17 Burst results for "Nick Sharma"

"nick sharma" Discussed on A Hot Dog Is a Sandwich

A Hot Dog Is a Sandwich

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on A Hot Dog Is a Sandwich

"Taking top ramen. I bet it's really delicious Garm Masala tastes like at least a lot of the prepackaged stuff you get almost tastes more kindle pumpkin. Spice. Say That yeah, it's totally a very warming a very, very intense spice blend. I would toast it before I put in my rom actually I would just put a little bit of oil and at and just toasted up just to really awaken the spices and then I would add it to my top ramen but this is a good take that's called the todd concerted really great article by Nick Sharma about making todd 'cause, which is where you infuse the spices into an oil before you cook and it's like the reason so many Indian dishes tastes so great Seattle toddler. And then add your top. Roman to that's dope and also don't let your wife make fun of before it stand up for yourself. Don't make fun of people for. Food preferences unless it's funny and unless we're making you and then it's okay that's our job our job Kaley cat underscore. Says I love Salsa Dasher sour cream to make them more creamy mixed in my Mac and cheese. Hey. Mac and cheese is like wonder bread it is a blank slate do whatever you want to it and it'll probably be just don't be weird about it like this is acceptable. A little bit of sour cream a little bit of salsa go wild. That's awesome. But whenever it starts to get like really weird like I don't putting like. What's a weird thing to put can cheese raisins raisins. If you put raisins in your Mac and cheese, it's questionable. If you put a precaution jam I'm going to look at you. Funny. This has got jam in Mac and cheese hold on hold on. That sounds pretty good to me. Nor doesn't Africa jam would belong on a cheese plate doesn't belong in Mac and cheese because I said so fair. Cream and Mamadou sounds really great sounds lovely at Charles..

Mac todd Kaley Africa Seattle Nick Sharma Mamadou
"nick sharma" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:32 min | 2 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Wanted true, So when the investigation is over, then the truth will be known, and we'll know what's what his family argues many officers knew roughened because he had bipolar and schizophrenia, adding They were at his home just about a week ago for an incident. The Milwaukee Fire Department taking disciplinary action against firefighters responsible for hanging a brown figurine by a looped ribbon inside of a fire station back in February. Fire chief Mark Ruffling says their internal investigation did not reveal Intent, but says they must do better. The incident does not express who we are is Milwaukee firefighters and it's unfortunate that this incident by this individual Diminishes their work and their service to the community. The chief declined to specify what punishment the firefighters may face. The holiday weekends travel along with everything else this year, may look a little bit different rate American road trip in the Times of Corona virus. No, it's not a novel. It's reality, and it's going to be weird. We are expecting this to be a little bit smaller than last Fourth of July. In terms of auto travel, the Triple A's Nick Sharma says. Other modes of transportation will be taking a harder hit when it comes to air travel and other modes of travel like rail and buses. It's gonna be way down. Still, If you're going to be hitting the roads, you'll definitely want to plan ahead. Knowing what is going to be open and available in your destination. Always a good idea. Nebulas ago W. T. M. J News. Milwaukee is among many municipalities without fireworks or parades this weekend. Milwaukee's lakefront will be much quieter this year than most on this July 3rd, no tents. We're going up here Veteran's Park the only workers in the area are construction workers taking care of a new parking lot by the art museum. You'll see a few bikes, a few runners, but no fireworks going above and Partying in preparation for that. But there are some municipalities still holding different types of parades and some fireworks displays along Milwaukee's lakefront Chase orgy W T and J knew, and you could check out the list of events that is still happening at W. T m j dot com. W T M J Forecast for your fourth of July weekend today high of 84 degrees. A slight chance for a straight thunderstorm. Otherwise mostly sunny tomorrow, mostly sunny, very warm and human high of 90 degrees inland and 86 near Lake Sunday's high of 85 another chance for some isolated showers and thunderstorms and Monday. Another chance for some storms and showers. Partly cloudy and a high of 86 degrees in sports. The N B A is close to signing off on a second bubble city in Chicago. For the eight teams that were not invited to play in Orlando. It would enable them to participate in many training camp and subsequent games against other clubs with a target date of September 9 more N BA players testing positive for covert 19 bringing.

Milwaukee Milwaukee Fire Department Mark Ruffling Nick Sharma art museum Orlando Lake Sunday Chicago W. T. M. W. T
"nick sharma" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To forgive a lot of sense in order to win in November gold rose NPR news New York during president trump's recent visit to India a popular snack became the subject of some unexpected controversy rates this market would be the symbols a crispy fried pastry traditionally filled with peas and potatoes I'm version of the snack was served during trump's visit to the former residents of Mahatma Gandhi instead of peas and potatoes the feeling was made up of broccoli and corn samosa Puritans were outraged and expressed their distaste in a storm of tweets but rather than jump into the fray we thought it might be a good time to investigate the triangular snacks identity I think the main thing with the small size there are two parts right that's award winning food writer Nick Sharma the forces that texture so you want that myspace string it that's you know it's flaky it breaks and causes that crunch when you bite into it the second is the filling and that's where in this case things that may have gone awry my concern is that with broccoli it's something that to Lisa so much water on cooking if you're put broccoli inside us the most and then you cook it it just feels like it's going to have a goalie mushy texture for Shurmur though it goes beyond cooking fundamentals it's also about the culinary roots of an entire country broccoli as far as I know is not a need to vegetable to Indiana so if if if it were me I would want to showcase the vegetables from India group executive chef victims Sundaram of receita in Washington DC says he respects the chefs willingness to experiment but he would have gone with something a little more classic since it moved closer to India I mean I would have definitely tried and served in the traditional symbols of because the potatoes and green beans Seth syndrome also says no chef worth his salt would criticize food without trying it first now that's on the line with I'm excited the proof of the pudding is you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news Michael stayed on KQED public radio thanks for joining us this early Wednesday morning we have more of the All Things Considered rebroadcast on the way coming out NPR's Ailsa Chang is going to speak with New Yorker staff writer Johnson Blitzer the interview will be about White House senior aide Stephen Miller and Miller's influence on the president's immigration policy that interview just ahead four KQ weedy comes from the corporation for public broadcasting and the capitol steps in their new tour the lying kings providing laughter therapy and musical satire torn.

Stephen Miller White House staff writer KQED Seth Washington group executive Nick Sharma NPR president New York Johnson Blitzer Ailsa Chang Michael Indiana Shurmur Lisa writer Mahatma Gandhi
"nick sharma" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 7 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of sense in order to win in November Joel rose NPR news New York during president trump's recent visit to India a popular snack became the subject of some unexpected controversy rates this market would be the symbols a crispy fried pastry traditionally filled with peas and potatoes a version of the snack was served during trump's visit to the former residents of Mahatma Gandhi instead of peas and potatoes the feeling was made up of broccoli and corn samosa Puritans were outraged and they expressed their distaste in a storm of tweets but rather than jump into the fray we thought it might be a good time to investigate the triangular snacks identity I think the main thing with the small size there are two parts right that's award winning food writer Nick Sharma the forces that texture so you want that myspace string it that's you know it's flaky it breaks and causes that crunch when you bite into it the second is the filling and that's where in this case things that may have gone awry my concern is that with broccoli it's something that to Lisa so much water on cooking if you put broccoli inside the symbols and then you cook it it just feels like it's going to have a goalie mushy texture for Shurmur though goes beyond cooking fundamentals it's also about the culinary roots of an entire country broccoli as far as I know is not a need to vegetable to Indiana so if if if it for me I would want to showcase the vegetables from India group executive chef victims Sundaram of receita in Washington DC says that he respects the chefs willingness to experiment but he would have gone with something a little more classic since it moved closer to India I mean I would have definitely been served in the traditional symbols of which is the potatoes and green beans says syndrome also says no chef worth his salt would criticize food without trying it first now that's come in the limelight I'm excited the proof of the pudding is you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news there is traffic trouble in the Dumbarton bridge at six eighteen with the details here's true leader you'll see the staunchest coming off the bridge eastbound before the toll plaza that stuck there in the left lane I'm pretty slow back to the high rise he would crash that's out of the lane cell AT the south Bennett AT St still recovering back to San Leandro and a big wreck San Ramon is still there nor six CD at all costs to two left lanes several vehicles one overturned in back of starts a castle would shoot the deputies for KQ weedy traffic support.

San Leandro KQ NPR Washington group executive Nick Sharma president San Ramon New York Dumbarton bridge Indiana Lisa writer Mahatma Gandhi India trump
"nick sharma" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:28 min | 7 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on KCRW

"Forgive a lot of sense in order to win in November gold rose NPR news New York during president trump's recent visit to India a popular snack became the subject of some unexpected controversy rates this snack it would be the symbols a crispy fried pastry traditionally filled with peas and potatoes a version of the snack was served during trump's visit to the former residents of Mahatma Gandhi instead of peas and potatoes the feeling was made up of broccoli and corn somo set Puritans were outraged and they expressed their distaste in a storm of tweets but rather than jump into the fray we thought it might be a good time to investigate the triangular snacks identity I think the main thing with the small size there are two parts right that's award winning food writer Nick Sharma the first is the texture so you want that myspace street that's you know it's flaky it breaks and causes that crunch when you bite into it the second is the filling and that's where in this case things that may have gone awry my concern is that with broccoli it's something that's in the system much water on cooking if you're put broccoli insight as the most and then you cook it it just feels like it's going to have a goalie mushy texture for Shurmur though it goes beyond cooking fundamentals it's also about the culinary roots of an entire country broccoli as far as I know is not a need to vegetable to Indiana so if if if it were me I would want to showcase the vegetables from India group executive chef victims Sundaram of receita in Washington DC says that he respects the chefs willingness to experiment but he would have gone with something a little more classic works was the two ND I mean I would have definitely been serving the traditional symbols of because the potatoes and green beans chef syndrome also says no chef worth his salt would criticize food without trying it first now that's come in the limelight I'm excited the proof of the pudding is you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news when you're homeless in LA your belongings also don't have a home meaning they could just get swept away they confiscate.

New York trump India Mahatma Gandhi writer Shurmur Indiana LA NPR president Nick Sharma group executive Washington
"nick sharma" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 7 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on KCRW

"Are willing to forgive a lot of sense in order to win in November gold rose NPR news New York during president trump's recent visit to India a popular snack became the subject of some unexpected controversy rates this snack it would be the symbols a crispy fried pastry traditionally filled with peas and potatoes a version of the snack was served during trump's visit to the former residents of Mahatma Gandhi instead of peas and potatoes the feeling was made up of broccoli and corn somo set Puritans were outraged and they expressed their distaste in a storm of tweets but rather than jump into the fray we thought it might be a good time to investigate the triangular snacks identity I think the main thing with the small size there are two parts right that's award winning food writer Nick Sharma the first is the texture so you want that myspace string it that's you know it's flaky it breaks and causes that crunch when you bite into it the second is the filling and that's where in this case things that may have gone awry my concern is that with broccoli it's something that's in the system much water on cooking if you're put broccoli insight as the most and then you cook it it just feels like it's going to have a goalie mushy texture for Shurmur though it goes beyond cooking fundamentals it's also about the culinary roots of an entire country broccoli as far as I know is not a need to vegetable to Indiana so if if if it were me I would want to showcase the vegetables from India group executive chef victims Sundaram of receita in Washington DC says that he respects the chefs willingness to experiment but he would have gone with something a little more classic was routed to India I mean I would have definitely been serving the traditional symbols of which is the potatoes and green beans Seth syndrome also says no chef worth his salt would criticize food without trying it first now that's on the line with I'm excited the proof of the pudding is needed you're.

New York trump India Mahatma Gandhi writer Shurmur Indiana NPR president Nick Sharma group executive Washington Seth
"nick sharma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:30 min | 10 months ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To connect us to his story Nick talked about it with our friend Russ Parsons Nick Sharma it's so great to have you here today I rest thank you for having me here today that you were raised in India and you moved to the United States as an adult and you seem to have instinctively adopted the flavors of your home to the dishes of your adopted country and your partners from the south and so there's a there's a really interesting adaptation of Indian spicing to southern technique right my husband Michael from the south he lives as family lived on a farm right on the border Virginia North Carolina and the food that they eat it's interesting eight reminds me of some of the dishes that I grew up with in India but in a very different way you know like biscuits for example right like biscuits to use fact to kind of create that flaky texture and then you have brought has which are cooked in India and you use fat again there in that you cut it for you to give a flaky texture to the flat bread arms I started noticing a lot of these little nuances in cooking techniques as well as the food that was being cooked okra okra is big in the south my husband loves okra okra is big in India to and then spices this is something that I've noticed that a lot of countries where people lined warmer climates they tend to use a lot of spices and they do that in the south as well and so it just seemed natural to kind of bring those flavors and do it in my own way and the good thing is most recipes are amenable to manipulation depending on how you do no that's good that kind of culinary adaptation can be a real tight rope Walker there been so many bad examples of bad fusion food what with the poor the most important lessons you learned that allowed you to marry these different cuisines so effectively so when I cook I really don't cook for a restaurant so I'm not truly looking to impress people I'm not really looking to played beautifully I'm just looking to cook things that I think I would like to meet my husband would like to have my friends would like to eat my family would like to eat and then of course for the home cooks so I'm looking just to play with play when the kitchen and I'm not really looking to do something on a more ambassadorial scale and you know build things in different layers I do flavor in the US but I'm not really looking to make multiple components added at a meal and at the end of the day I think the dish is strong when it tastes good and it's cooked well and I'm coming always from the home cooks perspective so I think it's mine it's a much different audience that I'm trying to connect with how deep does the adaptation go when you feel the need for for comfort food for example sure you turn to traditional Indian dishes that you grew up with or the American dishes that you've learned to love or is it a combination of two it's definitely a little bit of both so it's definitely of course what I wanted at the moment it's not necessarily always Indian and it's not necessarily always American but it's what's around me it's I feel that having grown up in both these countries now as an adult and hopefully much more mature one the thing that I want to do is have both of them with me and so often there are things like I'll give you an example rice pudding right I feel like every country has a rice pudding of some sort India has to type stays Kieran than this for any which is a ground rice flour kind of putting and then there's the whole dry screen which is key here and then you come to America and then there's another that's right putting your too and so you know it's easy to draw on those spices and those flavors and those are the things that matter to me at the end of the day like I want it to taste good I'm really not looking to say this is traditional of this is not I always stay away from that because I feel that's not what I'm looking to do and that's where I always come from that should it tastes good doesn't taste good will it executed well and while I eat it at the end of the end of course will others want to eat it photography is so important to to your work you started as a blogger you have a very distinctive look how did you develop that signature visual style okay so of course I didn't start out that way I was photographing like pretty much all food yet as US of a you know I was learning how to play with light and then I also realized a lot of my photos which just looking like everyone else's at the same time I love to cook and one of the things I really want to do was kind of showcase not only the final dishes on the ingredients that you commonly see but also the process of cooking and I wanted to do it in my own way and I always think about these things happening like it's a ballerina on stage and the spotlight is only on which is why I cut out a lot of the light in my photos because the focus is then just happening only on the process or the food at that point and everything else is noise and falls aside I also use my hands another reason why do that is because I want voters to be instructional so people are attracted to them but I feel sometimes especially with more complicated recipes that involved a lot of technique it's easier to remember things when they visually happening it acts as a better guide than boards and then one of the things having worked in the kitchen of you know I've always wanted to kind of represent people who don't look I sound like everyone else you don't see these people in the front of the kitchen that was something that I really wanted to do and give them a voice through destroying my hands in the photos one of the things when I started out with blogging and even photographing for print journals and magazines I really didn't find a space for myself a lot of the mainstream food media was pretty much you know focused on white my people and there was I didn't really know if there was something that I could share because I didn't feel like I was a part of it and then having worked in the kitchen I would work with people that for from all over the country so you'd have all over the world actually so you'd have people who were immigrants people who grow up yes number eight from Asia summer from the Middle East summer for from Iran are some off a summer from India like me and I'd never see them in front of the restaurant and so that kind of made me wonder why this representation was never that because these other people actually producing the food for us to eat and so when I started to photograph food my skin is brown so I really couldn't change anything and so that was a way when I said I'm gonna like do these instructional photos this became a way for me to kind of give them a voice in a much more subtle way I was trying to do my bit out to kind of represent the people that I worked with so hopefully kids that kind of want to get into this field and don't look like or sound like people that are already in it well established they kind of feel like they have a place in there and that was something that I was missing and I hope that my work kind of gives them that that's such an important point it's so easy to overlook Nick Sharma thank you so much for being on the phone table talking to us thank you for having me around this great to be a.

Nick Sharma India United States Russ Parsons
"nick sharma" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"The past few months but i hope you're able to sort of realize the impact actor having and what you're doing for indian cuisine in america. I hope so i mean i also feel like i am benefiting from like a wave of people bull and books that came before me. That's sort of like fomented this happening. I feel like my book arrived at the right time or you had breathy mystery three and nick sharma an offshoot gomez that sort of paved the way in showed that there isn't just one type of indian cookbook and that we all have these really unique perspectives to share you know. I think i try to make it so that my book isn't this is how you make indian food. This is like the definitive take but like this is really. This is the indian food that i grew up with and i think it's really tasty and really accessible so maybe it'll help you get into the food. Do you think it's also part of a bigger appreciation just for indian culture and indian american culture you know you've got priyanka chopra on the cover vince style and vogue yeah. I was thinking about that. I mean i a hundred percent think that there is a relationship between brianca chopra mindy caling and the popularity of indian food. I mean i never cultural troll moment it. It really is and i you. I never in a million years ever thought that bianca chopra someone who i grew up watching bollywood movies would be considered a mainstream stream figure in america but it gives me a ton of hope to see that too or that you'd be discussed in the same sense as mindy kaeling and priyanka chopra i mean. I don't think i'm there yet bunch. Uh-huh pre chris note mindy kelly show where there you go. You're just in a sentence with the two of them. Yeah i wouldn't quite a full sense and you know what i mean. Yeah i hope one day. I get to meet branka chopra. I met him indicating in passing many many years ago but maybe i'll get to meet her again but it is is an interesting dilemma for you because you gave that wonderful talk jubilee about not wanting to be pigeonholed or token is used and now you have become an indian food expert which is something. You're kind of trying to avoid well. It's funny because it's almost as though like as a home cook. I'm totally fine nine being the indian food expert but as a journalist. I don't just want to be the indian food expert and i've tried to make that really clear because at bone app they're constantly asking me like are there other dishes dishes. You want to make and i'm like i don't think that me making pasta will contribute much but i think me making indian food like i think i think that's where i have the most to offer whereas as a journalist..

priyanka chopra branka chopra bianca chopra america mindy caling mindy kelly mindy kaeling nick sharma vince hundred percent million years one day
"nick sharma" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"How can we help you today, a while ago? I bought a jar of, hey, or ossification is only like two bucks, and I was trying to make maintain food and I've had trouble making Indian food more offensive, but you only use a tiny little bits, and now I have this jar of really pungent. Like that. I'm not quite sure the us up. Did you get the lump version of it or the powdered version of it? How version that's part of the problem. Maybe we should just pause for second and say what it is. Well, I just interviewed Nick Sharma, who wrote a book called season, which is a fabulous book, and he grew up in Bombay, and then moved to Cincinnati, VO places his grandmother when his grandfather died, and she was widowed in that culture. She's not allowed to eat onions and garlic. Right. Because her religious reasons it's fought. This is their heating substances, they lead to impure thoughts. So guess what she uses to replace it. But so fatigue. Right. That's a replacement for garlic onions and India it. So if you think of it that way, pretty interesting, you could sort of think of it. It's weird. It's got this weird smell, although it truly mellows as soon as you cook it, and you must cook it in oil, but the James spirit, even said it's sort of like their version of truffles not that it's a fun guy or anything, but it's, it's pungent. And so what I would say the trouble is you have the powdered version, which is far stronger, just because it's been ground up is put it in another. Jar in another jar and another jar just to keep the Roma down. But you won't have any problem cooking with it, because it does Mela when you cook it, and I agree with Chris, I would use it in dishes, where you would have put onion and garlic, and it will just as an onion, would it has some, you know, soul furious compounds in it. But set just as onion does, but soon as you start cooking and onion it gets really very sweet. Let's back up the reason to use. It is, is like Emami boost just amplifies flavor. Don't use too much of it, and make sure it's cooked oil p shape is what you need for. If you were replacing garlic or can you use it as a new? Mommy addition to you wouldn't use it to replace just use it as an ample Bishen. I'd say P shape again, start with something small. Yeah. It's powerful. But it's a great ingredient, you know, have fun with it. All right. All right. Go crazy with as a data. All right. Thank you. You're listening to most your radio. I'm Christopher Kimball up next. We're talking soul food, chef Carlo hall. That's coming up right after this break..

Nick Sharma Christopher Kimball us Carlo hall Bombay Bishen Cincinnati India Chris
"nick sharma" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And so she voluntarily gave that up which is a very sad thing. But she used way. I gotta stop you. What year is this? Roughly speaking it still happens today. What's done is that when your husband passes away, you become a widow and to avoid impure thoughts because onions and garlic are considered heating. So it's considered aphrodisiac in a way, you'll have impure thoughts. So you have to give that up, and then they would use ASA Fatiha to create those flavors in those dishes. So when I was a kid, I was very confused by it. And I asked my dad to explain he said, so he said to me that. So I've talked to my mom, and that it doesn't really make a difference. You should do what she wants. But she won't listen because the culture is embedded in a head, and she would cook food for other people with onions, and garlic, but what she made for herself. When no one was around had no onions, and garlic was always Asif Petito. So it's so interesting than onions, I mean, we're at that easy to have impure thoughts from onions, I mean, you think very hot spice or something. I get that. But onions. Okay. You made me in a bar. We're having a beam, and I only got five minutes, and I say, do you look tell me three things about how you think about cooking, which you learn about cooking when you grew up. There would be different a different way of thinking their words, Gimmie three tips, techniques or ideas that you brought with you. They would change how I cook. What were those three things be? Let's see the first thing would be the use of heat consider heat. Oh, actually temperature in general in terms of spices. Because that influences how you cook. In india? We have the concept of warm spices and cool spices. It's not just a random combination of ingredients thrown together. And that actually Rowley helps to improve flavors when you cook food the second thing, I would tell you is know the difference between green Cardamom black Khartum on. And I always dress on this because they are such big difference. And they look different to. So I always try to tell people about that. And the third thing I tell people is never by Cari leaves that a dried just buy them fresh because you can't replicate that taste it just doesn't. There's no flavor when its dried fresh is the best and would fresh curry leaves be that one ingredient that that is hard to find here that you really think is critical or would it be something else? It's there's no substitute for. That's the first thing. And the second thing it's not that hard to find one of the things I tell people. When they're looking for a spice from any cuisine bid Indian or any other country. If you have a restaurant that's close by go to them and ask them where they get it. From most often they'll just give you some because it's going to be such a tiny quantity. Although point you to this. So thank you a best of luck with your new book season. And it's been a pleasure having you on milk street. Thank you. Thank you for having me. Chris. That was Nick Sharma. His book is called season big flavors, beautiful food. You know when the British imported the cooking of their far flung empire. They often got it wrong. Major Grey's mango chutney is a sticky. Sweet condiment not at all like true Indian chutney that are often as savory as salon tro and chilies, but let's be honest all cultures are strange to foreigners especially the food. But let's make sure that the recipes don't get lost in translation. Right now, I'm heading into the kitchen in mill street the chat with Catherine smart about this week's recipe maple whisky pudding cake, Katherine how are you? I'm good. Chris. How're you back in the early nineteen seventies?.

Asif Petito Cari ASA Fatiha Chris Rowley india Nick Sharma Catherine Katherine five minutes milk mill
"nick sharma" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on Here & Now

"And it is December thirteenth. We are winding down twenty eighteen which means it is time to find out here. Now resident chef Kathy guns favorite cookbooks of the year where at that time of the year. Hi, kathy. Hello. And we hear that. This was a tough year for you to do this. Why it was a tough year because there were so many good cookbooks? And I swear I say it every year, I literally went through over one hundred cookbooks to kind of call it down and try to find dishes that I found really exciting. You know, people don't know that there are so many cookbooks. And we get them you get them. I mean, I just we talked about this recently carded a u hauls worth cookbooks. Yeah. You know to people who needed them more than me because you know, they're pretty limited people who cook these students, you know, like, right because you you, you know, sometimes I feel if I've hold a cookbook, I'm actually cooking. You're not. So what is it that you want an cookbook? Well, I wanna learn something new I want I want. Some inspiration. I want to understand something new about a cuisine, and this collection really taught me about Indian spices. It taught me about baking unexpected combinations. It taught me inventive ways to use leftovers. It taught me about his Rayleigh food and Middle Eastern food and California restaurants, and one of the themes that really came through this year because we need it more than ever is community and belonging and sharing. Because after all what is food. It's not about sharing and community. And you get that in a cookbook, you do a lot of these books are full of messages. So let me start with what I don't want to say my favorite because you know, it's sort of like who's your favorite child? But Nick Sharma, I know a lot of these people I need to come clean and say that some of these people are friends the food world. It turns out is quite small. He wrote a book called season big flavors, beautiful food. This guy is. Young. He is immensely talented. He not only developed this collection of outstanding recipes, but he also took the photographs many people may know, his blog called a Brown table and indisp- blog. He writes, a lot about his life as a gay man in northern California and his immigrant roots? And the theme of this book is taking Indian spices and bringing them into everyday cooking. So you both have this gorgeous bowl of yogurt in front of you. Right. And I want you to take your spoon and stirred up. So it's yogurt salt and pepper and a little bit of water tweeted this out at here. No roberts. He could just see. I mean, there's so in Oregon, so it's red beets golden beets carrots and scallions graded on top. But the trick is this this is where the spices come in you heat up black mustard seeds curry leaves and grated ginger in canola oil, and when it's hot and the seeds of pop like popcorn you put it on top of this yogurt. Taste the layers of flavor and the colors his food is just gorgeous. I also tried his toasted Kumon and lime cucumber salad and the spice beef kebabs. And I'll tell you I just diving in I just want to cook Indian food all year after reading this book. Jeremy it's harder than it looks. I remember we did a segment with an Indian chef recently on here now, and it is much heart. You've got to really be firing on all cylinders to make it work. I would say that Knicks book breaks it down. But you do need to have the spices next is a kind of really interesting inventive book. Holland hottest pipes wear ties square. Yeah. Irresistibly easy sweet and savory slap pies by Kathy barrow. So what the heck is a slab pie. She kind of reinvented the pie, and you may ask yourself just at need reinventing for those that struggle with pastry and crimping and laddis sing she has you cooking pies in a rectangle or bay. Sheet. You throw the dough in its functional it's beautiful, and it almost always serves a crowd. It's like a casserole. Well, it's kind of. Yeah. A slab pie. So she has fabulous ideas for cross. There's a cream cheese. Cross. There's a cheddar cheese crust caramelized onion cross, and I can taste the gorgonzola here. That is a spinach gorgonzola and walnut slab pie. Boy. I it's a very inventive group of recipes. Got last one.

Kathy barrow California Nick Sharma Rayleigh Knicks roberts Middle Eastern Holland Jeremy Oregon
"nick sharma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a super personal book about being a gay Indian immigrant, but he uses these powerhouse flavors to connect us to his story in Nick talked about it with our friend, Russ Parsons. Due nick. It's so great to have you here today. Hi rest. Thank you for having me today that you were raised in India, and you move to the United States. It's an adult, and you seem to have instinctively adapted the flavors of your home to the dishes of your adopted country and your partners from the south. And so there's there's really interesting adaptation of Indian spicing to southern technique. Right. My husband Michael's from the Saudi lives his family lives on a farm right on the border, Virginia, North Carolina and the food that they eat. It's interesting. Eight reminds me of some of the dishes that I grew up with an India. But in a very different way. You know, like biscuits for example, right like biscuits. You use fact to kind of create that flaky texture, and then you have parameters which are cooked in India, and you use fat again, they're in the door, you cut it through to kipah flaky texture to the flat bread. So I started noticing a lot of these little nuances in cooking techniques as well as the food that was being cooked okra okra big in the south. My husband loves okra okra big in India too. And then spices. This is something that I've noticed that a lot of countries where people in warmer climates, the tend to use a lot of spices. And they do that in the south as well. And so it just seemed natural to kind of bring those flavors and do it in my own way. And the good thing is most recipes are amenable to manipulation depending on how you do it. That kind of culinary adaptation can be a real tight rope. Walk on there've been show, many bad examples of bad, fusion food. What were the what were the most important lessons? You learned that allows you to marry these different cuisines so effectively. So when I cook, I really don't cook for a restaurant. So I'm not really looking to impress people. I'm not really looking to play it beautifully. I'm just looking to cook things that I think I would like to eat. My husband would like to eat my friends would like to eat my family would like to eat. And then, of course for the home cooks. So I'm looking just to play with flavor in the kitchen, and I'm not really looking to do something on a more ambassadorial scale, and you know, build things in different layers. I do flavor in layers, but I'm not really looking to make multiple components at a at a meal and at the end of the day. I think the a dish is strong when it tastes good. And it's cooked. Well, and I'm coming always from the home cooks perspectives. So I think it's it's a much different audience that I'm trying to connect with how deep does adaptation go when you feel need for for comfort food, for example, shirt you turn to traditional Indian dishes that you grew up with or the American dishes that you've learned to love or is it a combination of two it's definitely a little bit of boats. So it's definitely of course, what I want to eat at the moment. It's not necessarily always Indian, and it's not necessarily always American. But it's what's around me. It's I feel that having grown up in both these countries now as an adult and hopefully much more mature one the thing that I want to do is have both of them with me. And so often there are things like I'll give you an example rice pudding, right? Every country has a rice pudding of some sort. India has two types there's cure. And then there's for me, which is a ground rice flour kind of pudding. And then there's the whole rice grain, which is cure. And then you come to you. America. And then there's another there's rice pudding, you're too. And so, you know, it's easy to draw in those cases and those flavors, and those are the things that matter to me at the end of the day. Like, I want it to taste good. I'm really not looking to say this is traditional at this is not I always stay away from that. Because I feel that's not what I'm looking to do. And that's where I always come from that. Should it tastes good? Does it tastes good? Will it execute? Well, and will eat at the end of the course below others wanted. Photography is so important to to your work. You started as a blogger you have a very distinctive. Look, how did you develop that signature visual style? Okay. So of course, I didn't start out that way. I was photographing like pretty much all food. Get to. So I was learning how to play with light. And then I also realized a lot of my photo which just looking like everyone else's at the same time. I love to cook. And one of the things I really wanted to do was kinda showcase not only the final dishes are the ingredients that you commonly see but also the process of cooking. And I wanted to do it in my own way. And I always think about these things happening like it's about arena on stage. And the spotlight is only on her which is why cut out a lot of the lighten my photos because the focus is then just happening only on the process or the food at that point. And everything else is noise and falls aside. I also use my hands. Another reason why do that is because I want to be instructional. So people are attracted to them, but I feel sometimes especially with more complicated recipes that involved a lot of technique. It's easier to remember things when they visually happening it acts as a better guy than boards. And then one of the things having worked in a kitchen. I've always wanted to kind of represent people who don't look sound like everyone else. You don't see these people in the front of the kitchen, and that was something that I really wanted to give them a voice through destroying the hands on the photos, one of the things when I started out with blogging you've been photographing for print, journals and magazines. I really didn't find a space for myself. A lot of the mainstream food media was pretty much. Focused on white people. And there was I didn't know if there was something that I could share because I didn't feel like I was a part of it. And then having worked in a kitchen, I would work with people that were from all over the country. So you'd have all over the world, actually. So you'd have people who were immigrants people who grew up here somber as from Asia somewhere from the Middle East somber from Iran some summer from India like me, and I'd never see them in front of the restaurant. And so that kind of made me wonder why this representation was never there because these other people actually producing the food for us to eat. And so when I started to photograph food, and my skin is Brown. So I really couldn't change anything. And so that was a way when I said, oh, I'm going to do these instructional photos. This became a way for me to kind of give them a voice in a much more subtle way. I was trying to do. Do my bit to kind of represent the people that I worked with. So hopefully kids that of want to get into this field and don't look like or sound like people that are already in it and established they kind of feel like they have a place in there. And that was something that I was missing. And I hope that my work kind of gives them that that's such an important point. And it's so easy to overlook Nick Sharma. Thank you so much for being on the table and talking to us. Thank you for having me..

India Nick Sharma Russ Parsons United States Michael Virginia North Carolina America Middle East Asia Iran
"nick sharma" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"Well, there's Nick Sharma he's the blogger behind Brown table, and he his book is called season. And he was born in India. But I think has lived most of his life in America. And he's it's not and I have not tested anything from this. This this book yet, but I'm a big fan of his blog and his work in general. But he says it's not a traditional Indian cookbook. It's it's influences. From growing up in Bombay, and then also acclimating to America. And he's and he writes for this in Francisco Chronicle, his column is called a Brown kitchen, again, then I mean, what interested me about this book, it's beautiful book, but that familiar dishes, so like for Totta, we're totally changed in a way that you know, I've made a million for Todd as we all have right, and every seems to have one, but what he put like, salon tro, and Garam masala and turmeric and ritually flakes besides Asia will garlic and onions, and then some punchier or Fettah instead of the cheese. We might be using, you know, I'm out of us parmesan or something and more talion influence, and it just I thought. Wow, I've never thought to put those with eggs. But of course, of course. Right. Right. No. I thought there was one of the recipes I booked in there had been here. And I think it may have may have had lentils also moving roasted cauliflower, lentils and Pinior it and it had all. These just flavors that I would never think to put in. And it just looks and sounds so delicious. So other ones in that sort of global flavors group. Yes. Isreaeli soul by domino. And Steven cook from Huw in Philadelphia and number of other restaurants now, they have I think three or four I forget all their names one is called Goldie. It's more like a fast casual thing and Philadelphia, but I want to make every single thing in this book. This is the problem with this Mitsubishi. Yeller full flashy in your face kind cookbook. Right. And I mean there was like what what do they say the reveal? They say like reality show, the reveal like there was this thing like grid of pictures of how full awful comes to get of my favorite foods being of a turn. And there it was it was like you throw it on the quiz Chapin of a little bit. You throw it in the quiz an art. And it becomes the the dough. And you and it was just so like, I didn't even practically have to read the recipe to get it. You know, and it was great. And it looked so beautiful and doable. Yes. No. And I made the they're quick tahina recipe, and they're five minute HAMAs recipe, which is you I you make quick Tina. And then you make the HAMAs, and it was delicious inside. No, I made this the day before the big tahini recall, have whatever. Yeah. Yeah. I've derived, so I think I think okay. But yeah, just maybe don't make the tahina right away. So as really soul looking good as chose. And what about together the this is I have not had a chance to make anything from this. But it looks really beautiful, and it has the vendor story, right? I mean, this is features. Like, I think like fifty recipes from women whose community was affected by the Grenfell tower fire, you know, so many people. And so I think this the Royal foundation in the UK has supported them coming together and created this book, you know, so it's kind of this beautiful community of healing and recipes look delicious. So yeah. Yeah. Other choices another one in that category is a common table by Cynthia mckernan. She's the blogger behind to red bowls. And it's she's Korean her husband. I think her husband's Chinese. I'm forgetting now, and it's just all about their. They've lived all over. He was born in Hawaii. They've lived everywhere east coast west coast, and it's just it's a book about you know, it's not a against traditional Korean book..

Nick Sharma America Cynthia mckernan India Bombay HAMAs Philadelphia Grenfell tower Francisco Chronicle Mitsubishi Steven cook Hawaii Todd Asia Chapin Totta Fettah Goldie UK
"nick sharma" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

Bon Appetit Foodcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

"Called we're starting to cook book club, and so can you go check it out? All right. Now let's do this. Here is Christina with Nick Sharma. Tiny high. It's so it's so funny and weird to like, see your face. Now for the first time feels like I've been reading your words and looking at your photos and cooking your recipes for like the past month and a half. So it's very nice to see your face in the flesh. Likewise, your, thank you. So we've been talking about, you know, so much of why I've been going really deep on your beautiful new book season. It's been because it is the subject of our very first cookbook club, which for anyone who's interested in learning about it, we have a whole bog post about it on the site and instructions for you can start your own cook club. But basically this book really struck me and you know, I mean, as you know, it's like sure, it's October right now. So my desk is complete bright over with, no. Did you see that when we were walking by? Did I? It was kind of exciting to look at. It holds. Yeah, I'm just like drowning. That's right now. So that's something that happens every year as well. And I don't know what the philosophy is like for, you know, when you're thinking about when you want published, like do you wanna go in writing the gates? Like in the high season, you know? No. 'cause this was my. This is my first book. Right? And so I'm kind of walking in not knowing what's going to happen. I also did not know I'm so naive. I did not know that fall is actually like the cookbook season off the air, and I have other friends who are who are giving you advice, Julia version. I didn't ask anyone..

Nick Sharma Christina Julia
"nick sharma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"A taste them nick sharma youth these drew james gunn yeah so this role as we know a days they're done it gave must gear these incidents lorde not us wing a taste no the fbi sean is truly snoop dogg five lies has something very special for you right after church gospel brunch and sunshine i'm robin lin and joining me for jazz with jane dairy sunday any glass y vibes live dot com twelve new pacific line three pm eastern the.

robin lin nick sharma james gunn fbi
"nick sharma" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on RobinLynne

"A taste them nick sharma youth these drew james gunn yeah so this role as we know a days they're done it gave must gear these incidents lorde not us wing a taste no the fbi sean is truly snoop dogg five lies has something very special for you right after church gospel brunch and sunshine i'm robin lin and joining me for jazz with jane dairy sunday any glass y vibes live dot com twelve new pacific line three pm eastern the.

robin lin nick sharma james gunn fbi
"nick sharma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nick sharma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"A taste them nick sharma youth these drew james gunn yeah so this role as we know a days they're done it gave must gear these incidents lorde not us wing a taste no the fbi sean is truly snoop dogg five lies has something very special for you right after church gospel brunch and sunshine i'm robin lin and joining me for jazz with jane dairy sunday any glass y vibes live dot com twelve new pacific line three pm eastern the.

robin lin nick sharma james gunn fbi