5 Burst results for "Nico Newman"

"nico newman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:09 min | 4 months ago

"nico newman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Try to understand this ecosystem Better first, we will need a guide. Sure my name is Tim Huang H w A N G. My day job is I'm a research fellow at the Center for Security and emerging technology at Georgetown. And before that, Was previously global Head of public policy for a I in machine learning at global, long recently published a book called Subprime Attention, Crisis Advertising in the Time Bomb at the heart of the Internet. It's about how big tech monetize is our attention. When I started to do research, by very naturally started to talk to a couple friends who work at these big tech companies, and it was a little bit like talking to someone who works in national security or the intelligence community or something like that, because they would be like, Oh adds definitely work, but we can't tell you how or why, or give you any evidence for it. Google would plainly dispute that there is no evidence for whether online ads work. Tim Wong recognizes he is tilting at windmills here. Trillion dollar windmills. But in fact, he first grew skeptical about online advertising. While still working at Google. He began reading trade journals and going to conferences and I had this fascinating experience with one of these key notes at this conference was given by Nikola German who Basically is a big ad critic Nico Newman is a marketing professor at the Melbourne Business School in Australia, and he presented to really fascinating studies that his lab had done. The first one was looking into the quality of data used in the ad tech industry, basically demonstrating in many cases, it was incredibly accurate. And the second one was he took dead aim at the type cycle around a I that exists in ad tech right now, where people are saying, If you have this latest machine learn, and you have to say, I you'll be able to do targeting in a way that you never ever were able to do before. And Nico's lap, did some experiments that demonstrated that in many cases, machine learning was finding people who would have bought the product anyways. Bringing this message to an ad tech conference is a bit like bringing a safety pin to a balloon conference. I looked around being like way. So when people be angry, and it was just total dead air, no one responded. No one engaged with it. And it got me really interested in thinking about like, Is there a bubble here? Bubble like the dot com bubble or the subprime bubble or the tulip bubble. Because this is exactly the kind of behavior that occur in other financial bubbles where the red lights are flashing. But everybody in the street just refuses to take a look at the real data long began thinking about how bubbles happen. So the origins of every bubble come in this cap that occurs in a marketplace. On one hand, you have people who believe that an asset whether it's collateralized debt obligations or advertising inventory is extremely valuable. And then, on the other hand, what you have is declining asset value. So in the subprime mortgage crisis, we believed that mortgages were always going to just pay out regularly forever, right when it actually turned out that the package of mortgages were actually a terrible asset. They were toxic and about to go belly up. So how can one justify a parallel with digital advertising? I think the first piece is really the big question of do people ever see ads at all? So Google actually did a fascinating study not too long ago, which concluded that close to 60% of ads on the Internet are never ever even seen. The ad is delivered, but it just ends up in some dumb part of the page. Right. It's below the fold. It's along a sideline, but what about the precise targeting the digital ads are supposed to offer? 2019 study, this one done by three academic researchers addressed this question by measuring the impact of a user's cookies. Those remember are the tracking codes that most of us allowed to roam our computers and phones in exchange for all the free information we get from companies like Google and Facebook. This study found that when a user's cookies were unavailable, ad revenues on Lee dropped by about 4%. Why would cookies be so ineffective? Tim Wong argues that people pay a lot less attention to online ads and they used to people often forget that when banner ads were first launched on the Internet there, click through rate was like 50% completely mind bending right and it's just continued to fall and fall and fall and now it's like 500.12 point. 03%. Some estimates of click through rates are higher than what Hong sites here. That said precise measurement is hard because there are so many bots clicking on adds a whole other problem with the digital ad universe. But no matter how you measure it, click through rates have fallen a lot. As the novelty wears off habituation sets in, and an ad that might have once grabbed your attention becomes invisible or worse. Annoying. People increasingly don't want ads. So ad blocking, for example, is really, really increasing over time. And I think these factors not being able to see ads, the questions about the effectiveness of ads and the rise of things like ad blocking, bring into question whether this thing that we think is so valuable. Is actually worth as much as we think it is. But if there's such a big gap between the perceived and real value of digital advertising, why are Google and Facebook worth so much money? Look at it this way. There are a couple trillion reasons why Tim Wong might be wrong. He doesn't think so. His theory is that digital advertising is grotesquely overvalued because it is still so hard to measure and one reason it's hard to measure is that the marketplace is exceedingly opaque. So there's a fascinating incident that I always think about, which is one of the last times that Mark Zuckerberg was called up to Congress and one of the questions that he got from one of the senators was. How do you guys make money? How do you sustain a business model in which used to stump pay for your service and Mark's hacker? Berg was like.

Google Tim Wong Crisis Advertising Nico Newman Tim Huang H Facebook Mark Zuckerberg global Head Georgetown research fellow Center for Security Australia Melbourne Business School Nikola German Berg Lee
"nico newman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:48 min | 4 months ago

"nico newman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"G. My day job is I'm a research fellow at the Center for Security and emerging technology at Georgetown. And before that I was previously global head of public policy. For a I'm machine learning at global, long recently published a book called Subprime Attention, Crisis Advertising in the Time Bomb at the heart of the Internet. It's about how big tech monetize is our attention. When I started to do research, by very naturally started to talk to a couple friends who work at these big tech companies, and it was a little bit like talking to someone who works in national security or the intelligence community or something like that, because they would be like, Oh adds definitely work, but we can't tell you how or why, or give you any evidence for it. Google would plainly dispute that there is no evidence for whether online ads work. Tim Wong recognizes he is tilting at windmills here. Trillion dollar windmills. But in fact, he first grew skeptical about online advertising. While still working at Google. He began reading trade journals and going to conferences and I had this fascinating experience with one of these key notes at this conference was given by Nicholas Newman, who basically is a big ad critic. Nico Newman is a marketing professor at the Melbourne Business School in Australia. And he presented to really fascinating studies that his lab had done. The first one was looking into the quality of data used in the ad tech industry, basically demonstrating in many cases, it was incredibly accurate. And the second one was he took dead aim at the type cycle around a I that exists in ad tech right now, where people are saying, If you have this latest machine learn, and you have this AI, you'll be able to do targeting in a way that you never ever were able to do before. And Nico's lap, did some experiments that demonstrated that in many cases, machine learning was finding people who would have bought the product anyways. Bringing this message to an ad tech conference is a bit like bringing a safety pin to a balloon conference. I looked around being like way. So when people be angry, and it was just total dead air, no one responded. No one engaged with it. And it got me really interested in thinking about like, Is there a bubble here? Bubble like the dot com bubble or the subprime bubble or the tulip bubble, because this is exactly the kind of behavior that occur in other financial bubbles, where the red lights are flashing, But everybody in the street just refuses to take a look at the real data. Long began thinking about how bubbles happen. So the origins of every bubble come in this cap that occurs in a marketplace. On one hand, you have people who believe that an asset whether it's collateralized debt obligations or advertising inventory is extremely valuable. And then, on the other hand, what you have is declining asset value. So in the subprime mortgage crisis, we believe that mortgages were always going to just pay out regularly forever. Right when next you turned out that the package of mortgages were actually a terrible asset. They were toxic and about to go belly up. So how can one justify a parallel with digital advertising? I think the first piece is really the big question of do people ever see ads at all? So Google actually did a fascinating study not too long ago, which concluded that close to 60% of ads on the Internet are never ever even seen. The ad is delivered, but it just ends up in some dumb part of the page. Right. It's below the fold. It's along a sideline, but what about the precise targeting the digital ads are supposed to offer? 2019 study, this one done by three academic researchers addressed this question by measuring the impact of a user's cookies. Those remember are the tracking codes. Most of us allowed to roam our computers and phones in exchange for all the free information we get from companies like Google and Facebook. This study found that when a user's cookies were unavailable, ad revenues on Lee dropped by about 4%. Why would cookies be so ineffective? Tim Wong argues that people pay a lot less attention to online ads and they used to people often forget that when banner ads were first launched on the Internet there, click through rate was like 50% completely mind bending right and it's just continued to fall and fall and fall and now it's like 500.12 point. 03%. Some estimates of click through rates are higher than what Hong sites here. That said precise measurement is hard because there are so many bots clicking on adds a whole other problem with the digital ad universe. But no matter how you measure it, click through rates have fallen a lot. As the novelty wears off habituation sets in, and an ad that might have once grabbed your attention becomes invisible or worse, Annoying. People increasingly don't want ads. So ad Blocking, for example, is really, really increasing overtime. And I think these factors not being able to see ads the questions about the effectiveness of ads. And the rise of things like ad blocking, bring into question whether this thing that we think is so valuable is actually worth as much as we think it is. But if there's such a big gap between the perceived and real value of digital advertising Why are Google and Facebook worth so much money? Look at it this way. There are a couple trillion reasons why Tim Wong might be wrong. He doesn't think so. His theory is that digital advertising is grotesquely overvalued because it is still so hard to measure and one reason it's hard to measure is that the marketplace is exceedingly opaque. So there's a fascinating incident that I always think about, which is one of the last times that Mark Zuckerberg was called up to Congress and one of the questions that he got from one of the senators was. How do you guys make money? How do you sustain a business model in which used to stump tape your service and Mark's hacker? Berg was like Senator we run as and at the time. A lot of the chatter on Twitter was like, Ha ha! Look at the super Old senator, he doesn't know anything about the Internet. But it's true that even if you talk to people in the tech industry, and you're like, Okay, level with me, Joe Engineer how do ads work on the Internet? It's kind of a rumor like we know this is how the business model works, but no one can really explain how it works in detail. So when I say advertising a lot of people normally think of like mad men, right, but it really looks like what the NASDAQ looks like, which is largely automated system that moves millions and millions and billions of pieces of ad inventory on a daily basis. As Steve today, Ellis explained earlier. Most ad inventory is sold by auctions, which are run by algorithms operating at phenomenal speed. This is one contributor to the opacity of the industry..

Google Tim Wong Nico Newman Crisis Advertising Facebook global head research fellow Mark Zuckerberg Georgetown Center for Security Nicholas Newman Twitter Australia senator Melbourne Business School Long
"nico newman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:20 min | 4 months ago

"nico newman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"How or why are you any evidence for it. Google would plainly dispute. There is no evidence for whether online ads work. Tim wong recognizes. He is tilting at windmills. Here trillion dollar windmills. But in fact he. i grew skeptical about online advertising. While still working at google he began reading trade journals and going to conferences. And i had this fascinating experience. Where one of these keynotes at this conference was given by nicole. Newman who basically is a big ad. Critic nico newman. Is a marketing professor at the melbourne business school in australia and he presented to really fascinating studies that his lab had done the first one was looking into the quality of data used in the tech industry basically demonstrating in many cases. It was incredibly inaccurate and the second one was he took dead. Aim at the hype cycle around a that exists in tech right now where people are saying if you have this latest machine learning. You have this. You'll targeting in a way that you never ever were able to do. Before and nico's lap did some experiments that demonstrated in many cases machine. Learning was finding people who would have bought the product anyways bringing this message to an ad tech conference is a bit like bringing a safety pin to a balloon conference that looked around being like ways so where people angry and it was just total dead air. No one responded no engaged with it and it got me really interested in thinking about like. Is there a bubble here. A bubble like the dot com bubble or the subprime bubble or the tulip bubble. Because this is exactly the kinds of behavior that occur in other financial bubbles where the red lights are flashing but everybody industry just refuses to take a look at the real data. Wong began thinking about how bubbles happen so the origins of every bubble come in this gap that occurs in a marketplace on one hand. You have people who believe that. An asset whether it's collateralized debt obligations or advertising inventory is extremely valuable and then on the other hand what you have is declining asset value so in the subprime mortgage crisis. We believed that mortgages bro is going to pay out regularly forever right. When next turned a package of mortgages were actually terrible asset there were toxic and about to go belly so how long justify parallel with digital advertising. I think the first piece is really the big question of do people ever see ads at all. So google actually did a fascinating study not too long ago which concluded that close to sixty percent of ads on the internet are never ever even seen the ad is delivered but it just ends up in some dumb part of the page. Just below the fold there it's alongside line. But what about the precise targeting. The digital ads are supposed to offer a two thousand and nineteen study this one done by three academic researchers addressed this question by measuring the impact of a users cookies. Those remember are the tracking codes most of us to roam our computers and phones in exchange for all the free information we get from companies like google and facebook. This study found that when users cookies were unavailable ad. Revenues only dropped by about four percent. Why would cookies be so ineffective. Tim wong argues that people pay a lot less attention to online ads and they used to. People often forget that when banner ads. Were i lost on the internet. There click through rate was fifty percent completely mind-bending right and it was just continue to fall and fall and fall and now it's like point zero one. Two point zero three percent. Some estimates of click through rates are higher than what hong sites here that said. Precise measurement is hard because there are so many bots clicking on adds a whole other problem with the digital ad universe but no matter how you measure it. Click through rates have fallen a lot as the novelty wears off habituation sets in and an ad that might have once grabbed your attention becomes invisible or worse annoying. People increasingly don't want ads. So ad blocking for example is really really increasing over time. And i think these factors not being able to see ads the questions about the effectiveness of ads and the rise of ad blocking bring into question whether thing that we think is so valuable is actually worth as much as we think it is but if there is such a big gap between the perceived and real value of digital advertising. Why are google and facebook worth so much money. Look at it this way. There are a couple trillion reasons. Why tim wong might be wrong. But he doesn't think so. His theory is that digital advertising is grotesquely overvalued because it is still so hard to measure and one reason it's hard to measure the marketplace is exceedingly opaque. So there's a fascinating incident. That i always think about which is one of the last times. That mark zuckerberg was called up to congress and one of the questions that he got from. One of the senators was well. How do you guys make money. Sustain a business model in which users don't pay for your service and mark zuckerberg was like senator. We run out and at the time. A lot of the chatter on twitter was like ha ha. Look at the super old senator. He doesn't know anything about the internet. But it's true that even if you talk to people in the tech industry and you're like okay level with me joe engineer. How do ads work on the internet. It's kind of a rumor like we know. This is how the business model works but no one can really explain how it works in detail so when i say advertising a lot of people normally think of madman right but it really looks like what the nasdaq looks like which is largely automated system moves millions and millions and billions of pieces of ad inventory on a daily basis as steve to dallas explained earlier. Most ad inventory is sold by auctions which are run by algorithms operating at phenomenal speed. This is one contributor to the obesity of the industry. for instance. It can be hard to figure out why certain ads and up on certain pages if you are a family-friendly brand like disney you don't want your ad popping up on a youtube video showing a terrorist beheading. This has been a.

Google Tim wong nico newman facebook senator mark zuckerberg melbourne business school australia nicole disney twitter youtube professor engineer dallas
"nico newman" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

05:51 min | 4 months ago

"nico newman" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Ecosystem functions whether it's as effective as google says it is or as ineffective has researchers like steve dallas told us earlier about his research at ebay. Ebay believed that for every dollar. They're spending they're getting fifty cents of net profits and what we showed that on average. They're losing more than sixty cents on every dollar so okay. let's try to understand this ecosystem better. I we will need a guide. Sure my name is tim. Kwong h. w. a. n. g. My day job is. I'm a research fellow at the center for security and emerging technology at georgetown and before that i was previously global head of public policy for ai and machine learning at google one recently published a book subprime attention crisis advertising in the time bomb at the heart of the internet. It's about how big tech monetizes our attention. When i started to do research by very naturally started to talk to a couple of friends who work at these big tech companies and there was a little bit like talking to someone who works in national security or the intelligence community or something like that because they would be like oh adds definitely work. But we can't tell you how are y or give you any evidence for it. Google would plainly dispute that. There is no evidence for whether online ads work. Tim wong recognizes. He is tilting at windmills here. Trillion dollar windmills. But in fact he. i grew skeptical about online advertising. While still working at google he began reading trade journals and going to conferences and this fascinating experience. Where one of these keynotes at this conference was given by nicole. Newman who basically is a big ad. Critic nico newman. Is a marketing professor at the melbourne business school in australia and he presented to really fascinating studies that his lab had done the first one was looking into the quality of data used in the ad tech industry basically demonstrating in many cases. It was incredibly inaccurate and the second one was. He took dead. Aim at hype cycle around. Ai that exists in ad tech right now where people are saying if you have this latest machine learning you have this ai. You'll give the targeting in a way that you never ever were able to do before and nico's lap did. Some experiments have demonstrated that in many cases machine learning was finding people who would have bought the product anyway anyways bringing this message to an ad tech conference is a bit like bringing a safety pin to a balloon conference that looked around being like where so angry and it was just total dead air. No one responded no one engaged with it and it got me really interested in thinking about. Is there a bubble here. A bubble like the dot com bubble or the subprime bubble or the tulip bubble. Because this is exactly the kinds of behavior that occur in other financial bubbles where the red lights are flashing but everybody industry just refuses to take a look at the real data long began thinking about how bubbles happen so the origins of every bubble come in this gap that occurs in a marketplace. On one hand you have people who believe that. An asset whether it's collateralized debt obligations or advertising inventory is extremely valuable and on the other hand what you have is declining asset value so in the prime mortgage crisis believed that mortgages rose gonna just pay out regularly forever right. When next turned the package of mortgages were actually a terrible asset. There were toxic and about to go belly up. so how can wong justify a parallel with digital advertising. I think the first piece is really the big question of do people ever see ads at all. So google actually did a fascinating study not too long ago which concluded that close to sixty percent of ads on the internet are never ever even seen the ad is delivered but it just ends up in some dumb part of the page. Right is below the fold their sideline but what about the precise targeting. The digital ads are supposed to offer a two thousand nine thousand nine hundred study this one done by three academic researchers addressed this question by measuring the impact of users cookies. Those remember are the tracking codes. Most of us allowed to roam our computers and phones in exchange for all the free information we get from companies like google and facebook. This study found that when a user's cookies were unavailable ed revenues only dropped by about four percent. Why would cookies be so ineffective. Tim wong argues that people pay a lot less attention to online ads and they used to. People often forget that when banner ads first loss on the internet there click through rate was like fifty percent completely mind-bending and it's just continue to fall and fall and fall and now it's like point zero one. Two point zero three percent. Some estimates of click through rates are higher than what sites here that said precise measurement is hard because there are so many bots clicking on adds a whole other problem with the digital ad universe but no matter how you measure it click through rates have fallen a lot as the novelty wears off habituation sets in and an ad that might have once grabbed your attention becomes invisible or worse annoying. People increasingly don't want ads. So ad blocking for example is really really increasing over time. And i think these factors not being able to see ads the questions about the effectiveness of ads and the rise of things ad blocking bring into question whether his thing that we think is so valuable is actually worth as much as we think it is but if there is such a big gap between the perceived and real value of digital advertising. Why are google and facebook worth so.

google Tim wong nico newman ebay facebook Kwong h. w. a. n. g steve dallas melbourne business school australia research fellow nicole georgetown professor global head
"nico newman" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"nico newman" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"We were told to calculate or just to perform basic arithmetic operations and I got the highest notes. I got a ten out of ten. This is Nico Newman. When he was in high school in Argentina his favorite subject was computer science. I promised my parents study was going to be a a Robinson cleans the house but like many people on the spectrum. Nico had difficulty connecting with his peers at school so after three years of frustration isolation he approached his parents with proposal dot com. I don't want to go to school anymore because I feel it is not doing good for me. It took some convincing. But they agreed when he dropped out and I have a lot of free time. So that's when I realized that I also liked to to learn by MYSELF NICO. Eagerly dove into online programming tutorials. I got off the fundamental floor. Howard computer works. How do you run a program? How efficiently manage suffer resources after two years of teaching himself to Code Nico went on the Job Hunt? His psychologist encouraged him to apply to sap. I was selected to be the first wait with the L. decent work programme. Sap's autism at work programme leverage the unique perspectives of people on the spectrum to foster innovation through the program. Niko joined the accounts payable department as an analyst. His job was to process thousands of invoices a day one day NICO had an idea to make the process more efficient an idea that would put his coding skills to good use. He wanted to bring it to his manager but he still felt nervous. Navigating social situations thankfully. Sap had a mentorship system in place to support employees on the spectrum. We are here to help our colleagues in many different ways now not only to socialize but also to solve any problems. That's Bianca Nicos Mentor. He asked her for guidance. He says hey. We are doing these process in a very manual way. So I'm going to automate these and I say okay. Well go ahead. Research suggests that when managers give people freedom instead of saying. That's not my job. They're more likely to expand their roles to take the initiative to develop and implement new ideas with his manager's approval Nico spent two months building a computer program that would automate how. Sap process invoice payments. When he was finished he ran some tests at work. The efficiency gains were huge. It was really successful. We have three full lace on. We reduced time of processing to just a couple of minutes accounts payable started using Nicos Program regularly then a CO worker nominated him for the Hasso plattner founders award. The most important recognition for innovation and employees can receive at sap after multiple rounds of interviews and voting. Nico was selected as a finalist. He was invited to the award ceremony in. Germany Newman Patnaik and you have. I think one hundred thousands of employees watching the events. You can imagine how it feels overwhelming to so many people watching you congratulating so really thankful was like a Rockstar. You know everybody wants to ask him for self fees now. He super confidence you know. I'm I'm really proud of him. Change everything my idea was to develop these just for the era that I want for identity. That was going to be this huge impact today. Nico is finally getting to do what he's always wanted programming full-time for sap. Or I think the most important thing was support from Connex giving flexibility on the the time to develop this and see the results on once. You have the results. You can just continue to expand. Sap is a trailblazer for autism inclusion in the workplace and is inspiring other organizations through the SAP autism inclusion pledge. It's no surprise that. Sap earned over two hundred employer of choice awards in two thousand nineteen checkout careers. Sap learn more about experience management solutions for your employees and customers at sap dot com slash. Work Life.

Nico Newman Sap Newman Patnaik Bianca Nicos Hasso plattner Nicos Program Argentina Connex Howard Niko analyst Germany