28 Burst results for "Nicole Hannah Jones"

Charlie Confronts the Deconstructionist Doctrines Poisoning Politics

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Confronts the Deconstructionist Doctrines Poisoning Politics

"If you do not teach children that certain things are true, then where does it stop? You have a Supreme Court Justice that can not give you definitive answer of what is a man and a woman and guess what? That is the furthest right now and it will go even crazier. Extrapolation of deconstructionist ideology. At every turn tries to make you doubt question and tear apart things that we know are fundamental to existence that we know are essential to our survival. You see that in the whole transgender movement. You see that where all of a sudden we have the blurring of lines where Pennsylvania's own at University of Pennsylvania, the death of women's sports where you had the man who thinks he's a woman, all of a sudden be the 462nd best swimmer overnight transition to be a woman and win the NCAA championship. Why would that not be wrong? See, we as Christians have an answer. We have two answers. Number one, I want compassion for the person who thinks they're in the wrong body. I want treatment for that person and most importantly, I want their soul that we want for Christ. But secondly, that doesn't mean we have to all of a sudden rearrange the rules of the game to allow cheating. We as Christians believe cheating is wrong. Both things can be simultaneously true because we as Christians and most societies are not able to articulate this, but the Bible tells us when you have strength you are morally called, in fact, you are required to protect the not as strong.

Supreme Court University Of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Ncaa
Why the Constitution Is the Greatest Political Document Created

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Why the Constitution Is the Greatest Political Document Created

Charlie Speaks at Dayspring Christian's 'Remember America' Series

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Speaks at Dayspring Christian's 'Remember America' Series

"And last week I was in boulder, Berkeley and Cal state Fullerton. So it's a lot different of a reaction. I know some of you are booing, totally understandable, right? You should boo Berkeley. It's a very dark place to give you an idea how dark Berkeley is. I had to bring a deliver in sky with me. Just in case. Victor marks, if you know who I'm talking about. But here's the amazing thing. And there's something so special happening in our country. When I visited Berkeley in boulder last week, we had a major problem. And it wasn't antifa. It wasn't all that nonsense. We couldn't find rooms big enough to fit all the students that wanted to come to our events. On campus. Very special. So I traveled 330 days last year all across the country. I'm doing three podcasts today, a couple hours of radio. And I'm in the education space, but a little different than day spring. I go to hostile territory and try to spread truth where there is none. And tonight, we get to celebrate and support a place that is full of truth and full of light for liberty. It's a little different, but the same thing, really, because we're trying to raise up a generation to understand what they've been given. We as human beings all have a lot in common. One of the things we all have in common is that we've all been born into a world we did not create. So we're born into a set of circumstances that are not our own. And boy, are we blessed to be born in the set of circumstances in the United States of America? And that statement alone is agreed upon by basically all of you. But it's now wildly controversial to say that in most schools today. In fact, it's four and it's a concept that most young people when I come and I talk about how America is the greatest nation ever to exist in the history of the world, how the constitution is the greatest political document ever written. They want to believe it because in the soul of a person is a yearning to want to actually love the place that you're from. But there's this disconnect between all the propaganda that they've been led to believe and first what they are all of a sudden hearing what they know to be true. And I think one of the reasons for that is actually

Berkeley Cal State Boulder Fullerton Victor United States Of America
Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

"I just saw something today on social media and I retweeted it. Nicole Hannah Jones and she goes tipping, dipping is a practice that goes back to slavery. And then she goes on to say, you know, have you ever wondered why tipping is only in America and nowhere else around the world that's because it goes back to the slave plantation. This is basically Nicole had a joke so I'm thinking this is one of the stupidest statements I've ever read. First of all, tipping is universal. I grew up in India, people tip in restaurants all the time. I've been all over Europe, tipping is very common in Europe. So first of all, the idea that tipping is only American is nonsense. Number two? What is Nicole Hannah Jones implying that slavery is a form of forced and unpaid labor? Is she saying that on the plantations it was normal practice for masters to tip their slaves? You know, hey Frank, great job. Excellent service in the field today. Here's 50 cents for your efforts. What? I think historians worldwide are waiting with bated breath for Nicola Hannah Jones to explain and she's not going to explain because that these are people who essentially say stupid things and expect never to be called on

Nicole Hannah Jones Europe Nicole America India Nicola Hannah Jones Frank
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Like several pages long with lots of in notes. And I don't back off of it at all. So if you had questions about it. And what it did was it allowed me to get my vengeance through research..

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:07 min | 7 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Her work on it ever since. I'm Gustavo Yanni. You're listening to the times, daily news from the LA times. It's Monday, Martin Luther King day, January 17th, 2022. Today we bring you a conversation between Nicole and Los Angeles Times executive editor, Kevin metida. The 1619 Project is now a book, and in a live event with the LA times book club. Kevin and Nicole talked about how black people can be patriotic despite centuries of mistreatment, and about using mountains of research to get back at the haters. This version of the talk has been cut down for length and clarity. Enjoy. No, you gotta let that applause sink in a little bit. Enjoy that. The 1619 Project is a new origin story as you described, and you have your own origin story. One of the things that I really liked about the book and reading it are that regular people are in it. And journalism we would call these interstitial photos and snapshots and facts that interspersed to tell you something about history. But among the people are your dad. You grew up in Waterloo, Iowa, and there's a picture in your opening S and a of your dad built in Hannah. In this uniform in Germany. And you tell the story in there about your dad flying the American flag at your home and initially you're not understanding that. And later came to an understanding of that. Tell us about that. So I was grappling with my dad who like many people in this room had ancestors, grandparents, fathers, mothers who joined the military, hoping that military service would be our way to finally be recognized as real citizens. That if we showed we're willing to die for our country that maybe maybe that would allow our country to see us as citizens. And my dad certainly joined the military. And was this extremely patriotic in a way that I found so uncomfortable as a child. I just don't like, I don't remember another black family that I knew who had a flag in their free art. I was like, what are we doing right now? And the flagpole is probably like 15 feet, but in my mind, it was like a hundred feet. I feel like everybody in the whole community could see the flag. And it was hard for me because I knew my dad grew up in Greenwood Mississippi. I knew that my grandmother had had to flee the south. Other people were fleeing their country to come here and we were having to flee our own country, trying to get the rights that immigrants could have when they stepped foot on the soil. I knew that my dad was one of the smartest men that I knew, but he was a bus driver. And he was never able to live up to his potential. And here he is fine as flag. And so so much of that essay is trying to grapple with how do black people have this art and patriotism for a country that has never treated us as citizens. They didn't even believe we were to be citizens. And it's me working through that. In some ways. To ultimately come to the conclusion that people ask, when did you come to understand why your dad flew that flag? And it was literally in reporting this essay. So 44 years old. When I'm reading Douglas, when I'm reading Martin Delaney, when you're reading these black people who, in the midst of slavery, are saying we're not going to leave this country we built. There was no reason for black people to stay here. Why? Why would you stay in a country that enslaved you for 250 years? And yet, that type of patriotism, which isn't flag kid wearing, it's not performative. It's not saying my country is the greatest country in the world. But it's a patriotism that says, those ideals were majestic, and y'all might not have thought they applied to us. But we're going to fight and make them apply to everyone and that to me is the highest calling in patriotism and that's a patriotism I could claim. You were in Waterloo recently back and there was a gentleman, mister dial, right now who was an educator there. And I believe that he was the one through a special class that he had taught in the semester where 1619 first came into your consciousness. Miss if I was the teacher, he was the only black male teacher I ever had. He had taught black studies at the college level, and he just opened my world to an entire world of knowledge that I didn't even know existed. And I realized in that class when in three months, he introduced me to everything from African origins and civilization to they came before Columbus, to Fannie Lou hamer. And everything in between, that there was this whole world, and we had just been taught this very narrow view of it, and that somehow I had been convinced. I mean, this is the power of educator. Is you assume if it was important, your teachers would have taught it to you. And so if no one's taught it to you, it must be because black people haven't done anything worthy of them teaching us about. And in that class, it just showed me a way, people have made choices. This isn't the history that happened. This is a history that they have decided we will learn about that happen. And he was that type of educator who just constantly was exposing me to new ways of thinking. And one of the books he gave me was before the Mayflower by Laurent Bennett, who, as you know, was also a journalist and a historian. I went and looked recently. I still have to highlight in the book. And it was like on page 30 that I came across the year 1619. And it was just like, it was like a light, or I described it, I think, in the book is like, somebody gave me oxygen for the first time. And I realized, wait, black people's lineage here goes back to before the pilgrims. But every child learns about the Mayflower and no child learns about the white Lion, and that's a choice. I talked to mister dial about how our high school paper never wrote about black kids like me who were being bust into this white school every day. We had to leave our neighborhood, ride a bus, an hour each way to get an education. And classmates in many of our educators let us know every day that this was not our school. I came to miss about and I said, our paper never writes about us. And as a great black educator will do kept very real with me. And he says, either join the paper, write those stories yourself or shut up and don't come here, complains to be about it anymore. So I did. That's right, Nicole Hannah Jones. If you want something done, you gotta do it yourself. After this break, she and Kevin talk about the power of something Nicole calls ancestral intervention..

LA times Gustavo Yanni Kevin metida Nicole Waterloo Martin Delaney Martin Luther King Hannah Kevin Greenwood Iowa Germany Mississippi Fannie Lou hamer Douglas Laurent Bennett Columbus Nicole Hannah Jones
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

06:29 min | 8 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Part three the country we have. History and its accurate telling is that the heart of what Nicole Hannah Jones is aiming for in 1619. It sparked an intense debate about what story we should be telling ourselves about this country. But the debate doesn't end there. Questions are often put to someone like Nicole Hannah Jones, who does the work of storytelling and observation. Questions like, what are we supposed to do with this history? How can pointing out the darkness of the past be productive? How are we supposed to feel about it and what's the point? According to Nicole, these questions miss the point. I don't know why it should matter whether it's pessimistic or optimistic. It is what it is. It's trying to make an argument about our society. And some people have, you know, a criticism of the project is that they do feel it's not hopeful enough. It's too pessimistic. I'm completely unconcerned with that. I don't think it's true. I don't think you can read to the end of my essay where I say black people have made astounding progress despite every obstacle and that we have a right to fly the flag and feel proud of the country that we helped build and think that that is a pessimistic essay. But I don't think that's a relevant question. This is the country that we have. And the last two essays in the project, one is by ibram Kennedy on progress, which gets to this notion that Americans, we need to just believe that we're always moving forward, even if the evidence is to the contrary and that that belief that we are better than we used to be and we're getting better in the future than alleviate us of the need to do something right now about all the inequality that we see. And then the final essays on justice. And it says, okay, we've taken you through this whole history. We've shown you all of the ways that the legacy of slavery has hurt black Americans has corrupted our society. And it says we have a choice. That if you know it's all been created, then you know that it can be undone. And we are not captive to the past. We can't do anything about it, but we don't have to be held captive to it. But we do have a choice to make. And to me, that's tremendously empowering, because we can decide whether we will be that country of our highest ideals. Black people did not until the end of the Civil War with the reconstruction amendments. Believe in the constitution. The constitution laid out no vision for us as citizens or us as free individuals. But they did believe in those opening words of the declaration. And the declaration, which is a Succession document, but the beginning, brass, as we hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal endowed by the creator with an alienable rights of these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Black people took those words and turned the declaration into a freedom document. And I think that is the work that black Americans have been doing since those words were written and what we are calling on is the rest of America to join in the struggle to perfect. Those really majestic words of our founding. You know, I wonder what you think is in the present, what is at stake in revising and reexamining the past and do you think that we as a country can move forward without a shared agreed upon narrative about the past? Why it matters to me. Is we have learned the history of a country that does not exist, and because we've learned a false history of a country that does not exist, we are unable to understand the country in which we live and to create the country of our highest ideals. So I don't know that there can ever be one single uncontested shared narrative. But I do think we are a nation that is exceptional in ways that we should not be proud of. We have an exceptional amount of income inequality. We are the only western industrialized nation that does not guarantee healthcare for its citizens. We are the only western industrialized nation that does not guarantee paid, leave when you have a child. We have the stingiest social safety net of all of the countries that we like to compare ourselves. We incarcerate more people than any country in the world. These are legacies of settler colonialism and these are legacies of African slavery. And until we are honest about that upon which we are built, we will never become the country that we believe ourselves to be. So I don't know if there is one collective unifying narrative about America. I think that the 1619 Project can be a unifying narrative, but only if you believe that black Americans can be heroes of the story and that black Americans are just as American and that a white American can see themselves in the struggle to make this a democracy in a land of equality, just the way we're expected to see ourselves in white founders. So can we get there? I don't know. I don't think that is the concern of a journalist is whether we can have a single unifying narrative. I think the concern of the journalist is to try to help us understand the society we live in and to get as close to the truth as possible. You know, one thing I'm thinking about here is kind of circling back to the beginning of our conversation is and I know this is like asking you to imagine things. How would you know, but what would have meant to you is the 16 year old version of yourself to know that that thing you discovered about 1619 would now be entering classrooms, right? So another 16 year old will.

Nicole Hannah Jones ibram Kennedy Nicole America
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:47 min | 8 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"The truth is, if you study history, there is not been. Very successful, long-term class based movements that have not been destroyed by race. And in the end, every example that they can give about class movements, those class movements always end because white people in the movement choose their whiteness over their class solidarity. This is what the slave codes that follow bacon's rebellion are about is saying we have to divide black and white people who are all struggling under a wide elite from each other. And we do that by creating in black people a distinct class that even the poorest white person can never fall below. So if you look at history simply on a class basis, you can give examples, very short lived examples of cross racial solidarity. And then you can show how each and every one of those movements is destroyed by racism. And further, if you remove the class element. So if you look at poor people who are black and white, black people are still worse off in every measure than people who are who are white and poor who have the same income. So how does one describe that? How does one explain the disparity in class within class without looking at race? So I think the project is open to all types of critique, and I would never pretend that the project is perfect in every way. But I don't think the fact that we didn't focus enough on class when classes racialized in this country is the right argument. The one thing I was going to ask about is the one of the central arguments that essay around the American Revolution and being in part, at least in part, or not largely about American college trying to preserve slavery, there came criticisms from a number of historians prominent historians about the veracity of that claim for the most part you've stuck to that argument. My question is, how did you choose to respond to that in the book and why did you choose to kind of stick with that point of view of that argument? So I'm going to push back a little bit on that framing. Sure. I would say fewer than a dozen historians have come out against that argument publicly. And I can't speak to the whole profession and how many people have not said anything. Well, that's fair. But it's a small number of historians and not even all of them are experts in the period of America revolution. We have more historians than that who wrote for the project. We have far more historians than that who agree with our framing of the American Revolution who have also written publicly about that. And yet they never get brought up and no one ever talks about all of the historians who publicly supported the facts that we argued in the framing about the American Revolution. Now, why did I stick with argument? If you've seen the book, then you see the copious amount of end notes from historians of the period of American Revolution that that argument relies upon. We tend to think about history as being settled, right? There's these facts, this happened on this date, and this is who did it. But history is, it is a field of consensus. And consensus does not mean that that's actually what occurred. And for a long time, historians didn't even deal with slavery in a revolution that was largely led by slaveholders. But you have for the last 40 years, have had historians who are really trying to excavate the role of slavery. And they have come up with scholarship that says that slavery played a prominent role, particularly for virginians, south carolinians, in joining the revolution. And is that scholarship that my project or that section on the American Revolution is based on. So why did I leave it in there? Because I think it's right. I think one of the things you just pointed out is the history isn't settled. And there's arguments made about history. People have perspectives. And one of the arguments that I've read you made is that look, for most of American history, it's been one kind of type of person who's been able to make that argument, right? White men, for the most part, historians, and that now, as a black woman living in a 21st century, making this argument, you're making a historical argument, right? Like that, you're making an argument. Like you said this is history is like a collection of historical arguments that finally people settled on and it's never settled. So it sounds to me like that's part of what this is about as well is that there's a historical argument being made. It's just as there has been in the past. Yes. I mean, this is history as toll from the bottom. So do we think that enslaved people were inanimate objects during the period of the American Revolution? That there were no different than the cattle. They were just kind of doing their work and not asserting themselves in the conflict, not understanding that there was the issue of slavery was at play here, right? Not actively engaging in what was happening. This is about focus. It's about if you're not interested in what they are doing, then you don't focus on it. But that's not objective history. In these wars within the profession, have been ongoing. If we think back, if you're a history nerd, to win a net Gordon Reed in her Pulitzer Prize winning book, asserts that Thomas Jefferson had a relationship with Sally hemmings and had children by her. That work was castigated. Scholars of Jefferson said there is no way that's false. Thomas Jefferson absolutely did not have children with Sally hemings and there is no proof that it happened. It is now the historical consensus, including even Monticello, that he did. I'm not arguing as a non professional historian that I could never get anything wrong because of course I could, because historians also get things wrong. What I am saying is I've said many, many times, is I did not sit down at my desk one day and say, let me make up something about slavery and the American Revolution that I wrote that because there was scholarship that backed it up that I thought was compelling and that I believed. You have this book coming out and it's much longer than the original project and I'm assuming that part of the motivation is also that you can fit more of the nuance maybe fit more of the things that ended up not making it into the original project into a longer book and that you can spend more time. I don't want to say responding to because that's assuming that you're responding in parts to some of the things that some of the criticism that came along. But definitely flushing out things that weren't able to be flushed out. In the original project, I mean, is that fair to say do you think that that is partly what the book is able to do that maybe the original project just didn't have the capacity to do as a magazine feature? Yes, absolutely. I mean, let me be clear, there was valid critique to be had on the project and where the critique was valid. We listened to it. And we consulted more experts. And we did more research. And with a book, yes, you can be much more nuanced. You can add much more detail. You can add end notes, so people can actually see the sourcing on the arguments that you're making. And as with anything, which happens with academic publications all the time, you publish something, you get the feedback on it. And then you revise it and you improve it, which is a very normal thing. It's just that 1619 project has become so politicized that people are like, oh, you revise, or you must have got it wrong in the first place. No, we just.

Sally hemings bacon Gordon Reed Thomas Jefferson America Pulitzer Prize Monticello Jefferson
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"America as an exceptional nation and an exceptionally free nation. So that forgetting becomes necessary because that's the only way you can maintain the belief in American exceptionalism. But of course, if you're black, if you're indigenous, you can't forget that. How can you forget every thing about your experience is a reminder of that. And so that for getting it's just not possible. Nicole began her career as an investigative journalist at the news and observer in Raleigh, North Carolina. For years, she covered everything from education to housing. Eventually, becoming a prominent reporter at The New York Times. She also became one of the most influential voices on Twitter. And her clever and actually really funny Twitter handle Ida bay wells.

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

03:48 min | 8 months ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Rond Abdel Fattah and rob team are blue host that show. And recently, they talked with Nicole Hannah Jones. She's an investigative reporter at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. A lot of you may have heard about the 1619 Project by now. It's a collection of essays that reframes the origins of the U.S. by looking at the legacy of slavery and racism in this country. And how that impacted just about every aspect of the America we know now. It is also an award winning podcast and it was just turned into a book. On top of all of that, the 1619 Project has also become a lightning rod for the right. And it's been a big part of the recent debate over critical race theory. In this episode, Rand romp team and Nicole talk about why the 1619 Project became so political. Here's rondin Romney. The past is never passed. This phrase which is a remix of a passage by the famous American writer William Faulkner is basically the tagline for this show. But it isn't just a tagline. It's kind of like a guiding principle. Here on through line, we're constantly trying to understand the mechanics of history. It's limits. The way it oscillates between the light and shadows, darkness and hope. And ultimately, how the past and our interpretation of it has shaped the world we live in today. This task can be especially challenging when it comes to the history of the country we live in. The United States, the complex, murky, painful, and beautiful history of this country has always been ammunition for the political battles of the present. This is because the story we're told about the past shapes the way we view the world and our role in it. So history becomes something we're always updating and fighting over. Whose stories are being told? Whose are being left out? Who gets to decide what stories we teach our children? Who gets the final word on truth? There's a battle waging across this country over these questions. And there's one person who, for the last few years, has been at the center of it. My name is Nicole Hannah Jones. I'm a reporter at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. In 2019, Nicole Hannah Jones conceived and curated the 1619 Project, a collection of essays by scholars from different disciplines that reframes the origin story of the United States. It contends that the date 1619 should be at the center of our national history. It's the date the first people of African descent were forcibly brought to what would become the United States. And it says that the only way to fully appreciate the vast complexity of American history and identity is to understand the legacy of slavery and racism, experienced by black Americans and the powerful role black Americans have played in our democracy. We have a country that was founded on these ideas of individual liberty of inalienable God given rights, which is unique to the world to have a country actually founded on those ideas. And we were not unique in the world in not giving most people rights. We were unique in the world, though and saying that we were a country based on individual rights while depriving so many people of any rights. That to believe then that founding narrative requires a great deal of historical amnesia, we just can't think about those contradictions. We just can't think about those hypocrisies because if you do, then you have to upend the entire identity of.

Nicole Hannah Jones Rond Abdel Fattah United States rondin Romney The New York Times William Faulkner rob Nicole amnesia
Nikole Hannah-Jones: Parents Shouldn’t Decide What’s Being Taught in Schools

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 8 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones: Parents Shouldn’t Decide What’s Being Taught in Schools

"So Nicole Hannah Jones is on meat that the press on December 26th the day after Christmas On a Sunday What does she have to say To schmuck Todd Cut 17 go hat tip right part I don't really understand this idea that parents should decide what's being taught I'm not a professional educator I don't have a degree in social studies or science We send our children to school because we want them to be taught by people who have expertise and what we're talking about What should be taught The parents aren't saying I should sit there and teach them calculus Or advance physics The parents are saying I expect you to teach them math and have a proficiency in math I expect you to teach them English and have a proficiency in English maybe a second language I expect you to teach them literature and have some proficiency in literature I expect you to teach them real history and have some proficiency in history and so forth So you set a foundation perhaps they want to go to college perhaps they want to get a job out of high school whatever it is Don't fill their minds with crap with your radical Marxist racist segregationist

Nicole Hannah Jones Todd Cut
Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Americans Have 'An Obsession With Guns'

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 9 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Americans Have 'An Obsession With Guns'

"The call Hannah Jones included Listen to this cut 11 go We have an article that talks about the Second Amendment That's by doctor Carol Anderson in out of Emory And really argue that our obsession with guns we are What is an obsession with guns me What does that mean These phrases that the marxists use we have an obsession with guns You know as an exception with guns the communist Chinese government The Cuban communist government the communist vet Venezuelan government the police states have obsession with guns They have the obsession with taking them from you So they can overpower you with their own guns Now the call Hannah Jones is a moron The police are systemically racist Because they're there to keep in place this white dominant society which we know is unjust in every respect Meanwhile you are obsessed with guns so you need to be disarmed And it all goes back to slavery You're going to what Oh yes indeed That's how much she knows about the Bill of Rights in the constitution All goes back to slavery Did you read the Second Amendment Nicole Hannah Jones does it say only white people and slave owners have a right to gun Is that what it says Cut 11 go We have more guns than almost any society in the world Who cares What does that have to do with anything What does that have to do with anything Why does it matter Are we supposed to compare ourselves to France

Hannah Jones Carol Anderson Chinese Government The Cuban C Venezuelan Government Emory Nicole Hannah Jones France
Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 9 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

"Nicole Hannah Jones tweets over at the federalist they picked it up Sean Fleetwood New York magazine writer and founder of the 1619 Project the call Hannah Jones took to Twitter this week to offer historically illiterate take on why the United States bond Hiroshima during World War II In a course she was promoted by The New York Times or 1619 project cronut but a New York Times Historical scholars from every walk of life came out and said she doesn't know what the hell she's talking about but it doesn't matter You see And now deleted November 6th tweet Jones attempted to argue that the only reason the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city was due to financial reasons All you World War II vets listen to this She said they dropped the bomb They I guess meaning her country America When they knew surrender was coming because they'd spent all this money developing it and to prove it was worth it She wrote propaganda's not history my friend Now that is unbelievable She is a complete idiot She is a complete idiot Their first bomb was dropped and then the second bomb was dropped because Japan refused to accept unconditional surrender And that's what Harry Truman insisted on She is a historical illiterate but she can push her Pablo her hate for this country and there's not a single corrupt media platform that wouldn't love to

Nicole Hannah Jones Sean Fleetwood Hannah Jones The New York Times New York Magazine America Hiroshima Twitter Jones Harry Truman Japan Pablo
Author Mary Grabar: Howard Zinn and Nikole Hannah-Jones Hate America

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:57 min | 1 year ago

Author Mary Grabar: Howard Zinn and Nikole Hannah-Jones Hate America

"Heard about the six thousand nineteen project which since we don't have a ton of time i will simply say is evil and full of baloney but when you want some more details i would If you're going to reject something as utterly as i have you wanna be able to back it up with a big book. That has all the facts. Well mary gray bar. Who is my guest. Has written a book called debunking the sixteen nineteen project exposing the plan to divide america. Mary great bar. Welcome thank you. Well listen you. You wrote a book called debunking howard zinn exposing the fake history that turned generation against america. It's devastating stuff. I mean let's start there. Who are these people that obviously you know for lack of a better verb hate america. Why are they putting forward narratives. That are not only pernicious but are actually false. There's no question that howard johnson's version of america and the six thousand nineteen projects version america. This is complete nonsense being pedal as though it were true. Why do these people want to destroy the greatest nation in the history of the world. Well i think they have some personal resentment of howard. Zinn nicole hannah jones. Who is the creator of sixteen. Nineteen project have slightly different. Motivations both are promoting a kind of neo marxist version of history howard zinn of course was a one time member of the communist party and his allegiance was to communism and he hated this country and he hoped to foment a communist revolution. Nicole hannah jones from her interviews. And what. I've read about her and things that she has said has this resentment towards this country She believes perhaps going back to her family. that was mistreated because of their race. The black side of famish used biracial believes that this country has not treated her fairly and she believes in off. The fidel castro's cuba. She praises that regime. She she took a trip there and her politics are aligned with the squad of the democratic party. The far left. She wants to see a redistribution of wealth. She wants socialized healthcare. And so this is a history that kind of fits in. She may not be as aware of the real history is howard zinn but she refuses to take any kind of criticism. How would kind of enlightened her as to what really did

America Mary Gray Mary Great Howard Zinn Zinn Nicole Hannah Jones Howard Johnson Nicole Hannah Jones Famish Communist Party Howard Fidel Castro Cuba Democratic Party
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Remember that last vacation you took last brench you had with your friends knowing that a once in a century pandemic was about to hit us. Oh oh wait you didn't see it coming. And that's just it. The covert nineteen pandemic showed us. How a microscopic virus could upend our lives and how unprepared our systems. Our leaders in our society were for it. There's so much more out there. We need to understand how new genetic discoveries could change our relationship with their own genes however addiction to social media. changes are brands. Or how right wing. Extremists are conspiring to take away reproductive rights. Every week dr abul el-sayed a physician epidemiologist and the former detroit health commissioner offers perspectives on these issues. And more and talks the leaders who are working out new ways to solve them from crooked media new episodes of america dissect every tuesday. Wherever you listen to podcasts. This episode of deep background is brought to you by see me. Why seamy wine was born from the grit. And perseverance of its tenacious. Founder isabel seamy. Because when life gave grapes she knew exactly what to do. And that's why a glass of seamy wine is a reward worth having because good things come to those who work hard. Even a small goal achieved is a moment worth celebrating. Whether it's a sip of their medium bodied white chardonnay or the full bodied red cabernet-sauvignon raise a glass to the moments that make us seamy wine. Goodness from grit. Enjoy their many varietals. Wherever fine wines are sold or visit online at shop cmih dot com to learn more about their premiums selection of california wines and order yours. Today please enjoy our wines responsibly. Seamy winery geyserville california..

dr abul el isabel seamy detroit america california geyserville
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

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Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Cuba ‘Most Equal’ Western Country

Mark Levin

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Cuba ‘Most Equal’ Western Country

"Go ahead. Spot in places that are truly at least biracial countries. Cuba actually has a lease inequality. And that's largely due the socialism with temperature. No one wants to hear. What Most of the Caribbean. It's hard to count because the white population a lot of those countries, very, very small, the country's run by black folks, But in places that are truly at least biracial countries, Cuba actually has it. Is the least inequality. That's largely due to socialism, which I'm sure nobody wants to hear. What she means is Marxism. Because that's what she believes in, which is the whole point of my saying American Marxism. She is pushing American Marxism, dressing it up as a whole racial issue, and she's not alone. Books lesson plans. Propaganda on and on and on. And she sure nobody wants to hear O. I'd love to hear about it. I'd love to hear least inequality because these people are not really pushing for racial justice. Quote unquote. They're pushing Marxism.

Cuba Caribbean O.
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"The confederacy and many of the students wanted it taken down for generations. Yeah and and had been working for decades to remove it in a way that was legal and followed all the rules and they went through every process. They could go through the north carolina. General assembly passed a law specifically to protect statues of this type from being removed even by the communities in which they stand and schools where they are in court houses and to make it virtually impossible to remove them and so stymied and unable to do this in a legal way protesters toppled the statue on the campus. And so what happened. After that was members of the board of governors board of trustees in conservatives north carolina said put it back up we would like to redirect confederate statue now in the modern era and this was twenty eighteen and so this was for a lot of reasons. Very bad idea. People who are white supremacists or showing up sometimes armed on campus to quote unquote defend. The statue You know and it's just a terrible terrible idea to deal with any further. So what did the university do about this well in their telling to try to get around this law the state law. That's still in place that protects these statues. They made a secret deal with a neo. Confederate group called the sons of confederate veterans whereby the sense of confederate veterans. Who don't have anything to do with the statue assert that it is their property and they've gotten rights to it from the daughters of the confederacy which did in fact was the group that so many years before had had erected a statue and that they'd be willing to take it off the universities hands in a legal way if they would give them the statue and several million dollars. Technically for upkeep of the statue but still over two million dollars to maintain a confederate statues. That's exactly right and the leader of that group in a celebratory email. Said we're gonna use some of that money to build a headquarters for ourselves. We've won our allies in the unc system in the board of governors Simply helped us do this. It was a huge controversy and and the public only found out about it when it was done deal and it had been announced. So what happened with nicole. Hannah jones when i listened to all of this history is part of a pattern and it becomes clear like in the weeks after the ten year. Back and forth was reported on there was some reporting that for instance i think seventy percent of black faculty had considered leaving the institution. And when you place. What happened with nicole. Hannah jones into the wider context. You can understand why that it's just one more incident that might make that faculty feel unwelcome. Yeah in fact. A prominent tenured professor williams turkey in history. Farmer told me he thinks it's probably closer to ninety percents and their other professors who are leaving their Are publicly saying this is why we've got professors who they were trying to recruit who our top people in their fields. Who've said i'm not coming there and this is why so guy there's there's it's not a theoretical cost so for people who live in. North carolina is the solution to this problem in their educational system. The same solution. We keep hearing about for every other political fight. Were in the middle of vote. Like that's the only way out given the way the boards are appointed as you disagree with what they're doing. Yeah if you agree with what you're what they're doing and this is a. These are the glory days while their husband likes to talk about objectivity and reporting if i totally objective about this and i overlooked any number of things that are ethically objectionable or outright illegal and i just sort of look in it with the totally objective lens than what i see is a political struggle between two sides conservative general assembly in their political appointees and faculty staff alumni and students of the university of chapel hill in many universities in unc system who are are more liberal progressive and they have competing interests and competing philosophies about the university of how should operate what should stand for and one of them is in power and one of them is not a joke kellyanne. Thank you so much for joining me. Glad to help jokey leeann is an investigative reporter at nc policy. Watch and that's the show. What next is produced by lena. Shorts carmelo shod mary. Wilson daniel hewitt and davis land. We are led by alison. benedict unleash. montgomery mary harris. You can go track down on twitter whenever you want. I'm at mary's desk tomorrow. Stay tuned to this feed what next. Tvd is going to be here. Henry gruber is coming in the hosting chair. And he's going to be talking about what happens with remote work once we all go back to the office. okay. I'll get you back here on monday..

Hannah jones board of governors board of tr Confederate group north carolina williams turkey General assembly nicole unc university of chapel hill Farmer North carolina general assembly carmelo shod mary Wilson daniel hewitt davis land montgomery mary harris leeann
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"After punting on this tenure decision twice the university of north carolina came back to nicole. Hannah jones a few months back and said let's do this. We'll give you a five year contract with the opportunity to secure tenure later on. This was a compromise. Hannah jones writes about this moment in a statement. She released this week. She said she was crushed. She didn't understand why her tenure hadn't been approved but she wanted to avoid the humiliation of being known as the first night chair at not to get tenure so she she just take the deal. Make the best of it. She signed a contract. But then that whisper campaign against hannah. Jones got louder this spring a conservative website. North carolina published an article about nicole. Hannah jones and i feel like this is when the public starts to get an inkling that something is going wrong here. The article basically makes the argument that nicole. Hannah shouldn't be teaching at unc at all. And it's a travesty that somehow there's been some kind of to get her to teach without the board having their stamp of approval. And this is this is when you get involved because you seem to see that reporting and say there's a story here what you're talking about. I think is publication from james g. Martin center yeah. That's sort of conservative. Think tank in north carolina and it is very easy to pay attention to what the martin centre publishes to pay attention to what is publishing a conservative publication called the carolina journal. There are members of the board of governors and members of the knockout. a general assembly. Who will walk into committee. Rooms with printed out copies of things that were published on the martin sinner website or carolina journal and read them aloud when they're talking policy. Oh you know. This is a very influential group. So when you saw this post you knew it wasn't just like another blog post. It was more than that. Yeah when it reaches that level. There's already something in play the piece that you're referencing. I believe said this is terrible. That they would do this. That they would hire her and the board should prevent it. And here's how and if they're not willing to do it. It says the board of governors who appoint them should replace them or they should take over the process. It was not a subtle article yet not at all it. Put it right out there and frankly as a political reporter. I appreciate that kind of candor. Here it makes my job a lot. Easier joe kellyanne started working. The phone and his story came together pretty quickly. Board members told him. This ten decision was stuck in committee at the behest of republican state lawmakers as that big donor to unc chapel hill. The one with the journalism school named after him. Walter hudson walter husband is a very influential graduate of journalism school himself. He is He's given enormous amount of money to that school and he's very plugged in and conservative circles. I know you interviewed walter. Hussmann what did he say. Video about his role husband has got this very interesting affect you said. He's folksy he's very folksy. It's like talking to mr rogers with a mix of bill clinton. He's like hey. I got i got. I got a note here. You're looking to talk to me. I'm happy to talk to you. Well let me let me lay out for you. What happened here really. What happened is i didn't do anything wrong. I you know. Had some conversations offered my opinion but when when wins up when when is a alum- alumni of the school. Not allowed to do that. And i said well you know most of the school wouldn't have the inside track on who's being hired. They certainly wouldn't have access to the dean the chancellor they wouldn't have the school named after them nicole. Hannah jones is an alum if she called somebody up and said here's i think you should hire. They'd say i'm sorry. Who is this you know. They certainly wouldn't say oh well by your leave it out. You know i had this. I had this very long. You know polite conversation with him. It wasn't hostile in any way wherein he just said. There's nothing wrong with anything i did. I i wasn't lobbying for anything. And i said well. Would you describe to me how you weren't lobbying. And he's like well. All i did was. I had a conversation with the dean. We're gonna try to convince her. This was a bad idea. Then when that didn't work i. I sent up to five emails that i can remember to the chancellor the vice chancellor for charitable giving also to remember the board of trustees. But i wouldn't call that lobbying for an outcome. I wasn't trying to influence their decision. It just sounds like he's deeply divorced from acknowledging his own power. Yeah you know. I find that in my line of work. I find that there are two types of very powerful people powerful people who badly want you to know how powerful they are and then there are people who are very powerful. Who want you to understand that really. They have no power and he's the latter. I would say that. He's the latte in the end. Walter husband's desire to keep nicole. Hannah jones off campus got overwhelmed by public pressure. Local reporting like joe's was being read by unc students including the student body president. Who insisted unc's board finally hold that tenure vote but by the time they did nicole. Hannah jones had seen the chancellor of the university. Stay quiet about the whole saga. He was walking a political line so even though the university did offer her tenure finally she rejected it and instead henna jones took a job at howard university the mecca of hp in the us cited. Well i've decided to decline the offer of tenure. I will not be teaching on the faculty of the university of north carolina chapel hill. They're difficult decision. Not a decision i wanted to make. It's pretty clear that my tenure was not taken up because of political appointees because of discriminatory views against my viewpoint and on my race gender. And let's say should. I think it's important to say here. That nicole hannah jones has spent her whole life as she said herself being asked to fit into white spaces at fence. The second grade. When i being bused into white schools. I've spent my entire life proving that i belonged in elite weiss basis that we're not built for black people and i decided i didn't want to do that anymore. That i i was so brought in by your reporting is that you've really made clear how this controversy over nicole hannah jones. Tenure is really just the latest issue on the unc campus. Both with the boards but then also just in the school itself like in the last few years very recently. There's a controversy over a confederate statue. And i think. I think if you told the details it might be unbelievable to some people what happened. I wonder if you'd tell that story. Yeah well so. There's a confederate statue was a confederate statue on the campus of the university of north carolina A nicknamed silent. Sam that stood on the university grounds for one hundred years is a statute with a very shameful history. It is supposed to commemorate people who were students at the university who joined the civil war in the confederacy. it was placed there the university Not right after the civil war. But during the sort of flush of the jim crow era when people were really adopting this lost cause ideology and trying to glorify.

Hannah jones carolina journal nicole university of north carolina Martin center martin centre martin sinner joe kellyanne unc chapel hill Walter hudson walter james g mr rogers hannah Hannah general assembly North carolina Jones nicole hannah jones north carolina bill clinton
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"For tenure.

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Td ameritrade where smart investors get smarter. Joe killian thinks about nicole. Hannah jones in the university of north carolina. He doesn't think about what happened this year. He thinks about a much younger nicole. Hannah jones before the awards before the sixteen nineteen project became a political lightning rod back when nicole hannah jones. I came to unc as a graduate student nicole. Hannah jones attended the university of north carolina at chapel hill. She she got her masters there. She's a tarheel. Yeah when she was a grad student in journalism school at unc chapel hill. She really thrived and she really started to become a journalist and she credits the university with watt and so she's always as she worked her way slowly up from the chapel hill. News to the durham bureau of the news. Observer to the oregonian propublica new york times along the way winning every major were journalism the peabody the polk award national magazine awards the pulitzer prize. She is maintained that relationship with you. See she's come back and giving commencement speeches to journalism school. She's come back in. Guest taught guest lectured classes. Her either be well. Society is based out of n. Say she cofounded that in its headquartered at safe so the dean of the journalism school susan king who is herself a pioneering woman in journalism began to think you know. Let's bring her back here in a. Let's set up a knight chair for people who don't know the. The knightfoundation endows professorships night chairs. They bring working professionals. In media reporters producers people who work in media to universities to share their professional expertise in the classroom and traditionally they get the protection of tenure which means they have a lifetime appointment right. It's not the case with every night. Sharon it's not the case at every school but at unc since the early eighties when they started this program there every single night. Chair has gotten tenure. And it's been presented to applicants that way and it's never been a problem and all of the applicants have been white. This is the the first black person the first black woman who is up for one of these and it's the only one that has come up against this sort of assistance and it sounds like when the dean offered this potential position to nicole hannah jones. She was initially you know she has a good job in new york and she had to think about it but then decided to really throw herself into the application process teaching classes and going through multiple votes from faculty and other people. What is that process. Typically like this tenure process is incredibly rigorous. Not only do you have to come and do all this things you were talking about where you come to teach you submit things people who you don't even know right things about whether you'd be a good candidate in our people who are faculty members at other universities. The faculty in the department has vote. The tenure committee has vote. she passed unanimously through. All these things so it goes up to the to the chancellor and the provost level of chancellor in the provo recommend her. There's nobody in this process. That has a problem with this so far. So where did the trouble start. Well there was sort of a whisper campaign you know. She's such a prominent persons such a prominent journalist and sixteen nineteen projects in the new york times especially has been the focus of such political ire on the political right. I mean leading political figures. Refer minting as sort of a second satanic panic has to do with critical race theory and the idea that white children are going to be taught to be embarrassed of their history and they wanna make us ashamed of america. Kelo school districts are now using the sixteen nineteen project from the new york times for example a curriculum. That project is the work of an out of the closet. Racial extremists called nicole. Hannah jones the president. Donald trump specifically denounced it teaching this horrible doctrine to our children is a form of child abuse and briefly. I should just say that the sixteen nineteen project. The idea of it is that the country was really founded when slaves were first brought to this country and that that is uniquely american experience that has shaped the country ever since. Yeah that's not a bad way of putting it. I mean not in a literal sense. She sang a better way of thinking about the founding of the country is through looking at its relationship with slavery. And for that you've got to go to sixteen nineteen so that is in this. Racial moment that we're experiencing in this country been very controversial and she's one of a few prominent black journalists and scholars who have taken the brunt of the hit from conservatives on this so because that is the case in because she's such a known quantity it got around that they were pursuing her. Yeah what did this whisper campaign look like i began hearing about it because there were some people in conservative circles. Who were talking about it. They were kind of gearing up to prevent this or make it an issue. One of the things that happened was that there was a conversation between dean. Susan king of the j. school and walter hudson walter. Hudson is an arkansas media. Magnate whose family for a couple of asians has owned and operated a lot of newspapers television stations in arkansas. His name is also on the j. School at unc y- because in two thousand nineteen he donated twenty five million dollars. Pledged twenty five million dollars to the school. They named it after him. It's now the hussmann. Unc husband school of journalism in media and they also agreed to etch what he calls his core values of journalism into a wall at the school. And these are primarily about objectivity and you know restoring faith in journalism things that sound really good sort of on their face if you are abstract ideas once you begin to learn what husband thinks they are and how could be weaponized to attack journalism. He doesn't like Becomes kind of a different story so hussmann calls the dean. And says hey. I've heard that this is where it gets. Super strange husband doesn't call the team. The dean calls husband And says we're thinking about hiring nicole. Hannah jones he says well. I don't much like that idea. Here are my concerns. I'd like to see nineteen project. I'm concerned historians have said that they have some problems whether they think that they're eight historical things in it you know. She says well listen. It's got its critics. They've answered those criticisms. You know we're gonna make the decision here ourselves a good one. He says well. I disagree with you. She says while. I disagree with you. I guess we're gonna have to respectfully disagree. Do they do that not so much. What husband does is contact the chancellor kevin gus quits. He contacts the vice chancellor who's in charge of charitable giving at the university so he goes over her head at yeah and he also sends emails that he sent to them to the board of trustees who will ultimately be responsible.

Hannah jones nicole hannah jones nicole Joe killian unc unc chapel hill durham bureau of the news chapel hill oregonian propublica new york polk award national magazine a susan king ameritrade Kelo school watt new york times dean Sharon provo Susan king
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Joe's got an answer for that. I primarily think of as a political story.

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

"The wall street journal's michael bender wrote his book about trump's twenty twenty defeat one section stuck out as the most difficult telling the story of what bender dubbed hell week and a half those the ten days on twenty twenty that started with the super spreader event in the rose garden included trump's disastrous debate with joe biden in cleveland and then trump himself obviously testing positive for cova a few days later. It's not just that it was a lot to fold together. It's that simply figuring out. What happened was maddening. How early he tested positive. How sticky was during that time. These are serious questions with national security implications that very few people knew or had hand knowledge of and i had competing versions from senior officials. Serious people who all were telling me different versions of that story. That struggle bender explains itself emblematic of the trump administration. That deception wasn't just with the public. It was literally from person to person inside the west wing. And that's the story not necessarily worrying about exactly what happened benders book. Frankly we did win. This election is one of many trying to pull order from trump's chaos. Another nightmare scenario comes from the washington. Post yasmeen abu talib and damian pauleta about trump and cova. Abu talib agreed that it was hard to discern the truth from dozens of conflicting stories which made it all the more striking when they did find consensus on the white house's corona virus response of the more than one hundred eighty people we spoke to you. There wasn't a single one who defended the collective response according to princeton presidential historian. Jillions eleazar telling the story of the trump white house means not just recounting news-making moments the racist statements the allegations of sexual assault the impeachments plural. But making sense of it. Why america's political system have room for so much chaos over a four year period. Which is like this big puzzle. I don't think everyone's totally grappled with and it's not just journalists and historians trump administration insiders will try to explain their place in history. That's according to keep her bond. A co founder of javelin a literary agency that represented bender former un ambassador john bolton and former fbi director. James comey with more to come. I think it does require for people who worked in the trump presidency to wrestle with some of the moral compromises that they had to make by serving in that administration writing. The history of aliki live tweeted. Presidency has been unusual for a variety of additional reasons. There's book industry. Tumult simon and schuster employees protested the publishing giants printing. Mike pence's book. In addition trump could still run for president again which may be why he has given at least twenty. Two book interviews. As axios recently reported there was also a trump era boom in political book sales now however those sales are down sixty percent from the second half of twenty twenty according to market research firm. Npd but that doesn't mean interest will disappear according to javelin co founder matt latimer for example next year or a dozen or more books coming out about president nixon. I mean i think long after we're all on people trying to figure out what the hell this is all about. It's been forty seven years. Since nixon resigned by that same math will be reading new trump books into the late twenty sixty s and probably beyond danielle. Kurt lieven npr news. Pulitzer prize winning journalist. Nicole hannah jones is going to howard university. The new york times reporter and creator of the sixteen nineteen project will be the new knight chair in race and reporting at the revered historically black college. Her decision comes after her alma mater. The university of north carolina at chapel hill denied her. Tenure prompting an outcry that the decision was based on her race and gender nicole. Hannah jones joins us now. Welcome back to here. Now thank you. Thank you for having me. And congratulations on your new position at howard university. What's the message. You're sending with your decision to go to howard after the very public tenure controversy at unc. So i of course. I love the university of north carolina. I was very excited to return back to my alma mater. The place that really launched my journalism career and to teach there. But i was denied initially the vote on tenure by the board of trustees which are politically appointed by the republican legislature and it became a very kind of ugly in public battle where political appointees. We're not voting on my credentials. But because of political reasons they didn't like the nature of my work. And i just decided you know at the age of forty five heavy worked my self through the ranks of my profession having achieved very high level of success in my profession that i was just unwilling to keep fighting that battle that i really wanted to take my talents and the resources i could bring and bring them to an institution that was actually built for black uplifting. Black excellence that wasn't built in opposition to the work that i wanted to do and me as a human being since the nineteen eighties. Nobody had ever been denied. Tenure at unc in the position you were offered you talked about this political process. Did anyone at the university. Tell you why they didn't offer you. Tenure no and this is also part of my decision making you know. I understand that. The political situation around the university of north carolina's not been good for about a decade now. And it's one thing when political appointees interfere in the process but it would have been something else had the leadership of the university namely the chancellor and the provost of spoke out publicly and demanded that i be treated like every other night chair. All of them who are white before me and that didn't happen and not only did they not publicly speak up but privately they were not transparent with me about why i didn't have my ten year. Package voted on in november. When it was supposed to have been voted on the first time orange january and to this day no one in leadership at the university has explained to me what happened and why i was treated differently than everyone else would come before me. You talked about your an alarm of. Unc talked about how how much you love it there. You love the tar heels. This lack of transparency obviously was difficult. How did it feel to go through that process. You know it was. It was humiliating. I didn't speak out about what happened to me. I didn't want everyone to know that. I was the first night chair in the history of that position. To be denied tenure. So it was it was humiliating personally professionally to be treated that way by your alma mater..

trump bender cova michael bender Unc yasmeen abu talib damian pauleta Jillions eleazar James comey aliki axios javelin co matt latimer Abu talib rose garden joe biden howard university Kurt lieven npr news Nicole hannah jones
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and you are npr dow. And i'm jane clayson it's here now. Haitian president giovanelli. Louise has been assassinated in his home in port-au-prince he was shot dead his his wife. First lady martine moe's was also shot. There are conflicting reports about her condition. The news was confirmed by the country's acting prime minister claude. Joseph for more we're joined by. Npr's carrie kahn. Who's been covering the news from mexico city. Hi carey good morning. What do we know about what happened this morning. Sorry good afternoon. It's been a long morning definitely. this happened about one. Am haitian time. Eastern standard time A group of armed heavily armed men attacked the presidential residency. Went in and shot the president What we have seen videos that have been circulating About the attack from a neighbors cameras and what is most stunning is that you hear the people talking in spanish and you actually do here some english to And those videos have been identified as as from the neighbors and they saw actually when the when the attack happened as he said. The first lady was taken to a local hospital. Do we know anything about a potential motive here behind this assassination including a possible coup attempt. it is. It's too soon to say right now. I was just listening to a press conference with haiti's ambassador to the us bow. She add mon and He did mention that. The first lady has survived the attack. That's the information that he has and that she is getting ready or is being transported to a miami hospital at this time but he was quick to warn that it is too soon to talk about potential motives. He kept repeating and we've heard that from haitian officials that these people were speaking in spanish and so that is unusual considering that haiti the language in. Hey haiti is french or krill. And so there's concern about who these assassins were and he and how they got out of the country. He said the airports have been closed in possibly. They snuck across the border into the dominican republic but as a potential motive there The president jovem wave had enough enemies. political enemies that the situation. The political situation in haiti has been in turmoil for months. Some would say years over in over a lot of instances but mostly because many of his political opponents believe he is not a still a valid in his term. It's l- illegitimate presidency. He was elected in two thousand sixteen but he was. He did not take office until two thousand seventeen and so each term is a five year term so his opponents say he is out of office in two thousand twenty one this year but because there were had been such a delay in him actually taking office because those elections were marred by controversy and allegations of corruption. He says that he's he didn't start until two thousand seventeen so he his rule is extended to twenty twenty two and so that has been a constitutional question and such a difficult situation in haiti for for quite a long time and there are plenty of opponents that believe he is ill. He had been illegitimate in holding office. This long president biden condemned the assassination. Today he called it a heinous act in a statement. He said quote. We stand ready to assist as we continue to work for a safe and secure haiti. How has the rest of the international community responded kerry. Well condolences have been flooding in from all over the place i. I'm here in mexico getting from the president. The foreign minister everybody has sent. Condolences has been shocked throughout the region. Especially in the caribbean that a sitting president would be assassinated by foreign mercenaries that appears to be so. There's shock and there is just a outpouring of condolences. There's also a question about the stability of haiti at this time. And what will happen in the aftermath of this. The haiti's ambassador to the us. In this. Call that. I was just on was saying that. They have asked the us for assistance. He did not specify exactly what that assistance would be but he says they have been asking for the last six months and help with the security situation in haiti that had deteriorated greatly in the last few months Gangs in the country Control great of of the capitol and very important points in in haiti and that had been a big problem the asian. Embezzle did say something interesting. That i did not know. He said that the president moi's had recently given an interview to a spanish language outlet where he said he had received threats and that he feared for his life. I had not heard that before. Well the president's death was confirmed by the acting prime minister claude joseph whom always were placed. Just a couple of days ago as you mentioned what did you make of that. Yeah this is also. I hate to say it. But this is a situation in haiti. Were who is in. Charge is always confusing. There's is very many times very confusing right now. the new appointed prime minister was set to take power today. But now what is going to happen so there. There is no clear path on constitutionally. What happens although. I'm sure people will disagree about that. So the haitian ambassador to the. Us said there is discussions going on and they're trying to figure out what will happen but at the time at at this time closures. The acting prime minister is in charge of the country right now and he's left to lead the country at this point. I guess well we'll have to see what happens because as i said he. The the new prime minister was set to take power at this time at today. Sometimes so it's it's confusing. We'll have to see. But i think the main issue and the main point that everybody's worried about is the security situation in the country right now. We'll continue to watch. Npr's carrie kahn reporting from mexico. City carrie thank you very much. You're welcome thank you. Well anyone who collected unemployment benefits this year could be eligible for low cost or even free health insurance plans through the affordable care. Act this benefit is part of the nearly two trillion dollar american rescue plan than president biden signed into law back in march joining us. Now.

haiti carrie kahn jane clayson giovanelli martine moe Npr npr mexico city Louise au carey prince Joseph dominican republic us Embezzle miami claude joseph biden
Nikole Hannah-Jones Declines UNC Tenure Position and Will Join Howard University

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Declines UNC Tenure Position and Will Join Howard University

"On and off the University of North Carolina at Capitol Hill at Chapel Hill, the school boards the school's board of trustees voted to grant tenure two Pulitzer Prize winner Nicole Hannah Jones. She's the author behind the 16 19 Project for The New York Times. At first, the University board declined to hold a vote on the issue. Hannah Jones spoke exclusively to CBS this morning about how the decision has impacted her life. It was embarrassing to be the first person Should be denied tenure. It was embarrassing, and I didn't want this to become a public scandal. I didn't want to drag my university through the pages of newspapers because I was the first and the only black person in that position to be denied tenure. In the end, Hannah Jones has chosen to come here to D. C S. Howard University to teach instead, Dave Preston

Nicole Hannah Jones Hannah Jones University Board University Of North Carolina Capitol Hill Chapel Hill Pulitzer Prize Board Of Trustees The New York Times CBS D. C S. Howard Dave Preston
University Trustees to Vote on Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

University Trustees to Vote on Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure

"It became a national controversy and now you NC Chapel Hill trustees could vote today on whether or not to approve tenure for Nicole Hannah Jones the journalist behind the new York times sixteen nineteen project on slavery and racism university leaders had said had a Jones's tenure application was halted because she did not come from a quote traditional academic background and a trustee wanted more time to consider her a prominent donor revealed he had emailed university leaders challenging her work as highly contentious and controversial which others have said as well the black journalists one a Pulitzer Prize for her work on the sixteen nineteen project and said she would not start work in July at UNC Chapel Hill with out tenure black faculty staff and students have said the university does not value them I'm Julie Walker

Nc Chapel Hill Trustees Nicole Hannah Jones The New York Times Jones Unc Chapel Hill Pulitzer Prize Julie Walker
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Worked for generations so that they could become independent so that they could make their own money and be independent of the white people who had ruled over them and there were black men who had served in the Union army. There was a meeting that was held between some of these men, and some generals from the army, and they asked well what? What do you want and what they said is we want land. We want land so that we can be prosperous, and and be our own people so General Sherman takes that to heart, and he issues field order, number, fifteen and field order number fifteen declares that black families will get forty acres of former confederate land, and that they will be able to. To work that land, and actually at the time it was alone. It wasn't even being given to enslave people. It was it was on. They would eventually make enough money and pay for the land, and for a brief period of time. This is what happened. a small number of former slave people in the Georgia. Sea Islands in coastal. South Carolina. Had the land that they had once worked for white people turned over to them, and they began to farm it, but unfortunately That period was very very brief. President Lincoln was assassinated, and he was replaced by his vice president. Andrew Johnson who was a southerner who was a white supremacist, and who believe like many white Americans at the time that black people were deserving of after slavery, that they should be grateful for their freedom, and he skated the land and return the land to the former confederates, and that ended the only real effort in the history of this country to provide reparations for those who have been enslaved and it really left. Formerly enslaved people in absolute devastating poverty, there are stories of math starvations of black people after they had been freed having to leave the plantation and find shelter and burned out buildings of trying to forge for food in burned out field It was a devastating period for black people in this country decided that it was going to do nothing that owed these people nothing. And the black people who had been enslaved had worked their lives for no pay, no property no right to. Keep their family together and slavery ends, and they get nothing. They're left with nothing. Exactly I mean think about this..

Union army President Lincoln Sea Islands General Sherman vice president Andrew Johnson South Carolina Georgia
"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"nikole hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today we talk with Nicole Hannah Jones. WHO created the new? York Times. Sixteen nineteen project marking the four hundred hundred for Serie of the beginning of American slavery when a ship carrying enslaved Africans landed in the English colony of Virginia. This ongoing project includes essays, videos and PODCASTS, reflecting on the history of slavery and its legacy. Hannah Jones won a Pulitzer Prize last month for the essay. She contributed to the project. Her new article for the new. York Times magazine is headlined. If true justice inequality are achieved in the US it must finally take seriously what it owes black Americans. She'll tell us why she concludes the article by saying. It's time for reparations and we'll talk about her family's story..

Nicole Hannah Jones York Times Terry Gross whyy Pulitzer Prize US Philadelphia Virginia