17 Burst results for "Nicki Hello"

"nicki hello" Discussed on Johnjay & Rich On Demand

Johnjay & Rich On Demand

05:21 min | 2 weeks ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on Johnjay & Rich On Demand

"Crystal god. Love my father in law but every morning is morning walk is he goes by mcdonald's drive through and walk the drive thru specifically just to pick up change. He's done it so many times that they told me why. You're walking drive through like this. Every day employees therapists straw hat or a hawaiian shirt. So i think that's part of. He's got a new balance on just one old man walking for guy you know the thing about also the other things that we pay parking. What sucks is when you can't reach. The machine got to happen to me. Took my son college. And i was an there was two lanes to go in and i made a turn because some lady was like go round. Go round her things broken so had to go round. But i was too far from the thing. And it's like where it's inconvenient. You open the door. You're not close enough. So i had i get out sell to behind you. Stern you so stressful out care if there's loose change of employer not else like deleted. Because i felt so stupid story that awkward part we just there you can't. You're too close and things that eh. Just embarrassing so we're gonna play true. Crime trivia eight seven seven nine three seven one four seven john dean rich. Okay we're gonna play to trim trivia is our contestants. Hello nicki hello. Payton is the host of this game peyton. How do we play this game so we are going to be playing true crime trivia. I am going to give each person a question and you guys will give me your answer if you get it. Correct you get one point. And if you get an incorrect somebody has a chance to steal part name will be our buzzer at that point. Okay okay all right nikki. Are you already. You'll go after kyle. We'll start with the john. Jay then to you rich suzette kyle and then you nikki. Okay okay all right john. J what was john wayne. Galaxies last meal cakes incorrect was a bucket agassi. mcdonald's chicken. iq what's up. What do you think about that of candy tickets. That is correct making a bucket of kfc chicken. Y'all gret great. Did you know that question. What is johnny gators last meal. You didn't even know that fancier killers have question all right. So how old was the youngest who has sent to death in the us. So that had to be like lizzie. Borden no twenty one. Eighteen years old is is correct. Answer so you are incorrect. Nobody nobody judge judge. Eighteen jason on onboard. Judging i'd all right suzanne what sport did aaron hernandez play before he was convicted of murder. Football and that is correct. That is on the board with one point kyle. You're okay all right ronald defeo. Junior killed six of his family members in one night. Which horror film franchise was based off of this event. Okay i don't know who that was a. Don't watch many horror films so i'm going to say oh i got. I don't know any of those freddie. No the guy. The guy with the face. Jason versus the shining and that is incorrect blah. John jay's correct amny john the board with one point all right nikki. Are you ready. I'd also okay. What year did the oj simpson. Trial take place. Nineteen ninety seven in that is incorrect. Kyle.

john dean rich nicki hello mcdonald suzette kyle nikki johnny gators Payton Stern peyton kyle john john wayne kfc ronald defeo Jay Borden aaron hernandez lizzie suzanne jason
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:44 min | Last month

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Hello and welcome to this day in esoteric. Political history from radio topa. My name is jody advocate this day august tenth. Two thousand six. The incident actually happened on august eleventh. Two thousand six. George allen was on a campaign. Stop in drake's virginia near the kentucky border george. Allen was running for reelection as virginia senator. He had also been virginia's governor but today he stephan it because on this day in two thousand and six. He was caught on camera. What was he caught on camera doing peter hamby he was saying. Give big welcome to my friend macaca over here. Welcome to america. And the real world of virginia or something. Something like that. That is of course. The voice of peter hamby who we have on because he does such good george allen impersonation buddha's the george allen in the world but now peter hamby is political journalist host of good luck america at snapchat contributor to the new outlet puck news but also i think a great fit for this conversation because he is to my mind one of the best chroniclers of how new media and new technology has transformed politics and that in many ways is what the story is about an early viral moment. That truly changed an important election. So peter hamby. This is your formal intro. Thank you for doing this. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks for having me. I'm happy to geek out on this. Yes and also virginia native which we which we can get into as well nicole hammer and kelly card jackson are here is always hello. Nicki hello kelly hello jody. Hey there and a quick shot to our listener. Jacob barisan for suggesting that we do this or reminding us that we should do this. Thank you jacob. Thank you to our listeners. Who give us suggestions so peter. Let's talk about this a bit as a media moment I suppose one thing we should define is. There is a person by the name of s sedov. Who's very young just out of college. Maybe still in college and he is at this. George georgiana event in the capacity of what is known as a tracker. So what is what does he tracker. And how does it fit into this political moment. Yeah that's a great question because it really signals a pivot and campaign. politics trackers are pretty commonplace now and they might not. They might even be obsolete because they're just cameras everywhere all the time but In the two thousand six race trackers were pioneered by democratic campaigns who were increasingly at least among younger. More clever staffers using the internet and in video In a way that republican campaigns weren't yet and so s ours. Dr who was an undergrad. Uva fairfax was in south west virginia with george allen And i went back and looked at this. He had just been following tracking allen's campaign for like five or six days before. This macaca moment happened. Would basically he would stand in the back of a rally you know sometimes with the press corps sometimes when the press corps wasn't even there as i think was the case with this incident just recording on a mini..

peter hamby george allen virginia macaca jody snapchat nicole hammer Nicki hello kelly Jacob barisan stephan america drake George georgiana kentucky Allen kelly jackson jacob Uva fairfax peter
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

06:31 min | 7 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Hello and welcome to this day in attorney political history from radio. My name is jody africans. This day march fourth eighteen fifty five in istanbul turkey. A sanitary commission arrives at a hospital that is treating wounded british soldiers. From the crimean war. Is that both was noble at the time. A song about that anyway. The soldiers at this hostel were dying at an alarming rate and not just from their rooms but from illness conditions in the hospital were horrific and nurses at the field hospital. Were doing all. They could to stem the tide. Among the nurses was florence nightingale perhaps the most famous nurse in history and this moment this experience in hospitals during the crimean war would help establish her reputation not just when it came to nursing but when it came to data visualization as well because florence nightingale was able to tell a story through data and graphics about how conditions at the hospital began to improve so really fascinating story when the has lots of interesting echoes for today so he has to discuss as always. Is nicole. hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and kelly carter jackson of wellesley. Hello kelly and their and our special guests for this episode. Is tim harford Writer economist He's done many many wonderful things that i am. A fan of the latest book is called the data detective and his podcast is called cautionary tales. The new season of the podcast has the story of florence nightingale and data viz and the new book. I gather has a chapter on that as well so tim. Thank you for doing this. This is great. It's my pleasure special guests. I like that. Let's go to call you so so guests. Well look if all the guests special then well okay are increasingly difficult guests. Tim harford escalated quickly. Okay so take us to this moment. And then we'll get into the whole world of data viz since we do want to hook it to a moment march eighteen fifty-five there is this battle in crimea and a sanitary commission shows up in istanbul. Why is this a an interesting moment to you tim to me. It's an interesting moment. Because this is the pebble that launches an avalanche of both public health reform that saves millions of lives and also triggers a revolution in data visualization. And an. both of these things. Start at this moment and there's not much sign of it at the time. The basic problem in istanbul is that the way from the front line. Istanbul is not in crimea. But it's the hospitals in. Istanbul are in a terrible state in charge of the nursing. Those hospitals is florence nightingale. Probably still the most famous nurse in the world and she is requested help to clean up. The hospitals and arriving at the hospitals comes sanitary commission. It's their job to sort everything out and nightingale later tells a story about what happened. She tells that story using graphs and that story becomes incredibly influential important moment in just the sanitation revolution. I to take listeners back. It's time in which you know there. Ours are open. Sewers running around this Hospital there are carcasses everywhere of dead horses and different things and in a pre germ theory era. The idea that these are exacerbating the spread of infectious diseases is just not something. People have totally gotten yet and so even though it seems so straightforward to us today nightingale was doing something kind of revolutionary here. Yeah i mean. They found a dead horse in the water. Pipe supplying water to the hospital. That's not sugar coat. It and i think e even then there was the sense of. That's probably not good at be problems. But they didn't have a theory of germs. That comes later. Robert kark louis pastor. That comes a twenty thirty years later so there were various ideas about what was going on. And the idea that nightingale had was actually. It's all about bad smells and so. She's very interested in ventilation so they don't really know how to clean up these hospitals. They don't really know what will help. And what won't help. But they try a few things and but what to me. I think is fascinating. Is that having done. This and the results seemed to be great. I mean enormous numbers soldiers dying in these hospitals. The mortality was i think early in eighteen fifty five. It was more than fifty percent of the soldiers who showed up then died and almost all of them died of disease not of wounds. But why this is a story about more than just the crimean war or more than just this couple of hospitals in istanbul is because nightingale then takes experience back to london back to the british empire where she is one of the most famous people in the whole british empire and she says we learned some lessons and we need to clean up not just those hospitals in istanbul but every hospital not just every military hospital but every civilian hospital and we need to clean up the barracks and we need to clean up the slums. I've seen these things but not only. Have i seen these things my own eyes. But i've got the data. And i'll show you the data and i will show you the data in a way that you will not be able to argue it. And the reason she needed to make this argument very concrete and very persuasive was because although she was very famous in beverly influential. She's a woman in a man's world and the military establishment and the medical establishment. Don't like what she's saying. They were embarrassed and they think this is the kind of thing you may have heard. During the time of corona virus. People are saying things like well. You know there's not really anything we can do about these deaths. yes yes sure. People die these infectious diseases. But what can you do. People are gonna die. Just suck it up and nightingales. No this is. These are preventable deaths and we prevented them out in istanbul. And i'll show you how we prevented them and we.

Jody kelly Tim harford tim harford nicki Robert kark louis istanbul london florence nightingale nicole Istanbul crimean war twenty thirty years later kelly carter jackson tim march fourth eighteen fifty fi one istanbul turkey both more than fifty percent
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:50 min | 8 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"This episode is brought to you by express. Vpn stop handing over your personal data to isp's and other tech giants who mine your activity and sell off your information. Protect yourself as i do with express. Vpn go to express vpn dot com slash. This day support for this show comes from new podcast seizing freedom from vp. 'em seizing freedom. Tells the story that you may not know about what happened during the end of slavery in america. You'll hear how formerly enslaved americans made freedom real by organizing for equity and justice during the civil war and reconstruction despite the attempts at violent suppression. This podcast is built around personal accounts to illustrate just what was at stake for a nation and reveals unsettling parallels in the fight for political and social justice. Today listen now seizing. Freedom is available on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher or wherever you find your favourite show. Hello and welcome to this day in esoteric. Political history from radio topa. My name is jody. Aggregate this day february seventh eighteen twenty eighty six formerly enslaved people boarded a boat headed from new york to freetown sierra leone. This was the first trip sponsored by a private group. The american colonization society that seeks to help free slaves return to west africa namely to the region that would come to be known as the country of liberia here to discuss the acs. How actually complicated the abolitionist movement here. In the united states and the back to africa movement in general is as always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and kelly carter jackson of wellesley. Hello kelly hey there So calling you wanna start by painting a picture of this moment. Eighty six people getting onto this boat. What do we know about them. And what do we know about this trip. So it's eighty-six people men women and some children and these are formerly freed slaves. Many of them who were born in the united states here who have never lived in africa before let alone in liberia and they're making the long pilgrimage of what could be considered a reverse middle passage back to africa We know during this time it takes about three to four weeks depending upon whether To get back to the west coast of africa they leave during pre terrible time. It's february it's winter it's cold We know that a lot of people onboard board. The ship get sick. This is not the best time to travel considering that conditions but when they get to liberia i mean a whole new world opens up for them and it and it starts the story of More and more africans making this pilgrimage will back to africa and a really interesting story of colonization because the experience is one that we're used to when we think about the colonization of what would become the united states a lot of the people who arrived in liberia over the first twenty years or so died like two thirds of them died because the conditions were difficult Building a society is pretty hard to do and they were living in this colony. That was owned by the american colonization society. Which is a a weird thing this private colony africa. Yeah and you know. I think the image of it being a reverse middle passage. I've heard i've heard this ship referred to as the mayflower of liberia as you were hinting at nikki But the sponsor of this the acs the american colonization society Kelly what do we know about this group. Why is it popping up. And what are it's whatever. Its fundamental goals. So we know that the acs was founded in eighteen sixteen by robert finley and he really had emission of returning slaves to africa and rubber finley. A white a white man we oh yes robertson as a white man the mission i should be clear is not really abolition. This is mad about you know responding to the atrocities of slavery. But how do we deal with free. Black people. a lot of black were not on board with the eighth. This was all so many black americans head were just that americans. They had been born in the united states and they were unwilling to leave the country of their birth for this unknown land. But it gets a lot of buying by quakers in particular and by white elites even white slaveholders who don't really know how to deal with free black people and believed that the presence of free black people will run counter or conflict with their Enslave property this is such an important point because it wasn't that this was a benevolent society. That was trying to just do the best for these people. It was about cleansing. The united states of free black people. And that was how you're going to deal with slavery. There were some people in this group who wanted slavery to end. They just want there to be any black people left in the united states when that happened. Yeah that's why. I always tell students. There's a difference between being anti slavery and abolitionist like you can be anti-slavery because you think the institution of slavery is wrong. Or you think it undercuts free labor. It doesn't mean that you're like pro black by any means And those are two different Categories people who are anti slavery people who were abolitionists who wanted the overthrow of the institution of slavery and there is also somewhere in here. My sense that there's also this kind of like well meaning liberal problem right Where you know as you were saying. Kelly like You know maybe even people who who were abolitionists or or slavery At but you know had this notion of rather than confront the question of slavery and deal with the fact that these men and women are. Now americans You know instead. Have this perhaps well-meaning idea of what will send them back to africa And sort of put netherland patronizing way and the idea that they're christianizing the continent so there's a big sort of like this is a little early for for white man's burden but the idea that we're bringing christianity to this continent in that you know we're somehow saving souls in the process of doing this. People believe that. This was the lord's work. Mickey can you talk a little bit more about this. Tensions between abolitionists and groups like the acs and these back to africa groups. Yeah i mean. As kelly was saying definitely anti slavery groups were much more moderate. A lot of them were like slavery will end eventually and we will deal eventually with the end of slavery. We won't do things to help. Spread slavery across the continent. But let's not get crazy here. Go about like abolishing slavery overnight and abolitionist really No it's a moral evil and it should go away tomorrow and if we have to take up arms to make that happen that might be what we need to do. Because this is a fundamentally corrupt and immoral and violence system. And until it's gone. The united states is basically constructed on and continuing to live a lie about freedom a lot of prominent politicians though were kind of supporters or at least open to what the acs was trying to do. Including abraham lincoln who i think pretty early on expressed A notion i mean. I think he's quoted as saying you know if it were up to me i would free slaves and send them all back to africa And so. I wonder if i don't know if this is the right way to frame it but you know. Is there a way of of seeing the way. Abraham lincoln progressed through the slavery. Question as maybe seeing this as a gateway drug to at least it's sort of gets you thinking about fronting this.

robert finley new york africa Jody robertson abraham lincoln Kelly nicki kelly america Today Mickey west africa Eighty six people Abraham lincoln jody first trip tomorrow two thirds eighty-six people
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Hello and welcome to this day in ece turk political history from radio topa. My name is jody advocate this day. February fourth nineteen seventy-three president. Richard nixon signed endangered species. There had been a couple preservation and conservation. Laws passed sixties. But this was truly the landmark with the spotlight on extinction of plants and animals can the pressure on government to preserve species but the habitats in which they live one historian referred to it as quote the magna carta of the environmental movement. We haven't done an episode on the magna carta on this podcast but listeners. I think you can pick it up from context clues. You get the gist. This is very important. I wanna give a shout out to the bald eagle the red wolf. The san clemente indian paintbrush the big. Bend gam bouza the hawaiian goose. All of these are species that have bounced back after initially being on the endangered species list and here to discuss it all is always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody longtime fan. We should say the virginia big eared bat. You've always talked. Keep bringing it up on the podcasts. Now's your chance. Yeah but it's to balance the fact that i'm also a longtime enemy of the big ben gam bouza's that's right. Well that's unfortunate because kelly carter jackson wellesley. You are a fan of the gambler. Gambler is ideal again. Boozy as referred it is a fish. It's a fish. Good guess but yeah. So so look. Let's talk about this act. And i think it tells us some really interesting things about how view environmentalism and how that's changed but let's let's start in nineteen seventy-three nikki Why do you think that was the time for this. Landmark preservation act so. This really was building online a few years of very intense environmental activism. And we'll get into this. But nixon had done a lot signed into law a lot of different Bills about the environment. The endangered species act is an interesting end note to his environmental activism. Because it really is like bell. Last thing that he does on the environment He's himself not really an environmentalist but they got him with the lake. The bald eagle is dying and so he was one over on this. Act the same way that a lot of people are one over two endangered species protections or you point to this charismatic metaphor l like a panda or a crying eagle and suddenly that becomes the thing that's emotionally fueling you to support protecting endangered species kelly. What's your sense of. What kind of environmentalist. Richard nixon once. Well we think about a lot of the landmark legislation. That's coming out of this. It's it's huge. And i think it's things that we don't necessarily connect with nixon today so he creates the epa. He signed the clean air act and the clean water act. He endorsed earth day. And so these are all legal actions that i think now serve take for granted a little bit but at the time you know they were unprecedented and they were major moves to protect things that were being polluted at a gross levels and so when we think of the fact that the american eagle or could have been extinct that at the time he signed at this particular act there were only four hundred and eighty seven nesting partners in the united states. And now there's over four thousand. i mean. This legislation has huge consequences and the context of how public sympathy can. I towards environmentalism is really important and this was also a moment when i think the ohio river right famous the river in cleveland that caught on fire i was just a couple of years before and they were just like these big very easy to get your head around moments of environmental disaster. And we'll get to this. But you know so much of what we're talking about now when it comes. Environmentalism is a little harder to see as a little harder to anthropomorphized. Or whatever. And so i think it relates to some of these challenges but it did feel like nikki. There were some very clear battle. Here's a very simple levers to pull like like you were saying. Save this cute animal. And we're just gonna put it on a poster and talk about it for a while. He and i think that we forget. How just filthy. The united states was before all this legislation you mentioned the cuyahoga river which had caught on fire. There was a huge oil spill in santa barbara ruined the beaches People were polluting everywhere. It was really normal. You've saw this if you watched madman lakey. Littering was just something that people did. As a matter of course so america was trash. And there were some efforts to beautify under the johnson administration. This was lady bird. Johnson's big thing. But there was a much bigger like it was litter that caught the river on fire. It was that you were filling it with oil and all of these other toxins and so those very visible images along with just add one more thing space exploration and being able to see the full planet and the kind of beauty and fragility of the planet. Those images Really do inspire a sea change in how people think about the environment. I mean we're talking about something that people did not care about in the late nineteen sixties. Have you pulled them in the late. Nineteen sixties one. Percent of americans said that this was the most important issue to them. And it's twenty five percent just a few years later so it's a it's a moment of a real cultural shift with huge political implications. I think part of that too is because so many people thought that resources were inexhaustible that you could just keep using over and over again or killing animals are taking away the claiming that these are regions. These animals lived in and that there were no consequences. And so i think people don't realize is that this legislation didn't just protect like animals and fish but also like plans and you know the lakes and our drinking water systems. Like all of that is is related. And that actually does seem to be really important. Knockoff effectiveness it. Did sort of expand that you know that that vision of habitat being important. Not just specific animals. I mean seemed simple. Now that like animals have to live in in a habitat. But i think that from reading about the legacy of this. It really did expand that understanding of environmentalism. That said i think that's also one of the places. Where nixon i think really kind of like yes. He enacted all this legislation. We've been talking about but you know when push came to shove. He was on the side of exploitation and extraction and business. you know and there's so many remarkable quotes from him where he's derides environmentalists and he basically says if it comes down to like smoke versus jobs we're going to choose jobs But i think that there's some political winds shifting here. And i want to get out in front of this and this might be an easy political winds so We spend a little rehabilitating warren g. harding's reputation. I last episode. I don't want to spend too much time. Rehabilitating nixon's environmental reputation on this episode. Yeah no we shouldn't look he's he's a very transactional politician and so the the huge popularity of environmentalism and the repentiti with which people really started calling for these pieces of legislation. They mattered accents responding to that. Because he wants to win re election he actually calls all these environmentalist of the white house and he says all politics is a fad. Your fat is going right. Now get what you. And here's what i can get you. And they love that actually devolved into a shouting match between him and the head of the sierra club but it is this idea that all right. I'm open for business as richard. Nixon often is. I'm open for business. I wanna win reelection And also we should add that. He didn't have a choice on a lot of this stuff. Democratic congress was passing all of this legislation and occasionally overriding his veto. It's not like i mean with things like the epa. He definitely was was out there. He was making speeches about the environment but his hand was forced on a lot of this where he didn't want to spend quite so much and he definitely didn't want to hamstring business..

Richard nixon richard Nixon clean water act clean air act ohio river cleveland twenty five percent Landmark preservation act santa barbara Johnson sixties late nineteen sixties nicki today sierra club February fourth nineteen seven warren g. united states over four thousand
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

08:57 min | 8 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"January. Twenty six nine hundred sixty four margaret chase smith announces. That she's going to run for the gop nomination we've talked a little bit on this show about jfk. Being the first catholic to be elected president breaking a religious barrier of sorts margaret. Chase smith actually cited that in her speech as she tried to break the barrier and become the first woman placed into nomination by a major party which she did <hes>. She made it all the way to the convention and was placed into nomination. She was also eminently qualified to run for president. She had been in congress as a representative for maine for over twenty years longer than any of the men running for the gop nomination that year <hes>. Sense is that when people list trail-blazing female politicians margaret chase. Smith's name doesn't maybe come up right away but she is a very fascinating character. We're gonna talk about her now and her nineteen sixty four run with as always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and kelly carta jackson. Hello kelly f so nikki. Paint the paint sketch of this nineteen sixty four run. And then we'll talk about margaret chase smith in general. But why does she jump into this race in this moment. Nine hundred sixty four is such an interesting year because we talk about that election a lot. Because it's the faceoff between barry goldwater and lyndon b johnson and so margaret chase smith kind of gets forgotten. But as you're saying she was someone who had served the first woman actually to have served in both the house and the senate she'd been there since nineteen forty and in nineteen sixty four. She throws her hat in the ring. She says you know kennedy. Showed that catholics. do this. i'm going to show that women can do this and she was pretty upfront with the fact that the prospects were not good for her to win the republican nomination <hes>. She didn't have a big group of <hes>. Didn't have a huge campaign staff. She didn't have any money should really want any money but what she wanted to do was she wanted to be the first. She believed that if the first woman made a bid for the presidential nomination that many many women would follow not sure that exactly panned out the way that she thought. But i think that it was. It was important understand that that's how she saw her candidacy as a barrier breaking moment. I think that oftentimes we sometimes want to dismiss women that are making these symbolic political runs. But i think in some ways we can say that she opened up the space for shirley chisolm who does take a serious run at the presidential campaign in nineteen seventy two. And so you know these moments that we sometimes are inconsequential. I think we can pay them forward into the future and see the ways that they can play out or at the very least prepare people to think about what it might look like feel like to have a woman in the highest office in the country just to paint the picture of sometimes. When you talk about i it can be a little complicated. I see it right. We have done episode about shirley chisolm before and she was a. I obviously a black woman but also she was the first woman who won a primarily margaret chase smith <hes>. Did not win any primaries. She got twenty five percent of the vote in illinois. but as mickey said she didn't really but she was the first to stay all the way through the convention and then at the convention she actually i think has a little bit of a showdown with goldwater refuses to release her support to goldwater. She ends up entering the formal nomination. And that's her first <hes>. Trail-blazing is not a zero sum game. Everyone gets to a hold that mantle here but just to clarify a little bit <hes>. But nikki you know there is that showdown with goldwater at the sixty convention. What does that tell us about her politics. And her place within the gop of the early to mid sixties so she and barry goldwater were in the senate together and gold wise a staunch conservative or rock ribbed conservative him and he was the entering wedge for turning the republican party into a much more conservative party than it was in nineteen sixty four and people like margaret chase smith who were much more moderate. I mean she's somebody who voted for the civil rights act leader in her career. She would vote for the equal rights. Act she somebody. Who stood up against joe mccarthy in nineteen fifty when she was still in the house and announced his red baiting in his attacks on people by suggesting that they were communist so she was someone who was a bit iconoclastic. She was a moderate and she was worried about the growing and vitriolic conservatism. That was taking root in the gop <hes>. So she wasn't just making a stand as a woman but she was making a stand for the moderate and liberal wings of the party every like this quote by her where she says. I don't want to see the republican party ride. It's a political victory on the four horsemen of colony. Fear ignorance bigotry and smear. And i think is really cool. Is that you know. She supported increased educational funding. Civil rights medicare. She voted in favor of the civil rights. Act in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven sixty sixty four sixty eight she also was huge proponent of the twenty fourth amendment which banned the poll tax amazon also huge support of the voting rights act of nineteen. Sixty five. She supported the confirmation of thurgood marshall to the us supreme court. And she's a huge proponent of space so when we think of the nasa administrator james e webb he wants commented that the united states would never played a man on the moon. Had it not been for smith so when we think about hers. The highest ranking republican fischel and the <hes> aerospace committee. You know this is a powerful woman. Who's making huge strides in terms of progressive. Yet it's such a good reminder of how different the republican party once looked her husband when he was in the house in the nineteen thirty support. It is kelly was just saying she supported things like social security and medicare and medicaid and a lot of the great society initiatives and it's just a reminder that the parties were sorted very differently back then <hes> and it's also a reminder that women from maine in the senate ben iconoclast from the very beginning she. She seems like also a little bit of a hawk to raise. She really pushed kennedy to be a little more aggressive with nuclear weapons negotiations. And the and sort of you know <hes>. Having a little more teeth in the threats of using nuclear weapons against the soviet union. So yeah. I think just a really fascinating character it. We should actually talk about one of those moments when she stood up against kennedy was after the berlin crisis in nineteen sixty one when kennedy refused to use nuclear weapons against the soviet union and she goes onto the floor of the senate and she says you have to be more willing to use this kind of weaponry. She says it in short. We have nuclear capability but not nuclear credibility because nobody believes that. We're actually going to use these. Weapons and nikita khrushchev over in. The soviet union is not happy about these comments. He ends up calling her the devil in disguise of a woman. I'm so she was <hes>. Not a dove margaret chase smith managed to piss off kennedy and khrushchev at the same time quite an accomplishment running the gamut so nicky as we start to wrap up. I wanna talk a little bit about legacy but also just about female politicians within each party. And i mean the gop has really fascinating legacy of women who have achieved high office and run for high office. Obviously sarah palin was on a presidential ticket a lot of people look to nikki haley as possibly someone who's really going to be in a position to run <hes>. In the future so you know how just paint that picture of the of the legacy of republicans democrats and women politicians within those two parties so the republican party in the nineteen forty s and the nineteen fifties and many ways was the party of women. <hes>. it was the party. That was defending reproductive. Rights for instance <hes>. It was the party that was i think it was the first to support formerly the equal rights amendment. So after the feminist movement of the nineteen seventies things start to change a bit and people start to get confused because they don't separate out women and feminists <hes>. So as the republican party becomes more and more anti-feminist people start to be surprised that they are women in the republican party and there are certainly many fewer elected women in the republican party but there are a lot a lot who as you just mentioned have been very prominent in the republican party and because we're not paying attention to women in the republican party. Sometimes i think we miss movements like the creation of the pack maggie's list which was actually named after margaret chase smith and was founded in order to raise money for conservative women to be elected to federal office. And so it's fascinating that that both is a project that is happening. But also that margaret chase smith somebody who wasn't a conservative but was a prominent republican is the one who gets it named for that list

Jody sarah palin lyndon b johnson shirley chisolm kelly carta jackson Chase smith Smith amazon khrushchev twenty five percent nicole nicki barry goldwater illinois joe mccarthy nineteen sixty four four horsemen kelly nikki haley mickey
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:38 min | 8 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Twenty six nine hundred sixty four margaret chase smith announces. That she's going to run for the gop nomination we've talked a little bit on this show about jfk. Being the first catholic to be elected president breaking a religious barrier of sorts margaret. Chase smith actually cited that in her speech as she tried to break the barrier and become the first woman placed into nomination by a major party which she did She made it all the way to the convention and was placed into nomination. She was also eminently qualified to run for president. She had been in congress as a representative for maine for over twenty years longer than any of the men running for the gop nomination that year Sense is that when people list trail-blazing female politicians margaret chase. Smith's name doesn't maybe come up right away but she is a very fascinating character. We're gonna talk about her now and her nineteen sixty four run with as always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and kelly carta jackson. Hello kelly f so nikki. Paint the paint sketch of this nineteen sixty four run. And then we'll talk about margaret chase smith in general. But why does she jump into this race in this moment. Nine hundred sixty four is such an interesting year because we talk about that election a lot. Because it's the faceoff between barry goldwater and lyndon b johnson and so margaret chase smith kind of gets forgotten. But as you're saying she was someone who had served the first woman actually to have served in both the house and the senate she'd been there since nineteen forty and in nineteen sixty four. She throws her hat in the ring. She says you know kennedy. Showed that catholics. do this. i'm going to show that women can do this and she was pretty upfront with the fact that the prospects were not good for her to win the republican nomination She didn't have a big group of Didn't have a huge campaign staff. She didn't have any money should really want any money but what she wanted to do was she wanted to be the first. She believed that if the first woman made a bid for the presidential nomination that many many women would follow not sure that exactly panned out the way that she thought. But i think that it was. It was important understand that that's how she saw her candidacy as a barrier breaking moment. I think that oftentimes we sometimes want to dismiss women that are making these symbolic political runs. But i think in some ways we can say that she opened up the space for shirley chisolm who does take a serious run at the presidential campaign in nineteen seventy two. And so you know these moments that we sometimes are inconsequential. I think we can pay them forward into the future and see the ways that they can play out or at the very least prepare people to think about what it might look like feel like to have a woman in the highest office in the country just to paint the picture of sometimes. When you talk about i it can be a little complicated. I see it right. We have done episode about shirley chisolm before and she was a. I obviously a black woman but also she was the first woman who won a primarily margaret chase smith Did not win any primaries. She got twenty five percent of the vote in illinois. but as mickey said she didn't really but she was the first to stay all the way through the convention and then at the convention she actually i think has a little bit of a showdown with goldwater refuses to release her support to goldwater. She ends up entering the formal nomination. And that's her first Trail-blazing is not a zero sum game. Everyone gets to a hold that mantle here but just to clarify a little bit But nikki you know there is that showdown with goldwater at the sixty convention. What does that tell us about her politics. And her place within the gop of the early to mid sixties so she and barry goldwater were in the senate together and gold wise a staunch conservative or rock ribbed conservative him and he was the entering wedge for turning the republican party into a much more conservative party than it was in nineteen sixty four and people like margaret chase smith who were much more moderate. I mean she's somebody who voted for the civil rights act leader in her career. She would vote for the equal rights. Act she somebody. Who stood up against joe mccarthy in nineteen fifty when she was still in the house and announced his red baiting in his attacks on people by suggesting that they were communist so she was someone who was a bit iconoclastic. She was a moderate and she was worried about the growing and vitriolic conservatism. That was taking root in the gop So she wasn't just making a stand as a woman but she was making a stand for the moderate and liberal wings of the party every like this quote by her where she says. I don't want to see the republican party ride. It's a political victory on the four horsemen of colony. Fear ignorance bigotry and smear. And i think is really cool. Is that you know. She supported increased educational funding. Civil rights medicare. She voted in favor of the civil rights. Act in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven sixty sixty four sixty eight she also was huge proponent of the twenty fourth amendment which banned the poll tax amazon also huge support of the voting rights act of nineteen. Sixty five. She supported the confirmation of thurgood marshall to the us supreme court. And she's a huge proponent of space so when we think of the nasa administrator james e webb he wants commented that the united states would never played a man on the moon. Had it not been for smith so when we think about hers. The highest ranking republican fischel and the aerospace committee. You know this is a powerful woman. Who's making huge strides in terms of progressive. Yet it's such a good reminder of how different the republican party once looked her husband when he was in the house in the nineteen thirty support. It is kelly was just saying she supported things like social security and medicare and medicaid and a lot of the great society initiatives and it's just a reminder that the parties were sorted very differently back then and it's also a reminder that women from maine in the senate ben iconoclast from the very beginning she. She seems like also a little bit of a hawk to raise. She really pushed kennedy to be a little more aggressive with nuclear weapons negotiations. And the and sort of you know Having a little more teeth in the threats of using nuclear weapons against the soviet union. So yeah. I think just a really fascinating character it. We should actually talk about one of those moments when she stood up against kennedy was after the berlin crisis in nineteen sixty one when kennedy refused to use nuclear weapons against the soviet union and she goes onto the floor of the senate and she says you have to be more willing to use this kind of weaponry. She says it in short. We have nuclear capability but not nuclear credibility because nobody believes that. We're actually going to use these. Weapons and nikita khrushchev over in. The soviet union is not happy about these comments. He ends up calling her the devil in disguise of a woman. I'm so she was Not a dove margaret chase smith managed to piss off kennedy and khrushchev at the same time quite an accomplishment running the gamut so nicky as we start to wrap up. I wanna talk a little bit about legacy but also just about female politicians within each party. And i mean the gop has really fascinating legacy of women who have achieved high office and run for high office. Obviously sarah palin was on a presidential ticket a lot of people look to nikki haley as possibly someone who's really going to be in a position to run In the future so you know how just paint that picture of the of the legacy of republicans democrats and women.

Jody sarah palin lyndon b johnson shirley chisolm kelly carta jackson Chase smith Smith amazon khrushchev twenty five percent nicole nicki barry goldwater illinois joe mccarthy nineteen sixty four four horsemen kelly nikki haley mickey
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

08:03 min | 9 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Advocates this day january tenth nineteen eighty four the united states and the vatican established full diplomatic relations for the first time in one hundred seventeen years. We'll get into some of the details but the us and the vatican ties from george washington the beginning of the country up until eighteen sixty seven and then congress passed a law banning funding for any formal diplomatic relations with the holy see and then from eighteen. Sixty seven all the way to nineteen eighty-four. There were some informal meetings and personal on voice but it wasn't until this day in nineteen eighty-four under president reagan that a formal ambassador was appointed to the vatican then headed up by pope. John paul the second so here to talk about that moment and our relations formal and informal with the vatican is always nicole hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello jody. I am your local catholic correspondent. Okay great so we have this moment in one thousand nine hundred four but let's actually go back to eighteen sixty seven because That is the last time there were formal ties. What happens in eighteen. Sixty seven that the united states says. We don't want to form a relationship with the vatican anymore you know. There's not like a distinct thing that happens. It's just that there's this rising anti-catholic sentiment and this is one of the places that it expresses itself And so a lot of this is tied to the influx of immigrants from europe a lot of italian and german immigrants who are bringing catholicism with them and a real bigotry in the united states about and fear of catholicism. Something that is fundamentally anti-democratic and un-american yeah And is that centered in the northeast. A lot of New immigrants were coming or is there also a sort of i mean you think eighteen sixty seventy certainly think reconstruction is there a post civil war context to this as well. I mean it certainly happening all across the country because you know yes in the northeast where they're immigrants but also in the south which is heavily protestant area In the mid west where a lot of new immigrants are settling so this is not necessarily a localized phenomenon. it becomes pretty quickly Of an across the country phenomenon right. And certainly if you read about things like the rise of the ku klux klan and so forth as a deep anti catholic sentiment in there so you yes you were saying it's just sort of throughout the country. There's this real suspicion and theories and all these kind of insidious stories about catholicism as this as this threat. Yeah i mean. There's this real fear that catholics are fundamentally loyal to the pope over any political leader. And so they're taking orders from the pope that um with it comes to choosing between the united states in rome. They'll choose rome that they're trying to get funding for catholic schools they. Catholics are both trying to take over the united states but also fundamentally disloyal to the united states and that's the the rhetoric that you hear pretty much anywhere in the country in the late nineteenth century. I'm it becomes a slogan. An opposition to roman roman ism as anti-catholicism was not the time That's part of an anti-immigrant push but also part of a defense of the united states is a fundamentally protestant country and you know it's a reminder that think for certainly in the last generation or maybe two when you think of religious divides in this country you often think of christianity and other religions and you know obviously islam is a big part of sort of our political conversation around religion now this is a reminder that for so long it was protestants and catholics. Was the real big leaving within this country within christianity. Yeah absolutely i mean. Anti-semitism becomes pretty big in the united states particularly in the early twentieth century as they're more immigrants from places like eastern europe But certainly for the nineteenth century and you know well into the twentieth century the anti-catholicism of the us a defining feature of american politics. And you know when you think about what you were saying. These these rumors about catholics be more loyal to the pope. I mean certainly in modern political time at the j. f. k. election that seems to be the big flash point for that. I mean that. That was the big story around. Jeff cake rising political power right right so we should say. Catholics made their political home in the democratic party and so they began in the twentieth century to exercise. Power there in nineteen twenty eight. You get your first catholic candidate. Al smith who actually loses pretty badly So when john kennedy comes along there is the sense that like will. Protestants actually vote for a catholic. It's particularly clear. And so he goes out of his way to make clear the lake. I don't have a loyalty to the catholic church. I'm not going to. He actually says that he's not going to extend diplomatic relations to the catholic church because he doesn't want to bear the taint of catholicism He is running for president right and then when he becomes president. I mean you just you would think that we have decades and decades at this point almost a century of having diplomatic ties with the vatican. You'd think we finally have our first catholic president. He would be the one to take that step. But as you were saying i think he was so cowed by this charge and an over correcting to not feed this rumor that he was kind of almost the worst candidate to take that step and he was also informed by something that had happened just a few years earlier in nineteen fifty one harry. Truman had floated the idea of reestablishing these diplomatic relations. And what happens his baptist. Pastor denounces him publicly And there's this huge pushback from protestants in the country so even just a few years earlier the sentiment against embracing anything that seemed catholic was still suspicious in the united states and came at a political cost So before we get to what happens in the nineteen eighties in his changes. We've been talking mostly about the domestic considerations often political considerations or at least political refracted through religion There is an element of what's happening in italy and the vatican's role as both a diplomatic state and a religious state. Which i will say is often something that has kind of like been curious to me that it's able to or tries to walk these two sides But you know it does seem like that played a pretty key part in the. Us never taking that step at least for one hundred and fifty years or so of establishing formal ties. Yeah i mean. I think it's important to remember that. The late eighteen sixties where huge moment in italian history. Eighteen seventy one. The reunification process begins but part of that process is the papal states which were actually a pretty significant part of what would become. Italy are disbanded and the catholic church instead of controlling this large territory that could have diplomatic relationships with another country. For a lot of reasons. I'm gets shrunk down this tiny little city state And so when it comes to reestablishing diplomatic relations with the vatican. It's a very different prospect because it's no longer a political state. It's just a religious state in a lot of ways it's just this tiny little spot on the map and it's not the same kind of motivation to develop diplomatic relationships with which with what is fundamentally a religious state which would have been the only religion that the us had formal diplomatic ties to right right so if it had remained part of larger italy almost under the guise of relations with italy have a sort of deep relationship with the us government and catholicism. But because it gets narrowed down to just the state it becomes a little trickier politically. Because the papal state had ports and controlled land in net exports whereas again madigan city is just this tiny little place. Yeah for sure so. We get now to the early eighties. There's a larger geopolitical context but it also really does seem to have a lot to do with two people president. Reagan and pope. John paul the second and of relationship between.

us nicole hammer nicki hello jody vatican roman roman ism president reagan rome Jeff cake george washington John paul europe catholic church pope columbia congress un Al smith john kennedy democratic party italy
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:03 min | 9 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Hey everyone jody here. Over the next week the next four episodes were bringing you four of our fever conversations from this past year. Maybe you've heard them. Maybe you haven't but were taking this week off. Hopefully you are getting a little downtime. As well and then we will be back in twenty twenty one tuesday. The fifth of january is our first new episode of the year on behalf of everyone at the show happy new year. Thanks for listening. And we'll see assume hello and welcome to this day in esoteric. Political history from radio topi. My name is jody. Aggregate this day september thirteenth nineteen eighty eight democratic presidential candidate. Michael dukakis was touring. A general dynamics plant that assembled the m one tank during his tour his press team arranged for him to put on a green helmet and military coveralls over his suit. And kinda ride the tank around for a bit on the assembly plant. The cameras were rolling photographers. Were clicking away. And the next day an image of dukakis aboard the tank with the helmet plot down over his head this big goofy smile on his face. That image was everywhere and many of you have probably seen this image right now. Kind of came to define dukakis in many ways so here to talk about the tank photo. How very likely contributed to his blown. Lead and eventual loss to george h.w bush and in general the question of optics blown leads. How photo ops can go very very wrong here with us. Is nicole hammer of columbia. As hello nicki hello. Jody and our special guests were very excited to have her on. Amy walter national editor of the cook political report host of politics with amy walter from wnyc's takeaway. It's a friday political show. Which i really really love amy. So thank you for coming on and thank you for doing this excited. Thanks jodi so there's a lot of Facts here to get to the. I mean the one thing that jumps out to me. Is you know we're doing this on september thirteenth. I'll say the ad that focused in on this photo didn't run National until october eighteenth. I'm this seems late and to me. It's like a kind of reminder of the things that we remember from as defining political campaigns along those happen a lot later than we seem to remember when we think of campaigns is taking forever and ever and ever. I know an to think that a campaign would sit on this for a month right and the reality of what it meant to. Even i think just produce an ad now. You can do it in fifteen minutes from your laptop and doesn't have to go through the challenge of of making it as he did back in one thousand nine hundred like the physical reality is of putting an ad together. But i think it also highlighted this other piece. Jody that you pointed out. Which is you know. Folks really not keying in on the election until october that yes. These elections went on just as they do now with. You know you have conventions and you have candidates going out and about on the hustings all throughout the year but that folks were paying attention regular voters in october and didn't wanna spend too much time in september talking to people who weren't paying attention. Yeah this idea of the perpetual campaign where road to the white house. Specialists start like the the astor election day for years earlier. I mean that is a relatively reason phenomenon. This idea that voters are so tuned into politics that they just want that stuck into their arm via really really early. You don't have the same kind of twenty four seven cable news like cnn. Only eight years old at this point. It's still hasn't really figured out how to fill up all twenty four hours So there are a lot of changes on the horizon for campaigning. And we're just not there yet in one thousand nine hundred eight listeners. You should just make a listen your head of what you think of as the most of defining campaign changing moments and i almost guarantee all of them happened in late. September through late october So it is true that this stuff hits late. I also feel like it's important to point out that the stuff that hits hits because it's sort of landing in fertile ground in that ground has been sort of tilled over the course of months and months and years and years so those campaigning kinda matter but then the actual specific thing that we remember it feels like oh it changed the campaign like this photo. Yeah happen happened really late So maybe amy. We can talk a little bit about that in about the photo itself. I mean one thing. That's interesting to point out is. This wasn't necessarily like a gaffe. This was an attempted photo. On the part of the dukakis folks right yeah and again we forget in nineteen eighty eight. One of the top issues was the cold war and on that front when you looked at the polling dukakis really was very far behind George h w bush on the question of you know who do the best job on defense issues. So if you're thinking tactically as the dukakis campaign you say well we're ahead in the polls but we have a really clear weakness and that's on security issues and on defense issues and remember caucus was governor. So he didn't have that sort of national foreign policy experienced that you know other candidates have had so you say all right. Let's go do something that makes us look tougher security. It makes kind of perfect sense. But the other thing to note about dukakis is you know he went into the fall campaign after the primaries not particularly well known or well defined as naked pointed out you know we we think now of the fact that by the time we get to election day we've had four years of road to the white house coverage and everybody knows everything about these folks. By the time the fall heads but back in nineteen eighty eight new michael dukakis part of the reason he was leading by the degree that he was over push was that he was just assertive. A stand in for change right. We've had eight years of republicans time to give democrats shot and people didn't know a lot about who this guy was. Who was the democratic nominee. Yeah it's really hard to imagine it. Being like august and september and voters not really knowing much about one of the major party candidates. But that wasn't the case and it's sort of like as people get to know dukakis. They move more and more towards bush in part because the bush campaign has two people on its side who are doing bang-up job of defining dukakis in negative ways and that is lee atwater. Who makes these notorious political attack. Ads and roger ailes and if you leave the field to ales and atwater to define your candidate your candidate is going to lose a lot of points and likeability because they just tapped attacked attacked and dukakis really got it together to respond well like this photo op is now going to be an effective response to all of these ads.

dukakis jody nicole hammer nicki hello Amy walter amy walter michael dukakis Jody george h wnyc amy jodi bush George h w bush columbia white house cnn lee atwater roger ailes atwater
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Eighty one days later as the supreme court held up a ruling in a case called browder versus gael that deemed segregation on public buses and other public transportation to be unconstitutional. So people who've been boycotting were now going back on public buses but of course the civil rights efforts would continue so we have a boycott in montgomery of over a year legal battle that ended up in washington. Lots of names in the story beyond the one that everyone knows rosa parks. So that is what we are going to discuss today and here to talk about what this moment meant is as always nicole hammer. Columbia hello nicki. Hello jody and our special guests for this episode is christina green associate professor of political science at fordham co host of the excellent new york city podcast. Faq nyc which. I will definitely be listening to as the mayor's race here in new york heats up. But there's also a new podcast from christina gather. What's in it for us. It's from the grow so christina listeners. Now know you're very busy person. Thank you for making the time to come on and join us. Of course of course so. I guess we should start with this moment. Is this moment that we should look through the lens of on the ground pressure over more than a year or since ended up in the courts. Should we see this as a legal victory. It can be both and and what i always try and remind my students. Is that a lot of people. Think about the civil rights movement in like the context of just the nineteen sixties. But we know that. This organizing started in into the twenties and the thirties. Because we don't have brown v board until one thousand nine hundred fifty four and then after that we we see triumphs in the nineteen sixties. So the the fight for justice and equality and equity and dignity has taken not just centuries but when we think about the civil rights movement as as as a proper movement we have to include all the decades or to get to that moment and the ebbs and flows in the stops and starts so when we have the victories of the nine hundred sixty four civil rights act or the nineteen sixty five voting rights act or even the one thousand nine hundred five immigration. Act that's a combination of a series of legal battles on the local level state level but also within the supreme court that sort of happened in the mid sixties. But we have to remember that this is organizing legally and you know. I always tell people with like electoral politics and protest politics. Black people have to go hand in hand. we've never gotten one without the other and especially league victories. We haven't got without protest politics and and changes at the ballot box and the timeframe then that i mean that that puts into such good context these three hundred eighty one days of the boycott in montgomery which may strike some people as well. That's a really long boycott. But in the context you just laid out of years and years and maybe doug yeah that seems very reasonable. Well it's also interesting because on the one hand it's like well. It's today days after thirty years of organizing right but then on the other hand on a day to day just thinking about. That's a full year. Plus of not having conveniences of making sure you don't lose people make sure you maintain that momentum break the collective action the free rider problem all these issues that we think about when we're trying to get people a large group of people to do something for the greater good that you may not necessarily see right now and it's and it's going to be uncomfortable and it's going to be inconvenient for you but you need to do it for the larger good three hundred eighty one days. It's pretty remarkable that so many people in the rain in you know and for those of us who know this out the south get snow to this out gets gold And then you're walking to and from work for some people you know so after you've done labor all day you still are looking at miles to go and i think that's a metaphor of how people feel about this country you know sort of miles ahead and miles to go with the same time and organizers understood these different timelines right so you had folks who were focused on the courts But for the day to day of the boycott there were these mass meetings that were being held at churches on a regular basis. Because they understood that this kind of sacrifice. This kind of you know walking to work or finding carpools to work the standing up against all of the pressures from employers and from new irs and from white people all over the community required that kind of soul fortification. That was just happening very different scale in that local community in those local churches that that was necessary in order for those bigger director is happening at the supreme court and we can't forget the amount of bravery it takes right. It's not like people were walking on the sidewalk. Just strolling right. i mean they. They faced physical violence in doing so. Because people know that. If you're if you're walking in many instances in your part of the boycott and that means you're part of the rabble rouser that means you're part of the problem of black trying to get too much freedom in the south so for for men and women especially to do this because we know the great thing about rosa parks is i mean. Because she's so brave in its. I didn't even think about rosa parks in the bus boycott. When anything about rosa parks think about rosa parks the rape investigator. Like i think about the woman. The petite woman going to the deep south and investigating white men who have used rape as a tool of control and violence against women. That's who i i see. The sort of sitting on the bus was a strategic choice. And so this idea that people would not just risk you know their livelihood because many people got fired when people found out that they were part of this. You know organizing but you could also risk your life in doing so is just like the magnitude of that. Experience is really sort of hard for me to fully digest. And we've done an episode. On the case of rec- taylor and rosa parks his work as an activist prior to Montgomery and rosa parks. Oh interesting in this regard because it's like because of the prominence of her of that one moment where she refused to give the seat all what you talked about this life of activism before it has kind of gotten now but then also because of the prominence of that moment. I think a lot of the activism. Those happening around that moment also gets written out and so nikki. I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about your the other women who were involved in this there are some really remarkable other characters there who when you read the history of it you almost feel like any one of them could have turned into what rosa.

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:34 min | 10 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"The us senate for the first time in its history. Rejects peace treaty. The treaty of versailles the treaty was the most important of the peace treaties that brought an end to world war one. It was a treaty. That president woodrow. Wilson backed had been negotiating along with nations of europe for months and months as those negotiations concluded. Wilson declared that quote at last. The world knows america as the savior of the world but when he brought it home to the. Us senate for ratification things got complicated and ultimately the republican led senate rejected the treaty. So here to discuss the rejection of sinai is. There's always nicole hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and our special guest for this episode. Christopher mcnichols director of the center for humanities a professor of history at oregon state university. Chris thank you for for joining us. Hey hi nice to be on with you. Yeah you know your stuff about this. Tell us what were the objections stateside to the treaty. Yes so it became a pitched battle in the senate in november nineteen thousand nine hundred and all throughout really the summer into the fall over the treaty of versailles and especially the league of nations. That was the sticking point and within debates about the league of nations. There were roughly three broad kind of seems that they clustered around. The i was about the us out of entangling alliances as general principle avoiding binding commitments Political military diplomatic of the second was about the arbitration the piece itself and kind of keeping the us out of leadership role in that. You're not doing something. That would be immoral. So the nature of the treaty and in which some of the articles in the league of nations for instance supported colonialism. Was another piece of that. And then a third category of Issues and objections revolved around the question of balancing foreign and domestic commitments. And really a lot of senators democrats as well as republicans who either want some reservations in the treaty or wanted to reject it outright. focused on improving the us at home saying the us had this adventure abroad. That's enough in this Certainly don't join the league. I feel like you can hear in that description the anxiety over what the us's role in the world was going to be and it gives you the sense of both possibility and anxiety at the turn of the twentieth century of art. We got involved in this war little controversial even that and now what we do we stay involved in the rest of the world..

senate us league of nations versailles Wilson nicole hammer Christopher mcnichols columbia Jody europe woodrow president oregon state university Chris professor of history america director
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

08:32 min | 11 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"That crisis. So does any of this sound familiar folks Here to discuss the bush. Obama transition and presidential transitions in general is as always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody and we can talk a little bit about twenty twenty. But i i wanna go back not even just the two thousand eight way back and start maybe with a bigger some bigger context which is elections are november as you know inaugurations are in january as you know why so much time between why transitions take so damn long well. I like historically there shorter than they used to be. If that's any comfort that used to be in presidents used to be sworn in on march fourth and in part because a like news took longer to travel as did people so it just took a long time to get everyone the information they needed to transition to a new government but also takes a long time to stand up a government and in nineteen thirty two. The twentieth amendment is passed through congress saying that. Actually we need this to go. A little quicker people And it was finally ratified in nineteen thirty three and you could imagine people really want it. That in effect in one thousand nine hundred eighty two because franklin roosevelt wins the election in november and the country has to wait for long months before they finally get a new president who can address the existential economic crisis. that's crushing the country during that period. Yeah and i've seen people to this conversation kind of break out and people say gosh it really seems like it takes a long time in other countries right. I think in the uk. It's like you know. The prime walks out at ten downing street and like hands the keys over kind of the next morning. I mean i go back and forth like i get that frustration about how long it takes and i do agree especially in these moments of crisis like you end up with some of the dynamics that we'll talk about But i also sort of see it like this period where you do get to set up your your government and if all of a sudden the next president was on the clock in the expectations where they were going to solving the problems right away well. It takes a long time to bring new people in and figure out the new passwords on the computers. And all those things. It's sort of like time. It is sort of like a little bit of a period in which you get the flywheel going or whatever. But i'm i don't know it feels like shorter than this but maybe not right away is the right answer is what i'm trying to say everything in these periods. You're just like come the hell on. It's time we have voted. It's time to get a new government in there especially in the middle of a crisis when it seems especially urgent but especially in the middle of a crisis when you feel like the current government is not doing its job. That was the big thing in one thousand nine hundred eighty two right. Was that the the feeling. The hoover administration was not doing enough to address the depression and that something needed to be done. It's a little different in two thousand eight. There's open lines of communication about the economic crisis. And how it's unfolding. They think that there is this desire to have these things happen. More quickly but standing up a government. I mean there are thousands of jobs that need to be filled. There's a cabinet that needs to be assembled. There's a lot of work that needs to be done and it's work that these campaigns have been doing for months now right though transition projects that start pretty early on. Yeah and i mean. Let's go to two thousand eight and talk a little bit about that dynamics there but yes i do. I do think there was a sense of were. In this moment of crisis bush knew he was no longer going to be president. But that's part of it. So they had reached out as the crisis was unfolding to the obama teams and the mccain teams. And so there wasn't the sense of okay. This is no longer our problem once once the election's over And that might be a little slightly different dynamic than two right now. We'll see but You know i also at the same token do feel like there was this real sense of okay. Now obama's been elected we have this crisis in front of us. Obama is speaking publicly about it as he has been throughout the election. Who do we turn to. Who's calling the shots here. And i mean obviously the person calling the shots as the person who's president until january but there's also that other kind of leading a nation kind of thing Which is also matters. A lot So how do you remember that time. And how did the two sides kind of navigate it. I remember that same feeling. Which is you're kind of done with the old president right of this. Is that idea of a lame duck session where everybody has been kicked out of their jobs and they're just keeping the lights on until the new guy comes in But i think that the obama transition team was very clear lake. We're not president yet. We're getting together our plans. We're trying to communicate to you what we're planning to do because you need that kind of sense of stability especially when it comes to financial and economic policy there needs to be some predictibility about what's going to happen next So there there signaling. They're going to do but they're trying to make very clear. Look they're still a president in place that president is going to continue to preside over this until it's time for us to take the wheel and i remember. I don't want to say too much about this. But i remember. Some little controversies about that kind of who's in charge thing i mean. I think you know. Obama was giving press conferences where he obviously track presidential. I think there were some press conferences where he brought out his entire expected cabinet. Once he had sort of announced that there was even a little hubbub. It may have been doing the election itself. But like i feel like some people gave him a hard time for using a like a seal. That was like presidential ask. I mean maybe these were more than anything. Just the sort of signs of the little scandals that we're going to continue to during the obama administration but yeah it was just a sign of these little things like well. How do you step around this. And how do you navigate this. Yeah this is really challenging for transition teams because you do have to spend a lot of time before the election even happens figuring out how you're going to transition into office if that eventuality comes to pass But then you get criticized for kind of like measuring the drapes that you're too early. Eyeing that oval office and assuming you're going to win and there's some arrogance or cockiness around that and that's a that's a media narrative right lake absolutely. These campaigns need to be doing the work of transition. Well before we know who wins the election because again it's just. It's a huge huge job and it requires that level of planning. Your kind of you know gets to this larger question it's just. What are the expectations for. A new president reminds me of this Michael bloomberg quote. Actually that when. I think when he first took over and this was more related to that whole first hundred days thing which i will. We'll do an episode about that at some point but you know bloomberg was asked. What did you accomplish in your first hundred days. And he said well like. I hired my team. I got my team in place. And he was like people. Don't understand that's a lot of work and that's the actual work. One hundred days is perfectly reasonable to spend your first hundred days just getting your team in order and getting a functioning government upward instead. There's these expectations that you should be. You know notching tons of tons of wins so again it gets to this question of what kind of work is being done and whether that work satisfies as you said it kind of external narrative but yes the work that is being done right now to set up teams to transition to just convey information to declassify information. All that is very important and should count as real work. Let's talk a little bit about some of the like nuts and bolts of it. Actually i mean there is like funding for this is an actual sort of project that has its own rules and regulations. So what do we know about how. The transition actually operates said this kind of started by the nineteen sixty. Three presidential transitions act that kind of lays the groundwork for this idea that when incoming administration it needs office space it needs funds in order to sort of bridge those now about two and a half months between the election and the inauguration and it needs things like security clearances so nineteen forty eight harry. Truman is running for reelection. And it's the dewey campaign that starts to get these national security briefings because you've entered the cold war and there's the sense that there's real threat out there and that whoever is going to take the reins needs to be prepared. Something that harry. Truman was actually prepared for when. Fdr is right. He had to be read into national security apparatus. We wanted to make sure that somebody else coming into the presidency wasn't caught off guard and this was true to for president obama. There was a new law passed in two thousand four that made sure that people started to get their security clearances right away early in the pre transition period so that they would be ready to hit the ground running a national security issues. These things have been amended over and over and over again to provide more money to provide more formality to the process but there is a real legal process here which starts off with the general services administration saying hello president-elect here's accused the transition offices. Here's your money go to town and there's a a phone call. That.

president obama president obama administration columbia hoover administration Jody uk congress franklin roosevelt Truman nicole Michael bloomberg president-elect Fdr bush mccain
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Moment are you thinking about this moment in history as the election count continues to determine who won the twenty twenty presidency control. The senate asterix asterix asterix You kind of have to say that as your recording these days you kind of have to time when you're recording this so we are recording this. Actually on friday morning november sixth a winner has not really been declared but just before we started taping. The vote count showed that joe biden is ahead in pennsylvania and that is very likely going to mean that he is going to take the presidency take pennsylvania and take the presidency You know something. We can absolutely say that. More people voted in this election than any election in history. So yeah. We're recording this at an interesting moment. I'm sort of harkening back to my life. Newsday's this is not a breaking news. Podcast is a history podcasts. Nevertheless that is the moment in which recording a very interesting moment and this episode is a little different for lots of reasons but You know we're not going to just focus on one historical moment but through a bunch of them. And i would just say that it's been really great to read your emails and thoughts and your tweets and thank you everyone. I send them our way. We're going to get through as many as we can here to do. that is as always nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello nicki hello. Jody happy election day part. Four three four. Who knows that when and look what we talk about this a little bit but this is exactly kind of said. I was going to play out. No still felt like a roller coaster but yes it is on. The processes is sort of working But there are still some lessons from history about kind of how it works and doesn't work and so forth and our special guests sorta sift through that. Is kelly carter jackson coming back on the show professor at wellesley. Welcome back kelly. And thanks for indulging us in this special show at this very interesting moment. Thanks for having me So let's start with the three of us and we'll kind of answer a very simple question here. What moment in history are you thinking about in this moment. So kelly you wanna you wanna start first. Yeah i'm i'm thinking about the nineteenth century. I'm always that sort of my bread and butter. But i think about The multiples eighteen fifties. And how if you went. Enslaved person. or you're an abolitionist. During the eighteen fifties it would seem completely dismal. There were no new pieces of legislation. That favored the abolitionist movement. You have the hugh supreme court case of jet scott said basically that like will have no rights which right people are bound to respect their effectively not citizens of this country. You have a failed raid. But john brown's wade his attempt to try and free the slaves and eighteen fifty nine. And then you have like the first shots of fort sumter and the beginning of the civil war and it's this really crazy moment but if you fast forward three years. It's the emancipation proclamation. It's the freeing of four million enslaved people and it's you know the beginnings of what will become this radical reconstruction moment and so i imagine that if you're living through a few in your prime in the eighteen fifties and within a short maybe fifteen twenty year period within one generation you've seen rapid amounts of political seems social change economic change..

joe biden pennsylvania kelly carter jackson Newsday john brown columbia fort sumter nicole Jody wellesley scott professor
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:38 min | 11 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"In this day friends is our last Sunday show before the election we started doing the Sunday shows to Kinda give ourselves a chance on the weekends to stretch out a bit and take on a broader range of topics especially as related to the election the election of course is this coming Tuesday. So for today's episode, we thought that instead of focusing in on one particular election moment, we'd run through a number of them all along this theme how we communicate election results I don't WanNa get to tree falling in the woods on everyone, but an election doesn't really exist until the votes are counted and the results are communicated. And throughout the years that thing the communicating of the results has been a particularly tricky thing especially on election night itself especially through the media and I'm not telling you anything new that this will continue to be an issue this year with all sorts of murkiness about when exactly the election will be quote unquote over how contested it may be and how the press will absolutely be a part of all of that. So maybe history give some lessons or at least a little bit of stuff to mull as we await results in partial results and confusing results in spin and bad faith and how excited I refer election night this. With us to have this conversation as always is Nicole Hammer of Columbia hello, Nicki. Hello. I'm in this space of trauma now is we're talking about. Him waiting for results. Our last year who bringing into our space of trauma is album rod host of radio. APP will be doing this with us today. Jeff. Thank you for a thank you for coming on. The happy to join you in your space trauma pre trauma like pre-game trauma. I what I'm going to predict that we're going to get to a little bit of silver lining as we go here and I think the past has some lessons for us if only to show us that things just screwed up in the past as they are today. We're trying to do the way we should change our description and I show listening but let's start actually. Then we're going to go sequentially through the years. We have about five moments over the last one, hundred, Fifty, hundred, twenty years or so. But let's start in actually nineteen o four because something really interesting happens in one, thousand, nine, hundred four, and it provides the origin for freeze that I've used many times but never actually stopped to think about the phrases the newsflash. So Nicky, tell us in one thousand, nine, hundred, four. What is a newsflash while it comes down? To what's happening over at the New York Times down in Times Square they decide that they're going to communicate the presidential election results through this giant searchlight that's on the top of the time headquarters, and so the idea is that if they flash the light to the east than the Democrat Alton, Parker will have won the election they flash it to the West. Then Teddy Roosevelt will have won election if it's to the north and south at the answer for the governor's race is this was their way to kind of be the first to call the race in the city. You mean, the flash was actually a visual flash of light. Yeah. Like A searchlight flashing the results in sort of a a code that was disseminated in advance. That's so cool and it wasn't. It wasn't like Morse Code it was at any given point you could look up at the light, and if you knew the decipher, the empire state building, the sort of still does this right has sites at the top.

Teddy Roosevelt New York Times Nicole Hammer Nicki Times Square Nicky Jeff Parker
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:13 min | 11 months ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Serving as governor, he would go on to serve as president probably Nikki can correct me on this probably the most important. Figure in conservative politics in the last sixty years or so here's a disgust that turning point speech is Nicole Hammer of Columbia, hello, Nicki. Hello, jody. Yes. I think most important conservative and sixty years I'll give him that. Yeah, I think he's got that and I of course, you know wrote this insurance that he burst onto the scene that isn't exactly right and that's actually I wanNA start because well, first off he was an actor. So when you say burst onto the scene, he kind of walked onto the scene in installed us. but but you know but also I think Reagan's political awakening something that's sort of developed over the course of seemingly decades and this speech seems in many ways to really both be a capstone but also really represent that kind of long awakening. So you know what is in this speech and what does it tell us about Reagan's move from actor to political figure Yeah I mean we often use that phrase political evolution but I think in the case of Reagan political evolution is the right word because it really is like tectonic plates shifting over the course of more than a decade because he had been a kind of new deal. Democrat, he'd been asked by Democrats to run in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty. Two four Congress a but you know he he was hired by GE to give these speeches about the state of the world about politics, which was something that Reagan cared a lot about and now he's giving these speeches for a massive corporation. He is a fairly wealthy actor at this point and his speech begins to hit on themes of Lake maybe taxes should be lower. Maybe. Government should be smaller I'm and he begins to develop this kind of libertarian economic policy. He's reading a lot of conservative activists books at this point in time that he then fuses with a kind of a social message although that social message that social politics doesn't really come to the fore until he's governor of California, but the speech was a long time in the making. and. So actually let's let's talk a little bit about the. Actual nature of this speech, we call it a speech produce sort of like. You mentioned it was the he was doing a lot of stuff G. it was sort of like a like an infomercial. Yeah. So this is like a thirty minute televised speech. So we think about those thirty second ads that we get now maybe every once in a while it might be one minute or two minutes but this was thirty minutes of Reagan laying out his political vision. He was doing this for Barry Goldwater. So we're just like a week away from the nineteen, sixty, four election goldwater is doing really badly in the polls Reagan doesn't mention him very much. But goldwater is sort of the new standard bearer of the. Conservative. Movement and Regan's coming in and he's giving You a vision of what conservatism could look like if it was a little less scary a little less of an atomic focused then Barry Goldwater what a softer kinder conservatism might look like and and I think that's really important point. Well, a this was a time when you could buy thirty minutes just have someone give her political speech on national television knows and millions and millions of people would see but also. It's come up a few times on the show but that moment when you're heading into an election and the person who's on your party's ticket is likely to lose their is that really interesting vacuum we've noted this often when we've talked about conventions, but there is interesting vacuum for people to make a name for themselves and I think that's exactly what Reagan did here. As you said in the speech, he doesn't necessarily do a standard stump speech. You know vote for Goldwater he does stuff like I'm GONNA quote. Here. But he's he you know he says the founding fathers new a government can't control the economy without controlling people and they knew when a government sets out to do that, it must use force and coercion to achieve its purpose. So we come to a time for choosing which is the name of the speech a time for choosing you and I are told we must choose between the left or right but I suggest there is no such thing as left or right there is only an up or down. That is really powerful stirring stuff well delivered but also like it just seems like it that just must set the DNA for Conservative language and conservative ideals for generations and generations i. mean you could hear someone giving that speech maybe not trump you could hear someone keep you. a Republican giving that speech today, you could imagine Paul Ryan giving. Or somebody perhaps maybe a little more charismatic than Ryan But yeah, this idea that he had found the right way to pitch this message that took away some of the harsher edges thing that conservatism always being criticized for was being kind of heartless being passion passionless being too hard edged, and if you look at earlier versions of this speech, the kind that was giving the nineteen fifties, it was more conspiratorial it was darker, but he found that didn't resonate with audiences. So he figured out how to give this message of conservative politics in a way that was much more appealing, much more stirring, and here's like the fact that he's an actor comes into play and a lot of ways. But also that this was something that he really working on trying to find the right way to deliver this message something Goldwater just could not do. But Reagan. As you mentioned, he becomes the guy in the wake of gold butter sauce well, and of further highlight that that evolution that you're talking about in terms of just almost tone and presentation the last time Reagan's name came up on our podcast was when we were talking about the Husak hearings in nineteen, forty seven, which had exactly that you're describing that kind of sinister communist among us. We're ratting people out and Reagan testified during that I did go back and watch some of his testimony when we were prepping for that episode. He you know I'm stating the obvious here. Matt. But still he was in that context of red hunting and commies are here and so I think you see that evolution here that said I mean obviously like anti-communism seems to be the biggest. Storyline for Ronald Reagan and seems to have been the Lynch pin thing that transition him from a new deal Democrat into he would become. Yes. That's absolutely right. Has Experiences as the head of the screen actors guild, his experiences with WHO act all of those were part of this moment where anti-communism and this particular kind of conspiratorial life or death upper down kind of anti-communism becomes the linchpin for all conservatism for holding together the Libertarians with social conservatives they're united together by this anti-communism and. Reagan is sort of the personification of that fusion of new conservative ideas. With with anti-communism at its heart now, Barry Goldwater was that way too. I. Mean he was more Libertarian. But when he talked about communism, he scared people because he would talk about like using nuclear weapons. There was a real concern that he would somehow get the US into a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. So what Reagan did was he was able to have that hardline message still be at the heart of his politics, but he was able to do it without frightening people, which.

Ronald Reagan Barry Goldwater president Nicole Hammer California Nicki Nikki US Congress Paul Ryan Soviet Union GE us. Regan Matt Lynch
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"From radio? Topi. My name is jody African. Isn't. This Day September thirteenth nineteen, Eighty, eight Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis was touring a General Dynamics plant assembled. Battle. During his tour, his press team arranged for him to put on a green helmet and military coveralls over his suit and Kinda ride the tank around for a bit on the assembly plant. The cameras were rolling. Photographers were clicking away and the next day an image of Dukakis aboard the tank with the helmet kind of like plot down over his head. This big goofy smile on his face that image was everywhere and many. Of You have probably seen this image in your head right now, kind of came to define Dukakis in many ways. So here to talk about the tank photo, very likely contributed to his blown lead and eventual loss to George H, w Bush, and in general, the question of optics blown leads how photo ops can go very, very wrong here with us is Nicole Hammer of Columbia as always. Hello, Nicki Hello, jody, and our special. Guests were very excited to have her on Amy Walter National Editor of the Cook Political report host of politics with Amy Walter. From WNYC's takeaway. It's a Friday political show which I really really love, amy. So thank you for coming on and thank you for doing this. I'm excited. Thanks, Jodi. So there's a lot of facts here to get to the I. mean the one thing that jumps out to me is you know we're. Doing this on a September thirteenth I'll say the ad that focused in on this photo didn't run national until October eighteenth. I'm this seems late and to me it's like kind of reminder of the things that we remember from as the finding political campaigns. A lot of those happen a lot later than we seem to remember when we think of campaigns is taking forever and ever and ever I know and to think that. A campaign would sit on this for a month right and the reality of what it meant to. Even I think just produce an AD. Now you can do it in fifteen minutes from your laptop and doesn't have to go through. The challenge of of making it a as he did back in one, thousand, nine, hundred like the physical reality is. Putting an ad together but I think it also, you know highlighted this other piece jody that you pointed out, which is you know folks really not keying in on the election until October that yes, these elections went on. Just as they do now with. You know you have conventions and you have candidates going out and about on the hustings all throughout the year but that. Folks were paying attention regular voters in October and you didn't WanNA spend too much time in September. Talking to people who weren't paying attention. Yeah this idea of the perpetual campaign where road to the White House specialists start like the the after election day four years earlier I mean that is a relatively reason phenomenon. This idea that voters are so tuned into politics that they just want that stuck into their arm via IV really really early you don't have the same kind of twenty four, seven cable news like CNN is only eight years old at this point it's still hasn't really figured out how to fill up all twenty four hours So there are a lot of changes on the horizon for campaigning and we're just not there yet in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight. Listeners. You should just make a listen your head of what you think of as the most success defining campaign changing moments, and I almost guarantee all of them happened in late September through late October So it is true that this stuff hits late by also feel like it's important to point out that the stuff that hits hits because it's sort of landing in fertile ground in that ground has been sort of tilled over the course of months and months and years and years. So those years of. Campaigning Kinda matter. But then the actual specific thing that we remember and feels like, Oh, it change the campaign like this photo happen happened really late So maybe we can talk a little bit about that in about the photo itself I mean one thing that's interesting to point out is this wasn't necessarily like a gaffe. This was an attempted photo up on the part of the Dukakis folks, right? Yeah and again we forget one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one of the top issues was the Cold War and. On that front when you looked at the polling Dukakis really was very far behind. George H W Bush on the question of you know who do the best job on defense issues so If you're thinking tactically as the Dukakis campaign you say, well, we're heading the polls, but we have a really clear weakness and that's on security issues and on defense issues and remember Dukakis was governor. So he didn't have that sort of national foreign policy experience that you know other candidates had. So you say, all right. Let's go do something that makes us look tough on security. It makes kind of perfect sense but the other thing to note about Dukakis is. You. Know he went into the fall campaign after the primaries, not particularly well known or well defined as Nikki pointed out you know we we think now of the fact that by the time we get to election day we've had four years of road to the White House coverage and everybody knows everything. About, these folks by the time, the fall heads but back in nineteen eighty, eight, you Michael Dukakis I think part of the reason he was leading by the degree that he was over plush was. That he was just sort of a stand in for change. Right? We've had eight years of Republicans Kinda time to give Democrats a shot. And people didn't know a lot about who this guy was who was the Democratic nominee. Yeah. It's really hard to imagine it being like, August and September and voters not really knowing much about one of the major party candidates. But that wasn't back the case and it's sort of like as people get to know Dukakis, they move more and more towards Bush in part because the Bush campaign has two people on its side doing a bang up job of. Defining Dukakis in negative ways, and that is Lee atwater who makes these notorious political attack ads and Roger Ailes, and if you leave the field to Ales and atwater to define your candidate, your candidate going to lose a lot of points and likeability because they just attacked attacked, attacked and Dukakis. Never really got it together to respond like this photo op is not going to be an effective response to all of these ads pouring out of the Bush campaign. So just to put some numbers to that, Dukakis had a fifty, five, thirty, eight lead in July. By early August it was down seven points by Labor, day? Bush had overtaken caucus push ended up winning by about eight point. So it is this remarkable collapse or switch and and you know when you compare it to. Other elections and even current elections and say, well, can you know can lead like this erode I think amy, your point about name recognition and do people know the candidate is probably the critical issue here and in certainly the two twenty election both candidates are relatively known quantities at this point I do want to stay on the photo a little bit for a second and I think we can do a little analysis of of sort of Wyatt played the way played One thing that's interesting is that you know Dukakis's people I think and you read about how this came together. They were aware of the risk here. So one thing they did Dukakis. I. Think it was five eight not very tall person, and so they had they decided to have him climb onto the tank inside the hangar away from the cameras because they understood that there was maybe some like goofy optics there where the this relatively short persons climb out to a big tank they they sort of saw that for some reason, they did not anticipate that than like the helmet would be too big or the Greenwood. So it let's engagement. What is what is aiming nicky what is so goofy about this? I think judy array something about the grin right with the helmet that it looks like if you were goal is. I am Emma Bad ass right on tank. Collins and I can blow stuff up like you. WanNa look like a dude that's going to blow stuff up. And that's not what he's looking like right here like what you would want in the heart of the I hope the.

Michael Dukakis George H W Bush jody African Amy Walter WNYC General Dynamics White House CNN Columbia Democrats Jodi Greenwood Labor nicky Editor Collins Lee atwater Nicole Hammer
"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"nicki hello" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"This Day in eighteen sixty two, generally considered the start the first skirmishes and what would come to be known as the Dakota wars armed conflict between the United, states and fans of Takada Indians sometimes referred to sue the battles took place in southwest Minnesota which had been admitted to the Union as a state for years earlier, there would be dozens of battles. Throughout the summer fall into the winter, and one of the most notable events of the Dakota awards is in December eighteen sixty, two the day after Christmas thirty eight Dakota men were hanged in Mankato Minnesota the largest mass execution in US history. So we're going to discuss the Dakota wars and kind of which stories get written into out of this period of. American history, which is something we've touched on a fair amount on this podcast. So here as always is Nicole Hammer of Columbia. Hello, Nicki. Hello, jody. So a lot of people don't know this story but I think a lot of people know this period of in American history. So when we hear the year eighteen, sixty, two, most people think well the. Civil war is raging at this time. So let's start there. How do we think of the Dakota War and the civil war and can how important is it to keep that larger context in mind? I think that it's pretty important to keep in mind I mean this is the central obsession of the US at the time because the US is being torn into. This is also happening out on the frontier on which we were still seeing a lot of action on the frontier both in the war. But in the US government itself, Ra eighteen, sixty two is also the year of the homestead act and you can kind of see where that comes together with this fight because homesteaders are moving to the West and as they moved to the West, they encounter indigenous tribes and when you read the histories of both this war, but also the frontier and the expansion. Westward I. Mean You just see over and over. So the people moving from one battlefront in the south the same generals then all of a sudden showing up or you know veterans looking for land in the in the frontier, and so you know kind of moving from one war to another. It's remarkable how much they were connected just in the sort of movement of people back and forth who were fighting these various fronts. Yeah. It's actually something we see throughout the nineteenth century is the way that people. Build their military careers, not just in the wars that were used to talking about like the war of eighteen twelve or the civil war. But in these battles with indigenous tribes I mean, this is these are the wars that people like Andrew Jackson cut their teeth on and play such a big role in the lives of soldiers in the US. So what is your sense of who the WHO the soldiers on behalf of the United States are out there fighting in these Dakota wars they are. They people who had recently been fighting the civil war or how separate were where those groups yet. So it's a, it's a mix and a lot of ways, and we should talk about some of the particulars of this war. But yes, you have some people who have recently seen battle who are part of this fight. But also like a lot of the clashes aren't necessarily happening between groups of armed soldiers and armed members of the tribe, it's happening there massacres that are happening everybody is considered A. Combatant even if they don't raise arms and that's true on on both sides and so it's a mix. Yeah and you see that reflected in the language that written around this war, you know people refer to it as a as a war. But then there's also all this language which is certainly coded and all sorts of interesting ways about skirmishes and ambushes and massacres, and certainly the United States was telling a story to itself about continual ambush by the Dakota warriors on settler encampments and the Dakota. We're seeing this as encroachment on their land, but it's interesting when you use that word war even with the civil war, it feels like we have an understanding of what the nature of that is. This was much more fractured an intermittent and sort of textured in that way absolutely in the dakotas themselves were split on whether they should be involved in armed conflict with the white settlers in the area but one of the things that drove at least part of the Dakotas to take up arms is. You know the story of the US making treaties with indigenous peoples that they constantly failed to follow through, and in this case, not only had the dakotas been put on a very small range of land that they weren't able to. Have enough food to feed themselves but the US government was supposed to be paying the money money that they could've used to buy food as their crops failed but that money never came and so they were they were starving to death. So some of them said, all right while the only way that we can save ourselves is to go to war. What is your sense at the time of how this war and these battles that were taking place on the on the frontier and in new states like Minnesota are playing out kind of in the larger public imagination I mean, is it the case that you know? My sense of it is that the country is obsessed with the civil war and the question of slavery and does this just not appear into the headlines as it not rate into cabinet meetings I mean where does this fit in inside and outside of the government infrastructure? Oh, it's something that people are still paying attention to you in part because there are are certain tribes that are teaming up with the confederate. We've talked about this before that there were a number of tribes that ended up surrendering at the end of the civil war because they had taken up arms with the confederacy and so. There's that kind of military concern and then you know this idea of marauding native tribes had been atropine American reporting for such a long time I mean it's it's the story that gets told that you know these what were called at the time savages are taking advantage of these innocent white settlers and murdering them and scalping them and all kinds of things that fit into certain stereotypes of indigenous peoples and that's Those are the kinds of stories that make their way back to. I want to talk a little bit about this massacre in December of eighteen, sixty, two in Mankato Minnesota thirty eight Dakota men are hanged that the backstory to that. How got to that moment is really fascinating. One element here is that it is President Lincoln. Himself who gets involved and has to make some decisions about how this takes place. One thing that's interesting to me is just this notion of Lincoln. Having to sort of manage battles a multiple fronts. Does it force us to rethink a little bit Lincoln as a wartime president and should we in some way sort of think of him as someone who had to manage to wars at the same time? Yeah. I mean, certainly the Dakota war wasn't as present in his mind at all times but he understood it as part of his job as president to do something about this because we have to capture how dire things were in. Minnesota at this point the. MINNESOTA. Governor had basically issued extermination orders. The state government of Minnesota was offering up to two hundred dollars for a murdered Dakota and they said that the rest of the DAKOTAS had to be removed from the state. So that's kind of the background for what ended up being these kangaroo court that are held in which some four Dakota are found guilty and sentenced to execution, and when they send this list of executions that are planned to President Lincoln, he says. Can't just execute four hundred people. We've gotta find a more rational way to approach this that both satisfies the bloodlust of White Minnesotans, but doesn't make us look lake. Bloodthirsty people and so that's.

Dakota US Minnesota President Lincoln Mankato Minnesota Dakota warriors Union Nicki Nicole Hammer Columbia DAKOTAS president atropine Andrew Jackson Ra