17 Burst results for "Nick Turner"

"nick turner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:11 min | Last month

"nick turner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Nowhere neutral rates are. There is the potential that there will be more of a focus on the lag effects and a slower pace of rate hikes from here on out. This is Bloomberg surveillance with Tom Keene, Jonathan farrow, and Lisa Abramovich. Good morning, everyone, Jonathan Farrah, Lisa bramley in time. We welcome you on jobs day in 29 minutes and John. This is a jobs day, which is about three days. A fed press conference, the stunning two year recession announcement out of the United Kingdom. And then on to some real data today, it's going to be amazing to see what your own power thinks of it. It's been two hours. We haven't said it once. It's bad news, good news today. It's good news bad news. It's been too hard. We didn't mention it once. You're just trying to trigger us. He triggered you. Well, I mean, honestly, I've heard this week. What's the end zone? 195 K is the estimate. Chairman Powell's on a mission Tom to convince this market to the terminal rate is going to go higher. Even if they slowed down, they're going to do. Are the vigilantes outdoor and we're going to do this is going to be a little different folks. We're doing the jobs day and we'll do it Michael all of his expertise, but we're going to fold the markets in the whole way. Are the vigilantes out today. The China vigilantes, the real yield vigilantes, the copper vigilantes, they're out today for jobs day. Well, let's talk about crude and let's talk about China. The rumor mill in overdrive. We just had a 98 point on Brent all week. And it gets more fuel today. 98 on prem, WTI just short of 92. We're up 4% on WTI crew today and Tom, you've asked all year. Imagine what this commodity market looks like if China came back online. Well, we're starting to price it in slowly. Let's see if we get any kind of confirmation from China whatsoever, because so far, we haven't had much attention. And at least this is critical. That's a difference. Edmore earlier this week saying, no, we're not going to go to one 20. Lots of demand dynamics there and supply dynamics as well. And Christian may look over at JPMorgan says baloney, China, Pacific Rim, up if they get the demand back. And if that happens, what does that do to the global economy? What does that do to our end rates have to end? It's not just to your yields that are the highest since 2007. If you take a look over in Germany, to your yields there are the highest going backwards. 2.14%. What does that mean? Just this comes after ECB's Christine Lagarde actually came out and said, they might actually have to have higher rates even still, echoing what Jay Powell said because of his concern about inflation. At least it's your point. This started in Jackson hole. At the end of August, you heard from an ECB executive is about schnabel. You heard from chairman Powell and they were both telling me the same thing. They're willing to cause pain. And in fact, the ECB is going a step further because they face the very near real reality of rolling into recession and they're tanning you they will keep hiking interest rates in that recession. So Tom, it's different. Different to what we've experienced before and I keep asking the question for 2023. The number one question for 2021, 2023. If you expect economic weakness, do you expect the fed to stand idly by and watch it play out? That's going to be difficult. Before we get to the data, we've got to look at the present news, which is tech austerity, Nick Turner with a great phrase, over at Bloomberg tech, and but guys, I want to talk about the scariness to lay off the Twitter thing in all that and is that separate and discrete from the job economy or is it portend a path to 5% unemployment? I don't know the answer to that. Let's strip out Twitter, it is I'm based. You can pick up on all the others to chip makers, Qualcomm freezing, hiring, Intel, cutting jobs, cutting spending, all the above, you've seen that at Amazon, send layoffs at lifts, layoffs are striped. That was announced yesterday. We know that's where the excess has been in the tech sector, not just the last couple of years. The last decade plus, so you know you need to unwind some of that excess. You're asking the right question. Is this a narrow story? Or is it going to become a broader problem? And that's part of the conversation right now. 4.75%, two year yield. That's the data point of the morning. Four 75, just unreal. 40 basis points, 12 months ago. 40 basis points 12 months ago. That's like, you know, CD. You could get a two year CD and you're like, okay. Get 12 months. I'm trying to do one right now. What's wrong with you? That's a futures are up a 181. Okay, there's your case. That's how you think I'm going to go. Futures look like this on the S&P. We're 25 minutes away from the payrolls report. Futures are up 7 tenths of 1%. We do the survey here at Bloomberg, the media, 195 K, the previous number 263 unemployment time, expected to take a little higher from 3.5% to 3.6. We had a briefing now. We go to the market. It's not your level joint. Just sing your U.S. equity strategist. Now that we've ignored this this morning at UBS, can you reaffirm an equity call for next year or as a labor economy, the fed economy is so uncertain, you just really can't get out to say June of 2023. What's a call? I think it's going to be difficult, but I think our message, Tom has been quite consistent. We've been seeing that this market is going to be choppier and lower for longer because it will be determined by how high the fed go and how long it stays there. You know, I think what the market has been trying to suss out is whether we end up in a recession or not. And as we've been discussing this morning, the fixing market does point to high probability of recession, you've been talking about the deeply inverted two tense curve. But I think also more importantly, watching that three month ten year curve, which recently briefly inverted and that tends to be a better indication of recession. And so it's really difficult to see how this market bottoms before that. If we do end up in a recession, it's just that typical historical trends market tends to bottom in a recession not before recession. Even German Powell this week admitted that the pot to a soft designer is quite narrow. And so if we think that if that happens, we think that we've lowered our outlook for the S&P 500 to 3700 for June of 2023, you know, there's risks to the downside. We see an earnings recession. I think it's just really difficult to be bullish in this market when you have a fed that is laser

China Tom Keene Jonathan farrow Lisa Abramovich Jonathan Farrah Lisa bramley ECB Chairman Powell Tom Edmore Jay Powell chairman Powell Nick Turner fed Christine Lagarde Pacific Rim JPMorgan
"nick turner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It is non 30 a.m. in Hong Kong and here in Singapore I'm Juliette Sully And I Brian Curtis looking at Marcus just opening up the hanxing index is trading flat We're also not doing too much in China The CSI 300 is down about two tenths of a percent We didn't learn anything too new from the fed minutes and nothing has changed all that much with Russia and Ukraine Details coming up on markets Juliet Well let's get to those minutes of last month's fed meeting which show that officials are poised to raise rates soon and they're viewing persistently high inflation as having the potential to justify the faster pace of tightening U.S. consumer prices rose in January to a four decade high of 7 and a half percent Some fed participants could view this as a reason to raise rates by 50 basis points in March Carl icahn is chairman of Icahn Enterprises and here is what the 86 year old investor had to say about the fed and the inflation outlook We keep putting out money putting out money putting out money to thank he was pushing it out there And that's great for a while I mean that's great It's like makes you happy but and at times it certainly needed But now that party has to stop what's going to happen is you having it already now the manifestations of it is rampant inflation And the fed also said it expects the process of reducing its balance sheet to begin after it starts raising rates After the closing Bill on Wall Street Cisco reported a revenue forecast above estimates the company's the biggest maker of computer networking gear It said sales will increase three to 5% for the current quarter That's compared to analyst projections right in the middle at 4% Cisco also announced a $15 billion increase to its share buyback program that brings the total repurchase to 18 billion Bloomberg's Nick Turner tells us what else the company is planning to do They were the king of networking for so many years and still are but they are trying to pivot more to software and services And I think this latest quarter isn't really giving us a massive indication of progress there yet but it's still something that kind of aiming for in the coming years Cisco rose in after hours more than 3% Well we're hearing SoftBank is asking banks to underwrite a margin loan of around $8 billion the margin loan financing would be linked to arms initial public offering Sources tell us banks are planning to pitch IPO valuations for arm of up to $50 billion The IPO is fallback after the deal sale to Nvidia collapsed over regulatory opposition And that deal was evaluated of course more than $60 billion Renee has his arms new CEO and he is on the failed acquisition Personally disappointed but also excited going forward Jensen's a fantastic leader thought the combination would have been fantastic between the two companies At the same time honestly we're just glad to have the uncertainty over It was a really long regulatory process The deal was announced back in September Here it is February candidly the uncertainty that we were under Having that behind us is really terrific I think going forward we've just got a lot of reasons for optimism And based on industry metrics and analyst predictions armies likely worth 25 to $35 billion We are seeing SoftBank shares in the Tokyo session just a little bit weaker down by about 8 tenths of 1% 33 minutes past the hour Let's get to the markets with Doug Krishna Let's begin with the eco data first Japan Brian exports in the month of January were up 9 and a half percent 9.6% to be specific That's year over year but the street was looking for a gain of more than 17% So a bit of a miss on that front The end right now is steady one 1550 thereabouts and weakness in the Japanese equity market right now with the new K two 25 down about four tenths of 1% using the WE I function on the Bloomberg terminal You can see clearly it's real estate materials financial shares leading this decline We go to Singapore next we've got the GDP number first for the fourth quarter and expansion quarter on quarter of 2.3% much below what the street was looking for the market was looking for a gain of around 2.9% If you stacked back and look at all of last year in terms of GDP for the Lion city a gain of 7.6% for 2021 year on year And right now if you look at the straits times we are pushing higher right now by about let's call it three tenths of 1% Australian employment rose by 12,900 the estimate was only for basically no gain So positivity on that front and the equity price action were looking at the ASX 200 in Sydney higher by about to 8 tenths of 1% In Hong Kong hang seng weaker by a tenth of 1% also similar drop on the Chinese mainland for the Shanghai composite different story in South Korea where the Cosby is rising by 1.2% Crude oil being very hard hit we had a tweet after the regular session closed here in New York from Iran's top nuclear negotiator the indication here is that sides in terms of the negotiation process are close to an agreement and this could potentially pave the way for a lifting of those U.S. sanctions on the Iranian crude WTI crude right now weaker by 2.4% we're trading 91 45 The Brent contract is right now at 92 65 and we're off in that regard by about 2.3% Long-term interest rates and short term rates are moving lower across the US Treasury curve ten year now at 2.03% in the Tokyo session and a two year at one 51 more on markets in 15 minutes Juliet Thank you 36 minutes past the hour time for global.

Juliette Sully Brian Curtis fed Icahn Enterprises Cisco Nick Turner SoftBank Singapore Carl icahn IPO Hong Kong Marcus
"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:22 min | 11 months ago

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Not on housing, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not on <Speech_Male> public health, <Speech_Male> not on <Speech_Male> substance abuse, care, <Speech_Male> not a mental healthcare <Speech_Male> on policing, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> by the way, 80% <Speech_Male> of the things that the police <Speech_Male> are stopping people <Speech_Male> for are for <Speech_Male> conduct that relates <Speech_Male> to poverty and homelessness <Speech_Male> and mental <Speech_Male> illness and <Speech_Male> substance use. Does <Speech_Male> that make sense to <Speech_Male> you? Is <Speech_Male> that how you want to <Speech_Male> spend dollars? Is that <Speech_Male> what you believe is the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> return on <Speech_Male> investment for <Speech_Male> societies? First of all, <Speech_Male> I think it's important. <Speech_Male> You have to listen <Speech_Male> to people. And <Speech_Male> if they're fearful <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> crime, you've got <Speech_Male> to acknowledge <Speech_Male> that that might be the <Speech_Male> case and certainly in <Speech_Male> communities where we've seen a <Speech_Male> lot of time. People <Speech_Male> do have a right to be <Speech_Male> fearful. <Speech_Male> I come to this <Speech_Male> work <Speech_Male> because of my commitment <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> racial <Speech_Male> justice and equity. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Others on the other side of <Speech_Male> the aisle might not. They <Speech_Male> might come to it for <Speech_Male> civil liberty <Speech_Male> reasons that <Speech_Male> they want to shrink <Speech_Male> the size of government. <Speech_Male> They don't like government <Speech_Male> overreach. <Speech_Male> They are <Speech_Male> concerned about <Speech_Male> how government spends <Speech_Male> its money. So I think it's <Speech_Male> important to <Speech_Male> figure out how to <Speech_Male> meet people where <Speech_Male> they're at to have <Speech_Male> the conversation <Speech_Male> that obviously requires <Speech_Male> listening first. And <Speech_Male> then the last thing <Speech_Male> that I'll say is <Speech_Male> that I would urge <Speech_Male> people to <Speech_Male> recognize that the humanity <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> people and <Speech_Male> to again <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> one and two <Speech_Male> Americans have had a family <Speech_Male> member who's incarcerated <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> us to remember <Speech_Male> what we would like for <Speech_Male> our <Speech_Male> sons and our daughters <Speech_Male> or our brothers <Speech_Male> or our fathers <Speech_Male> and to <Speech_Male> start from that <Speech_Male> perspective. So I <Speech_Male> would try to engage <Speech_Male> people <SpeakerChange> on a <Speech_Male> human <Silence> empathetic level. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> just like a <Speech_Female> final thought here, <Speech_Female> do you <Speech_Female> feel <Speech_Female> hopeful, I guess about <Speech_Female> this moment? Do you <Speech_Male> feel like <SpeakerChange> we're <Speech_Male> moving in the right direction? <Speech_Male> Most <Speech_Male> days. <Speech_Male> Most days I feel <Speech_Male> I feel hopeful. <Speech_Male> I talked <Speech_Male> about the <Speech_Male> deep roots of <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> system that we have. <Speech_Male> And I <Silence> talked about the <Speech_Male> fact that <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> is something that democracy <Speech_Male> chose that we <Speech_Male> all chose it. <Speech_Male> We can un choose it. <Speech_Male> We can <Speech_Male> act differently. <Speech_Male> I think it will take <Speech_Male> a long time. <Speech_Male> I'm very <Speech_Male> hopeful that <Speech_Male> people are <Speech_Male> engaging. I see <Speech_Male> movement on the <Speech_Male> policy level, <Speech_Male> but I'm also not <Speech_Male> tricked into <Speech_Male> believing <Speech_Male> that it will be <Speech_Male> that it <Speech_Male> will be easy. And some <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> same tools <Speech_Male> that we have seen <Speech_Male> that have <Speech_Male> created this apparatus, <Speech_Male> the fear <Speech_Male> mongering <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the iconography <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> gangbangers <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> cities of carnage <Speech_Male> and Willie <Speech_Male> Horton and <Speech_Male> all of these are the things <Speech_Male> that fueled this <Speech_Male> movement. <Speech_Male> I see that <Speech_Male> again <Speech_Male> today. I see <Speech_Male> that on headlines. <Speech_Male> My mother <Speech_Male> in law visited <Speech_Male> for a while, she watched a lot <Speech_Male> of Fox News. I <Speech_Male> saw it 24 <Speech_Male> hours a day. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> it's dangerous. <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> that makes me <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> remember what <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a task we have <Speech_Male> ahead of us and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> how much we're really <Speech_Male> going to have to lean <Speech_Male> in and to <Speech_Male> be resilient <Speech_Male> to claim victories <Speech_Male> when we can. <Speech_Male> But to wake <Speech_Male> up the next day and know <Speech_Male> that we're going to have to reach <Speech_Male> harder <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> stronger to <Speech_Female> get more done. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> so much Nick, you've given us <Speech_Female> a lot to think <Speech_Female> about. <SpeakerChange> Thank you for <Speech_Male> being here tonight. Thank <Speech_Male> you retina. It's a pleasure. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> PRX.

un Fox News Nick
"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:36 min | 11 months ago

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Our four <Speech_Male> conduct that's <Speech_Male> associated with <Speech_Male> poverty, <Speech_Male> homelessness, mental illness, <Speech_Male> and substance use. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And so we're <Speech_Male> investing in this <Speech_Male> apparatus <Speech_Male> that sucks <Speech_Male> people into the <Speech_Male> system <Speech_Male> that isn't well <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> adapted <Speech_Male> to address <Speech_Male> these complex problems, <Speech_Male> because many of these things <Speech_Male> are public health problems. <Speech_Male> Homelessness, <Speech_Male> we should have <Speech_Male> support of housing. <Speech_Male> Why would we lock <Speech_Male> some someone <Speech_Male> up? <Speech_Male> If someone is <Speech_Male> decompensating, <Speech_Male> would we <Speech_Male> rather have <Speech_Male> two people <Speech_Male> with sidearms <Speech_Male> pop out of a car and <Speech_Male> address that situation or <Speech_Male> we'd rather have a <Speech_Male> trained <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> person <Speech_Male> who actually knows <Speech_Male> how to deescalate <Speech_Male> and understand <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> mental illness <Speech_Male> and connect <Speech_Male> that person to the right <Speech_Male> kind of system. So <Speech_Male> what we <Speech_Male> need to do is <Speech_Male> invest <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> less in this <Speech_Male> massive apparatus <Speech_Male> and invest in <Speech_Male> the things that we know <Speech_Male> will actually <Speech_Male> provide the <Speech_Male> kind of <Speech_Male> safety and the thriving <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> far less <Speech_Male> harm than what we <Speech_Male> currently have. So <Speech_Male> it has to be <Speech_Male> a fundamental <Speech_Male> reordering <Speech_Male> of how we <Speech_Male> think about things. <Speech_Male> We have to be deprogrammed. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And then we have to go <Speech_Male> out and we have to act and <Speech_Male> we have to vote on that. <Speech_Male> And we have to participate <Speech_Male> in local elections <Speech_Male> for district <Speech_Male> attorneys and <Speech_Male> sheriffs <Speech_Male> and demand <Speech_Male> these kinds of <Speech_Male> changes in demand from <Speech_Male> mayors and governors that they <Speech_Male> invest in <Speech_Male> public health and invest <Speech_Male> in communities <Speech_Male> rather than in the systems <Silence> that end <SpeakerChange> up harming <Speech_Female> them. <Speech_Female> So what you're describing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is really this <Speech_Female> idea of decarceration <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> defunding the <Speech_Female> police, which has <Speech_Female> gotten a lot of <Speech_Female> airtime <Speech_Female> in the past <Speech_Female> year or <Speech_Female> two. And <Speech_Female> I think there are definitely people <Speech_Female> who think <Speech_Female> that this idea <Speech_Female> feels either <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> two pi in the <Speech_Female> sky that it's <Speech_Female> too <Speech_Female> far from where we are right <Speech_Female> now as a nation <Speech_Female> to get there and <Speech_Female> other people who maybe <Speech_Female> just feel like this just isn't <Speech_Female> the right way <Speech_Female> to go about fixing <Speech_Female> these issues. And so <Speech_Female> I'm curious <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what you would <SpeakerChange> say to <Speech_Male> skeptics. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> I mean, the first thing that I <Speech_Male> would recognize is that <Speech_Male> so the <Speech_Male> language of defund <Speech_Male> intentional <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> provocation <Speech_Male> and that sort of <Speech_Male> sharpened the <Speech_Male> issue and <Speech_Male> I think that <Speech_Male> in the political <Speech_Male> context, <Speech_Male> Democrats <Speech_Male> have been very effectively <Speech_Male> trolled by <Speech_Male> Republicans <Speech_Male> and have been tagged <Speech_Male> with the issue, but <Speech_Male> if you really stop <Speech_Male> and you look at it, <Speech_Male> if I were to talk <Speech_Male> to you and I say, look, we're spending <Speech_Male> a $115 billion <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a year on <Speech_Male> policing <Speech_Male> and major <Speech_Male> cities in this <Silence> country, we're spending <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> 30% <Speech_Male> to 40% <Speech_Male> 50% <Speech_Male> on policing, <Silence> of a city <Speech_Male> budget,

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:56 min | 11 months ago

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"People who have grown up with the concept of mass incarceration and understand it's actually not something that is necessary to deliver safety, but in fact that there are all sorts of profound costs and burdens that are associated with it. So it may feel trendy because for, you know, up until 5 or 6 years ago, while many people carried the stigma and the sadness, one and two Americans have a family member who has been incarcerated, that's massive, one and two. This is what we've created. And a lot of people carry that stigma so that people are finally talking about it and calling attention to it is absolutely necessary. So I'm okay. If people are on trend. And I'm curious if you feel the pandemic in any way has impacted your work or the way that we all should be thinking about justice reform. Well, not enough. I mean, I think one of the things that happened when the pandemic started was that we actually saw a pretty remarkable reaction on the parts of jail systems and police where we recognize that some of the most profound vectors of COVID spread were going to be in care facilities. So that's jails and prisons around the country. And jail populations dropped about 15% because sheriffs were letting go of people, judges were not imposing bail, police were issuing tickets rather than arresting and sending folks to jail. And so that was actually a very positive general reaction to see. We've seen those numbers start to tick back up. So it didn't quite have the durability that we would like it to. But one of the things that I think we learned at that moment in time is that it actually didn't cost people anything. Those decisions could be made. And people stayed safe. And there was a manifestation that what mattered was public health over public safety and people's humanity mattered..

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:44 min | 11 months ago

"nick turner" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Being.

"nick turner" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Listen wherever you get your podcast. China has imposed sanctions against an american think tank and six individuals including former commerce secretary wilbur. Ross it's the first time that country is used its anti-foreign sanctions law marketplace's china correspondent jennifer pack reports from shanghai. The new law gives china a legal tool to retaliate against american sanctions. International trade lawyer young is from the law firm in shanghai to make which is haleh phone call. Us recently put sanctions on seven chinese government officials over hong kong. So this time. China also sanction seven targets from the american side. I think china's countermeasure is restraint restrained because china's new law can apply to not just individuals and companies but also staff their spouses and immediate relatives and the penalties can be sweeping says. A lawyer specializing in economic sanctions. Nick turner at steptoe and johnson in hong kong. But there's no detail on what x. Commerce secretary wilbur. ross in the others will face. we're not certain if those are asset freezes visa bans or simply a prohibition against chinese companies doing business with those targets the new law also helps chinese companies fight back. If they get blacklisted. By the us they can complain. If any american firm tries to sever ties with them again. Lawyer young you the mytalk clinically john. Our bucci the chinese company could report to china's ministry of commerce and say the american client is engaging in what is called a discriminatory restrictive measure and unfair action. Who determines an unfair action. His guests audio hogan thoughtful yet. You see your song. What does sound will a joint working group from. Different government agencies will determine that under the new law. Chinese companies can sue others for damages if those firms comply with foreign sanctions but it shouldn't affect most companies in china again lawyer nick turner full if you have a locally incorporated company even if it's owned by a us parent company. It may not be subject to certain us sanctions. He advises foreign firms to audit supply chains and check if supplier contracts comply with the new chinese law. Also be proactive says analyst. Joe mazer with the consultancy trivial china. Multinationals operating in china should conduct an audit of their risk exposure related to hot button issues like xinjiang hong kong taiwan and should also be developing a clear strategy for messaging around sensitive issues. So far he says. China has not targeted any. Us company the narrative that china has been seeking to promote is that china is becoming more and more open for foreign business. The advice for us businesses in china. Don't panic just yet in shanghai. I'm jennifer pack for marketplace and with corona virus cases. Up one hundred seventy percent over two weeks in the us. The white house says it has decided to keep travel bans in place for people who would have come in from the european union the uk and other countries checking stock index futures again. The dow future is down one hundred and eighteen points three tenths percent. The nasdaq futures down less than a tenth percent with the federal reserve. Beginning two day meeting in a couple hours. Our producers are rose common meredith garretson stephen ryan danielson alec schroeder and erica soder strip. This is the marketplace morning report from. Apm american public media is molly would host of marketplace tech a show that helps you understand the digital economy. How a more of the country get access to better internet. What new jobs will artificial intelligence create or destroy and what tools will help us. Survive are already changing climate. We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts..

china nick turner jennifer pack shanghai Commerce secretary wilbur hong kong us wilbur steptoe Joe mazer bucci xinjiang hong kong Ross ministry of commerce ross hogan johnson john meredith garretson
"nick turner" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Dot com ford slash dunkin. And try it out and when you're ready to launch use offer code duncan and you will get ten percent off your first order of a website or domain squarespace dot com slash dunk. Tried out for free. When you're ready to launch he's africa and you're gonna get ten percent off your first order of a website where he do me. Thank you squarespace in. Thank you surprise. Lotion clown dot com pals. I want to invite you to subscribe to my patriots patriot. Dot com slash. Dt f. you're going to get so much extra. D f h related stuff. Including if you're interested weekly meditation group where we all gathered together once a week. Our journey into boredom. That's every monday and our friday family gathering. Today we talked about the there are some folks out there nebulizer their own urine wonderful family gathering today. Come home to your family. Patriarch dot com forward slash. Dt f h holy shit. We've got a lot of announcements friends. But these are good announcements my meditation. Teacher david nick turner. I'm very lucky to have in. My wife is offering a new course. Foundations of mindfulness. It starts july nineteenth and the link to get to that is going to be a doug. Trussell dot com. But if you want to just go there. Now it's dharma moon dot com slash foundations of mindfulness. You could just google it and find it definitely take the class. He is a brilliant buddhist teacher. I have to offer a personal thanks to one of my friends. Drew lewis for making. Today's podcast happen. Our guest today describes himself as garage philosopher. I think he's a philosopher philosopher. He's an expert on nostra schism and alchemy and her medicine and all the topics that i love so much and i was so lucky to be able to spend an hour with him today. Asking all the questions. I've had for very long time about nazda schism. It's one of my favorite podcast episodes in a long time. And i hope you all will stay tuned for today's guest. He is the host of the aon by nas. Tick radio show. That's on youtube. He's got a lovely twitter at.

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"How do we have meetings how you know all that stuff. I don't need to get into it. But i think we need to. We're going to have to figure out how to support a team building and support in and culture in healthy ways when when people are not on site in the same way but let's of organizations. Were doing that before we should ask them how they do. We should we should definitely So a brief thinking about the folks who are listening today who are executive directors. Many of whom don't have as many zeros on their budget as you all do and but you know smaller staffs sort of one piece of advice you might offer them as they begin to navigate this sort of return to some new new normal illinois. Start with you and going to give nicholas word. That sounds fair so first of all you know easy with yourself Figure out how to be attentive to your own wellbeing. Every day kiss this thing is relentless and we have to be showing up healthy and energized up. My advice is right. The words a grace and patience in big letters on pieces of paper and put those pieces of paper where you can see them at all times. i mean sincerely It's really the key. I think to to getting through tough times and being spacious with one another Lastly have folks take amid. Take this time sometime in the next several months to sit with your team and click up. What have we learned about ourselves. How can that inform. We would approach any crisis We hopefully we'll never need a pandemic playbook again but there's so much we learn that we're going to be able to use forever so just take some time with that. Everybody can make that time no matter what their budget. I think absolutely i like that. All right nick advice. Well i suppose this isn't going to say avoid pandemics but i suppose that's not really helpful advice because it's all beyond our control done the very practical level i would say like getting the cloud All sorts of valuable things. But i agree with with alan about About grace in patients. I think the one And to to be easy with yourself as a leader..

alan today one piece illinois nicholas zeros next several months
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"Is the blurry nece problematic right. So i think there are two pieces of the puzzle. Is that you know. Perhaps perhaps the pendulum swung more towards care and self care. Does it swing back or does it does it. Just by virtue of the reality of things swing back to people. Miss it like i i. I think there's a really interesting thing about this sort of personal professional unnecessary. The the swing so allen. Why don't you take it. I think that probably will probably be the last word on this. Actually my goodness wow okay. No pressure So i think this notion of blurry nece is there. There are positives and negatives who had been my view. So the one i'll share story went a. We got an email from a colleague on one of our teams weeping couple of senior leaders not few months ago maybe four months ago a basically saying you know our whole team is basically working set an am to seven pm now we have never not on email and It's burdensome and problematic for us of an eye. They appreciated that they made visible In my view just for the record. I don't believe this is a good idea right. People should not need ten working all the time. It's not really healthy or sustainable or desirable but What what i realized in talking with colleagues was you know we as leaders It's always comes back to modeling right. So am i sending emails at six or seven. Am i what am i doing. That's going to Either intentionally or unintentionally kind reinforcing expectation because the people are going to be checking email at all at all hours. Can i schedule these emails to go out at a different time. Can i purposely not respond on a weekend. can i put in the subject matter. Please respond on monday morning in some. What can i do. Simple steps that both model and then hopefully we can see kind of diffused themselves in the organization to create an expectation that people will have a sense of.

two pieces monday morning four months ago seven pm few months ago one seven ten both six couple of senior leaders
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"To help teams collaborate to create what i call happy collisions in the workplace. All of again like the interstitial stuff. The conversation with someone In the in the cafe area the ability that for a team to go plant in a particular area and do some collaborative work We think it's good for the way we work. We think it's good for culture and for people's attachment to the place So so know. Signed a fifteen year lease for this place and then moved in and then six months later the you know the pandemic hit so so this really is a you know. I think i would just sort of sum up by saying that. This really is I think it's important for the institution's culture. I i think it's important for career development. I think it's important for attachment to the ensued. I think it's important for race equity when we're thinking about how we develop and bring people in the career pathways and really make sure that we are holding our the values that we have Together as a community and struck by talking about what the but the pandemic created an absence of as as you know in in your work culture in your workspace as a leader Some and ask ellen So who are you as this pandemic is up as people start to come back together and we start to reframe the the gatherings as as something something to celebrate rather than something to fear Will you lead differently when people are back together. What did you learn that you're gonna bring with you and hold onto in leading and managing Knowing you know that that so much of what you used to what you might have relied on was absent for so long. Thank you well. Like sort of big and small ways to answer that. I just daily practices like this video messaging thing. I don't do those every week any longer. I actually realized at some point. It was taking more bandwidth than i had. I had actually noticed that for myself To do a in a in a thoughtful way. Every so i'm but i'm i'm going to not let those go. I hear a lot from people that they really appreciate that kind of connection. So there's no reason not to do that. I mean we're again centered fifty people on multiple sites online staff meetings. Actually i think we're going to keep all staff meetings because that way everyone actually could participate. And you don't have to be at any particular site and You know we've had very very very strong success in having a lot of people tune in to those things every week or every month we did the monthly One thing i wanted to raise Which is so tactical. But i will. It was sort of something a leadership moment for me. I realise we were doing I'm gonna put the air quotes for those who can't see it on the podcast. I'm quoting in the air. We had a retreat Now for those of you who've tried zoom retreats. I think you could see you know. I think it's an affront actually relatively hard to do well but at one point we we had one with our leadership is needed to do some planning..

fifty people fifteen year six months later One thing one point every ellen one every week
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"It's i you know it's not just myself as a leader but it's also what i think is really important within the organization that that in that direction what we should be doing so now to your question than we are doing exactly the same thing. That allen is which is that we are Were sort of doing a a slow incline into coming back We announced in march that we anticipated coming back in september sort of fully with some a hybrid model So recognizing that some some of this work from home stuff actually works at people can be productive. They can do. they're writing. They can do their research from from home and we can figure out how to do the teamwork three days a week and allow for people. The flexibility of you know otherwise But we sat early september as the date. We did a survey of our team to understand what they what did they like. That was working for us. Now that they wanted us to important to the future What did they what did they feel like they were missing. How can we help them to reenter. and then the summer will be all about like the slow inclined this. You know this thing up. I'm i am impulsive. It more of an imperative on our on our senior leaders managers which say if you're vaccinated i expect you to to to to come in And i expect you to come in more and start working on it now because it takes a while. It's not just like oh unvaccinated. I'm good. I'm ready to like you're working. Through whatever re resetting the neural pathways as allen. Sadder sort of working through the fear right and getting out of the habits that have been sat for us is a you know. It's a weeks months long process. I've really tried to encourage people to to do to do that. So i so i i guess the last thing that i want to say about this is that you know you made reference joan to the space that that..

september march early september three days a week
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"I think we'll be wearing masks for quite some time in in in our buildings And i think some of the work is going to be. You know what you read about in the news now just around. People are in increasing the more resistant to that. And having to introduced new skill sets and competencies in our staff about how to graciously manage that. Right on right So nick how about you Where are i mean. I can see right now. You are at the offices at vera and sort of what. What's the current thinking about The workplace at your workplace. Yes you can. You can see me in my office and you see that it's mostly you know that it's mostly empty. I've actually been coming into office Since july of last You know of last summer. I mean you know periodically for me. It was important to actually have a process of commuting of a of a buffer zone between home and and and work I wanna say one one thing quickly about something that you know that allen said that some important i mean i may she and i probably share in in common That i that. I believe that one of the things that helps to make me ineffective leader as the for for me. Leadership is title and it's and it's personal and it's an an. It's engaged so it's really important for me to know people and to you know and to see them and not just as oh. You're a senior program associate with ex program but to have a sense of their dimensionality. I and i've worked long enough not as the boss of an organization but within organizations to know that that mattered to me. When i was coming up through places at mattered to be seen and i think one of the things that i've you know that i've So it's been a challenge for me to lead in this circumstance where people are reduced to You know to two dimensions where the the way in.

last summer two dimensions july of last nick one things
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"Yeah i will just take a minute with that is again. I think what i want. I said this earlier. You know we. Every single person has a covid store or a. m that is multi layered and. This was so this is mine On the main. I would just offer that our family came through a flea and Without any major financial impacts are harm. So i found mentally wanted. Just be knowledge. That first and foremost and now. I will complain. The getting near then was really tough. Because i suddenly was not only was. I knew to town with a you know new job and has already to be steep learning curve in the role i had to really hit the ground sprinting in the organization And i did not have the opportunity to establish a professional network of any kind. Normally on so relational. I would be just reaching out to everyone. I knew around me and i didn't have any connections here yet and my personal My personal community you know also had didn't have the opportunity to really establish here. I mean thankfully with zoom. I was able to stay connected to my my loved ones in california but it really tr- You know the thing. I really i did realize very very quickly was that i had to make a very intentional decision to focus on self care. I was incredibly attended to my literally. My physical My made sure. I ate well and slept in mood kind of every day which was good as we only do that anyway. and gave myself a break. You know shits creek. Hello twice twice. Loved it loved it. you know. it's just like anything you need. I think nuclear could make insane point and giving giving myself that permission. Think with the team I think you know. A lot of nick describes as having done with his team. I i would echo with ours. Also again acknowledging very well resourced organization that had the capacity to give money to people who were suddenly having to navigate stuff at home that they weren't expecting and so forth but i just offer I think the the soft the softer work was probably the there was the how to make sure to deliver mission but in terms of showing up and leading how it to create two buckets i guess on. There's the sort of information buckets. And then there's the connection bucket and there were coequal importance in terms of how i spent my time and energy. So what do you need to convey everyday to people that they are going to receive an no and in work have in order to kind of do what we do you know deliver as expected And then how can we show up with folks to support and acknowledge and appreciate and hold and witness and make space for people who are suffering even as they you know every day in and day out at show up for the people who nina's and i would say this just you know for me like i've known this for a long time like in-person connection is kind of you know if you like this kind of one of my superpowers really a thing that i rely on In my leadership world and so work and it was a huge challenge for me to suddenly have to do all this on. Tv you know with with know and with by the way staff course young enough but enough younger than i don't even know tbs it's right But you know that you know so finding ways to leverage that technology to foster connections was accused him so Joe knows this. We did Colleagues of mine instituted these virtual gatherings with our staff twice a week once at noon on monday..

california Joe twice a week twice two buckets once first one noon on monday Every single person
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"That sentence when she heard that he had that he had covert and he had many conditions that were going to make it non survivable and we had lots of other losses of older. You know family members that we had to contend within the context of not being able to provide comfort to know that they left behind people who are isolated and so on. So yeah so that that was profound and on some on some level. also i also felt Incredibly lucky and and and privileged. That that i that i like many other people were i was contending with with fear and the The you know missing people having college a college student come back home and deal with his boredom and his manifestation of his frustration. Which is you know. It's like six foot one toddler. And and all of that. And and i felt lucky that i think we all experienced that. And there's the strange thing about the you know about the The what. I guess i would describe sort of like the lower grade. Traumas that we all feel In that we feel guilty for feeling we feel lucky. That's mostly what it is that it's you know we're not talking about tons of relatives who have passed away or sickness within you know the the nuclear family but in any event i think you know so one of the things that i really learned at least early in the early in that period or that i made a determination that that That i had to do as leader of the organization was To assume that sort of the default rule that I didn't know what people were going through that. There's a lot that was announced that was unseen because people various degrees of privacy and aren't necessarily willing or eager to You know to talk about something that they were struggling with And so we made assumption that that everyone was struggling. I think as you know. That's that's not rocket science because we all were you know we all were struggling in one of the things that made me do as a leader thinking about decisions that we made within the organization and how i stood deployed myself Was that it was incredibly important to acknowledge. The whole person that the that there was a blurring of the professional and personal that we sort of you had to sort of them. If not going well you had to ask yourself the question. What else might be happening And often something you know something was happening and and so you know so. We structured a bunch of policies within the organization essentially the institution. You know to institutionalize that to put care and safety of our staff. I to.

six foot one one toddler tons of relatives
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"Our community Education and training center to help develop an increase the number of competent care providers and clinicians globally Who are able to meet the needs of lgbtq plus patients and then we have a whole policy and advocacy arm That is kind of in the fight every day when policy decisions that affect people. Who count on us are happening. organizational budget is just over one hundred and forty million dollars or so and We have North of six hundred fifty employees who work at several different facilities Some of which a patient facing and some of which are not so the the silver lemay this. How did work get done during the pending. So as you mentioned in the intro really did arrive. I arrived on march night so it was actually but to the minute. Almost kind of the moment where the organization had to really accelerate Efforts to reduce the spread of course nineteen in our facilities. But we had to do that without missing on Delivering on our mission and providing essential taryn services to people who are counting on us every day. so like nick. I had a. There's one individual in particular in our organization our ap data informatics who had already essentially prepared even though she didn't know for this day We were able to pivot relatively smooth quite to the i should say Into a telehealth approach so the game was this see how many patients We can convert to a telehealth experience. I five phone only then by video. That will happen in a matter about three weeks. Well migrating nearly all of those six hundred and fifty plus people offsite so really in the initial stages of the pandemic north of seventy five percent of all patient visits happening via telehealth Excuse me ninety five percent or so with about seventy five percent of our staff working remotely Over the months that followed we eased back on that a bit in started bringing step back and settled ultimately into kind of what would have been Our situation for many many months now which is something strokes. Just half dozen or half of our staff were on site at any given time on because of course people need to be seen in person in order to receive competent care so we we really have been sort of integrating now the telehealth and the on site Work and the research goes on in the advocacy goes on in the education and training goes on but that's largely being done Via remote and do you. Are there any challenges with dealing with the fact that some of your staff or safe at home and others are sort of right there on the front line..

march night ninety five percent half dozen six hundred five phone six hundred fifty employees nineteen about seventy five percent nick over one hundred and forty mil about three weeks half seventy five percent one fifty plus people staff
"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"nick turner" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"At joan. Gerry dot com. I think of myself as a woman with a mission to fuel. The leadership of the nonprofit sector. I go with each episode is to dig deep into issue. I know that on profit leaders are grappling lists by finding just the person to offer advice and insights day is not. I'd like you to meet nick. Turner and ellen lapointe. You'll find their full bios in show notes but here's what's important to note. They're both really finding and beings. They're both kind of brilliant and they are both seen by. Their teams is highly effective leaders. They're both very kind and very funny. Nick has been the. Ceo of the vera institute of justice for seven years. He has had his boots on the ground in public service for decades with philanthropy front and center just a few short years ago. He moved into a terrific new space in industry city brooklyn. Note that the work of vera involves no direct service provision allen. The point is the ceo of fenway community health in boston. She just celebrated her one year anniversary. She began her tenure on a monday after moving cross country for an amazing gig and on tuesday that very next day. Boston shutdown. welcome to boston. Ellen ellen is also all about philanthropy public health and justice. Why did i just introduce sounding. Like superwoman fenway has a staff of over seven hundred across multiple locations fenway as a federally qualified health center patients. Through the doors at fenway every single day for those of you regularly listen to my podcast. You might remember that. Ellen is a repeat customer to this podcast. Having joined me to talk about her wild ride. A brand new. Ceo walks to the door on day. One and the world changes forever go. It's a great conversation. You should check it out nick. Let's start with you. Thank you for joining me. It looks like you're in the office. Your dogs miss you. I am indeed in office. Buttercup and pablo miss you joan there okay without me for the day i see well i i miss them desperately allen thanks for subjecting yourself to yet another podcast and shoulder surgery. How're you doing. Oh oh thank you for bringing that up appreciate that. I just wanted everyone to remind. I wanted to remind everyone that you're not thirty right exactly no. I don't think it is shocker. I think of it as a metaphor actually right now. I've doing well. I'm recovering. Welcome rotator cuff surgery due to aging. Thanks for telling everybody. How nick allen i selected both of you because i don't typically do a duo podcast but i know that neither of you are windbags and and each of you has a different perspective on this whole topic because of the different kinds of organizations that you run so i wonder First off. Let's start with you nick. Just a quick four one one on vera. And if you would then can you set up. How work got done during the pandemic sure. So The vera institute of justice as you as you described. Joan is.

ellen lapointe Ellen nick allen tuesday boston nick seven years Joan Nick each brooklyn Turner allen First Ellen ellen each episode monday one year anniversary both Boston