22 Burst results for "Nick Schifrin"

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 6 months ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The ongoing crisis in me and Mars had a devastating impact on one particular ethnic group Ro hinge a refugees forced to flee to cramp camps in Bangladesh. Battling the Corona virus and now being asked to relocate to a flood prone island news, our special correspondent Tania Rashid, reports. What were once homes, hospitals and schools at the world's largest refugee camp burned to ash as a massive fire rips through these makeshift settlements. 15 people were killed, 400 missing and tens of thousands displaced Three years ago. The Rohingya, a Muslim minority group, led a bloody military crackdown launched by the Myanmar military and police bordering Bangladesh. Mass killings of greats and arson drove close to a million into these sprawling camps in Cox's Bazar. In a report published in 2019, you went, investigators warned of genocidal intent. The Myanmar army denies that and claims it on. Lee acted against insurgent groups who attacked the police. But now these fires have uprooted these rocking goes, lives get again. Bangladesh authorities and agencies have been providing emergency assistance to over 45,000 homeless refugees. Since December, The Bangladeshi government has started moving more than 13,000 refugees from the overcrowded camps to bash on shore, a remote island in the Bay of Bengal. According to our local sources, the Bangladeshi government has offered those affected by the fires help with relocating there

Nick Schifrin PBS this weekend
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Increased confrontation the PBS newshour I'm Nick Schifrin scientists say it he body testing may eventually be a key tool in the fight against covert nineteen there was encouraging news on that front this week researchers said that any bodies found in a patient who had the corona virus connected to sars seventeen years ago were able to neutralize covert nineteen still many questions remain about the effectiveness of antibody testing and what a positive test means for immunity John Yang has the story round the world an increasing demand for antibody tests as people try to find out if they've been exposed to the corona virus I'm going to get the body to us Patrick easily was tested in Chicago my thinking was the tests came back positive that means that already have called it and I'd already gone to my system and that I should be a okay yes in West Texas coin Gibson drove three hours to get tested my rationale comes from my science engineering background in the you know knowing is better than guessing Serra Kerrison said she was the sickest she's ever been in mid January and was surprised when her anti body test was negative the question has changed from it I have it can I help someone to how accurate is that test that's the question even scientists are asking Gigi Kwik on wall is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins center for health security there are a lot of things we don't know about the antibodies it's not as simple black white yes No go no go type of decision making tool that I think people want it to be everybody's were a crucial part of our immune system they attach to viruses or virus infected cells and ideally neutralize them helping our body removed them testing for antibodies is different from testing for the virus itself anybody chance reliant a blood sample a positive result indicates exposure to the virus and an immune response to it even if you never have symptoms or at least that's the goal these tests especially for a new virus like covert nineteen can be wrong somebody may get the information that they've been exposed and then they they think oh I'm going to go and then it turns out they were actually both noble and they can get sick themselves and then transmits others in March under pressure to quickly ramp up testing the food and drug administration allowed manufacturers to start distributing test without confirming their accuracy the market was flooded with more than one hundred fifty of them it was kind of let it bounce and flowers bloom strategy and that leads to a lot of tests being less accurate than advertised earlier this month the agency began requiring that test makers prove their products are accurate or risk having them pulled from the market but even if every everybody test was completely reliable that wouldn't tell us much about immunity that's because scientists don't know yet if antibodies protect someone from getting covert nineteen again so who should get anybody test right now and why what's the right reason somebody should want to get an antibody test I don't fault people for wanting to know if that terrible terrible sickness they had a couple of months ago if that really why this kind of nineteen but you know you just I just hope that people understand the limitations of our knowledge even so doctors across the country are making test widely available it's important and we are opening it up to anyone who wants it people are saying are gonna say you're over test thank god you are over testing but we're not we're screaming into Iraq actually is without knowing you know they're not perfect practice structures are not perfect but it helps better inform the patient and help people make decisions for their own lives Stanford University bioethicist Hank Greely sees it differently I think the tests are not good enough to be pushed for almost all of them and people don't need them at this point if there are going to establish they should be used for important scientific research studies from California to Massachusetts have tried to use antibody tests to draw conclusions about the prevalence of the virus in New York City researchers estimate that one in five residents was likely exposed in researchers recently announced results from what they called the first nationwide anti body study they tested about fifty six hundred Major League Baseball employees the result an estimated positive rate of less than one percent one of the study's lead researchers Daniel Eichner of the anti doping sports medicine research and testing laboratory urged caution when looking at the data we're just gonna people employment is one company and so we gotta be careful before extrapolate out to the whole nation I want it's a very good study into its really good data but I think it's X. rays again a very throughout the country and then also in the read through different population demographic areas for sure some hoping everybody testing could eventually lead to so called immunity.

Nick Schifrin
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ready promptly we're a small small place at the bottom of the world but none the less I think that on this occasion we seem to have done something serving rice and maybe have some lessons for the rest of the world yes I think so for the PBS newshour I'm Nick Schifrin throughout the pandemic restrictions on social gatherings have forced those who celebrate Easter Passover and Ramadan to find new ways to practice their faith and we wanted to explore how the corona virus is changing places of worship with three faith leaders Reverend Tim Cole serves as rector for Christ Church Georgetown he was the district of Columbia's first confirm coronavirus case Regina Rosenberg is the senior rabbi at United Hebrew congregation in St Louis Missouri and imam Holland what teeth is the executive director of the Islamic center at New York University and we welcome all three of you to the program and a Reverend Tim called let me begin with you how has this time change the way you worship what is different what's lost well of course a huge amount is lost in the in the physical proximity of being together and worship as we understand it is to has two main dimensions as a horizontal dimension of where people are gathered in the community and of course is a vertical dimension in terms of our relationship with god but so what we had to do this and that then we started to do as many reps isn't done virtual services we have a daily morning prayer and which is read by different members of Congregationalist from their own living rooms the source rather lovely you can see families taking part in the daily prayer of the church on Sunday of course we have a similar offering but with a sermon in with music are quietly with record some useful piece of music to go with that so we're doing the very best we can I'm sure everyone else's imam Latif what about you this is of course we're in the holy month of Ramadan what's what's lost what's different now you know so much about Ramadan is communal as much as the fast that we have from dawn until dusk is an individual practice much ritual in this line blends communal aspects and draws itself towards social equity and so where people traditionally would be breaking their fast at sunset with family and friends are going to community gatherings interface settings city officials posting of ours now many are at home if they have family with them are roommates and might break fast together but many are doing it on their own so what we've done similar to the Reverend I shifted a lot of our programming online we are doing things from five in the morning till about ten or eleven at night I scattered throughout the day to really meet the diverse needs of our community at this time and we've also done is created a lot of online campaigns to crowd fund to help people who have been financially impacted by the endemic I am too sure that especially within our month of fasting where we can help individuals of whatever background I will do our part said be a source of healing at this time and rabbi Rosenberg ab April has been the month of Passover for for Jewish for Jews in America how how is what you're doing and what it what you've done change during this period you know certainly as we just heard from my two colleagues that we've really had to do in the same way take things online and do them virtually certainly with regard to pass over there is such a communal aspect to pass over just as there is to Ramadan especially the meals that are held together and so many families could not do that and gather generationally so many places Barak's the seder meals online and brought the opportunity for people to be together and I would say that the virtual world has really be calm such a lifeline for so many people especially those who are home by themselves and you know there isn't anybody else there and being able to come online not just for worship but you know to offer study to offer conversation you know just as we've heard we're finding ways to just bring the congregation and bring community and connection to people in a variety of ways and reverent call what is it that people are seeking right now in your congregation are you finding they're asking they're reaching out to you more are there are they able to express their needs yes I think so and once it's been a wonderful actually I'm I mean I mean six of my colleague crystal harden is the holding the fort here and then doesn't ask Joe it's really wonderful what's happened is being a flooring if you like a blossoming of community threat disappeared her people have reached out to their neighbors and their selfishness them even more than they normally do we have networks of changeling chains across the parish and I should have said at the outset we're so glad to see you looking so well after after what after what you went through imam Latif what about you are you finding people who who were part of it you know who are part of Islam that you work with who you know are they reaching out more is it harder for them to reach out what are you finding every day we're getting contacted by Muslims as well as people of other faiths who are just really trying to figure out how to make sense of it all I think the challenges that experience tends to be quite diverse and what difficulties like this we see a lot of revelations of various kinds that can help us to be compelled to doing our part because even in our month of fasting Ramadan is not in a vacuum there's that endemic in the background and the purpose of ritual in our tradition is to elevate consciousness and bring people to take on social ills so where we see people on the front lines are essential workers who every day are meeting the virus and displaying real goodness and beauty and rabbi Rosenberg what are you hearing from from from people who are part of of your of your synagogue of of that group of people who you would normally be reaching out to right now who would reach out to you you know I I'm I'm definitely hearing that people are missing them the physicality of being together and the virtual works but it sometimes it doesn't work for everything you know one of the things that we're having to do is adapt and adjust you know this is a time where there are rituals that we can't necessarily do so funerals look different right now weddings look different by about minutes the services look different because we cannot gather in the ways that we once did and finally I want to ask each one of you how how do you offer hope to people at a time like this when there is a lot of despair were morning people who are lost Reverend Cole what what is your message to people who say I I just I don't see the good in this well I think there's a lot of fear runs in there and fear of sickness fear of lawsuits largely due to fear of just on an uncertain future and I think there are three things that help us with fear one is humor and it's important to be able to and keep a sense of humor but the things as much as we can but more importantly there is coverage yet there is this friendship I'm the close ties to be half when I was in hospital the fact that people were praying for me and made it much harder to be afraid when I knew there was so many people standing beside me so reaching out to those people who care for us and love us and finally of course that trust in the people this is gone you know who has promised to us older he will see us through whatever it is the half day and so I think I'm those are the things that that certainly helped me in my lifetime hospital thank you Mr you know that's the pattern that repeats again and again you know we are we are in a dark place you're waiting and then there is new beginnings and new life not create this whole country in the world will get to that point with this crisis and this virus to words words to remember in my my teeth what about you what what do you offer in the what can you offer in the way of hope you know I think building off of everything of the Reverend is saying where individuals are looking for a sense of hope manifest that first step of empathizing being a mode of support but then taking it to a level of helping to fill needs are where people are struggling in their day to day because they literally have no money they have lost jobs they have no benefits and they don't know how to put food on the table we have people who are spreading hope to people of all backgrounds in New York City as Muslim volunteers are going out and providing meals to people delivering it to their homes making an opportunity for individuals to feel as if they're not forgotten or left behind by launching these campaigns that we have we've already in the last three weeks as a university based Islamic center raised over a million dollars to assist people in need and going into our month of fasting our most recent campaign others raise three hundred thousand dollars in the last week or so has already sent checks to about seventy new Yorkers in twenty five homes of various backgrounds not just of our faith not simply speak hope but to manifesto to manifest love to manifest mercy in actions that say that in an unprecedented time stepping up means also stepping out and it just doing for others which you can so that you are the reason they have hope in this world and never the reason they might dread it and rabbi Rosenberg finally I is I'm hearing more and that the three of you have in common that your face have in common then I think people might expect the one thing that that I would say and that I often look to when we talk about hope is stopping and recognizing the little blessings or what I call the little the little silver linings that come out of this because there are those days where you know we are so fearful or we feel like this is never going to end and yet they're these little moments of blessing when somebody reaches out to us well when we reach out to somebody else or we just stop and recognize we can take a break we can take a breath some of us in this moment and ways that we never were able to do before so it's just stopping and and finding those small blessings in life rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg such a wonderful note to end on imam Mohammed Latif and reverence him call we thank you so much all three of you thank you thank you thank you so much it turns.

Former Bolivian leader Evo Morales granted asylum by Mexico

PBS NewsHour

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Former Bolivian leader Evo Morales granted asylum by Mexico

"President trump today praised the Bolivian people and that nation's military for forcing the resignation yesterday ability as long time president evo Morales Mexico today the now announced that it would offer Morales asylum but in the Indian nation a power vacuum prevails with Morales and the politicians in line to replace him all gone what now for Bolivia and what does it mean for the region Nick Schifrin reports today in the pas public buses sit towards an abandoned pharmacy or ransacked and looted south America's poorest country is violently divided and right now leaderless desert for a mix of what we need now is control over lootings and robberies that are taking place but all of the citizens are in agreement that a change of government needed to happen that change happen yesterday when longtime president evo Morales announced on state TV he was a victim of a crime how does movies I am resigning precisely so to my brothers and sisters leaders authorities of the socialist movement don't continue to be held hostage traced or threatened I'm very sorry for the civic to talk what

President Trump Bolivia America Evo Morales Nick Schifrin
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The weekend is beginning middle swirl of speculation about President Trump's intentions toward Iran. He says he was on the brink of ordering airstrikes last night when he pulled back. Iran says it to practicing restraint despite having shot down a US military drone foreign affairs. Correspondent Nick Schifrin begins our coverage in Toronto day. The revolutionary guard corps showed off their catch the charred remains of the US drone they shot down. But as he invited camera crews to document that destruction. General Amir Ali Hodges said yesterday could have been deadly. That dies AK if the same moment when this aircraft was being tracked, another spy aircraft called P eight was flying close to this drone that aircraft is manned and has around thirty five crew members. We could have targeted that plane six thousand miles away, in an interview with NBC news. President Trump described discussing options with military commanders and also said yesterday could have been deadlier. They came, and they said, sir, we're ready to go with, like a decision. I said, I wanna know something before you go. How many people will be killed? In this case rains came back. Sure. Approximately one hundred fifty and I thought about it for a second. I said, you know what they shut down on manned drone plane, whatever you wanna call it. And here we are sitting with a hundred and fifty dead people that would have taken place, probably within a half an hour after I said, go ahead and I didn't like it. I didn't think it was, I didn't think it was proportionate, Iran says it used this interceptor missile to shoot down the drought, the US military says it's located here, along roms coast. Former senior military officials told PBS NewsHour, the president was likely given options to attack that missile site, it's command and control, and it's radar systems, and those former senior military and diplomatic officials say the military strike options presented to the president would have included casualty estimates from the very beginning. It's not clear why the president received that information so close to giving an order to attack. Those former officials say it raises. Questions about the decision making process taking the president as word today. The key fact how many people are going to die in this attack, apparently was not in the president's mind until really moments before he was about to order the attack. So that suggests to me a breakdown process should be one of the first facts, it's on the table. Brett mcgurk was a senior State Department, official until he resigned in December to protest the administration's decision to withdraw from Syria. He says the strike the president described could've quickly escalated, an American attack that took one hundred fifty Irani alive. Particularly in response to an attack that took no America lives. I think the Iranians would be in a position just given how they think that they would have to respond to that, therefore, there would be another reckless provocation from the Iranians, which are then put the onus again, I'm President Trump to respond again that fear was echoed today by speaker of the house, Nancy Pelosi.

President Trump president US Iran Nick Schifrin Brett mcgurk General Amir Ali Hodges AK NBC Nancy Pelosi Toronto America PBS NewsHour Irani State Department Syria official
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But I in Syria, there is a tale of two. Territories, the final stronghold of those opposed to the regime is the target of relentless attacks. In the source of constant tension between Syria and neighboring Turkey. And then there is the area liberated by the US and his allies, as Nick Schifrin reports each area faces unique and immense challenges with the war in Syria now grinding into its ninth year, sharla Saad has all the lawn. The war and kept power with the help of Iran and Russia in much of the country, the killing and suffering continues, especially in north Syria. It live province. Millions of civilians and tens of thousands of militants are under constant bombardment, meanwhile, in northeast Syria the Syrian Kurds with US and European backing the straight ISIS stronghold nearly three months ago, the Kurds control a vast area, but many of its major cities are destroyed and they live with the threat of. Promise US withdrawal to update us on both regions. We welcome to people with deep experience covering the war, hustle hustle was born and grew up in eastern, Syria. He is now director at the center for global policy of foreign policy think-tank and journalist, and author Gaels mock LeMond, she's an Adjunct Senior fellow at the council on foreign relations and just returned from her six trip to northeast Syria, and is working on a new book about the Kurds. Welcome to you both. Thank you very much. Let's start with you in it live. We've covered this story before, how bad is the onslaught by the Syrian regime, and the Russian air force against this last location, where rebels are living. This is as bad as it gets. We were the regime and the Russians will attack. We'd be anticipated in this for about a year now. So the has.

Syria sharla Saad US Adjunct Senior fellow Nick Schifrin Iran Turkey Gaels Russia three months
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reported already troubled waters were further. Royal today with a tax onto oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman. The US blamed, Iran and will raise the issue in a United Nations Security council meeting experts and government officials say it appears to be the latest in a series of increasingly aggressive actions by Iran. In response to new sanctions Nick Schifrin reports. About twenty five miles off the coast of Iran. The front al-tair oil-tanker is disabled and on fire and explosion ripped a hole and scorch the tanker side. It's filipino. Russian and Georgian crew had to abandon ship and be rescued. They ended up on Iranian boat. Just forty five minutes earlier a few miles to the east. The tanker cO Kuka courageous was hit with two explosions, three hours apart. The crew also had to abandon ship and ended up on American destroyer today at the State Department secretary state Mike Pompeo offered no evidence, but blamed Iran taking a whole, these unprovoked attacks present a clear threat to international peace and security of lightness alt- on the freedom of navigation and an unacceptable campaign of escalating. Tension by Ron a US military official tells PBS NewsHour, the US discovered an unexploded mine believed to be a Raanan on the side of the co Kuka courageous, Iran and its proxies you small boats in the. Zhen Gulf, and have the capacity to attack commercial shipping says retired Admiral Mike Smith who commanded destroyer squadron and the Persian Gulf have the ability to have the mine, they would certainly have the ability to. Employ that mine. The reports are that it would the traditional method would be you it send divers in port before the tanker even got underway, and you fix it to the tanker, cO Kuku courageous is Japanese owned and today, it's owners showed the press where their ship was attacked an attack the came exactly as Japanese Prime minister Shinzo Ave met with tola Alicante, Iran supreme leader. They was visiting Toronto to try and reduce Iran US tensions and appeal for peace as he told the press conference yesterday. Nobody would like war to happen in Japan hopes to be able to make any effort it can and to do its utmost to reduce tension. This is the goal of my trip. But today, how many rejected the olive branch and President Trump's offered sit down for talks? I have no response to Trump's message. I tell you some words, but I'm not giving him any message because I don't consider him worthy of even exchanging messages. I think the clear message here is that Comey himself is disinterested in negotiations. He has said that publicly and the revolutionary guard has provided the firepower to back it on Suzanne Maloney, is an Iran expert at the Brookings Institution. And a former senior State Department official, she says compared to last month's attacks that blew holes tanker Stockton Muratti port. Today's attacks.

Iran US Gulf of Oman State Department President Trump United Nations Security counci Persian Gulf Zhen Gulf Nick Schifrin Mike Pompeo Comey Admiral Mike Smith official Stockton Muratti port Brookings Institution Japan PBS NewsHour Suzanne Maloney
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Come on the news hour, President Trump welcomes the controversial leader of Brazil to the White House one on one secretary of housing and urban development. Ben Carson a report from the Syrian frontline of the fight against ISIS and much more. Today. President Trump welcome Brazilian, president Shire Bolsonaro for an official visit to the White House Bolsonaro has been dubbed the Trump of the tropics because of the rhetoric and policies the two leaders share as Nick Schifrin reports the two presidents are now trying to overcome more than three decades of Brazilian suspicion of the United States. We're going to exchange jerseys today at the White House. The leaders of the western hemisphere's two largest economies declared themselves on the same team and allied in a new north South American access. We're going to have a fantastic working relationship. We have many of us that are similar. Brazil in the United States stand side by side in their efforts to ensure liberty for the traditional family respect for God, our creator against gender ideology and political correctness against fake news. Zaire Bolsonaro is the first unabashedly. Pro American Brazilian president since the end of military rule in the nineteen eighties and made the US is first bilateral foreign visit. It's time to overcome all resistance and explore the very best potential that is there between Brazil and the US after all it is fair to say today. Brazil has a president who is not heads America, which is really unprecedented in the last few decades, the Trump administration considers Bolsonaro a key conservative.

President Trump Brazil president White House United States White House Bolsonaro Ben Carson Nick Schifrin secretary America official three decades
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And here now as our Nick Schifrin who was in Hanoi last week reporting on the summit, Nick what are the North Koreans doing if this facility, so this is a facility that they partially disassembled. And now they're reassembling what they disassembled and that includes rebuilding testing stand relaying railroad and reattaching a roof. So the facility is once again operational. But let's put it in some perspective when you say. Facility for testing. It is not a missile launch facility. This is launched satellites into orbit. So this is not necessarily an indication that they're going to launch a rocket with any kind of tip or an ICBM missile that can reach the United States. But if they did test and other satellite that would be a violation of a Security Council resolution and the technology that North Korea uses in that satellite test site would be the exact same technology that they use in long range missiles. So that is why US officials are concerned there is some concern. So armee understanding senior administration official briefed reporters yesterday on a lot of this. What was learned? We learned basically that the US approach has shifted in a major way before Hanoi. And that really led the president to try and seek a grand bargain that most experts say was doomed to fail. So let's understand the chef they'll take you back to January Steve vegan, the top US negotiator. Give a big speech at Stanford. And he said. The US was willing to take a step North Korea. Takes a step. It's a staged approach. She also said that the US was willing to talk about not only denuclearization. But the topics that North Korea wanted to talk about finding a peace regime on the North Korean peninsula and also improving relations between the countries, and they were willing to talk about all those things simultaneously. We've communicated to our North Korean counterparts that we are prepared to pursue simultaneously. And in parallel all the commitments are two leaders made in their joint statement at Singapore last summer now that was January. Let me read you a statement by senior State Department official from yesterday. Nobody in the administration advocates a step by step approach. In all cases. The expectation is a complete denuclearization of North Korea. As a condition for all the other steps being all the other steps being being taken. So every expert we say, we talked to say this is a major shift that led the president to ask for a front loaded grand bargain, all of the North Korean nuclear weapons for all of the sanctions relief in the US went further and demanded a freeze of chemical and biological weapons. That's not something that the US has done before. And in Hanoi. North Korea said, look, we don't trust the US enough to make this kind of grand bargain. The North Koreans put a smaller relatively smaller deal on the table. Experts. We talked to say it was meant to be a starting point. But the president did not like that wanted that frontloaded bargain and walked away rather than the sheet. So a shift why we don't know for sure, but what the officials I speak to point to two things one John Bolton, the national security adviser was at the table and Hanoi has never believed in a staged approach. Number two, the president has soured. According to one senior administration official on South Korean president moon. Jae-in who has been advocating for the stage approach. And instead is listening to prime minister Japan Shinzo Albie, who says don't trust the North Koreans. So what is what's next? What what does that mean? Administration. Officials say they believe no bridges were burned. They hope that negotiations continue, and they say that they understand the North Korean program. The unders- understand what North Korea wants a little better than they did before. But the question is what is the deal that the US wants next North Korea says it's open to some kind of stage deal, but as long as the US holds out. For this grand bargain. North Korea says, it's not interested. And so it's not clear where these negotiations go and the analysts we speak to both pro engagement and more critical of North Korea really fear that this moment is leading to the two sides digging in and tensions increasing and in other words, still far apart as far as we can tell as far as we can tell Nick Schifrin. Thank you. Thanks very much. A vote in the house of representatives.

North Korea United States Hanoi president Nick Schifrin North Korean peninsula official Security Council Stanford Singapore State Department Steve vegan John Bolton Japan prime minister Shinzo Albie
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To become ambassador to Saudi Arabia, retired General John Abbas aide testified in the Senate he defended the kingdom's importance to US foreign policy despite sharp criticism from senators who accused the kingdom of cracking down on its critics as foreign affairs. Correspondent Nick Schifrin reports even Saudi citizens here in the United States. So they can't escape the watchful eye of their government. College senior AbdulRahman Al Torri is carefree with his classmates, but he feels he has to watch his back. I was extremely afraid. I had to change my location. I didn't know what could happen next. I didn't know what to expect the Manhattan art gallery photographer. Donna is worried. Why are these people attacking me all the time like wants to like basically put me in jail want to see me homeless in America and in Washington DC, Georgetown, University, fellow Abdullah day says even six thousand miles from home. There's nowhere to hide. They have no limits. They can reach you everywhere the fear every criticism, and every different opinion three Saudi citizens living in the US who say they're targeted for the criticism of the Saudi government. They may be protected by US laws, but they say they have no protection from Saudi surveillance. It's a reality. And unfortunately, it's happening. In the United States soil to what do you think? We'll move Torri is a senior at the university of San Diego and an activist via online video blocks last August, he began criticizing the ultra conservative Saudi religious establishment. Toba if God accepts repentance, who are you to curse me to him with the videos earned him, thousands of Saudi and international followers and the ire of the government dime. I thought he had been studying on a Saudi government scholarship after the criticism. He says the Saudi embassy warned him to stay silent. When he kept talking he received this Email, revoking scholarship and this notification blocking his student portal, technically he'd been warned in two thousand seventeen the Saudi government published a list of rules for students studying abroad rule, number one, don't engage in political or religious discussion or conduct media interviews by disobeying. I'll move Torri ended up broke and on Twitter critic said the government should crucify him terminating his scholarship wasn't enough. Just because express my religious belief without harming anyone scholarship gets taken away. It was hard to digest that my own people and my own government want me to be executed up until then I'll move Therese criticism was narrowly focused on the listen, but then Saudi journalists are Shuki was murdered and dismembered while visiting Saudi Arabia's Istanbul consulate material turned his target two's own government. You didn't only kill him. You chopped him up is this government or a mafia? He said there's no chance crown prince Mohammad bin Salman known as NBS wasn't involved..

Saudi government Saudi Arabia Al Torri Saudi embassy US Therese criticism Nick Schifrin Shuki Donna Senate prince Mohammad bin Salman General John Abbas Manhattan Twitter Istanbul San Diego NBS Abdullah America
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today in Hanoi, a summit designed to achieve progress toward North Korea's denuclearization as well. As improved ties with the United States collapsed. Suddenly when the US rejected a North Korean offer. And tonight, the US and North Korea are publicly disagreeing over. What exactly that offer was Nick Schifrin begins our coverage from Hanoi after flying eight thousand miles and holding hours of high stakes meetings with the North Korean leader? He considers a friend President Trump chose to drive away from the Hanoi summit empty handed. You always have to be prepared to walk one hundred percent side something today, we actually had papers ready to be signed. But it just wasn't appropriate. I want to do it. Right. I'd much rather. Do it. Right. Then do it fast. The US says it asked North Korea to close the young young nuclear facilities that produce. Tony mean uranium seen here in two thousand five and what the US has. Specs is a second uranium plant a few miles away. The President Trump and secretary state might compare also idle rollback of Kim Jong loons entire program. We asked him to do more he'd he was unprepared to do that. Or even that facility, even the young beyond facility all of its scope, which is important for sure still leaves missiles still leaves warheads and weapon systems all of those things we couldn't quite get there today. The US says North Korea agreed close young on. But wouldn't go any further, and they demanded what President Trump called excessive sanctions relief. Basically they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety. And we couldn't do that. They were willing to denote denuclearize portion of the errors that we wanted. But we couldn't give up all of the sanctions for that. But in a press conference, ten.

North Korea President Trump Hanoi United States Nick Schifrin Tony President Kim Jong secretary one hundred percent
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's also linked up to what he's doing with South Korea, south and North Korea recently blew up outposts along the demilitarized zone and officials from both countries are trying to connect railroads the US could allow that opening to proceed by lifting some of the sanctions now imposed on North Korea. The critics fear that could lead the US to withdraw some or all of the twenty three thousand troops currently stationed in South Korea. Last week. President Trump said that's not on the table. No, it's not. Not a consideration. But early this month highlighted their cost to CBS's Margaret Brennan gonna keep us troops there in South Korea. I mean, we haven't talked about anything else. Maybe someday. I mean who knows, but you know, it's very expensive to keep troops. There. You do that. With President Trump's advisors know, they have to improve on the generalities agreed to in Singapore and create a specific roadmap. Both sides can follow while critics say that's a road to nowhere. North Korea is more time as theater side as the US puts it scar down with which to build its nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities defenders argue today provides an opportunity for the US to transform the relationship by negotiating more than denuclearization many things we can do destroy to bring North Korea in the world of nations until being a pariah nation now cast nation. And I think those things are worth doing to in parallel with working on the hard objectives. President Trump argues. He can do that by promising to make North Korea great again, providing the country prosperity, and by harnessing, the two leaders relationship. Now where are we now? No missiles, no rockets no nuclear testing. We've learned a lot but much more importantly than all of it much more important much much more important than that is we have a great relationship. I have a very good relationship with Kim Jong UN to Hanoi summit will test whether a good relationship translates into convincing North Korea that once and for all it can survive without nuclear weapons. The PBS NewsHour. I'm Nick Schifrin in Hanoi. And Nick will continue to report on the summit tomorrow. And that's a news hour for tonight. I'm.

North Korea South Korea President Trump US Nick Schifrin Hanoi Kim Jong UN Margaret Brennan CBS Singapore PBS
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So in the past the US said that you have to give us your complete list of nuclear and missile programs North Korean said, thanks, but no, thanks. That's like giving you a targeting list. Instead begin said last week that there needs to be a complete list that it can be at the end of the process. Before the process of denuclearization can be final. You must also have a complete understanding of the full extent of the North Korean weapons of mass destruction and missile programs. We will get that at some point comprehensive declaration. We'll get there at some point that is a real shift. And of course, critics say that this is like a watering down of the US demands. So what you've been describing how the US has given an has made concessions. What are they expecting from the North Koreans? US officials are actually very specific about what they want number one. They're looking for a roadmap a roadmap for future negotiations and declarations number two. They're looking for what they're calling a shared understanding of the desired outcomes. Basically what does peace look like what is denuclearization? Look like. And number three. They're looking for what they're calling concrete deliverables. Now. What does that mean that could be inspectors that would verify the closures of missile and nuclear testing sites? It could be the end of nuclear fuel production for the North Korean side. It also could be progress to end the Korean war. What does North Korea want at the top of their list is sanctions relief? What begin is doing? Now, he's in North Korea. He's going to set the framework for these negotiations. Critics fear that he's not gonna make enough progress that President Trump will go into this summit without much progress and give too much away basically, perhaps even lower the number of troops in South Korea. But I have to say Judy the pro engagement and analysts who we talked to as one of them put it say, this is the greatest opportunity that they have seen for progress in their lives. It's fascinating that it's finally appears to be about to take place. Absolutely. And this summit is all right. Thank you very much. Nick schifrin. Thank you. Now going beyond reading.

US North Korea Nick schifrin South Korea Judy President Trump
"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today in Syria, ISIS and US-backed forces fought over one of the terror groups final holdout, and the US is reinforcing the area with additional troops to prepare for withdrawal. But as the US draws down there are still Americans being held by the Syrian regime, Nick Schifrin brings us one of their stories with a family that is just now going public. When Marge MAs wasn't throwing the football, hiking up a mountain were fishing in the ocean. He was with his brood of grandchildren. He was an amazing grandfathered. We have family in Indiana in Texas, and Iowa and Virginia, and he was the glue that brought everybody together holocaust, MAs is marched, son. And when Marge wasn't with his children and grandchildren. He was helping other people's children who suffer through conflict or natural disasters heart, and he couldn't help seeing anyone in pain. He sausage, and he felt like there was a need. And so he was an advocate of that. After the war in Bosnia sue NAMI in Indonesia and Hurricane Katrina. He led an NGO that treated children who needed help in two thousand twelve and told an Arabic news outlet. How children can be resilient and with their parents court in from our parents should always stand with their children. This gives the child confidence in his or her family and insurance they can overcome any issue in the future. He's a father a husband brother a sign. He is a fan of many a colleague and his missed. Mas was last seen in Damascus and twenty seventeen his family says he was not part of the war or helping rebel fighters. Instead he was paying respects for his father-in-law's death. A western diplomat told the family he was picked up by police and transferred to a Syrian prison. I on CBS this morning. The now after two years of no progress they're going public with the media blitz to deliver a direct appeal to the president. They wrote a letter asking for his assistance. We're trying to approach President Donald Trump to see if we can get his attention. So he can take this matter personally. He's the only one we feel that would be able to bring our father back home to us. We are very happy to have you back home. President Trump is secured the release of several Americans held hostage overseas. Jauzi spent three years in jail. Last may the president greeted Americans at the airport after negotiating their release with North Korean leader, Kim Jong Hoon. And two months later. The president welcome pastor. Andrew Brunson who've been held by Turkey..

Marge MAs President Donald Trump president Nick Schifrin US NGO Syria Kim Jong Hoon Andrew Brunson CBS football Hurricane Katrina Bosnia Jauzi Indiana Turkey Damascus Indonesia Virginia
Facebook let companies access users' friends data

0 Show

03:29 min | 3 years ago

Facebook let companies access users' friends data

"In Europe today, Nick Schifrin tells us there are new documents that show the social media giant gave other companies select access to user's data. Judy. The documents were released by a British parliament committee and seemed to show Facebook using all of our data as a bargaining chip to increase revenue the committee accuses Facebook of cutting special deals with companies like Netflix Airbnb and lift to access users data because those companies were advertising on Facebook Facebook restricted access to users dated a company's at deemed competition the data. We're talking about is users education and religious background. Also, preferences, what users like and don't like this matters because Facebook claimed to have restricted access to this data to all companies in two thousand fifteen and it matters because it raises questions about Facebook's interest in collecting your data and making money for the record the NewsHour works with Facebook on some video projects talk about all this. I'm joined by the Washington Post Silicon Valley correspondent Elizabeth Watkin from San Francisco. Thank you very much for being on the news hour, can we start with these internal discussions in two thousand twelve and we now have these emails Facebook figuring out how to make money. Mark Zuckerberg writes the following in October twenty twelve without limiting distribution or access to friends who use this app. I don't think we have any way to get developers to pay us at all does that shows Brooke thinking about users data as some kind of bargaining chip. I think it does. And you have to see the big picture here. Which is this is right after Facebook is on gone public. And the media story is that they can't pivot to mobile are they going to make money their stock price was dropping. And so they have at the time this whole developer community in or tens of thousands of apps that are literally writing off the social graph. Even the Obama came campaign did at Cambridge analytic did it and they're looking and saying we need to make money. And so they're looking at these relationships with thousands of developers, and you can see this intense bargaining. That's going on between Zuckerberg Facebook's top brass over who should get access and how while at the same time what they're publicly telling developers is. Is that all the access is free and neutral and this runs up until this debate runs through twenty fifteen when they finally decide twenty fourteen two thousand fifteen to finally decide to cut off access, but what we're learning is that actually there were whole categories of exceptions at the time. So let's fast forward to twenty eighteen Mark Zuckerberg is in front of congress. This is April. And he is speaking in two in response to a question from dean Heller Republican of Nevada. Well, Senator once again, we don't sell any data to anyone. We don't sell it to advertisers. And we don't sell it to developers. What we do allow is for people to sign into apps and bring their data and it used to be the date of some of their friends. But now it isn't with them. And that I think makes sense. I mean, that's basic data portability the ability that you own the data, you should be able to take it from one to another if you'd like the documents out today show that while Facebook didn't sell data they use the data to make. It's the documents strongly suggests that now the caveat is we are seeing bits and pieces in the documents. It's not like it's a full transcript of everything Facebook ever did. But from what we can tell what's interesting is that privacy didn't come up that much in the documents. It was all about competition

Zuckerberg Facebook Facebook Mark Zuckerberg British Parliament Committee Europe Nick Schifrin Judy Netflix Barack Obama Washington Airbnb Elizabeth Watkin San Francisco Brooke Newshour Dean Heller Republican Nevada Developer Cambridge Analytic
President, Senate And Trump discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:59 min | 3 years ago

President, Senate And Trump discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Look at all these other immigrants. These all these people are like this man, who's a murderous dangerous person. And people are saying that that stereotypical and really that. It's that it's something that's unacceptable. And that's pretty remarkable for the president of the United States to be told that your ad cannot be run on major networks. Add to that the fact that there are people who are looking at President Trump, and you're saying that he is his rhetoric has really been unhelpful in forging racial divisions. Here this morning. The president was on a call with two hundred thousand supporters, and he's sounding a bit fearful of what could be coming tomorrow. He was saying that he does not really he doesn't really want to talk about the house in the Senate. He feels good about. But he said, I don't want this to be a referendum on my presidency while at the same time contradicting himself saying that if Republicans do pull this off any do keep control of the house and the Senate, I should Republicans. Feel good about my presidency. So this is a president who is being one on a lot of people see as racially divisive. But also someone who's a little bit nervous for what's going to come tomorrow. So Lisa you've got a number of Democrats out there in swing districts. How are they looking at this ad if this message of divisiveness and some say racism the truth is this immigration taxes? The president's puts both parties in a tricky position because he started it so late that they're not able to get pole as to how it's affecting their voters. There are some Republicans who hope that it does get out their base. It's obviously something that help the president get elected. But Judy I talked to one Republican campaign in a swing congressional district. They are very concerned that this is going to hit those swing districts, especially those ones that have newer representatives and have increasing minority populations about the state like California where there right now are six to seven seats in play. Democrats also have that hope and they're thinking about Senate seats like era. Zona Nevada, Texas where we've seen record early voting turnout. They think this could bring out even more say Hispanic population that they believe will vote their way, but the truth is they don't know yet. And when you look at both the house and the Senate that's also the case that it's not clear yet that for sure the Democrats will take over the house both parties think that's likely, but the Senate right now, it's still very unclear. There are many different scenarios for how that could go. And it depends on each race. So the ad for now isn't being aired. But the message is still out there. Yeah. Lisa Desjardins, Michel cinder. Thank you. As millions of Americans go to the polls tomorrow election officials in every state will be watching the process intensely in the face of numerous threats and prior attempts to meddle with American elections. Federal and state officials are trying to step up their defenses, the news hours, William Brandon in Nick, Schifrin, take a closer look. So what are the kinds of threats that officials are guarding against where are they coming from foreign affairs? Correspondent Nick Schifrin has been following all of this closely. Nick, there's been a lot of concerns raised in just the last couple of days about this coming election. We saw the president

President Trump Senate Donald Trump Nick Schifrin Lisa Desjardins United States Zona Nevada California Judy I William Brandon Texas Michel Cinder
Over 100 dead, including US soldier, in Afghan clashes

PBS NewsHour

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Over 100 dead, including US soldier, in Afghan clashes

"A pitched battle in Afghanistan between Taliban fighters and Afghan government forces continued today in Ghazni southwest of the capital Kabul at least one. Hundred Afghan security personnel have been killed in this latest show of, force by the insurgents and. Late today the Pentagon announced that a US special forces, soldier died from wounds sustained in a roadside bombing. He became the fifth American to die there this year almost seventeen years after the United States, entered

Leo Kritchevsky Iraq Afghanistan Pentagon Taliban United States Saddam Hussein Kabul New York Times Kuwait New York City Dustin Kirby Nick Schifrin Ghazni Asia Al-Qaeda America Ballade Tora Bora
Trump and Western Allies Expel Scores of Russians in Sweeping Rebuke Over U.K. Poisoning

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Trump and Western Allies Expel Scores of Russians in Sweeping Rebuke Over U.K. Poisoning

"The united states at least twenty other nations have joined in a mass expulsion of russian diplomats sixty are being kicked out of the us alone in a bid to punish the kremlin for an attack on a former russian spy nick schifrin begins our coverage we have from the british parliament it is part of a pattern of increasingly aggressive russian behavior to the european council we remained critical of the actions of the russian government to the white house this is not the type of conduct that the united states are allies can accept a united attempt to isolate and punish russia for the alleged poisoning of former russian spies sergei scree paul and his daughter yulia today eighteen countries simultaneously announced expulsions and more than one hundred russian diplomats accused of being intelligence officers european leaders say they wanted to express solidarity with british prime minister theresa may together we had sent a message that we will not tolerate russia's continued attempts to flout international law and undermine our values in addition to closing the seattle consulate the trump administration will expel sixty russians accused of spine the largest number of russians expelled from the us ever in response russia vowed cold warstyle reciprocal retaliation the russian embassy in washington trolls with a twitter poll which us consulate general would you close russia if it was up to you ambassador to the us anatoly antonoff said moscow had nothing to do with the former spies death deal with the united states of america is doing today they are destroying what little remained of us russian ties i would add that all the responsibility for ruining russian american relations is on the united states of america the us russia relationship has been deteriorating since the twenty fourteen russian invasion and annexation of crimea in two thousand sixteen in response to election hacking the obama administration closed russian compounds then moscow limited the number of us staffers in russia than the us close russia's san francisco consulate than the trump administration imposed more sanctions today's announcement is the trump administration's harshest punishment today i had a call with president putin and congratulated him on the victory president trump himself has not echoed his administration's criticism of russia today the white house said russia must change its behaviour but said the door dialogue was still open the.

Obama Administration President Trump San Francisco Moscow Twitter Washington Prime Minister White House Donald Trump President Putin United States America Anatoly Antonoff Seattle Theresa Yulia Russia Russian Government European Council Nick Schifrin
"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"North korea has again seized the world's attention with a new nuclear blast the weekend tests may move pyongnyang a quantum leap forward in its bid to become a nuclear power capable of threatening the us mainland that in turn is set off a new diplomatic flurry special correspondent nick schifrin reports and now is enough for the second time in a week the security council today held an emergency session on north korea and us ambassador to the un nikki haley said north korean leader kim jong woon had slapped the international community in the face his abusive use of missiles and nuclear threats show that he is begging for war or is never something the united states once we don't want it now but our countries patience is not unlimited and for the second time in a week south korea today practiced an attack on north korea the south korean military fired missiles it said could target north korea's nuclear testsites today president trump agreed to help south korea increase the size of those missiles cell south korea more weapons and south korea said the us would soon deploy a carrier strike group and longrange bombers those military moves provide the us with options that secretary of defense james mattis mentioned yesterday any threat to the united state george territories including wom or our allies will be met with a massive military response we are not looking to the total annihilation of a country namely north korea that as i said we have many option to do so but chinese ambassador to the un layer chiayi said today pressure won't produce peace you're one gov all these you've thumbed.

North korea nuclear power us nikki haley kim jong woon south korea trump secretary james mattis nick schifrin north korean president
"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Now we continue our series inside putin's russia there may be no more consequential relationship for the united states than with russia both nations possess world ending capacity and may be at one of the most critical moments since the end of the cold war tonight we explore the bilateral relationship the tension and how russian see the united states again in partnership with the pulitzer centre on crisis reporting special correspondent nick schifrin and producers act bannon start their report in moscow on victory day on russia's most patriotic holiday russians of all ages remember what they considered their finest moment marked the anniversary of victory in world war two by honoring the dead corregan off nine overs his grandfather fought the nazis he says russia in the us were once allies and should be again we let we really want to love you and be friends with you we are waiting for you to finally meet us halfway for russians it's the us was unwilling to come halfway many here believe president trump wants to improve things but has been blocked by with dimitri shaken calls the american establish lim will go ahead political trump wants to do something but he's forced to follow the general political line donald trump is the most right wing candidate all the republican party perhaps nobody expressed more hope hoping trump than alexander dugan a rightwing tv firebrand and philosopher who helped inspire the kremlin's ideology really was supported trump is which support our agenda do can says the kremlin such trump is a kindred spirit who vowed not to meddle internationally with support of these choice of either the establishment conservative american revolution that chain from president trump ordered missiles frank on russia ally syria and said he felt he must respond to a chemical weapons attack as long as america's stands for justice.

donald trump chemical weapons alexander dugan dimitri president america syria kremlin republican party putin world war moscow nick schifrin pulitzer centre cold war united states russia
"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"We returned to our series inside putin's russia tonight the fate of some of the kremlin's opponents according to one study in the past three years thirty eight prominent russians have been murdered or died suspiciously the high mortality rate among some russian critics has a long history but critics say it is emblematic of how president vladimir putin runs today's russia special correspondent nick schifrin and producers act fanon report from moscow in today's russia there are consequences to criticising the state police tow protesters their rally isn't sanctioned the raskin president vladimir putin not to run for reelection this demonstration is sponsored by the opposition group open russia from st petersburg and across the country police arrested more than one hundred protesters his democratic opposition activists are being arrested and and given lengthy prison sentence it has members of the democratic opposition or being forced into exile or harassed or attacked on loaded 35yearold vladimir car mersa is open russia's vicechairman he's an outspoken activist demonstrated against putin and organizing protests we i sat down with him late last year were believing the rule of law we believe in human rights we believe that russia should enjoy the same democratic institutions that the rest of europe enjoys to try and create those democratic institutions he teamed up with the man he calls his mentor boris nemtsov a former deputy prime minister who became the country's leading dissident the to travel to washington highlight the mysterious death of sergei magnitsky a lawyer who exposed corruption among senior officials nemtsov and karamursel convinced the us congress to freeze the assets of russians believe connected to magnitsky's death these people in a car russian regime who like to keep the money there center in the west there one of occasion the west to send the kids to to to schools to the west.

sergei magnitsky congress washington boris nemtsov europe moscow fanon president us russia prime minister human rights st petersburg nick schifrin vladimir putin mortality rate kremlin three years
"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"nick schifrin" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"From north korea today new defiance the communist regimes leader kim jongun insisted that he will never negotiate away his missile and nuclear programs but the world's highest diplomatic body held an emergency session on how to get the north to do just that correspondent nick schifrin begins our coverage thank you mr president this afternoon in the un security council the us tried to rally the world to punish and isolate north korea it is a dark day because yesterday's actions by north korea made the world a more dangerous place us ambassador nikki haley said north korea's test of an intercontinental ballistic missile requires a global response they have not had any care for russia or china in this they have not listen to anything that you've said they're not gonna listen to anything that you say and so it's time that we all stand together and say we will not put up with this action haley is trying to lead a diplomatic effort to change north korean behavior of whispering wood you've lugar us needs chinese and russian help but beijing and moscow have their own strategy improves policy will determine the recall for all interested states to act with restraint rather than provocation and warmongering woman you're going kufo we call on all the concerned parties to exercise restraint be avoid provocative actions and villager rhetoric and demonstrate the will for unconditional dialogue tuesday's missile launch cross the intercontinental threshold the us had been hoping to prevent in science terms the missile advance was incremental the us officials tell the news our it was in a new previously unseen configuration it was fired from a mobile launcher had a reentry vehicle and was to stage as seen on north korean tv the media american response was its own launch us and south korean military's fire tactical missiles that can be rapidly deployed and south korea released a video what an attack on north korea would look like.

north korea kim jongun nick schifrin president un security council nikki haley russia us beijing china north korean moscow south korea