't i don't want to try really hard not to speak for like asian or korean adoptees as a group you know. There is no like one monolithic narrative. But i would say like a common thread that runs through a lot of my conversations with fellow. Let's say asian adoptees in there. Is this feeling of not being asian enough. You know not to not to steal your title. But i kind of laughed when i heard the name and then when i started thinking about like all the time i have not felt asian enough i mean it will be very hard to pick one. I think a lot of the ways. We talk about. Asian american identity in this country. It's exclusionary or at least on purpose to the adopt. The experience and also. It's not that it's not balloting. Fine good to share common experiences. It's just that some of those experiences can feel like a look. What's our place in this. You know we'd obviously did not grow up with asian parents at least many of us in so like what's our identity. How do they fit in if like. I don't know if we didn't learn to use chopsticks at home. Like i'm consciously going out in learning to use them like in my teens or little things like taking off your shoes when you go into a home. But yeah i dunno. Now there are just all these. Little cultural touchstones big and small. That don't necessarily applied adoptees so then we're left wondering you know we're clearly not white. I think most of us know that. And so what is it that makes us asian. Or what is it. That connects us to other asian american communities. I i just. I tend to think of like my asian and my adopted entities as so linked. I can't really separate them. And so i think a lot of adopt these are probably looking for is an acknowledgement and space within our communities to say like this has been our experience and who we are and it doesn't make us less korean.

america nicole chung eighties malaysia One both early eighties first korean one twenty twenty one asian Asian tons culture camps more homeland asian american american
"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

"They're scary definitely for sure. Yeah i know. I mean i think as someone who like is an editor has been now for many years. I mean i started hyphen actually and then moved to the toast. Him now catechal. I think maybe that has actually played a big role in wyatt. I'm still writing in this genre. Because i do work with. And edit and publish writers sharing personal stories all the time. And i think a lot and have a lot of conversations with my writers and my fellow editors about you know what are the responsibilities would've ethics of that those from a writing and publishing perspective one thing. I think about a lot and something. I tell students when i teach workshop is like we all do have a tendency to write about like our trauma also and like it's very common to have like a an essay that is about your very worst or most painful experience. And it's not that that's not valid and it's not that it can't really help someone who's reading it because i think memoir and personal writing justifies its existence by making other people feel less alone but that said you don't owe anybody like your painter your trauma thinking about just this past year alone. And all the trauma and the loss disappointment the fear that we've all experienced during the pandemic. The raiders response does not have to be to take all that and make art for consumption. And i'm very grateful. In my case that i did kind of take the time between i guess my of my reunion starting to write about it. I was ready to write this when it was all happening. I will say like. I've had wonderful generous feedback from a lot of people but i hear from haters and i hear from people telling me that like i clearly. Don't love my adoptive parents and i'm ungrateful and like i bet there are ashamed of you and if i got stuff. Ten years ago or fifteen years ago. I think it would have been deeply devastating for me as it is. I don't like it. It doesn't feel good but it doesn't make me wanna stop writing. It doesn't make me ashamed. It doesn't get under my skin and make me think like deep down. Oh god are they write about me. I'm not a place in my life. Where i wouldn't say it rolls off my back but i can. I can cope with it and it doesn't make me want to stop sharing or writing lady. Sometimes in some cases would it does take his time and who you trying to reach. I guess just remembering that when you share stories whether it's on this podcast or in writing you're never sharing them for the haters. There's always gonna be people who don't care. Don't get it but you are writing or you're talking or you're producing work for the people who will get it and they're always going to be people like that out there but it is it's terrifying. I don't think it ever. It will ever not be a little bit and to this day. If i have an essay going the next day like it's really hard to sleep. And i know the day of the day of i'll be running on coffee and adrenaline and my stomach will be upset. That is on is what happens. All say like it gets easier but it doesn't. I'm right there with you. That's a nerve more of our conversation with nicole coming up after this short break. Stay with us in twenty seventeen when a trans woman disappears from the village alarm bells. Go off missing. Rose end up dead so her friends. Decide enough is enough. This is the story of what happens when sex workers and trans people stand up to fight the system that failed them. I'm justin laying and misses the village season two available now on the cbc. Listen app and everywhere. You get your podcasts..

fifteen years ago Ten years ago justin nicole Rose twenty seventeen next day one thing trans this past year village season two
"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Thank you so much for joining us to call. Thank you tracy john. It's good to be here. Let's are at the beginning. You were born to korean immigrant parents. But you're adopted. As an infant into a white catholic family in a mostly white rural town in oregon. So how did you first start developing your own sense of identity. Sure sure so. I will say i lose the only korean that i really knew until i left home and it was formative and ways and at the same time. That's really hard to see when you're growing up there when you're in the midst of it when whiteness is just kind of the default around you as it was for me and did grow up in a very white area and it wasn't just like my family. It was my neighborhood. It was my school every school. I went to pretty much. you know. It was definitely the church we went to. It was one of those things where i definitely noticed from a young age. I noticed i didn't look like everyone and also like it was pointed out to me and like many different ways by different people. I will say that i. I don't think. I began really noticing a lot or feeling self conscious about it until i was old enough to go to school so my early years and how many of us has that many memories of our early childhood right but the memories i do have. It's like well of course. I knew that i was adopted. I don't remember being told so. I must have been told like around the time i was two or three. Is my gas like when i was actually verbal and i remember a few discussions like my. My main memory is asking my adopted mother. My mom likes to tell me the story of my adoption. And i would ask for this over and over when i was a kid and i remember like sitting in her lap and hearing the story and it never changed but growing up for me it was so impossible and honestly still isn't possible to separate like my asian my korean identity from my adoptee item. They are so bound together.

Frank carson Nicole frank carson nicole chung Carson eight episodes california christopher northeastern ontario Today korean Both last year tracy brown nicole catapults melanie one september nineteen ninety-six asian american
"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Asian Enough

"The joys the complications and everything else that comes along with being asian american. I'm one of your host genu- motto and i'm your host tracy brown. Today we're joined by the writer. Nicole chunk you may know her from her writing on life identity parenting or from her social media presence. Both of which have helped me get through this last year. Particularly her work examining racism grief and asian american identity. Her two thousand eighteen memoir. All you can ever know chronicles nicole's upbringing in a white catholic family her adoption story and her journey to learn more about her korean birth parents. They're just all these. Little cultural touchstones dagan small. That don't necessarily apply to adopt so then we're left wondering you know we're clearly not wait. I think most of us know that. And so what is it that makes us asian. Or what is it. That connects us to other asian american communities. Nicole is also an advice columnist at slate a former editor at the toast. Rest in peace to the toast and she is currently the editor. In chief of catapults magazine. Our conversation with nicole chung coming up after this short break dope do go anywhere just kidding. I'm david ridden and this is the next call in september nineteen ninety-six melanie. Fda disappeared from northeastern ontario. Her mother's selene is still searching for answers. I can't let it go. I need to find her. She deserves that much. I follow every tip and every theory investigations that could break wide open with the next call available now on the cbc. Listen app and everywhere. You get your podcasts. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher offered writer and host of the la times podcasts. Dirtyjohn and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law in california's central valley new episodes of the trials of friend. Carson are available to find them. Search for the.

Frank carson Nicole frank carson nicole chung Carson eight episodes california christopher northeastern ontario Today korean Both last year tracy brown nicole catapults melanie one september nineteen ninety-six asian american
"nicole l" Discussed on Your Life Program

Your Life Program

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Your Life Program

"Hello welcome. Everyone to your life program where we live. Intentionally savvy lists every day. I'm your host andrea hammer. Certified fitness trainer health and wellness coach fitness nutrition. And we're here to discuss all our healthy habits and share with you. What we need to do to live really healthy lives and will we sheriff. Show it's coming from radio network in radio network project so stay tuned as we connect with my next guest who is a brilliant in loving healthy habits. Coach nicole battiste and nicole. When you talk to her she will share with you. How the thoughts you think the words you speak the breath you take and the foods you eat all affect how you feel and how you feel about yourself. She's gonna be on a show with us today to share and teach us how to learn new stronger foundations of healthy habits that will change your mindset and your chemical makeup. We're going to be well with nikki and we're going to start really living sooner than later. Because she's got the answers for that nikki. Thank you so much lovey. For coming to be on the show with me today oh andrea so much for having me. I'm honored to be here chatting with you today. You know you. And i share a really wonderful history of health and wellness since spirituality in how we love so much what we do in how we can help that change in in people's lives with fitness. Feeling good your story comes very poignant internal part of you that really reaches deep into the hearts of many women that find deeper struggled to have radiance in their life. In italian confidence would have gone to your experience in in grown out of it and thrived and become who you are today as magnificent person on this planet full of love and light. You now can help other women share through your experience and your knowledge how to really the empowered and and find that grace and exceptional living you know level in their life so that was your story. How did you get from there to here. Thank you well and have for the longest. I can remember. I had like the worst relationship. I was in the worst relationship that you could ever think of. And it's not a relationship that most people think of when you say that it's it's the relationship with myself <hes>. I used to say i feel like. I'm in an abusive relationship with myself. And i was i like i took myself for granted. I didn't appreciate or understand <hes>. You know the things that i did. Well i <hes>. i was. I was abused as a child and even through adulthood i've experienced different sexual traumas and that can take a toll on how you feel and think about yourself <hes>. And it wasn't until it was much sometime in my twenties that i was exposed to the book. Seven habits of highly effective people. When i realized that. I didn't have to just keep living like initially i. I thought that how was fueling the negativity and depression all this stuff like this. Just how i am. And who i am. And that's just part of life and whatever so i was literally just existing. I was just surviving. You know the traumas that i dealt with <hes>. And i suppressed a lot of of emotions. That so i like i mastered smiling people unless you could like really feel energy people like you. You always so happy like yeah only you knew the struggles inside my mind that i'm dealing with <hes>. So so back to that book. I i read the seven habits of highly effective people and it made me it. Just it's a paradigm shift book and it. It opened the door to me realizing that. I could actually shape my own life like i can clan for things. I can expect things more than what i was doing. And i can be more than who i was and i don't that never occurred to me. Well for and of course my. My elders wouldn't have known that. I needed some help or sense of direction because they didn't know i was depressed. All the time <hes>. I didn't share any of that. I didn't share any of the trauma with my family or anything like that <hes>. So by all accounts. I was fine so they wouldn't have known to to try to bring me out of that mindset that i was in

nicole nikki nicole battiste today andrea italian
"nicole l" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"nicole l" Discussed on Women and Crime

"Even though the traffic light was green, so of course he did his bullhorn. Somebody got out of that car. It was Nikki, Outta. Mondo. She got out of the driver's side of the car wearing. Wearing only socks on her feet, and her two young children were inside in the car seat asleep. She had told the officer I tried to leave, but he said he would kill me. She said that Chris was still in the apartment in the gun had gone off. Nikki also told police that she killed grover. She said yes. I killed him. He tortured me. Me Sexually and physically abused me for years. The police went to the sheriff's department and they're. They found Chris Grover deceased with one gunshot wound to the head Hill. Let's take a moment and talk about how his body was found. Okay, so he was found laying on the couch, says head propped up on pillows, one arm at his side, one arm draped. Across his torso with one single gunshot wound to the head. That doesn't sound consistent right now. With the story that she told, but that's just my opinion at this point, so you're not going to be the only one who will think that. We'll talk a little bit more about that crime scene as we get further into the trial. On July second, two thousand Eighteen Nikki, Outta. Mondo pled not guilty to charges of second degree murder, first and second degree, manslaughter and second degree criminal possession of a weapon. After posting a six hundred thousand dollar bond, Nikki was released on electronic monitoring to await her murder trial, which began in March, two thousand and nineteen. So this was an interesting trial. Because the two sides as they usually do right, they both offer to starkly different narratives of what happened here so on the prosecutors version, Nikki was a master manipulator who concocted a story of abuse justify killing Chris. And, in fact she had rehearsed this story and this bizarre narration of events. They had a friend's excite expert who said that there was no indication or evidence that grover was physically or sexually abusive. which doesn't make sense because to me in the night of or historically, and in the past, historically doesn't make sense based on what the prosecutor, also while the forensic psychologist expert for the prosecution also said that Chris had none of the common traits of a batterer, and that Nikki was a quote, unreliable historian, who put forth so many different accounts of who who abused her. Her at different times, so let me just explain what this means..

Nikki Chris Grover Mondo second degree murder head Hill officer murder prosecutor