10 Burst results for "Nick Tim Roche"

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"The latest updates dates on the outcome of the vote up. WSJ Dot Com the Wall Street Journal listeners come from all walks of life and in business and no matter what type of business you're in eighty. P is here to help you achieve what you're working for with HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people learn more at designed done eighty P dot com on to markets later in the show will look at what we're expecting from the conclusion of the feds two day policy meeting hint a rate cut but for now we're going to talk about index. EXP funds new might be invested in one they broadly tracked the performance of selected stocks on an exchange like the S. and P. Five hundred they're different than many active mutual funds which involve money managers choosing specific stocks to put into a portfolio that hopefully beats the market now reporting for the first time ever more of US have put money in those passive funds than the active ones. It's one of the most dramatic transformations in the history of Financial Markets Quentin web explains the main main reason for this really is one of costs over the long term you know money has switched active active funds into passive ones quite simply simply because it's a lot cheaper to run them and so the money managers behind them big groups like at Croke Van Garden State Street can charge much lower fees on top the sort of insult to injury many active manages for a long time have struggled to beat the benchmarks which they track the performance against you know it is it's hard to consistently beat the wisdom of the broader market if the broader market has already priced the stock appropriately. It's quite hard to stand up by finding a bargain and on top of that. If you are an investor inactive fund you start from a disadvantage because you're already paying a big chunk of the money that you've entrusted to your manager <hes> to them because they're an active manager they charge higher fees so that's why we've seen this is decades long advance of passive investing largely the expensive active management and here's what else were paying attention to today <music> the. Fed the FOMC concludes its two day policy meeting this afternoon where expecting that they'll announce a further quarter percent rate cut that would leave their target federal funds rate at a range of between one point seven five and two percent so what's changed since when they last met in July. Here's our fed reporter. Nick Tim Roche with more from Washington. If you look back what's changed for the Fed since their meeting at the end of July which was when they cut interest rates. They also said that time they were cutting cutting interest rates because of trade policy uncertainty because of weaker global growth and because of muted inflation if you take those first two items slow growth looks <hes> as bad or worse now as it did then trade uncertainty has gotten worse so the. Fed Right now is facing facing an uncertain outlook where the economic data in the US has been okay. The risk picture on the other hand does look worse and so the challenge for the feds. How do you tell people what you're going to do with policy six months or twelve months ahead when you just don't really know. We'll have an update in our afternoon edition about just what chair Jerome Powell had to say and to keep an eye out for this today. The trump administration is planning to revoke California's waiver to set its own tailpipe emission rules. You might remember we discussed this last week. It's an escalation of a fight between the state and the administration that's challenging challenging the car industry according to one administration official the move to rescind the waivers still under review and could be delayed but we're reporting that we're sending the waiver would fulfil a big goal of the trump administration that's to curb. California's influence over the car industry finally upside of the streaming lors. It's led to a classic. TV arms race where reporting that entertainment companies have spent more than two billion billion dollars. Yes with a B on Classic television shows in recent weeks some examples. At and T.'s warner media just struck a deal for the Big Bang theory and universal scooped up parks and REC and <hes> you might have guessed from the beginning of this item Netflix went for Seinfeld the whole ideas to win over to their streaming services at a time when we're about

Fed US Wall Street Journal California Croke Van Garden Nick Tim Roche Netflix Jerome Powell FOMC Washington reporter Seinfeld T. official two day two billion billion dollars
"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"On to markets u._s. Companies are buying back their own shares at the slowest pace in eighteen months some site that could be a sign of more volatility ahead. Steve russillo explains the buyback boom is showing signs that slowing down and what this means is that companies look like they're repurchasing fewer of their own shares than they have in recent years. Companies are really starting to tighten their waltz here. There's a lot of things that or concerning going on in the world right now you think of the the u._s. China trade dispute the corporate earnings picture doesn't look so great global economic growth is slowing down. The fed has cut rates. One senate could do more cuts in the future but we're not quite sure i there's a lot of uncertainty in the world right now and this is potentially a worrying being signed for the stock market because demand from corporations for their own stock has been you know one of the key pillars of the stock market's performance really since the financial crisis and so if that pillar of support starts to go away a little bit that could be a sign of more volatility ahead and it potentially could be assign that this bull market could be on its last legs and now the skied. Here's what else we're paying attention to today. The federal reserve will release minutes from its july meeting later today. That's the meeting when the fed decided to cut interest rates. It's by a quarter of a percentage point to a range of between two and two point two five percent nick. Tim roche has more on what to look for. One of the big questions is going to the how much support there was for that rate cut at the july meeting before the meeting nearly half of the twelve or thanked president seemed skeptical optical of the need to cut interest rates. Not all of the reserve presidents have a vote on the federal open market committee but they participate in the meetings and so the minutes will oh give a better flavor about how much support there was for this rate cut and then how different people saw the arguments the various arguments for four cutting interest rates in july. The minutes will provide a little bit more color on y. Two of the fed officials who descended from the vote to cut rates did so those are i have said that they were worried about easing policy when the economy was relatively good because that could feel financial bubbles or other instability instability so we may get a little more color on that as well but nick cautioned that a lot has changed since that july meeting so the miniature released with the three week lag and sometimes not a whole lot happens after the meeting so that information is still relatively fresh in this case there have been a lot of developments on trade trade and also in markets long-term treasury yields have really moved a lot lower in the meeting so we'll be getting the feds reaction to the outlook at a particular point in time but it's not clear that it'll be all that helpful to help make sense as the feds <hes> next few moves the minutes will be released at two pm eastern time. Finally we're spending more than ever for super fast internet speeds the assumption of courses verses that faster is better but we conducted an investigation and found that for most people put just not the case shalini ramachandran explains there are or fifty journal reporters who were part of a panel where we put small computer and of high-powered wifi router and everybody's home and we we worked with researchers at the university of chicago and princeton who created the software that would basically study the speeds of big heavy bandwidth width streaming applications like netflix that kind of thing and what did they find the study found that beyond speeds of about one hundred megabits per second and you're not gonna see much benefit to getting faster speeds as it pertains streaming video to hear more about our investigation into broadband speeds. You can listen listen to our afternoon podcast the journal. It's our podcast about money business and power. That's what's news from the wall street journal. Thanks for listening.

fed wall street journal Steve russillo China senate Tim roche president netflix shalini ramachandran nick university of chicago princeton one hundred megabits two five percent eighteen months
"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"We've been discussing these slide in oil prices over the past couple shows even increasing tensions in the Middle East haven't led to the spike that some might have expected where reporting today that it's part of a larger trend. A lot of commodities have seen a slide in their price. These are things like cotton, copper, even coffee from Hong Kong are markets reporter, Mike, Byrd explains. So what are the really interesting things going on? In commodities. The moment is lack of reaction to, you would usually think, over some fairly severe supply issues, and particularly this sort of geopolitical tensions that we saw in the Gulf last week, with regarding Iran, unto oil, usually, you'd expect those two from fizz of supply constraints and to drive up the price of oil. Now what you've seen instead as with other commodities is, it's really the global demand concerns that a dominating at the moment, there's been a real sour. During into of asses from both communists, and in other parts of the mall kits was expectations for global growth in the past few weeks. You've seen as the US growth numbers dropping off those sort of early indicates is you seen a lot of weakness in the Chinese numbers two. And since in China, one of the main growth drivers is the real estate and construction markets when you see a growth, Trump off that the demand for, you know, country of over a billion people, the one of the main ingredients full, you know, building things culpa if, that's if that demand is dropping off, then you're gonna see the price of copper take a hit as well. And now the skid, here's what to look forward to later today. The Federal Reserve meets this week as we've been discussing many analysts are now expecting either a rate cut at this meeting or a signal from the central Bank that it's considering a cut at its next meeting in July. But how will the fed make its intentions gnome as Nick Tim Roche reports from Washington, relatively new wonky message favored by some it's known as the dot spot, and it was introduced in twenty twelve well, it's coming into renewed, focus Ridolfi plot is a chart that shows where every fed official expects interest rates to move over the next three years, corresponding to their baseline outlook for the economy because this hasn't been around in a rate, cut environment and environment where people think the next move is more likely to be down than up. We don't really know how the fed plans to use this document to project rate cuts. If a number of officials are projecting rate. It cuts later in the year, but they're not cutting rates at that meeting. It really raises the question why if you think the economy is going to warrant lower interest rates in the future. Why aren't you cutting rates now? And the Paris air show gets underway today. It's one of the biggest events of the year and aviation circles and ahead of the show. Boeing's chief executive spoke with us. He promised that the company would be more transparent about what's happening with its grounded 737 max planes. He also added that he was disappointed with the company's communication lapses earlier from the Paris air show. Robert wall has more on what we can expect this week. Well, you know, the max isn't here at the show, but it's kind of still hanging over the whole event. But there is there is other news. I mean Airbus is likely than announce a new plane today or at least an upgrade of its eight three twenty one single plane, it'll get longer legs. And really, it's designed full to fly transatlantic between smaller markets markets that. Don't warn a big wide body that you might put on a New York Paris routes. But if you wanted to fly like, I don't know, you know, Boston Dublin or something, you, you might wanna small plane, and those typically I didn't have the legs to, to, to make the hop and eight three Twenty-one. Excel are is targeted at that market. So, so that's a big important development, and especially because Boeing has plans to enter that market to. But of obviously, they're distracted right now with the max finally CalPERS the country's largest public pension fund, which manages the savings of thousands of California's public employees is facing a dilemma make money or save the world.

official Federal Reserve Nick Tim Roche Boeing Paris Middle East Hong Kong US Iran New York Paris China reporter Airbus Robert wall California Mike Byrd
"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"A ten dollars monthly or you can buy games Alicarte end. They're gonna watch with about thirty games though. Most of them are older games that have been out for a while. And they're not any of the big, big blockbusters that gamers are most familiar with, but there are some a couple of big names out there. And at least a two, new ones launching on the service that was there, a needle men speaking with JR Whalen, about the e-3 expo. Now, our main story this morning, just how President Trump's repeated hectoring of the Federal Reserve has complicated interest rate decisions. Here's what the president had to say to CNBC yesterday in response to a question about whether he thought the fed had listened to him. Listen to me, and get a we have people, it's more than just Jay Powell. We have people on the fed really weren't, you know, they're not might people. So how has this changed the environment in which the fed must determine whether economic conditions warrant a rate cut are fed reporter, Nick Tim Roche has been speaking to Charlie Turner from Washington. Well, let's be up front about this Nick has any fed chief ever faced such pressure before, from a president actually, yes, you could probably say that this is something fed cheers in the postwar period, have faced, what's different about President Trump? Is that his criticism has been much more public of the fed? So just to. Go back in time in the nineteen sixties, the fed chairman by the name of William mcchesney Morgan was very unpopular with president Johnson recall Johnson was trying to boost domestic spending while fighting the Vietnam war, and he did not like the fact that the fed was raising borrowing costs to limit inflation. And so he was very critical privately of Martin. There's a story about how he pushed him up against the wall said my boys are dying in Vietnam. And you won't give me the money I need. So there is a history of presidents putting pressure usually in private on the fed chair. What's different about this president is that he does it pretty often in public via Twitter via interviews or off the cuff statements to reporters on his way to Marine One helicopter. And so it creates a perception problem for the fed because the fed doesn't want to be seen by the markets is responding to anything but the economic and financial. Data that they analyze that could change the way investors. Think about inflation, and bond yields, and so forth. You described three challenges fed chair pal is navigating at this point. What are they so the fed has to set the right interest rate of the right time? The fed has to explain clearly, what they're doing and why they're doing it, and those are two challenges that every fed leader faces, but the third one is unique as we've talked about. And that is he has to deal with this public pressure, campaign, very loud, criticism from the president something that we haven't seen since the early nineteen nineties President George Bush senior was the last president who even said publicly what he thought the fed should be doing President Clinton and his two successors Bush, and Obama maintained this rule where they were not going to comment on the fed, and Clinton's advisers convinced him. This was a good policy for them because they had seen how President Bush. This is a first President Bush had called on Greenspan to lower rates. And Greenspan didn't go along with it. And so Clinton's advisers told him, look, you really don't have anything to gain by pressuring the fed. They're going to do what they think they need to do. And you putting pressure on them isn't gonna make their life any easier. They may feel like they have to do the opposite to to, you know, to look independent so Clinton and then Bush forty three and Obama never said anything about the fed, and that was a tradition that continued up until about a year and a half into Donald Trump's presidency doesn't fed chairman pal. Face pressure to cut rates for the rest of the year, including at the June meeting. So the Fed's next meeting is in less than two weeks on June..

president Federal Reserve President Trump President George Bush President Clinton chairman Martin reporter Jay Powell Obama Nick Tim Roche JR Whalen Johnson CNBC Vietnam Twitter Greenspan William mcchesney Morgan Charlie Turner
Fed Considers Rate Cut as Political Pressure Mounts

WSJ What's News

03:50 min | 1 year ago

Fed Considers Rate Cut as Political Pressure Mounts

"Now, our main story this morning, just how President Trump's repeated hectoring of the Federal Reserve has complicated interest rate decisions. Here's what the president had to say to CNBC yesterday in response to a question about whether he thought the fed had listened to him. Listen to me, and get a we have people, it's more than just Jay Powell. We have people on the fed really weren't, you know, they're not might people. So how has this changed the environment in which the fed must determine whether economic conditions warrant a rate cut are fed reporter, Nick Tim Roche has been speaking to Charlie Turner from Washington. Well, let's be up front about this Nick has any fed chief ever faced such pressure before, from a president actually, yes, you could probably say that this is something fed cheers in the postwar period, have faced, what's different about President Trump? Is that his criticism has been much more public of the fed? So just to. Go back in time in the nineteen sixties, the fed chairman by the name of William mcchesney Morgan was very unpopular with president Johnson recall Johnson was trying to boost domestic spending while fighting the Vietnam war, and he did not like the fact that the fed was raising borrowing costs to limit inflation. And so he was very critical privately of Martin. There's a story about how he pushed him up against the wall said my boys are dying in Vietnam. And you won't give me the money I need. So there is a history of presidents putting pressure usually in private on the fed chair. What's different about this president is that he does it pretty often in public via Twitter via interviews or off the cuff statements to reporters on his way to Marine One helicopter. And so it creates a perception problem for the fed because the fed doesn't want to be seen by the markets is responding to anything but the economic and financial. Data that they analyze that could change the way investors. Think about inflation, and bond yields, and so forth. You described three challenges fed chair pal is navigating at this point. What are they so the fed has to set the right interest rate of the right time? The fed has to explain clearly, what they're doing and why they're doing it, and those are two challenges that every fed leader faces, but the third one is unique as we've talked about. And that is he has to deal with this public pressure, campaign, very loud, criticism from the president something that we haven't seen since the early nineteen nineties President George Bush senior was the last president who even said publicly what he thought the fed should be doing President Clinton and his two successors Bush, and Obama maintained this rule where they were not going to comment on the fed, and Clinton's advisers convinced him. This was a good policy for them because they had seen how President Bush. This is a first President Bush had called on Greenspan to lower rates. And Greenspan didn't go along with it. And so Clinton's advisers told him, look, you really don't have anything to gain by pressuring the fed. They're going to do what they think they need to do. And you putting pressure on them isn't gonna make their life any easier. They may feel like they have to do the opposite to to, you know, to look independent so Clinton and then Bush forty three and Obama never said anything about the fed, and that was a tradition that continued up until about a year and a half into Donald Trump's presidency doesn't fed chairman pal. Face pressure to cut rates for the rest of the year, including at the June meeting. So the Fed's next meeting is in less than two weeks on June.

President Trump Federal Reserve President George Bush President Clinton Reporter Jay Powell Chairman Martin Nick Tim Roche Cnbc Johnson Vietnam William Mcchesney Morgan Greenspan Twitter Barack Obama Charlie Turner Washington
"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"From HR talent, and time management to benefits and payroll. That's ADP always designing for people. The big theme on the first day of Apple's developer conference privacy, apple has kind of waved a flag of privacy over the past few years and fed watchers are now predicting a rate cut Wall Street analysts were closely watched the fats are beginning to council in rate cuts for later this year, plus the NASDAQ slides into correction territory. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Kim get Allston. Let's get started. Now before we get in term main story this morning, Apple's efforts to position itself as a digital privacy crusader at its developer conference. Here's what you missed. Mexico is exploring possible retaliation to the threat of US tariffs on all of its exports. However officials say they would rather convince the Trump administration that negotiated solution is in both countries best interest. Here's Mexico's ambassador to the US Marta by Sana. We have faith in dialogue and politics, a means to avoid a costly and unnecessary confrontation. We believe our countries can reach a deal on how to face a matter on which were approaches are different business groups also warned against imposing tariffs on Mexican imports with Neo Bradley the executive vice president and chief policy officer of the US chamber of commerce saying the organization was considering legal action, due to the potential impact that tariffs could have on US businesses. Look at manufacturing and autos, you know, the number of parts and a vehicle, that's a symbol here in the United States. They go back and forth across the border presumably each time being taxed at five percent under the president's proposal escalating to twenty five percent with essentially destroy the supply chains. The White House says the imposition of tariffs are necessary to push Mexico to better deal with the influx of Central American migrants to the US border already hover the esscalation of those tensions with Mexico, as well as with China, and others, is prompting some Wall Street analysts predict that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates later this year. That's a marked change from just a few months ago in December when many were expecting an increase from Washington are fed, watcher, Nick Tim Roche explains. Why? So it's hard to tell how fed officials thinking about this, but Wall Street analysts who closely watched the fed are beginning to pencil in rate cuts for later this year because they think that the trade tensions are going to create enough uncertainty for businesses that the economy will slow more than they currently expected the economy grew three percent last year. Most economists had expected that would slow to somewhere around two or two and a half percent this year. So it's really a now that they think that there could be a bigger slowdown than that. I think the fed is going to respond later this year by cutting interest rates. Meanwhile across the pond, President Trump addressed the Queen at a state banquet is part of his tour of the United Kingdom this week in his speech. He praised the queen's participation in the war effort in World War, Two in April nineteen forty five newspapers featured a picture of the Queen Mother visiting the women's branch of the army. Watching a young woman repair a military truck engine that young mechanic was the future Queen. Great, great woman. The Queen also spoke about her first trip to the United States in nineteen forty four under President Eisenhower. She also took the time to remind the president, not just of the strong cultural bond between the two countries separated by a common language. But also the financial ties British companies in the United States employees over one million Americans and the same is true by versa. Mr President, as we look to the future. I'm confident that our common values and Shad interests will continue to United's today, the president will meet outgoing Prime Minister Theresa may amid protests that are planned in central London. Now, our main story this morning. Apples focused on privacy at its developer conference in San Jose, California at the event, which kicked off yesterday and continues this week. Apple unveiled a whole host of new privacy features it comes as the US government, ramps up its scrutiny of the.

US Apple Mexico President Eisenhower Wall Street Journal developer Federal Reserve Mr President executive vice president ADP US chamber of commerce President Kim Trump Washington United Kingdom Neo Bradley
"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"It seems as if the US and China had a truce, there are other aspects that will be of interest to investors from Washington, Nick Tim Roche has more vis will still be a really interesting set of minutes because the other big focus, the fed meeting, April thirtieth and may I was around this problem of inflation, being lower than fed officials had thought it would be. And it has been a real puzzle. And if you go back to that meeting, there were a couple of fed officials that had been talking about the possibility of cutting rates maybe later this year, even if it looks like inflation was proving to be more stubborn below. Below the feds two percents target and chairman Powell really pushed back against kind of market expectations of a rate cut at his press conference he did that by repeatedly referring to the recent softness in inflation, as tranche, enter transitory. And so what people will be looking for out of these minutes, is, how did the rest of the Fed's rate-setting committee approach the inflation dynamic at this point in time speaker, Nancy Pelosi is facing growing calls within the democratic caucus to impeach President Trump? That's something she'll address at a meeting today. Here's democrat Steve Cohen from Tennessee. A see a lot more people. Offensive heard in would like to see the inquiry they'd also like to see speaking closely would that all the committees. If you're sick Shen proceed, and get all the information they need. Has so far fended off impeachment requests for months, saying that President Trump was goading Democrats, but the decision by the president to block his former counsel, Don Mcgann from testifying has angered members of the party who say that President Trump is obstructing their inquiries. Finally, despite some high profile young tech CEO's, Mark Zuckerberg, and Evan Spiegel might ring a bell here. We've crunched the numbers and found that just six percent of S and P five hundred CEO's are under the age of fifty that's a percentage, that's more than have since two thousand nine in fact, now the average age of a CEO is fifty eight.

President Trump Fed CEO president Nick Tim Roche Steve Cohen Powell US Nancy Pelosi Don Mcgann Washington Mark Zuckerberg chairman Evan Spiegel Shen Tennessee China six percent
"nick tim roche" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Why when i say major economic news i mean major because four months four months we were told that three percent economic growth was impossible take for example this segment on national public radio with host scott simon nick tim roche is national economics correspondent for the wall street journal joins us nurse studios thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me based on what you've learned three percent growth there's that seem confident optimistic or naive while it's extremely optimistic the professional forecasters at the congressional budge should office and the federal reserve see growth of a little less than two percent over the coming decade and that's where we've been for the past decade now presidents in their budget get to assume that all of their policies become law so you always see a little bit higher increase in the growth rate in the white house budgets but nothing that's quite diverge like this from the consensus viewers oh yes the consensus view is that three percent economic growth is impossible but simon then asked simon then asked nick tim arose well is it added normal for the us economy to grow at a three percent rate are there times in history when the us has had a growth rate of three percent yes it's been quite common i mean if you look back over the last two hundred years and the trump administration says the swede have grown up three percent and we we don't want to give to this idea that we now have a lower growth rates so wait a second it's rather common that the united states economy grows at three percent if only we could figure out out what might have happened in the eight years before trump took office that the united states did not see three percent growth a single time even more direct even a more to the point of how the media was circulating this idea the media is advancing this narrative that the trump it ministration was crazy for thinking that they could get two three percent economic growth stephanie rule at cnbccom demonstration clearly has keenly pulled growth on its mind three percent growth later american economies to some people an absurd assumption it used to be normal i think we can absolutely get to sustain three to four percent gdp we're bringing it from one percent up to four percent.

economic news scott simon nick tim roche wall street journal nick tim trump united states three percent four percent four months two hundred years two three percent eight years one percent two percent
"nick tim roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And more and increased military spending by ten percent doubted congress at the budget will pass without a lot of change all of the proposals bank a projection of three percent growth in the us economy by twenty twenty one nick tim roche's national economics correspondent for the wall street journal joins us nurse studios thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me based on what you've learned three percent growth researching confident optimistic or naive while it's extremely optimistic the professional forecasters at the congressional budget office and the federal reserve see growth of a little less than two percent over the coming decade and that's where we've been for the past decade now presidents in their budget to assume that all of their policies become law so you always see a little bit higher increase in the growth rate in the white house budgets but nothing that's quite diverge like this from the consensus viewers are there times in history when the us has had a growth rate of three percent yes it's been quite common i mean if you look back over the last two hundred years and the trump administration says this we have grown up three percent and we we don't want to given to this idea that we now have lower growth rate they see that is giving up the issue right now growth is the combination of your labour force how fast rallying workers to the economy and how productive those were hers or so labor force productivity has been slow for the last decade and the demographics in our country the aging of the baby boom means that the workforce is not growing as quickly as it used to those two things together explain why we've had two percent growth and demographics really baked.

congress nick tim roche wall street journal us twenty twenty three percent two percent two hundred years ten percent
"nick tim roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nick tim roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And more an increased military spending by ten percent doubted in congress with the budget will pass without a lot of change all of the proposals bank a projection of three percent growth in the us economy by twenty twenty one nick tim roche's national economics correspondent for the wall street journal joins us nurse studios thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me based on what you've learned three percent growth researching confident optimistic or naive while it's extremely optimistic the professional forecasters at the congressional budget office and the federal reserve see growth of a little less than two percent over the coming decade and that's where we've been for the past decade now presidents in their budget gift to assume that all of their policies become law so you always see a little bit higher increase in the growth rate in the white house budgets but nothing that's quite diverge like this from the consensus viewers are there times in history when the us has had a growth rate of three percent yes it's been quite common i mean if you look back over the last two hundred years and the trump administration says this we have grown up three percent and we we don't want to give him to this idea that we now have a lower growth rate they see that is giving up the issue right now growth is the combination of your labour force how fast rallying workers to the economy and how productive those were hers or so labor force productivity has been slow for the last decade and the demographics in our country the aging of the babyboom means that the workforce is not growing as quickly as it used to those two things together explain why we've had two percent growth and demographics really baked.

congress nick tim roche wall street journal us twenty twenty three percent two percent two hundred years ten percent