20 Burst results for "Nick. Taylor"

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome to the taylor. Horror show. maldin is a canadian writer and director. Perhaps best known for is likened throbbing cult classic wolf cop and its sequel. Another wolf cup usually. I'm not a fan of movies. That intentionally embrace campinas but wolf cop is an entirely different animal. Well written well acted great effects. Lots of laughs in overall a lot of fun and unmissable wolf cop really has the spirit of the midnight monster movie and actually is the closest thing in spirit. I've seen to rob zombie. Grind house concept where wolf women of the ss which i'm still anxiously awaiting in vain along with l. Roths thanksgiving in any case. Perhaps the best way to see wolf. Cop is on season one of the last drive in with joe bob briggs now streaming on shutter lowland and i talked about the making of wolf cop. His director origin story in major lessons learned from low. budget horror. Andy filmmaking. On this episode of nick taylor horror shalt now without further ado here is director. Lowell dean lull dean great to see you. Has everything going. Get nice to be here. Good good so. I mean been a big fan of yours for a while and i feel like one of the one of the interesting things about wolf cop in. The context of twenty twenty was one of the first exploding dixie. I've seen and there's been multiple exploding dixon movies and twenty twenty. I don't wanna spoiler alert. What the movies are. But those who have seen them know what i'm talking about. Yeah i think. I know which one it's on shudder. Right another one. I interviewed the director. But so you're the kind of exploding dick ambassador for the horror world but so as far as as far as wolf cop some some very respectable transformation sequences. I just want to dive in by talking about practical effects. I mean what was your. What was your approach to the effects in this movie in the overall contribution to the werewolf genre. I mean it's it's i've said the.

maldin wolf cup joe bob briggs Lowell dean rob zombie taylor nick taylor Andy dean dick ambassador dixon
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome back to the nick. Taylor.

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome to the nicktator horror show. Justin dyke is a canadian director who just released anything for jackson. She's now on shudder. Anything for jackson is definitely one of my favorite horror films of the year. It will really delivers the goods. It's scary it's funny. It's emotionally poignant and extremely unique and different take on ghosts and demons which was actually really refreshing all in all. It's a hell of a time. And i highly recommend it ironically. Enough justin made anything for jackson after making a number of commercial family films in canada which despite the genre really paved the way for his technical ability as a director we talk more about justin's back story the making of anything for jackson in how he pulled off this movie's fantastic creature facts in today's episode of the nick taylor horror show now without further ado here is just dyke justin dyke. How do you do sir. I'm well how are you. i'm doing good. Thanks though i admit. I have been struggling to floss. After seeing anything for jackson for a few days not approve. Our film down note is definitely not not dentist approved at all but i realized that i think i saw i saw your movie within like a few days of seeing Thirty two model asala street which was really good on shudder and his house on netflix star really loved an just kind of occurred to me that supernatural and demon movies will never ever go out of style..

jackson Justin dyke justin dyke justin dyke nick taylor canada netflix
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"The tough times tae talks about how directing is firing on all cylinders because it taps every single ounce of energy creativity and reserve that you have to take. This is a wonderful feeling and something very much to embrace one thing you notice is tate talks through all the trials and tribulations that happened on the castle freak shoot. He's never complaining. He's never annoyed or resentful for the difficult times instead. He has gratitude for every ounce of difficulty that this movie presented him with. That's what filmmaking is as a director you're worth is not always calculated by the quality of the movie that you make but by the severity of the challenges that you were able to overcome. That's what a lot of producers look for and director's problem solvers when production challenges present themselves. Are you going to buckle under the pressure or prove that you have an iron reserve. Despite the difficulties of castle freak tate embraced the growth that the experience provided him with he'd worked on enough movies to expect the journey to be difficult so he loved every single painstaking minute of the process because he knew it was making him a better director. Anyway guys. thank you for listening if you enjoy this episode. Why not share with your friends and family on social media. Don't forget to follow the shell on instagram. At the taylor and on twitter at the same handle. Thanks again for listening to the nick taylor horror show..

tate taylor twitter nick taylor
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"She was actually a fighting cancer for the first time at that point real man so six weeks then. She had just gone into remission. Sure to find it for months. It's not a year at that point but she'd gone into remission and she wrote me back and said hey i'm thinking about getting back into the business was talk you know. Send me script voice. So we got to hang out with her and know her and love her fucking four years and it was incredible If she was fantastic man and eight can't say enough about her as a human being but she tossed in that came from reading that book in writing a few fucking emails and stay on top of the emails. To i mean that's the consistency element is huge. I think a lot of people but it's beautiful story. That's sounds really wonderful. You're making you wanna reread rebels. On the back of buying this after james passages there with retail will. I will well guy. I mean this was such a joy. Thank you so much. Thank you man. Real real pleasure all right. Thank you as always for listening if you enjoy this episode. Why not share with your friends and family on social media. Don't forget to follow the show on instagram. And i'm nick taylor. That's im nicktator and on twitter at the same handle thanksgiving for listening to the nick taylor horror show..

cancer james nick taylor twitter
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Nick taylor or show so. We're doing things a little bit differently this time around on this episode. I have four very brief interviews with each director. Who made a film for welcome to the blue house. As a collaboration between blunt house productions and amazon studios welcome to the blunt. House is a slate of feature films. Showcase diverse casts female and emerging and diverse filmmakers with a focus on family drama. All for the movies discussing are currently streaming on amazon prime. So be sure to check them out there. Amazon launched the initial four. Welcome to the blunt house movies as double features back in october while four. Additional welcome to the blockhouse films will launch in twenty twenty one in this episode. We get a deep dive in four different perspectives. On working within the blunt house system blown house is becoming a very exciting ecosystem for aspiring filmmakers with their robust production. Slate across tv and film bloom. House is taking more and more chances on first time directors and lesser known voices in their blood house style. They're giving all of the directors ton of creative control making them a brand. That's really worth paying attention to. First up is veena sood. Venus suit is a writer. Producer and director perhaps best known for developing the television drama the killing now streaming on netflix venus. Also behind seven seconds and the qube horror web series the stranger venus. Welcome to the blunt house. Movie is called the lie starring. Joey king peter sars guard and marie. I'm totally screw. This name up marielle have allied tells the story of two separate parents who have to navigate protecting their daughter after she murders her best friend. Vinas tv industry veteran. And i'm probably not supposed to say this. But her movie was my favorite of the welcomed. The blame house films so definitely be sure to check out the live. Here without further ado is veena sood. Congratulations the movie was really just startling. Emotional and so compelling And i feel like there's so many So many that one could make. And i feel like a lot of people and and i feel like this might be part and parcel with the the welcome to the blunt. How series but all of these familial tales. I feel like there's so many things that people could kind of project their own experiences into..

Nick taylor veena sood amazon blue house Joey king peter marielle Amazon Vinas Venus netflix marie
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome to the. Nick taylor hor show jordan. Donny is the writer director of the head. Hunter one of my favorite horror moves two thousand eighteen and now streaming on shutter. What of the remarkable things about the head. Hunter with our source flow was considering the fact that it was an ultra low budget movie. It is extremely ambitious in terms of its scope and world building while still portraying a tightly structured and very intimate story about a medieval monster. Hunter this is a pretty fascinating balance. That jordan pulled off and one really worth studying. Everyone says your first movie should not be a period piece should not have elaborate effects and certainly should not include jordan did all three in the head hunter and he still kept the budgets super duper low and delivered a kick ass movie in the end. The head hunter is a serious case. Study for effective low budget filmmaking. Even if you've seen it it's really worth every watch for the fun of the movie and for observing its simplicity and elegance in terms of directing. And how much jordan was able to get away with for so little money. This is a really interesting conversation with some killer lessons in low budget filmmaking. So strap in and enjoy this conversation with jordan downey jordan. Donny how do you do good. How are you good. Good so i think one of the most And i know you've talked about this at length. But i think one of the for me. One of the most intriguing things about the head hunter was how it was such an intimate view of a larger world and in a low budget context. I feel like it's difficult to tip to pull. It is difficult to do something on a on a relatively low budget that has a big scale but a small scope. If that makes sense. I reminded me of something coin. Tarintino actually talked about it. I'm going to paraphrase the hell out of this. But he was talking about how there's a difference between directors who you feel like you're in good hands with them in other words you can. They've thought through a ton of things that never even appear on the screen and that never ever even come up in conversation in the movies dialogue. But you can just tell the world is thought out in very thoroughly understood in the audience consensus that even though you don't necessarily see these things you know. There's just an overall indication that this world is very thoroughly thought out and with your movie it felt like such a small glimpse of very very very large world. And go back to the tarantino analogy. I just felt like in such good hands. Because you just seem to thoroughly have built this world and i was wondering how had you do that. How will thank you. I mean i could go south pretty quickly right in just come across feeling random gripe Or just sort of like a bunch of stuff. That's just kind of shoehorned into something just because it was a cool proper cool. Set piece that you wanted to show off so to for you to say that hopefully then just means that those choices we made of what to show Built upon that larger world rather than distracted from the story in any way which is always the trick and the key but to be honest. I have a hard time doing anything other than that kind of world building. Just because the movies that i grew up you know really obsessing over as a kid Typically had that kind of Not necessarily camping but more of that..

Hunter Donny Nick taylor jordan downey jordan jordan hunter Tarintino
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Times in story organ whereas like Because it rains a lot there and just having not slept and sulking wet and just having no idea how we're going to sort of pull off the immense amount of shots that we're trying to do a day and just feeling like i remember actually distinctly feeling like if i was capable of having a nervous breakdown it would happen right now genuinely i was like this. Everything in my body says i. Luckily i was born with the fortitude to not crumble and parents or something whatever it was protected me in that moment i definitely felt like i would have never breakdown because it was like just felt like such an impossible task. And you know when you're not sleeping and when you're cold and when you're wet and just like they sort of builds and builds and builds but But again like things always come out of that like you. You're you're sort of your forged in fire and you kind of come out the other side and you suddenly the film god smile on you and and the idea hits and figure out a way to to make better than it ever was before it. Yeah you're always praying man another film. God's can like bless you but it feels like the curse you more often than it's it's it's rough. I feel like kids should know that more when they're getting excited about the glamour of of what. It is to be a filmmaker. Because you know sometimes. I'll teach you a film clock haulers level film class and i'm just like is there anything else you wanna do. That would make you happy because if so you should definitely do that. Got to watch this film. God's man they'll they'll four june fire. Though it's come out you come out better sharper. Was there anything that got you through those really difficult moments. This is gonna sound real basic but There was a juice shop in This real liz. Real like nitty gritty on these. Little things are important a little thing..

liz
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome nick taylor horror show tony. The keno is an australian filmmaker who made his directorial debut last year with the fury's now streaming on shudder. The fury's is a bloodbath. Daylight slasher extravaganza with strong nods to the texas chainsaw massacre but with a modern twist in this conversation. We hear all about tony's director origin story the making of the fury's and major lessons learned from his first movie. Now without further. Ado here is furious. Director tony to keno. Some curious how you approach the over a look of the movie because it looked very distinctive and again it did feel like some of those older slashers. But didn't feel throwback. Ease was what i keep coming back to as you know felt very much it had its own style at signature looked. So how did you approach the look of the movie. i guess. A lot of the Ones look like the seventies movies which kind of let us tweak to watch him on his chances without data transfers Like from fighting films. Talk big scratching. Horrible there was that and also the look was set a by the location. We outside that location. The film sitting the script was originally had different location and we had to fill in camera. Which is the capital strategies would have been the country in the middle of east allows so some point glutamate voice location whether town is and that's actually a rail sort of goldline has been left abandoned. And it's in the middle that we are scum forest so net took his diet. I look at that it does It does look like a dozen of film. it's very much quite washed and kind of. I'm very pallets that look l. That's cool so you focus the overlook cinematography based on the location bison lecoache we have had a very small budget so we couldn't To work with what we had was like. Yeah it was a great great locations very curious as to how you found it was a ghost town will it was It used to be it was going town in the hundreds. And then in the seventy s someone built recreated the town with anti as a sort of tourist attraction that went bankrupt and they just want to y and let everything. They're kind of rotting in bush fifty. It's almost like an edge. Backlit has been used. So was nice on you. How did you find it first of all. There was production manager. Who was producer. Who's on the film alien who left Before we go into production and she was it to look nice uncanny because was all in kind of abandoned font house in the outbuildings matab pluck. Midtown's much better than that very cool. Yeah it was such an amazing location. And i'm sure once you landed there what you've got to the location. You probably re. i would imagine. Let the location dictate the script and you know actions and things like that. It seems like the location was very much a character. It's really pretentious when people say that but your case it seems like yes. The location was very much a character. As soon as i. Soon as i found it i stopped an we could use it on scripting to highlight because it just adds value as well so yeah excited being built for a specific intel inside and essentially fellow budget film. You're always looking for rape ninety and that added really hundreds of thousands of dollars to ask now. Yeah and the idea that you shot at all. It seemed like you shop most of it in natural light right. Yeah it's almost entirely natural live new interior in houses into all natural law. Had we shot it old time side. We were very lucky. We didn't get any ryan when twenty shakes not ryan. Coutts that ride. We would have been in trouble but ryan at all. Yeah we did pick the time. When it was traditionally night looked at way patterns in it was the i'm lost ryan full period to shooting that we were still lucky. That's great yeah. And there is something very eerie about broad daylight horror particularly with the kinds of affects scenes. That you guys had yeah and also. I always wanted to do that anyway. Because i was to take the chance of mexicans. Fiber will time movies new. And that's pretty much all dynamite and it's kind of terrifying. I wanted to make that a little bit. Yeah yeah it definitely. It really made me feel like texas chainsaw in a big way but not it again. It didn't feel like it was throwback you at all it just felt like. Oh yeah. I remember what this feels like. Ooh so The of the effects in this movie were amazing. And there's one scene in particular that you keep winning best kill awards for which. I'm not going to anyone but if you want to spoil it feel free but it was. It was pretty amazing. It really effective. And i remember i. I heard in a previous interview with you. When you first saw it you were shocked at how real it was almost hesitant about using it because it was are you were shocked at. How can you were concerned that you perhaps went too far. Was that the case. So i read it in scripts and so i wanted but not how we're gonna do. It'll help defend donovan. Who is on was going to do it. And that defect on the was the second shooting field that so it really up to head wasn't you'll how well he was gonna work because they haven't had much rehearsal time at all So when we did film it was. I was hours ecstatic. I was super excited but at the same time. Yeah it was released in real life. Like i should look at look. Did think i had gone to fire. Knives wasn't gonna be too much for days always ending And the cat in the ada to the editor kinda quite cut down quite short i think because he was a bit shocked by then just as long as because there's gonna be a muzzle you might as well show it all off. Yeah yeah i feel like we're on this incredible new time period for horrid directors where you don't really have to care about the mp aa anymore and this conversation with damian. Leoni who did terrify horror directors can do what they want. Now you've to worry about cutting away in too much blood or anything yet. Yeah because i think Straining i guess you'd have to worry too much and writings have shifted a little bit. It does I think the excessive gordon the film That will show this fool above night. otherwise it hasn't affected the markets. Tyco or anything like that. Sorry.

Director tony to keno tony nick taylor ryan keno texas Coutts bush intel donovan Leoni damian gordon Tyco
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Whoa yeah. I wish they could all work like that. Yeah right i wish we could just have a producer said. This is exactly what i'm looking for an exactly what i need and give that to them in then new. Go make me. It seems like that. That's why can't it. Just be the. I don't know yeah. So on the development side it was it was it was a great experience. Yeah when you go to write my partner right ado Yeah chris and i have been writing together for for years we met out in phoenix. he is a teacher at arizona state or i went to school. Oh oh com. And when i took his class way longer ago than both of us care to admit He was the youngest professor working at a issues. Film departments and We we just clicked right away he He watched my student film for his class. He ripped apart. And i went back into the edit and i read it all the notes and he was like you turn this into a good little movie and we stayed in touch in because i knew he would give me honest back. I would bring my other projects to him kind of throughout so school and And when it came time when i graduated he was Prepping a little tiny movie called a the graves which was a after dark eight films to die for movie with tony. todd bill. moseley hands It was a really really challenging movie. We were outs in this. Abandoned mining town forty five minutes outside of witkin burgers on holy. Shit let's someways and And the crazy thing was because they were on this bending mining town you couldn't drive trucks down onto it because there was risk of cave-in little key as marching equipment across the desert cave-in. Oh because it's all built on top of minds exactly so you can be in a truck that could just go into an old mine shaft so we had. We had literally carry equipment like piece by piece. Holy shit the middle of the summer in arizona and it was crazy but chris and i had this really great bonding experience on that movie and i said to him very shortly after i was like i need a calling card piece to go to la and so he gave me a short film screenplay that he had been working on to direct And that sure ended up Opening lots of doors. It played a bunch of film festivals. Won some awards but the thing that it did. That was really helpful. Was i got in front of. I was interning in l. and i showed the short film to The assistant to the ceo of the company has working at and he was like this is good. I'm gonna show this to my boss. And i was like whoa. Okay and little. Did i know he was planning on leaving the company at that point and us trying to find his replacement and so when he showed the shorts to might the bill todman who would become boss. He kind of positioned it as this guy is pretty good..

todd bill arizona chris phoenix moseley tony la bill todman
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Ice. Wise words. Well, thank you again. Thank you so much. This is great. All right. So much to learn from that conversation, and here's always some key takeaways from this conversation with you. Hey, Tamara number one always blame yourself at his lowest point when nothing was working out you hey, could have blamed producers actors in the entire Hollywood system he instead blamed himself. This was actually an act of self empowerment which enabled him to pull himself up by his bootstraps and make. Things happen because he knew nobody was coming to save him when things go wrong it's human nature to find things and people to blame it on. But instead where you hey, story is a reminder to take full responsibility of your entire director path. Hollywood is fickle beast. It's loaded with liars sharks in parasites as where you hey said, when the chips are down, take the blows, learn the lessons. Get back up and take ownership of all of it. The system owes you nothing you have to fight for every single inch that you get number to be willing to throw it all away. Now, this is an extremely hard lesson, but on verses after spending tens of thousands of dollars that he raised from friends and family where you hey, look at what he shot and realized it was not. Good enough this led him to scrap eighty percent of the footage that he spent months on grueling sets filming this heartbreaking but an inevitable part of the journey. Yes. Your material will never be perfect, but regardless of how hard you work on something or how much money you spend on it if the quality isn't there, it's time to scrap it and start over you'll have to live with each and. Every frame of your movies for your entire life so you really can't afford to put out anything that you're not happy with number three, make outrageous demands and you'll be surprised how often you get what you want after talking to enough directors. I. Realized that movies are made up of a bunch of mini miracles and you have to believe there possible in order for them to happen after shooting. Verses on a shoestring budget where you hey boldly approached one of the top editors in Japan and asked him to edit his movie for free. The guy laughed at him at first. But y you haze conviction persuaded him to actually do it and he ended in the movie. This substantially boosted the quality of verses and it put Ryohei on the map and he was eventually able to pay the guy. Back to make movie is to literally do the impossible with limited time and unlimited budget. Often the only thing that will get your movie made properly is your own boldness and determination to make the impossible possible. This means you have to be bold and you have to make some preposterously outrageous demands and when you do, you may be surprised how often people say yes despite the fact that Hollywood. Can Be. Rough. Don't forget. There are angels as well as demons. You'd be surprised at how often people in the industry want to help filmmakers out because they know difficult the job is this is both a matter of getting out of your comfort zone and also believing in the power of possibility. So if you identify an opportunity like this, ask for it, the worst they can do is say now. Anyway guys thank you as always for listening. If you enjoyed this episode would mean the world to me if you shared it with your friends and family on social media, don't forget the follow the Shell on Instagram at I'm Nick Tale of its I m Nick Taylor twitter on the same hand and Doug this episode let me know you like the most about it. Thanks a lot guys..

Hollywood Ryohei Tamara director Nick Tale Japan Nick Taylor Doug
NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

The Esports Minute

02:13 min | 2 years ago

NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

"We're looking at a paper published by an associate professor, any PhD student at North Carolina State University. The research appeared in the Journal critical studies on Mass Communication. The goal was to see if college is worth programs have been more successful at crecy gender representation. East sports than professional sports have there are a few women who compete at the highest levels of professional sports. Rockets Karma is well regarded player who has spent time in. Her stoldas women, when major tournaments it so as fortnight, but for dependent environment that doesn't have fiscal differences creating a gap between genders us for to still almost entirely male dominated Nick Taylor co-authored the study and associate professor of Communication at NC State said in the journal quote five years ago we thought collegiate sports might be an opportunity to create a welcoming diverse competitive arena which. Was a big deal given how male-dominated the professional eastward scene was rapid growth of collegiate sports over the past five years has led to it becoming more professional with many universities having paid eastwards, positions, recruiting players at so odd we wanted to see how that professionalization has affected collegiate sports and what that means for gender diversity. The findings did not give us reason to be optimistic. For this study naked, his Co author interviewed Twenty One people involved in these sports programs. Eight of the people are part of Varsity programs with the other thirteen being president of their schools. Collegiate East Sports Club six of the respondents identified as women fifteen identified as men PhD Student Bright Style, the other CO author of the study told the Journal. Quote essentially, we found that women are effectively pushed out of eastwards many colleges when they start investing financial resources in east, Sports Program we talk lease sports might help to address the disenfranchise women in eastport at engaging more generally instead, it seems to simply be an extension of that disenfranchisement and quote. While an interview of twenty, one people isn't a perfect encapsulation of the wide-ranging college. He's worth ecosystem, all twenty one or in key rules of big programs meaning they speak for quite a few more when it comes to gender disparity. College eastwards still have a chance to be a place where we can create more inclusive east sports environments, but `gate-keeping in Tuxes D- are still real problems that women face in the space without focused initiatives that disparity won't get much better.

East Sports Club Associate Professor Mass Communication The Journal North Carolina State Universit Nick Taylor Eastport President Trump
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"To the Nick Taylor Horror show about three months before he passed all on I was afforded off the opportunity of a lifetime to interview Stuart Gordon. And what was already a tremendous honor looking back is made even more special by knowing that this was one of the last interviews he ever gave birth. So this being episode number 50, I really could not be more proud than a present this conversation that I got to have with Stuart when I spoke to him Stewart was right on the heels of completing his autobiography. So he was naturally in a very reflective mood. So we talked a lot about his major life lessons that he learned as a director as well the kind of connective themes that presented him. All throughout the course of his career all of which he was able to realize retrospectively looking back having written his autobiography Stewart was beyond a horror director. He was an innovator. He was at a loss Eliezer. He was a showman. He was a director that made you think made you laugh and made you squirm all in the same movie his work defied convention and was beyond subversive strong and just push boundaries. He bulldozed over them. He was also one of the most prolific adapters of HP Lovecraft and famously brought his own wonderful signature interpretations to his work. So Thursday October to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Re-Animator. I'll also be releasing a remembering Stuart Gordon episode where I sit down with some a Stewart's friends and collaborators and hear what they learned from him going to feature Larry fessenden Graham Skipper and Brian yuzna. So look out for that on October 18th. Anyway now for your listening pleasure, please enjoy this conversation with the late. Great Master for Stuart Gordon. Stewart thank you so much for taking the time. I'm a tremendous fan. And this is definitely a big honor. So thank you first and foremost know it's my pleasure. So there's a real undeniable of subversion to all your films to put it lightly and one thing I read about was the Psychedelic political satire version of Peter Pan that you had done and the fact that you got arrested. Yeah. So what I'm curious about is what level what effect did that incident have on your work? I mean, would imagine that something like that during a formidable time. Like being in college would probably make you more determined than ever to make subversive work. Is that accurate? Well, it definitely got you know, a lot of people's attention, you know, it became sort of a national news as a matter of fact, I remember Johnny Carson making jokes about it on his show. Oh wow. And I mean just the whole idea of you know, psychedelic a Peter Pan, right all by itself was enough to just kind of get people wage to the perfect people and and get their attention. Right did that did being arrested for your art give you this kind of more wage admissive purpose to make art that does push the boundaries and make art that might be a little dangerous and not quite make the type of art that Society might not quite be ready for I mean, does that give you any sort of em, you know, it's funny. It's I had done, you know, we had started a theater company. I did a play in you know with the University of Wisconsin called the game show. That was the first thing and that was a long way in which we made the audience believe that they were locked in the theater and it was very extreme and we had plants in the audience who I am. You're the audience believe we're you know audience members who were beaten and oh, wow, you know, you know kind of suck humiliated and so forth and and so you know that show that show got it a huge amount of attention and that led to you know, one of the professors at the University offering to give me a program that I could, you know summer program where we could produce five plays and the idea was that should all be kind of experimental Theatre and we do all kinds of things. We did a production of Afraid of Virginia Woolf that started at 1:00 in the morning and we the First Act was done. Conventional way men and women in the second act was done with all women and the third Act was done with all men. Oh wow. So we were doing all kinds of stuff. We did a production of Titus andronicus that was done non-verbally in a in a burned-out building that was you know, there was just a basically a huge Crater where the building had been and the audience sat on their sides of this pit looking down and watching this watching, you know, these these characters, you know off the kitchen at 6. Most violent play right and you know tons of tons blood and we did it all with, you know, instead of two packs Shakespeare's language and digital just grunting and sort of caveman Style. So we were doing doing a pretty crazy stuff. And Peter Pan was the last play in that series The Common Thread with all of those different Productions sounds like wage you kind of intentionally put yourself in very challenging scenario as a as a director by doing Shakespeare without words and doing a big elaborate plays in small locations and things like that and it sounds like that may have been by Design. So I'm curious about is did how much did that contribute to your ability as a director predict certain later on because from everything that I've learned in talking other directors one of the most important qualities in being a director, if you don't have those big crazy Hollywood budgets is resourcefulness, and it sounds like you're kind of training ground for being a filmmaker was was these Productions because you were you were kind of forcing yourself to be very resourceful from an artistic perspective. Is that accurate? Yeah. Yep. I'm sorry, you know the thing that sort of turned me around was the production when I was you know, I didn't direct it. But I was in this production of a play called Marat Sade which is the which is a play that's put on by the inmates of an insane asylum and the idea is that at any moment the actors could go crazy and jump into the audience and started attacking people and that turned me around cuz I used to think that theater it's just sort of like a bad movie and and then I realized after doing brats on the theater..

director Stuart Gordon Stewart Peter Pan Nick Taylor Johnny Carson HP Virginia Woolf Marat Sade Larry fessenden Shakespeare University of Wisconsin Titus andronicus Society Hollywood Brian yuzna caveman Style Graham Skipper
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"I was like. All right. Cool. Yeah. Hundred percent I can come up with which mood for you so. Drew Together, a pitch came up. We had this idea of a weird western back in the day. That was just A. Cowboys go to an abandoned ghost town and there's some force there and they were dying. They were getting picked off by one and I, love that the idea of a horror westerns latest why don't we just make this a witch story and they go to this ghost town and there ends up being a brothel on it's a common of witches and they start getting picked off on by one. And once we we kind of like merchants two ideas together. We had a a pretty interesting pager pitch and I pitched did and they have been like, no no what what what what the hell is this. We just said witches where the cowboys, what's going on. Western that doesn't even make sense and I'm Mike Okay, I don't know what which is nick sense I'm I'm just coming up with you know what the slow and so we sat on it for a long time after that, and then I had a screenwriting panel what Joe Lansdale that I was completely honored to be a part of and beyond and in that panel. I told that story and then Joe's and his son Keith he's also an amazing writer and ended up being a writer on the doors boilers I told that story and they were they were all excited about it. They go. That sounds really cool. This is fine like you should. You should really you should really make that and we were developing another movie a body horror sci fi film at the time. and. You know. So we just thought about it the dinner with them that night and came back and I talked to my partner camera and into Alex and Shawn's or apprenticeship papers street just said, let's make this movie like I. Think this is cool. It's just go for it. I'm not seeing a lot of stuff out there. The whiff stuff that's coming out now feels A. Little derivative like let's our own unique version of this and you know. So we we went for it and I had another script separate for Mattis. Well, this is what happens all the time as we had so many ideas and somebody's stretchable constantly writing, and then one of those doesn't really go the direction we want but there was a hook about it that we really liked. So we wrote this one that we call the dark day which was based on a real event happens in like the fourteen hundreds or so I might have a little off but and. The whole sky win black and we decided to tie that into the Salem witch trials and that you know cotton mather who was a real person who wrote the book on Ridges how to find them and same of. Individual to be honest and. You know it's it's just honestly like got period in history is so dark and so disturbing and I don't think about people think about it because they just you know the here sandwich trouser shows like Salem and stuff and you don't think you really like acquaintance what's what's actually going on there but but it was awful and this man, you know he i I read a story and I'll know if it's completely true but I read this and it was about a woman who was pregnant and fled from Salem and they found her and burned her Most people that time were actually not burn stoned or hanged, but that but that particular story. Just was so revolting and disgusting I mean even saying now just kind of you know I just listen to this like natural response from its. And so they know that that was their wall. What if what if that led to this kind of you know that the first which is like what if that events created the first which is so we started you know kind of playing with that and so that idea from another movie, there's other weird cowboy you know dark western that we had, and then you know integrated this which idea that we had just written and you know created a pill door. Very cool. Yeah. It's funny. How would you like when you keep writing scripts? There's something about even if the script as a whole doesn't work, you can kind of composite the things that worked about scripts that largely don't work. But I have that one little glimmer magic. You can take those things and you can composite them together into brand new scripts which I. Feel like that's a testament to the importance of just to keep on writing. Just never if you're a writer, you know to never not be writing. So to speak, do you have any sort of a either like a Stephen King Style daily minimum of Matt of words the try to reach every day or so I mean what's your writing process like? I write an hour a day every day every single day. No matter what happens and that our I clean out even now the only time the only the only times I would say that was the exception was when I was actually onset and directing producing but other than that. I write in our everyday. Now, writing to me is not always physically typing on the page. I sometimes will be I do a lot of writing in the car where I use the voice recorder on my phone, and for some reason, just driving around and having some like elemental you know kind of music on in the background just helps clear my head. So I'll just pop up in the sunroof roll the windows down and just kind of drive around and think about these characters and think about the world there and think about these struggles, and that's what gets me through quote unquote writer's block don't completely believe in Iraq So..

writer Salem Joe Lansdale cowboys nick Stephen King partner Iraq Keith Alex Matt Shawn
A thrilling naval rescue off the coast of Nova Scotia

The Big Story

10:53 min | 2 years ago

A thrilling naval rescue off the coast of Nova Scotia

"When things start to go wrong on the open ocean sometimes they go really wrong really quickly. We make really good boats. We have state of the art navigation systems and we have all the emergency measures in the world to prevent disaster still. We don't belong there. The Sea is not our turf. And if you've ever seen a movie about a nautical disaster it's not that far off from reality about a year ago off the eastern coast of Canada. Things went really wrong really quickly. And all that state of the art technology wasn't working when that happens the boat and its crew can't do much outs but put out an emergency distress call and pray that somebody answers it and that those people are close enough to help and if they're really lucky at the ships that answer. The call are part of the Royal Canadian Navy and are prepared to undertake one of the most dramatic. Rescues that you'll hear about outside of a Hollywood pitch meeting. This is the story of that rescue. I'm Jordan he throwing. This is the big stars. Nick Taylor busy of Maclean's chronicled the whole dramatic tale. An hello first of all what is the McKenna McKenna is a forty nine foot yacht. It's called the Hanse four ninety five. It was on the inside of beautiful boat. I don't know a whole lot of boats but I saw some photos Of the cabin and it was decked out you could wash dishes on that thing you could sleep very comfortably and you could sail the high seas. It's a fairly rich person vessel. Yeah I mean it's the kind of you buy when you have some money to buy a boat. So what happened to her well The owner of the boat was named John Hagen. He's a surgeon who lives here Toronto. And he asked a broker who is in the area where he should by boat so John and the broker whose name was pat sturgeon Had A few conversations and they found the McKenna in Greece. In this Mediterranean port called left us their mission was to buy the boat and then find a way to get her to Canada. How do you get a boat to Canada when you buy it overseas? I mean I guess. There's an obvious answer to that question. Well Yeah I mean you you usually on the water but there are a few options you can. You can bring a boat over in a container ship shipped almost package kind of thing or if you want to maybe save a little money depending or have a little more flexibility you can hire skipper to get on that boat. Hire a small crew and take it where you want. And this is what he did. And that's what he did. So tell me. But the the captain and the crew and and I guess what Rupert Mondro does because this is a job that I didn't know existed. It's an unbelievable story. How he started doing what he's doing he was born in South Western. England in Devon Place called barnstable. He was a trained actor at one point. He had his own company. He went bankrupt. He told me at the age of Twenty Eight. He was Drifting around I think thinking what do I do next at that point and so he got on a boat and loved. It started sailing and eventually he started delivering goods because he was very good. Skipper and so twenty five years. He did that until the he was he was hired to bring the McKenna across the Atlantic But he he's just a natural born c fair when you talk to him about it You know it's it's like he was born on the water and the way people talk about him is a remarkable. They say it's almost as if he doesn't need instruments he he can sail the seas just by sort of you know putting his finger in the wind and saying little now the waves are gonna come this way so we better go this way and You know he has autopilot. And all the fancy instruments but He's he's been spent the latter half of his life Just having fun sailing boats around the world and he's gone almost everywhere so he captained the McKenna taking it. I guess from Greece to Canada. Yeah he he brought crew And a cook And in October of two thousand eighteen they they met in in Greece and they spent a few days. They're getting ready Inspecting the boat making sure everything was in working order. It was by all accounts. A beautiful boat the McKenna was in very good condition and And ready for the voyage. He said By text to John. The surgeon Looking wonderful we're GONNA get going and so. They sailed through the Mediterranean. They had to stop in Italy everywhere. They talked with scenic about away but they stopped in Italy to fix a a steering problem fixed. It kept going. Stop at Gibraltar for a little while whether stopped them from going much. Further few days finally got onto the Azores which was the final stop before the Atlantic crossing Weather stop them again. There's a lot of weather in the late fall in the North Atlantic relatively treacherous waters so They were waylaid for for a while and It it took them quite a bit of time to get from Greece to the stores But then in November they set sail for Halifax what happened well. A lot of bad things happened relatively quickly The the treacherous weather caught up with them again. Rupert had this satellite phone that he borrowed from another sailor and he was able to get weather reports on sort of four or five hour delays. So he would check the forecast and based on what it said he would. He would steer the boat in a different direction. There was a big weather system coming in a big low pressure system from the South who was moving north and he and his crew. We're GONNA try to beat it to the north and they almost got there when you when you look at some of the screengrabs. They have of the of the weather patterns but they didn't quite make it and we're caught in this little arm of what they all refer to everyone involved in this as a hurricane. It was not a named hurricane but it was hurricane-force winds and it had this little arm whipping around and got caught in it and It for twenty four hours totally ravaged the boat crew was hunkered down The waves were were roaring. The wind was ripping through the rigging of the masks on On the on the boat and they were I mean they were they were rolling safely but quite violently through huge waves the kind of waves that you would see in big bad blockbuster movies you know. Not Maybe not the biggest of the big but huge so The weather data and they and they survived that The boats survived intact. They didn't capsize anything. Like that. But When it was safe to emerge in sort of inspect the damage rupert who Never saw probably couldn't fix came out and saw problem he almost couldn't fix because Man It was. Just it was torn. The steering was broken. The rudder was at a place it took some real Seafaring ingenuity to even get the boat. Operable again he and they kept going well. The steering quadrant was broken. The the the sort of mechanism that connects the rudder to the autopilot into the anything you need to actually change direction in the boat. He had to flip it around and turn it one hundred and eighty degrees the steering quadrant and then welded into place. Not Welding really. He had a cables and whatever it was at its disposal that would keep things together and worked. And so he I think the cruise airing macgyver. I got yeah he really was a seafaring macgyver and I think the crew was stunned They they were texting as well back to John. The surgeon who was a little helpless at this point in probably starting to feel a little guilty by boat is in the middle of the North Atlantic Middle North Atlantic. And his crew. That I sent. There's with it in. Oh my God we can even do and so. He was getting texts. They're saying we're pretty sure Rupert Scott under control because he's a pretty you know stoic. Man and And he did and they kept going and then well and then I hit more weather goodness. It never really stopped. They were chugging at this point as fast as they could to Halifax where the boat was gonNA spend the winter before coming to Toronto in the spring but more weatherhead This time the forecast racist dead wrong it. It misled Rupert and And his crew and they found themselves overtaken by a storm that I don't think was hurricane force but was nevertheless the kind of thing that would damage a boat. That's already been that's already damaged it just. His ingenuity was Was unfortunately Somewhat beaten down two to nothing by the storm so they found themselves once it had calmed a little bit and they were able to assess the situation adrift at Sea. What do you do in a situation like that? Well in this case what you do. Is You look for boats in the vicinity of your of your boat? Anybody who can help. You is a savior and fortunately for the McKenna. There were two Canadian navy ships. Who happened to be coming home from a mission a training mission in And War Games in Europe and they were only about eight nautical miles away from the McKenna. When everything went Super Ri- so rupert the captain got on the radio with Peter McNeil the captain of HMCS glaze Bay talked a little bit and Ships turned towards the McKenna it was glaze. Bay and HMCS summerside two coastal defence vessels. Which are two of the smaller ships in the fleet? But by comparison to the McKenna they were quite large and probably looked a you. Know a welcome sight to about adrift without any ability to really go anywhere on. Its own power and then they rescued them and it was no problem. In the story is over everything's Peachy The ship came and they just pluck them out. No it was really difficult. The story of this rescue is the stuff of a movie. This podcast will be right back after a really quick message. Can you guess the average dollar amount Canadian households have in savings according to the most recent data? It is just eight hundred and fifty two dollars now. The recommended rate of savings in Canada is ten percent and traditionally Canada's historical rate has been around seven point five percent last year though. It was one point seven. That doesn't sound like a lot because it isn't it can be hard to save today for people who are often carrying debt. It can be even harder in fact thirty nine percent of Canadians right now of all ages. Don't think they will ever save enough for retirement. So how do you save when there's not much there to start with? You need a plan

Mckenna Mckenna Canada Greece Rupert John Hagen Toronto Halifax Hurricane Rupert Mondro Royal Canadian Navy Italy Jordan Hollywood North Atlantic Middle Atlantic Rupert Scott Azores Mediterranean South Western
Mickelson, one behind Taylor, close to record sixth Pebble Beach win

CBS Sports Radio

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Mickelson, one behind Taylor, close to record sixth Pebble Beach win

"Nick Taylor and Phil Mickelson have just teed off as the final grouping at the eighteen T. pebble beach program Taylor has the lead at seventeen under par he's just one stroke clear all the lefty who's shooting for a record sixth title at

Nick Taylor Phil Mickelson T. Pebble
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

13:43 min | 2 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Welcome to the Nick Taylor. Horror show brought the Astros at filmmaker and one of the most unique and interesting documentarian working. Today his career was kick started by an eight-minute doc. Short called the s from Hell side. Note this film is awesome focuses on this bizarre phenomenon where an entire generation children were terrified of a seemingly simple corporate logo animation sequence the nineteen sixty four screen. Gym's logo is considered as the scariest corporate logo in history in the movie. We hear firsthand accounts of people who were terrified of the logo and its accompanying music which was considered by many to be demonic. It's a great watch and you can easily find it if you just google the s from Hell Anyway next Rodney direct. Perhaps his best known documentary room. Two thirty seven which focuses on the exhaustively diverse amount of theories surrounding the shining. This is another fascinating watch. Rodney's other projects include the nightmare a terrifying doc about sleep paralysis and the L. Do Che tapes about these shocking frontman of the band. The mentors his next documentary a glitch in the Matrix which will focus on the idea of simulation theory. This is the belief that all of reality is a digital simulation similar to the matrix all of his work is extremely unique and transcends traditional documentary formats by relying mostly on archival footage to move the narrative forward hypnotic music and really unique sound design. Rodney seems to create a palpably. Cerebral sensibility with his documentaries. They have a really overall cinematic and Kubrick esque feel to them and a really great and unique watches the common theme amongst all of his films. From what it seems. Is these subjective? Human experiences as documentaries are less interested in being journalistic and investigative and more focused on gaining insights into the human condition through individual perspectives. He's a fascinating filmmaker who I really admire. And I'm a huge fan of and enjoyed speaking with them a lot. Now here without further ado is great. Rodney Ascher been following your career for a while and I just wondering from the perspective of breaking in. How did you find your way into making feature length documentaries? What was essentially your your big break as it were brick was I'd say it was a short film I did a dock and it goes twenty ten a short one and I've been working on it probably two years the truth of s from Hell. Yeah and you know at that point. I mean I thought it was sort of a late film for me. Not a not not a beginning bill. Because you know I was pushing forty and I had had a Sort of stop and go career. is like a music video. Tv Commercial Director And you know had done two or three of those that you know that That I was happy with but they were few and far between and you know previously had worked story board artist and You know camera assistant and and different things on shoots and a couple of friends and I from film school imitator punches shorts together like in the nineties Now this would have been you know just coming out of school you know and we were very into you. Know like You Know Punk Rock and Industrial music music videos. The work of the folks. Like I don't know Richard Kern or Wherever was doing May ninth nails or like skinny puppy videos. Things like There's a group in Chicago each gun. That was really inspirational to a lot of what we were doing. And we had a sh- of me and my friend said SA- Garin Did like a super a true crime Black and white prison film. You know with all sock puppet cast and that's around a little bit Like the Chicago New York Underground Film Festival at a certain point. The two of US went out to San Francisco. And we're doing animation He did this amazing movie with a friend. His Eric Henry Animated Hip hop feature Called wave twisters Which was so incredibly ahead of. Its time you know they got so deep into you know matching each note of music with animated flourish out. That thing was you know. I don't know how many years in the making and I was trying to get more into live action stuff and you know rolled out into Los Angeles and you know I was. You know I took another stab at commercials music videos and this is. I don't know if I need to go over the point by point but it was very long circuitous path right And when I did the hell I was I had I had Taking Day Job. Teaching editing glass out here But you know for some insane reason you know the s from hell which couldn't have been more obscure If yes and craft project it just kind of broke lighter than anything I'd ever done. You know yeah you know played at Sundance and you know went on a on a pretty extensive festival tour which it's It didn't it. Didn't connect me with anyone who would go to finance anything but it certainly was a huge amount of cards. Meant to where I was pretty ready to give up. You know. Find a job teaching or post house or at Matt Agency or you know wherever I find wherever I could find a place But you know because of you know the success of the hell you know. I was motivated to you. Know try feature and and room. Two thirty seven was something that be in my my friend producer. Tim Kirk He'll do like ninety percent of it on our own You know So you've ever now got into Sundance two years later you know and that was really I think when well I think we that was when it became a career. You know you know in from you know and you know the kind of thing where if you're lucky enough to get into some dance a lottery ticket and then getting it should continue to live after sundance the second lottery tickets yesterday. That is you know it's you you just you just enough because so many. I. I thought I've personally seen so many amazing movies at those festivals. Who Don't you know don't get. Don't get that second. Strike lightning bright. You know. It isn't because of the quality of the film is a thousand variables. God knows you know. Why am I want enough? The other two three seven you know got picked up and both You know it got me on tore where I met. You know a ton of people that many of them still in touch with and kind of introduced me to the community that I didn't really know beforehand. You know and because of you know again you know like the s from Hell said. You know insanely specific idiosyncratic movie and one that I never imagined was going to play movie theaters you know. I thought it was a movie. That was going to play May I if I lucky my plate a festival but mostly play you know at you know art spaces you know right places? We have fifty folding metal chairs. Nothing wrong with those places. No that's a circuit that I know would love especially in San Francisco. Miami you know and I and I spent a ton of time when I lived in San Francisco at this place artist. Television access led by Craig Baldwin experimental filmmaker who I mean his movies are astonishing. Found footage to Lage's but more than that He's an amazing programmer. You know and there are nights where I'd say two or three hours of stuff that he would program together. New Independent shorts and things. Archives still has access to an incredible archives knowing those most greetings inspiration. What was his name again to me. Craig Baldwin. Okay his you know. He did. Features like doctors from the spectrum. Inspectors of this trim You did a documentary about negative land. sonic outlaws. He's a yeah. He's he he studied with is really like an air to Bruce Conner. Okay there's other movie tribulation ninety nine you know. Sort of the ultimate you know insane. Ufo Conspiracy Mash up right right. Well Craig and Craig Bruce Conner. Both in in their own ways were giant British for me the way that you know that they would do that. Way Today. Jews archives. Yeah I feel like there's there's there's a real nuance to properly using archive to not only cut away to archive. But a use archival footage to drive the narrative of movie and obviously depends on the archival footage and the subject. And all of that. But it sounds it seems like that's kind of that's a staple of their overall style and it sounds like it's something that you've embraced as well. Is there any sort of art to utilizing archival footage that you attempt to utilize from a storytelling perspective? Because some documentaries can do it just in his very natural way in other ones. Just kind of can't or don't yeah. It's if maybe a little bit of a challenge tour late but you know I think the the most important thing is finding ways for it to be to use it in a way. That's not little bits not exactly literal. You know that it isn't the narrator says You know and we went to Paris and the Eiffel Tower to cut the Eiffel Tower at There's there's like there's the movie there's you know Bruce Conner's movie called a movie. You know which one of the landmarks of found footage films you know. He just too simple things like cutting from you know and maybe a subcommander look periscope to like a bikini girl on a beach and clearly. That's not what he would literally be able to see you. It's very you know in conceptually. It's almost like Soviet style. Montage one plus one plus one equals three that you connect different ideas and to create a third one and I mean maybe that example is almost is almost literal because you can imagine not there on the water. She's nearby but he would he found ways of of use of using archive. That feels like I dunno architect art types. Which is you know you you get into dangerous waters of Y- pretension start. Do trying to describe the stuff yummy and the vocabulary but often in those kind of movies in the good ones you know. They find footage. That doesn't that doesn't feel like it's just you know even if it's like the reasoning military footage now this soldier is not this one guy he represents all soldiers history or right. He represents the United States of America. In somehow you're able to get that big idea that it's not just the specificity of whatever this thing originally was. Yeah no no I got. I got my first exposure to that style in of all things Do you remember down and everybody else vaguely do. Yeah I remember when it came out I think I I think I saw IT I. I don't remember it clearly. Well there's a sequence you know I think it's restrictions and bit midler are You know upper upper class couple living in Beverly Hills and Nick Nolte touched John himself in their pool but the moment that really struck me in that is their teenage son. Spires to be a filmmaker and What he in in the kind of filmmaker he is a US a found footage..

Rodney Ascher Bruce Conner Craig Baldwin San Francisco Sundance Chicago United States Astros google Nick Taylor L. Do Che Richard Kern Eiffel Tower Los Angeles Tim Kirk Kubrick sundance Commercial Director Eric Henry Matt Agency
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"A welcome to the Nick Taylor Horror. Show Tyler. Jensen and Roman Schimenti are of direct. To`real duo behind scream queen my nightmare on ELM street. This is a documentary that dives deep into the story behind a nightmare on ELM street to which was a sequel. That was very notorious for its overtly homoerotic. Innuendo and the controversy that ensued from this movie so I really enjoy this documentary. Not just because I'm a horror fan and love Freddie Krueger movies bite. Screen Queens is unexpectedly a very emotional journey and ultimately a very poignant story about forgiveness and the gay experience in Reagan Era America during the nineteen eighties which was a time that was loaded with a lot of cultural repression hatred and fear over the AIDS crisis so the movie follows actor Mark Patton who was ridiculed for his gate portrayal in nightmare on ELM street. To and it's kind of crazy 'cause that was really not that long ago but in the movie we follow him throughout the course of a year on the Horror Convention circuit where he interacts with fans and along the way he confronts the producers and Writers who in effect tarnished his career it It's it's it definitely packs a huge emotional punch in all in all it feels like I'm very important. Watch so I do recommend it. But in the meantime without further ado here are the directors Tyler Jensen and Roman House..

Tyler Jensen Mark Patton Freddie Krueger Nick Taylor Roman Schimenti Roman House Reagan America
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"All right great conversation with G. So here are my takeaways. From this conversation with gee-gee Guerrero for aspiring horror. Filmmakers number. One shorts are the shit a lot of filmmakers praise the value of shorts for their priceless educational value G G. Who's done eighteen? Shorts claims that they are the best way to learn the craft of filmmaking. Fast as simple as it may seem each short incrementally. Gets you more familiar with the craft of filmmaking and it does this on a condensed time line. Furthermore shorts are also away for first time directors to purge their mistakes in amateur habits in a low risk environment which is also very important to doing shorts. Also offers you the opportunity to build relationships with the crew that you can move on to bigger projects with number to finish what you start. Gee-gee mentions that the caveat to the importance of shorts the importance of having enough disciplined to finish them frequently filmmakers have multiple projects in varying stages of production but nothing to their name. That is completed. This is not great for your career because people need to see evidence that you can finish something through finishing her eighteen shorts g g learned invaluable lessons about filmmaking while demonstrating her style voice vision and ability to finish what she started. Now she's working with. I'm house number three. Go with your gut. Tv sets are notoriously grueling production experiences because of the breakneck pace and relentless shooting schedules but a lot of producers and directors who've worked on TV sets credit the experience with giving them a fast acting production rhythm which required them to have much more trust in their own intuition since. There's next to no room for second guessing anything on such a short time. Line Jiji's work on the purge. Tv series taught her exactly this and she credits it as a very valuable experience for her as a director's. Thank you guys as always for listening. If you enjoyed this episode would mean the world to me if you share it with your friends family and colleagues on social media. Don't forget to follow the shell on Instagram at. I'm Nick Taylor. Also on twitter at the exact same handle and don't forget to subscribe. Thanks again for listening. The Nick Taylor horror show..

Nick Taylor gee-gee Guerrero twitter G. director Jiji
"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

11:13 min | 3 years ago

"nick. taylor" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Film making tips tricks. Resources and strategies straight from the dark mine who are making it happen in horror today. As always each episode of the Nick Taylor Horror Show explorers and deconstructs the success strategies of established horror directors while summarizing the key insights and resources. You can use on your own hor filmmaking journey. This includes their creative process Z. Strategies for getting their first films off the ground favourite books and tools key life lessons and much much more. Today we have gee-gee saw Guerrero on the show G. G. is a Mexican Canadian filmmaker writer and actress who started her career making shorts including the Lucci Door Gore fest elegant which is now streaming on shutter. Gee-gee made her feature debut with the scathingly confrontational. Social commentary feature culture shock for Blunt House as part of their into the dark series now streaming on Hulu today Jiji's directing episodes of the purge TV series also for Blunt House and is attached to a new feature project about the Mexican. Religious icon sanctum workday. She's one of the most exciting emerging new voices in horror. I really enjoy talking to her about how she got started her favorite Mexican horror movies and is always her recommended. Strategies for aspiring directors. Here without further ADO is g g saw guerrero. Seems like you're on fire these days. Thank you so much just just the beginning so gotTA keep it up. Yeah that's very cool. Yeah I've read initially about year first. Look deal with blunt house which super cool I wanNA talk about but Cassette them where they project sounds amazing. I mean I know it's it's very early. But what can you tell us about that project? Well get is really early. 'cause I don't even know I'm just really excited that. The screen gems was ready and eager to tackle such a big part of our culture which is sent them. Warranty is like a big Thing you know I. It's almost hard to describe it as just with a thing is like it's a big part of our culture or background and sent him worth it has been a religion that It's not it's not been clear for a lot of people as to what it is. A lot of general people think is just a religion for criminals or for lower class as citizens in. It's not like that so I'm excited to really bring to life. I know about it and what I embrace about it and just keep it authentic. You know so again like like you said it's early so there's time to continue to develop it into an awesome feature in the goal is to have a franchise right so we'll see where see where life takes us on that one very cool. Well how do you describe to people who don't know it? Santa Marta is. How do you describe it? Well described it as many many ways when I go into depth like when I really go rented the detail. Like it's you know the Lady of Holy Dead Mexican folklore and all that people kinda freak out a little bit and they're like what like what do you mean the Lady of death like they they don't understand so I've kind of toned it down now and now I keep it so basic. I'm like you know that imagery of the Virgin Mary but with a skull that one in like Oh yes. I've seen that I just as like as simple as possible but I love describing about it. How it's not even a religion his way of life. It's a lifestyle. You know a type of faith that has a very vivid imagery but it's it really is about. You know this diety. God esque figure that has your back on. That's not going to judge you and I always really. I mean I'm not a symptom where the believer myself started looking into it and appreciating it some more and visiting some of the the altars in in Mexico I was like wow people really look at her with more than just faith. They look at her with with every inch of their bonds in their blood to to have that protection. It's quite beautiful and Mexico as Mexicans. We look at death so differently. You know than most countries we were not afraid of it like we cherish it and it's all kinds of strangely connected in our full colour like with the dead and sent them weren't they and all that like all all symbolism of is very much I find personally very connected very spiritual so it's very cool to bring that point of view to life I'm excited well to me. I'm getting excited. Just hearing you talk about I mean it sounds like such beautiful and meaningful subject matter. I mean I can't wait to sue do it. Thank you man. I appreciate that now. Of course so it sounds like you've been pretty busy with the purge. Tv show these days? How's that been going? Ooh honey please. I was a really intense shoot. It was just Miam- It was just my my first my first time on TV saw. I really didn't know how insanely fast paced it. Is that you really as a director like for anybody listening starting out like you really on. Tv Do not have time to second guess on anything Whatever your gut is telling you is what you have to go with. I've really learned that very quickly that there's just no time for anything. So you really have to be confident in that. Iran's for maybe it was the wrong one but you have to make it work. There's no time to go back but if you can deal with TV you can do. Movies LIKE NOT EASILY. But it just really. It's like boot camp for for producers. I agree with that I agree with that because TV. The thing is is like you have to be able to tell story in. Shoot it in such a quick turnaround so you have to be very not basic but but very like while may basic was the right word we have two very smart on how to get it all done in such a short amount of you know you. You're able to tell that story. Well keeping it simple size than a feature is a walk in the park as you can really elaborate on it. Take your time on it. Really you know milk it all and TV. You CAN'T RIGHT. So that was. That was quite a change for me. 'cause I I wanted to big on a lot of things. I wanted to really go crazy on certain stunts or certain shots or something bit you come to realize you don't have time you really have to split it up into the right moments of when you can do that so. I was like all right. Well I'll I'll put on the Gore but sting bet ran. The Gore is always eight. That's only it's the purge. Okay I so. How were you able to approach the purge? I mean it's a well established a property. How were you able to bring your own sensibility to something that was Kinda pre existing and that's a great question you know it was really. I was so blessed in so lucky to hear that it gave me such a big episode and one that you know everything happens like I don't WanNa give it any way but it's the one that you know within the characters when you watch the season it's the night you're anticipating a lot of things to happen and I was like. Oh my God like trusting of first-time DVD director This is so cool but I feel that definitely my sensibilities in my love for Uber and my love. Were you know the purge really worked out and it's a very strong episode. Episode Nine is very strong and definitely when people watch it. They're gonNA be like all I see a lot of GM like that's awesome very cool. There's a lot of crazy things that's on the characters due to each other and people will tell I I think you know close people will be able to tell a little things I implemented. So it's exciting. I'm I'm so excited because the perch I think is a great challenge for anybody Directing in genre because it's not just horrid like very dramatic and suspenseful situations between people in real people you know in this holiday that we're not Off from it so you know I. I really felt that a connection to it after making culture shock on that movie just I just really felt connected to Realistic horror that were not far from night that in being that savage to each other that just really felt that still fresh in my mind from making culture shock into bringing it to to the purge and it's like this is my jam also yeah a very cool. You said that People Watch it and see. See your hand in it. So how do you describe your aesthetic as a director? I mean one of the things I mean. I could go so many ways with at grade because I mean just in senior work. You seem to have a very strong visual language. You know and Definitely reminded me a little bit of Rob Zombie in a way. I love visit director but ration- Oriana I. Yeah I was in film school and I had never heard of him and What am I.

director Blunt House Gee-gee Nick Taylor Gore Mexico Guerrero Rob Zombie Santa Marta Lucci writer Hulu Jiji Iran G. G. Oriana GM