19 Burst results for "Nick Cave"

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:06 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The 160 foot long facade of the school. A gallery in the village of Kinderhook New York. Apparently it created quite an unexpected ruckus in town. And bob, I was wondering if you can share what happened when you mounted that installation. Sure, well, truth be told was originated right after the George Floyd incident as part of a series of projects that were going to go up in response to that. But it happened to be one of the last projects that we actually got to mount because of its scale and because of its complexity. And that was to put it up at Kinderhook and the timing led to it being right before the election. And as you can imagine, right before the election with all the energy that was going on around Trump specifically, the word truth starts with TRU and it takes a long time to put these letters up and that's where they started. And so you start to see T are you and people are going nutty, nutty, nutty nutty, and so that was the first thing was like, what's this going to be and people were up in arms about that it might be pro that it might be con that didn't know what it was going to be. And then all of a sudden when truth showed up and be told, showed up, they all immediately interpreted that as anti Trump. Not necessarily the case. Of course, we're not unhappy that that is the interpretation. But the minute that it had that interpretation by some was the minute that the village absolutely said no way can this be up there. It's a sign. We had to go through all these legal channels to what makes a sinus sign. It needs to have daytime place. It needs to direct you to do something. Truth be told, has none of those things there. But they were not going to let that go, even though the gallery had a an approval to use their building for art, however they want to. And so this went on for months. Months and thousands of dollars of fighting to prove that this is the only legal thing they could stand on is it's not a sign. Yeah. So the mayor of Kinderhook ordered the artwork to be removed because the town didn't think it looked all right. Yeah. Right. They thought it was a sign. That's what they're using as the reason to take it down. You know, I believe that the reason that they wanted it to come down is that it felt like it was a political statement that was anti Trump and this needed to not be in our town. It's interesting how, you know, people show their faces. But that's how they're able to do it as much as calling it a sign. They weren't going to come clean and say why they were upset about it. And the truth comes out based on communities, neighborhoods. This is right before voter repression and Atlanta. And so there was a lot of damn truth that was literally who's going to win the election. That was another whole thing. So it was so many layers in conflicts of that was sort of built around that. I just don't understand how the word truth could have a problem for anybody. Like, if you had to pick a single word? Well, it's almost as self fulfilling prophecy, truth be told. And then you're sort of confronted by the truth of what these people think. Isn't it what? But you know, again, the election was it ever. It was all fake based on false truths. But it just had to pick like a single word, all of us at this table right now. If you had to pick a single word that shouldn't be controversial, what would it be? Like, if it's not truth, what would it be? I guess love. Okay. But even that's. Hope. Yeah, that's true. There's lots of interpretations. Well, in the end, over 3300 people signed a petition in support of truth be told. And it did stay up until its end date. So at least justice prevailed. Yeah, justice prevailed. Man, oh, man. You know, you think something as beautiful as just the notion truth be told, which could be anybody's truth, really? Would be pretty banana. Totally you would think so. Is it going to go anywhere else? Yeah, it's going to be at the Brooklyn art museum in April. It's going up at mass MoCA in about two weeks. Wonderful. I think you should make it vinyl letters kit for people to be able to put the letters on their own homes because I would do that. Right? Right? I was fantasizing last night thinking, I want truth be told letters on my hands. I love this. Thank you. Okay, let's figure that out. If anybody's got funding for this cool project listeners, you heard it here first on design. Oh my God. Gentlemen, I have one last question for you before I let you go. One of the things that also kept coming up in my research was your love of sneakers and so I have to ask the question because I couldn't find the answer anywhere. How many pairs of sneakers do you both really own? Oh God, I don't even know. It's ridiculous because they're not just like, you can't even go count them because they're too deep, you know, they're stacked too deep. But I think, you know, for me, it's more built around how my feet need to feel when teaching. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. No, no, no. Oh my God. Oh no. Concrete floors. You know, I can't wear a real hard shoe. I have to really think about like, I'm gonna be standing for like 8 hours in the classroom. My feet, not only do they need to look good. The truth be told. But it really is really just sort of being able to have something comfortable and sneakers today are really quite fabulous. It's full on all about fashion. It's about having the right color for the right thing and the right level, height for the right thing. It's all about fashion. Fashion is comfort. The Snickers you're buying these days they're hard. They're not even, they're not even comfy. No. Looks like a pump feels like a sneaker is not how you live. Oh my goodness, Nick Cave. Thank you for making the world a better place with your work. And thank you so, so much.

Kinderhook George Floyd Trump bob Brooklyn art museum New York Atlanta Nick Cave
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:59 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Said, girl, perfect. Because I was really sort of moving expanding and sort of moving in a broader direction in terms of what's next with my practice. And so she goes, I'm going to go away for a year. And then I'm going to come back and sit down with you and talk about what you've come up with. In a year, I really wasn't thinking about it for probably quite some time. And then Michael Brown happened. Yes. And that was the catalyst for that show. The title until came about because I think Michael Brown Freddie gray, you know, it was Trayvon Martin. It was just one incident after the other. And yet, we are sort of hearing these stories we are sort of getting all of this propaganda from the news and yet these individuals are made to feel as if they're guilty. And so until sort of like guilty and to prove an innocent innocent until proven guilty. And so that was really the beginning of that and I created this crystal cloudscape. That allowed the viewer to sort of part of the installation you're able to climb up to the top of the crystal cloud and ask yourself that question is a racism in heaven, which was this sort of landscape that was built from this sort of fabrication of just extraordinary making of objects and about a dozen iron lawn jockeys that were all holding dream catchers that were elaborate and blowing through the wind. That was really sort of the beginning of that project. Talk about your relationship to the found objects and how that became one of the centerpieces of this installation. Where did you find them? How did you, how did you construct them into the show so seamlessly? You know, I think the found object really the beginning of that goes back to the hand me downs. Sort of the deconstructing that is really the beginning of that, you know, my mother was the one that turned me on to secondhand stores. You know, and I was just like at the age of 16, totally into all of that. This sort of retro garments and just sort of looking at style and fashion in that way. But I think it then led into the sound suits, you know, again, it was from twigs to bottle caps to other sort of materials and to think about like buttons and to think about like excess and surplus. That's here and that the available to use to reclaim to sort of identify was always part of this sort of making vocabulary. So it's always been part of the sort of building of the work. It's always been sort of rooted and grounded in nostalgia, memory, which then allowed the viewer to sort of find their way into the work. I think that's a really critical part, that memory piece, especially when you're asking questions like, is there racism in heaven or what's my role in racism? If someone sees something from their past in that space, well, no longer are they looking at a story from an artist that they're supposed to learn something from all of a sudden they've got to start identifying what their own role is in that story. Yeah. Yeah, and so I think that memory and history and, you know, making connections and finding ways in which people can find their way into the work. Because it's really about, you know, my work is always about me being able to invite you and take you by the hands on this journey. Yeah, and it's not just that invitation, but with until specifically as well as most of these newer, large scale shows. There is a real desire to use the show in its most impactful way. And so if you think of where until came from, guilty until proven innocent or innocent until proven guilty, we stripped all that other stuff away and left only the word until. So that it was more of a space that anybody could go to and interpret as they need to. And then that also became the starting point for a platform of performances or responses to the installation itself. So we had invitations to well over a dozen artists in their own right to do works within that about how they interpret until. But also from a community's perspective, reached out to local organizations to use it as a gathering space or a meeting space or a presentation space. And so we even had, in that case, two of the local police chiefs who came together to have a meeting with the community underneath that crystal cloud. And remember they're in a place that's about gun violence, specifically police gun violence, and that only happens if you're thinking about how to use it to its greatest ability. There's lots of strategy, even though that's not written down in any kind of a way. There's no denying the fact that every project does come with a purpose that's bigger than itself. And how do you create safe space for difficult conversations? How do you sort of create spaces and experiences in spite of the trauma that speaks about optimism and hope and enlightenment? Another reason project that you created together was called truth be told. A large scale text installation featuring 25 foot tall black vinyl letters.

Michael Brown Trayvon Martin
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Portions of the roof were collapsing, windows were broken, the basement had water damage. What made you decide to purchase this building in that shape? It was the only building that fit everything. You know, when you think about everything that his studio needed to be and how it needed to function, we looked for years and years to find a place a plate. That would allow that to become the most seamless that it could be. And this allowed that as well as ticked off the few boxes that were really important to me. And those were outdoor space, and so when you think about a big warehouse building, that does not come without outdoor space or the ability to live in it generally. And this one had all these little secret nooks. And opportunities to be outside from the terrace to creating a little courtyard to this indoor outdoor place with a hornet's nest live. And the store fronts. It just had everything. You know, it's not like that we had the other buildings that we looked at were in more or less the same sort of condition. It was really as bob said. It really, it really provided us with the exact kind of footprint. And the opportunity how we imagined the sort of businesses sort of functioning, to be able to have all of studio all on one level versus three or four levels. We can't make this project up here because we've got to get it out of the building. And just it was really just about flow. It was just and again to be able to be surrounded by creativity, our destiny, to be able to wake up to your desk, and it was everything, and so it was able to provide us with all of that and more. After you renovated the building, you mounted an installation, you titled love thy neighbor. Can you describe what you did? That was the first installation in the storefronts. And again, it was a great Nick prompt, right? The prompt came from him and it was, how do we introduce ourselves to the community, and I love the idea that when you move somewhere, someone brings you a pie. And I'm like, okay, so that is what happens in mayberry, but when you're in a big warehouse building across from a high school, ain't nobody bringing us up. He's ever brought me a pie. But instead of like putting up a big sign that says, we're facility, this is what we're doing and kind of making a deal about staking who we are. We wanted to go the opposite direction. So we reached out to the Chamber of Commerce, and we partnered with all the businesses in the neighborhood. We found neighborhood liaisons that were like block leads. And then we also worked with all the schools all the way through high school in the neighborhood within a 6 mile radius. And we asked them each to introduce themselves to us by taking a name tag and putting at a minimum their name on it. But they could also illustrated or decorated however they wanted to embellish it. And randomly we gave out, I don't remember what the number was, but let's say there were 4000 white tags, and there were 3000 red tags. I had those who worked out so that when you hung them in the window, you could use that red and that white in order to spell love thy neighbor. And because it's this macro micro thing, these tags are only like two inches big, up close, it was just an installation of all these mini artworks from the community members, but across the street where the high school is when you walk out of that door is where you see the monumental love thy neighbor. So it's this dual read that is made by the actual hands that live in the neighborhood. And I think it also was really, was the first opportunity where we were able to talk about facilities sort of mission and purpose. But in this backward way, as opposed to presenting it, we were able to say we're asking you to do this. And this is who we are. And so, you know, that civic kind of positioning the civic sort of work that we strive to sort of move ourselves forward in terms of purpose. And why are we here and what are we here to do? I want to talk to you about two projects that I think also really reflect those same questions of purpose. The first is an installation called until. It really got its start in 2012 when Denise market ish the curator at mass MoCA invited you to do a show in their gallery 5 space, which is the size of a football field. The show opened in 2016 and has since moved to several other museums in galleries. Can you talk about the concept of the show and why the name until? Well, you know, when Denise came to the studio, she came with this invitation and she said, right before she left, she goes, there's only one stipulation and I said, what? And she said, it knows sounds soups. And I.

bob Nick Chamber of Commerce mass MoCA Denise football
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I read an interview with you about the start of your romantic relationship where the interview asked you both who crossed the line first and bob you answered that's blurry and Nick, you stated that the feeling was just there, we both knew it. So I have to ask, you both don't remember who made the first move. It's so romantic. That's such a perfect place to leave that question, Debbie. We know. Inquiring mind so unknown. I could add a little to that. So I think the reason that all that opened up is because the year that that happened, my mom passed away. And I think that that was like this linchpin thing about that was holding all that story together. And when that lynchpin got loosened and she was no longer someone that I had to worry about. And this is made up of disappointing. Sure, sure. That I was able to tell myself a different story about myself and that story explained a lot of stuff that didn't make sense to me. And so I just confided in him one day when we were together doing a project out of town. And I just said, I think that I'm gay. And he said, of course you are. And that was. You were a man. I was so mad. Yeah. But that changed everything. The theme of overcoming fear came up quite a lot in the preparation I did for today's show and I thought that was a fascinating common denominator that I found this theme in individual pieces about you in my research. And bob, you've said that when you decided to confront your fear, it created a shit storm. You had been married to a woman but ended the marriage and came out. Was that something that was difficult for you? No. It literally was, it was that. That's why I used the word shit storm. It was a confluence of everything and you just couldn't get under yourself. You know, there was amazing things that were happening and opening up and then there was all of the things that you worried. We're going to happen. We're actually happening. And you're like, how do you navigate not hurting people and at the same time honoring what you know will be better for everyone someday and how long is someday? I mean, it's like influence. That's the only word that I've looked up so many words trying to figure out what it was because it wasn't all bad. Right. It's just, it was all hard. I came upon something that your therapist told you that you've written about. And it blew my mind. He told you that fear is not real. It is only a feeling a signed to predictions of the future. Bob, I honestly think that's one of the most profound things I've ever come across in my research. I have to say it again. Fear is not real. It is only a feeling assigned to predictions of the future. Mic drop, that's it. It's like, okay, thank you very much for the most profound thing I've ever heard. You're right. It's everything. Every time I get nervous, it comes right back up. Oh, I'm so glad you feel the same way because for me that got me through so much. You just say it over and over again. And it's not. I mean, there's nothing in reality. No, that you can put that word on. There's nothing. Nick, you've stated that fear is probably the most powerful thing that cripples creative people. And when asked about how to step up to fear, you've said that you just have to push your shoulders back, stand up stout, be bold, and just go in. And in thinking about that, I really felt that it takes courage and it's also kind of a gamble. Did you ever doubt yourself in that sort of moment where you stood up stout and moved forward? Did you ever worry that what happens if I hit hit a wall? Yeah, but you know, I think that I'll doubting yourself is fear. It's that place that is sort of the most seductive for me like, you know, I think about the way in which I work now. We all stand on the foundation, period. And so you're able to fall and get back up. You're able to fall and get back up. It's not that, you know, and you don't have that foundation. And so I think that that, that allows the comfort for me. I know what I know, but what I don't know is what I'm more interested in. And so to be able to step up to it, I know that I'm going to be okay. So you can rely on yourself. Yeah, you can just sort of like, we can always go back to what was. No matter what. However long we let we will always be moving forward ready or not. That's just part of human nature. And so knowing that, what do we have to lose? You now work and live together in a space you call facility, which was originally an abandoned building you found on the northwest side of Chicago and it is where the hornets nest lives. And I understand that when you first saw it, it was in rather rough condition..

bob Nick Debbie Bob hornets Chicago
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:45 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And so it was just this sort of great awakening. It forced me to talk about that moment that experience right now. And so it was difficult to talk about or to talk about that in my work, or to find its way in my work, but yet it was something that was very much in the forefront and in order for me to move accordingly and to get past this reality I had to sort of dive in. You know, I thought it was hard for me, but my colleagues, it was very hard for them because they didn't know how to talk about the work from my perspective. And so it was very, it was very interesting. And that was really sort of this moment where, you know, I had this awakening sort of moment that, wow, like, you know, this space that I'm occupying does exist without this sort of expansion of diversity. Can you talk a little bit about the impact in first seeing Barclay Hendricks painting Steve had on you? I know that that was a sort of one of the defining moments in your journey to being the kind of artist you are now. You know, when I saw that painting, it was in this exhibition called a color, which was the first black expo and look I had no money and I was like dying because I wanted this fucking painting. And I was like, I don't have $10,000. I mean, back then. It was back then. Oh my God. But you go, girl, $2000 back. Then it's like a $1 million. To me. I have a similar story about Jean-Michel Basquiat, I saw a show of his drawings on paper in, I don't know. Maybe the early, early 1990s, and it was $16,000. Right? And you're just trying to put it together like it was just not possible. Nothing I was imagining trying to put together a scenario that was working. So but you know, I think to be able to see. Number one, to be able to be to experience that expo. And to be surrounded by artists of color was like a real big awakening. That we've arrived that we're here and that I am not the only one that's making. All right, that's an artist of color. And so that was an extraordinary moment, but to be able to see Barclay's work. And to be deceived the black male as this symbol of power, a stoic, and, you know, standing with dignity was in style. That's when I really was able to tap into style. And the influence of dress and the impact of wet that is within the community of color. It's like a big deal. It really sort of identifies one sort of statue once clout. And so it was really sort of interesting to be able to sort of see that in the screen sort of gesture. And to be proud in that sort of moment of clarity in 1992, after the police beating of Rodney King, you were sitting on a bench in Chicago when you started to think about yourself more and more as a black man and as someone who was discarded, devalued and viewed as less than. And you saw some twigs littered on the ground in a new light. You suddenly thought that they looked forsaken and I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about what happened next. You know, I think I had just accepted a position at the school of the Art Institute in Chicago from cranbrook. And so that's how I arrived to Chicago. And I remember when that incident happened and I was in the office in my colleagues were, I could feel that they were avoiding me, heads were down. I could tell that they didn't want to have this sort of discussion. And I was literally just going through it because I didn't understand it. You know, this is the first time we had documentation of these brutal sort of incidents on tape. So it was really sort of like finally we were able to sort of show feature what we have been sort of dealing with. And so for me, I was just trying to understand how to process, you know, I could be profile that could be me. You know, I'm looking at that and thinking these sort of things. And then, you know, I'm sort of in the park just trying to find a way to connect to talk about this. You know I happen to look down on the ground and there was this twig. It became something insignificant, something last then devalued, but for some reason, I started collecting the twigs. And so then I went home and got a shopping cart, and then started just collecting all the Turks, took them back to the studio, started to build this sculpture. Didn't think that I could put it on. I don't know why I wasn't thinking that. I think I was thinking more about just building this sort of coat of armor. Something that I could wrap myself in to protect my inner spirit, and then once I realized I could put it on and I started to move, it made sound. And so that was the beginning of sound suit. And it sound at that particular moment was protest for me. So in order to be heard, you got a speaker out or and so that was the beginning of creating these sort of instruments, these suit of arm is that we're hiding gender race class forcing you to look at something without judgment because in order for us to understand something we want to put it into categories or find its place. And so it really was all of these things sort of combined into one protection. You know, I was reading about how they described Rodney King's larger than life, worked out with prism weights, and I'm sort of like imagining, what does that look like? And so building something larger than life, building something that could be threatening that is daunting in a sense, scary. And so that was the first time that you know how you think your consciousness is awake in your present and you are pretty much sort of like on top of it, but that was that moment, that situation. Awakened my consciousness in the most profound way. You've talked about how the sound suits obscure race and class and gender, was that something that you felt you were doing consciously or was it only after when you realized you could actually put on the suit that it accomplished that? You know, I think a lot of things in that series of work are all sort of came afterwards or in the process of doing because I think that I didn't know what I was making. I didn't know the power that it had until I gave birth to the first sound suit. And when I did and I looked at it, I knew I knew when I saw it that my life would never be the same. And it wasn't. And that was the one thing that I knew. And I built this sort of body of work. And I hid it in the closet. I sort of was getting attention around the work so rapidly that I as a human being was not ready. So I basically hit it in the closet for probably a decade. Wow. Building and making them and putting them away until I knew what I was doing. When did you know what you were doing though? How did you come to the realization that this is the moment I know what I'm doing? Here's my intention. Because I think once you start to bring research to the work and understand how to sort of manifest it and starting to understand what it means to be shrouded in a garment of sorts. What it is to be shaman, what it is to be sort of hidden concealed. All of these, it just takes time. And to be able to put on a sound suit and then to move and understand how do you become something other, the idea of transformation and stepping into that and surrendering to this other Ness..

Barclay Hendricks Michel Basquiat school of the Art Institute Chicago Rodney King Barclay cranbrook Jean Steve
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:35 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Hone your design skills? Oh, I'm trying to, and now I know where you found all this. And I'm trying to take myself back to diary conversation. But yes, I absolutely do because design is all about problem solving for lack of a better phrase and that means parameters. And so the more parameters you have, the more inventive you need to be in order to make something that's wonderful and special. To this day, as much as I love someone saying, go do whatever you want. I love to find the parameters because that's where the invention happens. And so I think that's what I'm getting at with that. The more walls the more you have to really think about how you live without those roles. Yeah. When did you first realize you wanted to be a designer? Well, I'm not a 100% sure of that because I didn't know what a designer was until college. At that time. There was this thing called commercial art. I think it was called. And that meant you worked for an advertising agency and you might draw things is what I thought. And so I do know that we had to do a time capsule in grade school. And it actually was sent back to you when you were 20 years old, so right after college, right? And the time capsule said that I would be a commercial artist. Living on a boat on the Lake in Chicago with a dog. And I was a graphic designer at the time that this thing showed back up at my parents address, graphic designer, living a block from the Lake because you can't live on the Lake in a houseboat in Chicago. And I had just gotten a dog. Wow. So I guess I kind of always had an idea. Yeah, talk about a ten year plan. Nicu attended the Kansas City Art Institute where you continued to sew Nick, you attended the University of Illinois and got a BA in graphic design. Bob, one of your first jobs was as a design manager for Playboy magazine. What kind of work were you doing for Playboy? And what was it like working around all those naked women? Hilarious. That job actually came because it was a brand new position and it was called the manager of design and production services for corporate communications. And they'd never had that position before. And it was part of the company's restructuring in order to eliminate the budget line of send an annual report out to be done by a design firm. So as you can imagine, back in the day, those were giant budgets. Yeah. And they thought, oh, we could hire a young person to do our annual report for less money than it would cost to send that thing out. And they could do all these other things. And I read it as, oh, I get to be the next star Paul. Because I'm still a young kid. And I'm like, oh my God, the opportunity is huge. Absolutely. So I took that job and it was a really awesome job because you're not your directory port, but the second to direct report was Christy after at the time. Wow. Her office was literally a stone's throw away. And there was a lot to learn. You know, part of my plan was work at a boutique design firm, work at a big agency, work in-house and then figure out what you want to do. So that was my in-house. Kind of idea. Right. Nick, I understand that the first garment you made in school was a very sort of flamboyantly designed pair of pants and a shirt with a quote harlequin sensibility. What is a harlequin sensibility? You know, I think back then, I was really sort of into Grace Jones. Oh, of course, who wasn't, right? And so you know I was really sort of like going through my drag Grace Jones direct phase. And so that was really what was influenced seeing, you know, my first sort of hand printed garment was sort of really sort of diving into this persona. And so I was like, Grace Jones doing my Grace Jones drag for a minute there. Just sort of in that space of then between, you know, androgyny and sort of exploring all of that, and just sort of using the cabaret. Which is the nightclub. Is this sort of platform? It was like, it was an extension of school. How do you bring Drake into the sort of public arena? And so I would be making these wearable objects, costumes, and then presenting them in this sort of setting. So it was sort of me just again, always sort of like, you know, outside of the studio, it was like, it's this open canvas. And so I would just be, you know, creating these spectacles on the street. Why not? You know, and just really just purely out of impulse and gathering friends and making something happen. It's really sort of just cycling through again through this sort of opportunity of looking at space as sort of space to occupy in a sense. You went on to get an MFA at cranbrook academy of art in Michigan, and you were the only African American in your class. You've said that this was the first time you had to look at yourself as a black male. And it was a struggle to find your place. How did you manage? In Detroit? Yeah. Thank God for Detroit. I mean, I really say that in the most sort of sincere way, you know, for me, not only cranberry, amazing, beautiful, but it's also very isolated. From everything. And so I need that urban environment to balance my sort of self out. So, you know, Detroit was there. It provided that opportunity for me to sort of step off of the grounds of cranbrook and to be in this urban setting to be around my people to be engulfed in house music, the club scene, and to be able to be refueled in order to get to get back on campus and get back to work. You know, I think that when you I just never had been in a educational sort of setting where there would even ever occur to me that I could be the only and so you're just sort of like all of a sudden, you know, your whole being is just in shock and you had never visited that campus prior to showing up the day. No, I had never visited the campus prior..

Grace Jones University of Illinois Chicago Kansas City Art Institute Nick Playboy magazine Nicu Christy Bob Paul Detroit cranbrook academy of art Drake MFA Michigan
"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:21 min | 2 months ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Here, Debbie. Thank you. Gentlemen, I understand that you have a very large preserved wasp's nest on the rooftop of your home in Chicago. about? We found this building, you know, we've been looking for a building for maybe I would say 5 years maybe 6 years ago. You know, we had designed the space and sort of we're in the process of a construction of the rehab and so in that process in the sort of sun room in the ceiling as they were pulling the boards away was this haunted nest. And I was out of town, they are sending me images and I was like build around it. And of course they were like, he's crazy. But he felt for me. It was sort of the epitome of like in and everything. It was like, you know, the fact that that was built. By insects and that it was sort of natural and it was everything that I believed in and so I wanted to preserve the authentic Ness of that idea. It's totally a designed object to the minute you like start looking up at it. You see this pattern that can't possibly be made by a machine and that's the most exciting thing. Yeah, and so you know and we sort of liked it because it was attached to the property as well as like in the building there is areas that you walk through the studio where graffiti artists had come in and marked up the building and that sort of way. And so we sort of, you know, and we sort of held on to these elements that somehow found their way as part of the history of the property. Nick, let's talk about your background first. You were born in Fulton, Missouri, the third of 7 brothers, your parents divorced when you were very young and you live with your mom and brothers, your maternal grandparents live nearby on a farm. You credit your mother with kickstarting your career by responding so enthusiastically to your handmade birthday cards. Tell us what kinds of cards you were making, what were you making them with? You know it was not only just birthday was every holiday I would make her cards. You know, it was just sort of, you know, it was sort of me sort of, you know, thinking about her and how do I sort of think about her in relationship to this particular holiday and what does that look like? What does that mean in terms of building a handmade card? And so for me, it was really sort of thinking through all of that and thinking through the last card and how do I sort of amp up? To the next one. And the thing that was amazing is that, you know, there was that sort of commitment of honoring a process that I had sort of decided that this is what I'm going to do every holiday. And just that commitment sort of paved the way for responsibility and emotion. For me, it was, you know, you think about this two dimensional sort of handmade paper assemblage and the impact that it has on one's emotion was like unreal and yet real. And I was thinking like, wow, like this makes you feel that way. And so I was it was magical because I could not really sort of identify with in a tangible sense like what in this process is received in this enormous way. And so that was the beginning of me sort of thinking about the impact of doing the impact of making an impression the impact of a one responding to something. You've stated that when you're raised by a single mother with 6 brothers and lots of hand me downs, you have to figure out how to make those clothes your own. Oh, honey, right? My mother was this also, so I did a lot of that. How did you go about making these things? And what did you make for yourself? How did you reconstruct some of the hand me downs that you were foisted upon? Would you know, you know, my mother comes from a family of 16 and she was the first. And so, you know, I was the oldest of 16 siblings. Yeah. You know the interesting thing is that, you know, I'm surrounded by like makers, like my grandmothers were quilters, you know, my aunts were amazing, seamstresses. So, you know, my grandfather is where carpenters furniture makers. And so you're just surrounded by all of this sort of making, and not that they taught me any of it. I was sort of like, this sort of person that was like this sort of voice sort of from a distance. I was like, observing and curious. And interested in it. But, you know, I think I took my first sewing class in high school and weaving class in high school. So I was very much interested in this process of building dean to build a cloth to weave your own fabric was just interesting to me..

Debbie Fulton Chicago Missouri Nick
'The Silencing of the Lambs' With Author Michael Brown

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:13 min | 2 months ago

'The Silencing of the Lambs' With Author Michael Brown

"Michael Brown, my friend, welcome. Great to be with you, Eric. Thanks for the memories. You've got a great story, which we're not going to get into today. We've talked about that many times on the program before, but you have a new book out, and unfortunately it's very important. The book is titled the silencing of the lambs, the ominous rise of cancel culture, and how we can overcome it. So what do you say in the book, roughly speaking? There really is an attempt to shut us up to silence us to cancel us to marginalize us and to put us in a place where we can not speak up and get our message out. When I say us, I mean followers of Jesus with conservative biblically based values, I'm not paranoid about this. In fact, a large part of the book is strategies as to how we can overcome. But this is real. I mean, we're in a situation today where it's not just a matter of we disagree with you. But we have to cancel you out. You know, in China, we'll talk about someone with disappeared. They use it as a vowel. They were disappeared. They suddenly, they're not there anymore, or under Soviet Union. Some of this disappearance, they're blanked out. They're blotted out. That's what's happening in a different way. Barry Weiss has spoken up about this. She was in New York Times journalist, a liberal feminist quote, married to another woman and she found the atmosphere in New York Times for her to be so toxic that if you raise a narrative, you are not just criticized but you would cancel she called it social murder and it's so extreme now that you have voices like the irreverent atheist Bill Maher or reverend Jewish comedian Sarah Silverman or actors like Alec Baldwin or sports personalities like Dana White and they're all raising their voice against this Nick Cave singer songwriter in Australia said that cancel culture is mercy's antithesis. So you do one wrong thing. 15 years ago, something in your useful days. It comes out today. You can lose your

Michael Brown Barry Weiss Eric New York Times Soviet Union China Bill Maher Sarah Silverman Alec Baldwin Dana White Nick Cave Australia
"nick cave" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"nick cave" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"If it could be, it could be found for $3 online. It's called End the ass saw the angel. It's by Nick Cave of Nick Cave and the bad seats, and it's as if William Faulkner dictated, wrote Slingblade. It's about a child who has messiah complex is born into the appellations in the Depression era, and it starts from his birth where he can actually see his twin. In the other bassinet, and it goes from there forward, So it's a stream of conscious and it takes this whole, uh The main character's life, and it's a very creepy guy, and it's during one of the weird and it's written by an Englishman on top of it. So it's called in the ass of the angel by Nick Cake. Well, you've got a full boat of very interesting books. I just wanted to mention one more thing on Eric Larson. The book I was thinking about. I couldn't come up with a title. But I did just look it up Stand by one second. It's called I just had it in the garden of beasts. That's the one that features the American ambassador during World War two Well, pre World War two and in Hitler's Germany. And you see the rise of the Nazis and this is a true story and hit and this ambassadors Um, daughter has this affair with the Nazis called in the Garden of Beast, Love, terror and an American family, Hitler's Berlin It'll blow your socks off. Wow. I'm definitely check that out. Eric classes all right, so much markets. I'm so glad that you have filled in for Dan. It's been a pleasure listening to you. And thank you so much. Getting to know you was a pleasure indeed. Take care of my friends. 617254 10 30. We'll take a quick time out will return. Neil is coming up along with Karen. Lines open. We're talking about interesting books that you can recommend to other lovely people and will continue. Jordan Ricin for Dan on night Side side with Dan Way.

Dan Way Nick Cave Eric Larson Nick Cake Hitler William Faulkner Slingblade Um Neil Germany Karen
DJ Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy on David Mancuso

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:37 min | 2 years ago

DJ Colleen 'Cosmo' Murphy on David Mancuso

"We're joined today by a very special guest asked Colleen Murphy known to nightclubs the world as DJ. COSMO welcome colleen. We'll be talking later about Lydia lunch launch and featured writer Darrell easily. But let's start with the main reason we've asked you'd to enter the world's back pages cover they tell. Tell us a little bit of wells February. This year is the fiftieth. I Love David. Mine cruisers loft passes you playing in New York at the fiftieth anniversary of the music. Yes yeah would it be fed cycling. The you are sort of Dave Matthews representative on. I think that's a few days few people I think one thing. That's very important to say about the Loft and David is is that he didn't think the party was even just about him And it's really about a sense of community. I am one of the caretakers Roy. And that's how he would speak. Speak to me about it and then meet considered himself a caretaker of the loft. I mean it was very much she said like the loft is a given name. I should back up because he I started doing parties in his own. Home at six forty seven Broadway picture phone. Google Street still fibrous building. Think he started throwing informal party in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight years that I was born and he didn't really make them into proper weekly party. He is with a contribution until February fourteenth nineteen seventy and he called it. A love saves the day but then the law was given name because it was a law. People are you're going. Hey going over there to that. Law became the name of the Party. Yeah well let's go. I will go by. When did you first when you start really getting the music? When did you start? DJ -ING Myself. One thousand nine hundred eighty two when I was fourteen. Wow I had A. I was quite lucky. I had a radio station in my high school. Alive is ten watts got basically to the edges of my town. My small suburban New England towns where I was the only one that played music. That wasn't top forty already and that wasn't classic rock. Although we did have one Christian music special not my show and I had a radio show for four years so the first year I was actually playing fifties and sixties speak. Because I was really into that. I was reading my uncle's record collection at the time and I had grown up. My parents didn't listen to a lot of music music at home but when we listen to music in the car and a Sunday drive we listen to people like Wolfman Jack still had a syndicated radio show and another one was already woo Ginsburg art show and she was all like the all those oldies and I just knew them inside and out and then my uncle lived if down the street from me and I used to raid his record collection. Because I I was given A. Ge Trim Line Record Player portable record player. Hand me down when I was about twelve. And that's when I really started getting properly into albums. The first one was Moody Blues Days of Future Past. That was my first obsession. Actually there's a proper album album. That's twelve the following year but my first year in high school freshman year. I had that old show the next year I started to more expensive. Expansive kind of new wave shows GALVEZ Castillo. Lot of Elena lavish fifty. Two's a little bit hard core stuff do that. It was kind of coming out really into black flag and the evanger all sorts of like the T. scene and then the following year. I had a show my friend. Mary crusoe called PUNK FUNK and junk. And that's where the name Cosmo was born because she became remix remix and I came cozma because there was a bound electro bound call nucleus and they had their. Dj was 'cause Moan. It's yell. Cosmo Gimme a beat. We we had sweatshirts that we may with our names on the back. We rock around arguing. Glenn High School you know no one else really was into that music and and then my final year. I had a show called strawberry alarm clock because I was still into sixty stuff. There was the whole kind of Paisley popping that was going on and I was working at a record shop. It was this chain store at that time called strawberries and because I had a show in the morning I worked at strawberries. Strawberry alarm clock and that was very eclectic. Six show pickup from a strawberry alarm clock to Chardonnay to black flag. To I mean it was just whatever my found was so yeah. I think I'll all ten listeners. Left at ease from the to some discussions Our B let's pick trajectory. I mean having said got my first GIG that I went to was the funk. FESTS and Providence Rhode Island's gap one way grandmaster Melle and bark as it was also going to few kind of Electrobi- clubs and Roxbury like my mom knows this mom. If you're listening to before center later I was into of course prince you know and slept out for tickets for the purple rain tour later. The cleaners tonight on Worcester Massachusetts so but luckily in Boston. Because I was outside Boston. We have great radio because we had college. Radio stations actually also brown station to Providence. Had a really good funk show and we had kissed one away with Sunny Joe White and so it was a commercial kind of I hate saying the word black music because I just don't think music has a color but I was going to do it for simplicity's sake right now and I used to listen to his show to. This is quite eclectic. I wouldn't say that wasn't the music. I was collecting and really it was quite a trajectory because I moved to New York Nine hundred eighty six eighty six okay and I went to Nyu and the reason I picked NYU's. I had to get out of Boston. It had the best college radio stations in the country. And I knew that's what I wanted and I knew that's where I wanted to be an somehow. We scrambled together loans and scholarships and got there. Because I was the first kid in my family to go to university. It wasn't expected to make sure and I went in the first week to. WNYC stations that high want to work work here and that they became my it was my family was my home intact and I ended up becoming program director and into the whole bunch of radio shows including the anchor show which was the new the afternoon. Show which is a three and a half hour drive time show where we played everything from like Nick Cave to the Belgian stuff. That was coming out of the cold ways stuff to you know to the four. AD cocteau twins Dunkin downs to everything so that was great. And then after that I produced syndicated radio shows I interviewed a lot of these bounds. Probably hundreds of pounds really that was syndicated to I think. Two hundred radio stations across country college radio stations. It was called Music View. And I even like you know a huge butthole surfers found at that time tall leary fifteen times and I. I mean Nick Cave loads of people I kind of and then all the Brit- British stuff too. Because I had always been an anglophile because growing up I was really into new order. J in addition in the Smith and seeing all these bounds of the cure fats down on stage. You want to dismiss legendary Gigs Boston so I was really and an anglophile as well. I was interviewing lows of bands like the verve and away Sis Anita all these bounds as well but I started going to save his. Party's we'll probably find Jim Sullivan's review of that show where she danced on the stage. And then I looked it up before because it was less. It's amazing one thing that's amazing. What the Internet is you can find? Old Settlers started listening to my first grateful dead show over and over last week. Some army onto a slight like March twenty second nine hundred eighty seven. The opening of the Spring Tour in Virginia Beach started listening to that. And you can find all track lists and I can find a photo the butthole surfers show the channel that I went. I mean it's amazing what you can find so. I did research and the smiths that that Smith's game was quite a big

Party Boston David New York Colleen Murphy Cosmo NYU Smith Dave Matthews Writer Darrell Anglophile Representative Nick Cave Virginia Beach Galvez Castillo Glenn High School New England DJ
"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

"But he's now doing lescot theater on the smaller shows And I laughed so hard in the similar sort of you know how he does. This physical comedy riffs. They will last for like five or ten minutes something and it gets funnier museum purpose. Funny funny repetition and the inanity of it ask all petition position reputation and I got to this point where I actually started to to worry about how out of control I was laughing and I thought do I need to go out for a second and calm down because like I've never laughed like that before and I think someone had written about it's infantile and cerebral at the same time. And is that what I love about. Mr stiches makes me love like uncontrollably so much So thoughtful and fascinating and appoint an offensive. And so this is something people can go and see you next year. Yeah it is. It is wonderful Andrew Andrea believe. You're paying a massive nerd. I am begging massive net and I've cutted retreated into the Niger even more details visit horrible horrible year. Might other didn't actually call it the shape but I'm recommending commended calls. It was recommended to me hugely this year. It's a science fiction book by Adrian Shaikha Sequel Children of time. Now stick with me here. Here's what happens right that trying to to get going again on a new planet because we've wreck the ethics knock heads so new planet what we're GonNa do monkeys with a genetic accelerate which makes move quickly and we're going to have a new planet filled with you know human type intelligent Simians Ono. What ATMs ball breaks? It goes on just by spot is becoming intelligent and the funding the story of a bunch of spiders building a society so you in parallel with humans suck on a spaceship elsewhere. Fuck guilt what we're doing here Really a mess of it and they you see the the spiders are heroic characters. They you've I know you won't believe this what you fail fail for the spiders. You feel that trump's tragedies that were recurring spider characters and he watched them pass through. Barbara's in the Middle Ages an industrial revolution an information age and you find yourself rooting for the spiders. Essentially the spider The spider civilization is in its assent and the human civilization is in terrible decay. The two stories run in parallel and it has got. I'm not kidding either. A moments in here where. I was sort of blubbering slightly to myself at the face of an individual spider character the funds that are completed day and they have names like names in given names by the author because spot is causing by waving the pope around and the way that they have very collegue the face the listeners. When miming the pilots doing the thing is into the the very eloquent and they developed language and they develop morals develop social search? I'm one of the sort of Berry bloke. Email things about science fiction. The well building is really great. It's really great the way they've constructed of Jerusalem stop. She's thinking about emotions suv health. This is an emotionally driven powerful book. Where Hall for the characters? You're invested in our eight legged arachnids. And I can't recommend the enough. I'm thanking everybody recommended to me because it's amazing I'm sure Does it have a cover for anyone who has any self respect. Could re have on Lucia. I think it just kind of pitcher planet and some typography. It's not John Spider. The laser gun unemployment brawl ripped off exit I might be proud to be out and proud with nattery Sean. I believe you chose the podcast. Yes I have Brian and Roger. If you haven't listened listen to this just listen to. It's wonderful sort of follows on from June Jericho. which is one of the shows favorite podcasts as we say It's Dan Skinner and Harry Peacock Doc. They are both play divorced. Men who message a forced men's support group Brian. Maybe not quite as nice as Roger and Brian Gets Roja into scrapes. And it just gets worse scrapes porting illegal drugs and they're having having a never taken out because Brian sold it to somebody in Albania. Brian has this This he's free lots. He has something business he calls. WHO's the Silk Road Autobahn? which is dark web? Basically and Roger Never guesses that Bryant new scheme may have something to do with the dark web and Brian Selling not to me. And I says there's one point Andrews referring to the trafficking of drugs where he pretends. It's a special sort of concrete unrighteous goes yes fine. It's just so funny. Brian also has a crush Carol Smiley. That ends really really. Yeah and also I actually. I was nearly going to give lots of the the trouble is you can't talk too much because you give it away. It's so good. Twenty minute only size episodes so you can listen on the tube and the boss when life is really share also. Brian Sloth of it's Christmas Kendall Bird spent another twenty minutes with with family in in lots of top-level meeting apparently because this will get turned into TV show or something much bigger so discover it now while it is fresh and pure. You're okay. Let's get back to acting scripts and that. What our favorite films of the year we could have had the joker or the Irishman or midsummer or the double gang horrifies us or the lefay Scottish Rave movie beats even avengers in game? But we didn't we for these instead to my right is body law series lead and Jikei Hill himself Alf Rick Dalton and to my left is rick stuff. Doubleclick Vuth Rick explained to the audience. Exactly really what. It is a stunt double. Dutch actors are required to do a lot of dangerous cliff. Here is meant to help carry the load food. Is that how you described shoplift carrying his load ads about right. Please just tell me the night and she doesn't know anything better not to tell them. Why is better? Chinese people. People have signed on people get cans of ood. Excuse me one and I'll be there. You can high the emotions if you goal. Netting were found out right away twitter party to make what nobody knows that we are fun. You didn't party because we wanted to focus on school and get into good colleges and it worked the irresponsible people who partied also got into those colleges. I'm incredible at hand jobs but I also got a fifteen sixteen the sat's we haven't done anything. We haven't broken any rules name. One person whose life was so much better because the broke a couple of rules also broke art rules Rosa Parks Name Menelik. WHO's in the Anti Gun dammit? Took through this. Take Your Lips. SANITIZER chapstick Chat Mace. Listen it is very important that you don't don't so if you harass. She chose Quentin Tarantino's riff on the Manson murders once upon a time in Hollywood which was not uncontroversial. Indeed and I.

Brian Roger Never Mr stiches Andrew Andrea Niger Brian Sloth John Spider Simians Ono Rosa Parks Jerusalem Quentin Tarantino Adrian Shaikha Brian Selling Doubleclick Dan Skinner Barbara Carol Smiley twitter Berry
"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Harrison. You went with because I love you by the Amazing Lizardo. Why because she is amazing because it was it's been such a bloody depressing year in every department and she's just a ray of fun excitement and I I don't care and Joe Yourself I think it's an extent I think some people are a little bit lizotte out in the eight kind of you've been given the title of great positives if she's not like a regular it'll pop star? which is the? There's a lot of an she doesn't care and all that kind of thing I reject those objections. She's the kind of pop so that we need. Who is unafraid? To be ridiculous as a great sense of humor has and everything else are they. A lot of people see herself. See themselves in hand and you don't have to not be an African American female lodge person actually to say a little bit of somebody's outside of the outside of the pop music tent. They choose on the fantastic. I think we just played juice. Though which is a brain. You Know Jerome. Take your ass home. Grown is just such a great. You'll get in the elbow. Chew the whole thing is the whole thing is about thirty three minutes long and I found I played it more than anything else. Just because I needed a mood elevates the truck tempo with Missy Elliot's particularly enjoyable the fact that she's migrated from you know actual hip hop person to fully fully graded Popstar and it is just pretty pro. Are you not concerned that the world is ruled by Liz's in human form. Yes well that's that's actually my my I am actually internally. Elizabeth is going to expand and I also like the idea of really house. I love the idea of football crowds. Go Liz Oh God it was closed on Neri no jogger fee but you could still so so great but we talked about the album and I remember you said that you wished boys was on. This is the one that's missed thousands some good news because because I love you look sedition has got boys so they're really really good remix of voices while on. Excuse the download on the Internet. Yes I think that's a very very good choice and I think that's a happy choice is a happy choice. Sophie Harris. What are we bought very sad choice? It's like I was thinking about this last night and I thought it's the most perfect saying that shouldn't exist. You know like she didn't execute a second obscure it's Nick Cave ghosting which was released sort of towards the end of the year and going back to the listing. It's sort of Through a lot of confusion into various magazines lists because he was my music. History came out in November And it's just a Stone Issing Am. I think all of us felt very much. We talked about it yet. We did podcast the Muslim Louis. All of these I mean the listeners will know fool well what the subject matter is and why why the record is the way is what do you think about it. That kind of what makes it says a banal things. What makes it so special talk about? I mean I felt as as we said at the time. It's it's a record that hasn't been made before you know I don't we know of any other requisite deal with The loss of a child in particular. But I also think sonically you know just in terms of its its arrangements achievements and it's it's subtlety and it's restraint in depth. You know that it's extraordinary in in that way and I think you know all of us have I've talked to a lot of musicians over the years and and and I'm sure have experienced musicians about you know themselves as a channel Aura. A conduit. You know it doesn't doesn't come from me and it to the point where it's almost cliche but these songs feel so incredibly natural an uninterrupted with you. No one feels very much as if that can be the the only thing that's happening and I also I you know I love how he deals in in archetypes and I'm very interested in that sort of union theory on archetypes. Or you know the idea that you have the same stories and archetypal characters in say in you it stories or Hungarian fables. You know there's a King and Queen and you know when we con articulate. It's sort of the bridge between the brain and the heart is like you know. So you you have the you know the king and the Queen and the and the whole is you know these characters. And then he'll and then he'll take it from the archetypal kind of Ozzy seamlessly but sometimes in a in a slightly arresting way into the real world and his wife sitting in the kitchen table. And and now I'm tearing. Yeah Yeah. Is it possible to listen into it more than once so incredibly upsetting. Can you get through that. I saw you on at the same time. It also say it's unusual in that you. You can't do anything while you're listening to you know there's requisite you can wash do the washing up to or make notes about something else too you know and it's It it absolutely commands all of your attention but but as you know his songwriting and melodic it. So writ beautiful But Yeah I think he needs to take a boy's or juice on it got it. Yeah that's a long pools silent McKay vaginal stick and write sometimes. I'm not really fast but Saint Nick Cave devotees discussing this record. Would after came on some of them were but actually I can see. It's deepened important. But other really WANNA listen to it ever again which the release the bats. I'm no no well. I'm not talking about people demand another one. He's the bats but people just felt that I saw people saying they just didn't feel that was fully truly emotional substance. I didn't feel it had the musical half to get them in. And I I feel very social. Jim scriven NAS doesn't Drummoyne at Disney caves. Said I felt the drums just title the songs down though too heavy. Oh who trump. I don't know that that's that's been musicianship is knowing when not to play as well. I think the musical incredible. Because it's it's over peace with what he's decided to deal with this appalling thing that's happened in his life with the comic Constellations of Fairytale and fronts myth like using and to hop in in and out those worlds and in the music got more income of our electronic marines. Like it is it is. It is a sound but but I think it's his masterpiece. It didn't record it's very but also for is difficult is to listen to us. I think that ultimately the tone is one of hope hunk and an advancing movement. Like it's moving forward rankled. Definitely Michael. Honn you went for when I have fears by the murder which I'm going to assure describing. I it's not the best record of the And his permanent my favorite record the but I'm doing what music journalist. I'm trying to shout about a band To whom I want to draw attention They're young band from Dublin The I I when I have fears came out in the summer at my listens. We're yes it's fine. It's GonNa grandiose the is punk punk post punk with the meaninglessly profanity in case the best kind of double party. I still live at the end of the wrote festival. Stone side of the stage and they knocked my socks off the most exciting live band. I have seen in years and years and years I went through the mcgann a few weeks later and I was still just as exciting. What we say exciting bettman their extraordinary life stage presence? I mean I don't think these people are thinking Taibbi hard about presenting accenting ideas non-threatening masculinity if. I'm on a slow. They looked like gangsters but I moved. Kind of Baletic Grace Baletic unthreatening on stage as an extraordinary combination the nation and the round where the base plays actually the one. You want to stare at the whole time. The album is good. I mean having after seeing live I went to the album and listen to it quite a lot and I really do like it I don't think it's astounding but to see them. Live is to completely be convinced. I think the life thing is really important as is. That's where bands make livings. I mean they all want to make album still. I'm I'm always astonished more. Don't think about how to present themselves live as some kind of spectacle that's cool you will want to go back to shout back. That's the way you're GONNA get bigger and bigger and bigger crowds and make more make it better living for yourself by being stonning live so I do. COMMEND THEM TO EIB UH-HUH SO yeah. I voted where where I number what it might guardian list. That was up from number right in my own cutlass and shows the economists album of the it should have been. I am listed out in politics. You'll be considered to be kind of so disgraceful. So Albritton Albritton. You'll get so you'll know if the murder capital in fact form the government's on Friday morning you'll know what's behind the see what's going to happen. I have chosen I by Tyler. The Creator I fell in love with this. What people like Terry welcome would have? But I just couldn't stop playing this when it came out tyler creator as we know was a frightening man in the frightening band future and they were really the hotline and they were really rapid and they were all about two years but they look like you want to meet them down and he comes out absolutely literally as as a gay black rapper. He dons this. Andy Warhol Style Week he says is incredibly tight. Pink suit he gets so and salons launches on the album an enormous amount of exciting talented people. And it's a soul record and part of it. Sounds like a mad rapper. Going mad to Michael Jackson Awesome Song from the Nineteen Seventies. It is so full of heart. This is his heartbreak. Album apparently went Jaden Smith Will Smith Dumped him and he writes ambitious. Just extraordinary the pain. The vulnerability the unrequited love their from this person who was of such. It's a different clock as you would say. It's just this revelation to him and two other just thought I just think he is the perfect pop star of two thousand nineteen. I just have absolutely crush on this very frightening. Gay Man the live show. I've missed them. I still have bad dreams about no. I miss them I miss them. I couldn't go there and it haunts me still because I think that would have been my very very happy place they would. They would put me off because I still stuff about going around killing people having sex with corpses along with stuff like earthquake and the crowd. kind of divided into the sense to millennials APP. Also people who did want to shot extremely loudly having sex with corpses wasn't unpleasant atmosphere. I don't think the room was filled with love for him but it was just this weird mix of people with after different reasons but he I mean I do think pop star of the I really do. I think that is your perfect thing. Someone who's deeply confused enough. That's an of pop music. Let's move over to TV. We are of course in the Golden Age Italian among the things that just didn't make the coatless were killing eve. Season Two euphoria catch twenty two his dark materials big little it lies and the slightly underwhelming game of thrones vinyl series by the way. Rip Club. James who actually coined the word underwhelming did not know the you know what now now. What welcomed US disrupted? When.

murder Michael Jackson Liz Jaden Smith Missy Elliot Joe Sophie Harris Jerome Harrison. Saint Nick Cave Albritton Albritton football Baletic Grace Baletic Elizabeth Rip Club Andy Warhol Louis Jim scriven Ozzy
"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Uh-huh Ride horses and broken three horses of learning Part in the city those sprite burning. Everyone is high the song the final numb to de eh the door basically in the office. I'll charlie the WHO the green and Blue Green Charolais agreed. They should make more uh-huh Andrew.

"nick cave" Discussed on Uncomfortable.

Uncomfortable.

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Uncomfortable.

"Don't force it task to the art of his life and I think him knowing that was that comfort has to pass to have a relationship. It's my father all shots. Now you know he chose to leave sooner. You call the shots if you say no. I don't WanNa see you in. That's Nick Cave. No I don't WanNa see and when it did happen. My son was under eighteen. So when it did happen that it was like okay this is going to happen undermine rules and you know now force older so he at that time it was under my I can see him when I see and they have a great relationship it just a few years. Yeah But now they do have ju yeah. Yeah that's that's awesome and what I can look the the legal aspects. I don't know in the states. If it varies from state to state you know in Canada like I guess I don't know the notes because again I'm not appeared and I've not experienced this but there is supposed to be some leg responsibility for that absent Peyton until that child does a certain age are the have to see them are the has to be some sort of like fifty d fifty agreement. was that something you kind of never argued and just let be we were talking about at this would show support. You say that so so I always have full custody of on my my son. I understand it from the age of Cuba's Too so I always had custody so that wasn't a problem and he was okay. I think that's what we were talking to the reason that it worked out. Allie was because he wasn't finding we want fifty. I'm not wasn't a won't financially. Yes he even when she lapsed That was that's how I need. You is. Let's act. Act to pay up provides shots or every every month. Whatever so he he did do that? You know known I'm in my case. Well I was married I was legally married to my son. Said therefore that gives him fifty percent right to his child like like I was so he could go to school and pick him up and no one can fight him about it but at first of all he's not right in the country second a lot on things. He's that smarts or wants to do that so so he didn't do it and then my daughter's dad we were now legally married married but he does have A right you know because I don't have just so custody I haven't thought for sole custody. I don't have it written down if he wanted to. He could could just see her without me knowing financially. I don't believe I don't believe that I need to I. Don't I'm not GONNA fight to. Shell support. I know that it is your responsibility. You should take care of your kids if you don't want to. I'm not going to be in court and trying WANNA fight it all the time. I'm still gonNA feed him from my mom. Yeah Yeah I feel like my kid is Mike it. I invited for his entire life. I don't need anybody else to help. When when we when his honor was given each help support I know at one point? They had to revisit the case the other had been a long time so we did have to go and so forth and and they did ask me like well what what do you need. I don't fear to them. All they want is for him to have a reminder every month or every two weeks ace whenever they go ahead and she's wages a reminder that he created a child's need and he actually like I I I want him to because we're also very proud. Yes I did want to ever throw in my face like. Oh Oh I helped you. Rate is our son will melt you you know just you know it was strictly to be strictly reminder. Yeah yeah that's easy died. I also did that. Put Him in. Social Security doesn't keeps it. He died. Then Yeah Yeah Yeah. We do need to be reminded of it. They do need to be hanged. They also created this life and they therefore they are responsible or take responsible ensemble do not read other lives. Yeah Yeah I was very responsible. New were very young. Yeah Oh and he did not have any more than so now that he he kind of learned his lesson by the second half of it. Yes yeah thank you so much for shading this Because I know these types of topics are ready personal so I think you've definitely done appearance. Their therapist by shading expedients. So thank you again. Thanks for agreeing to be on on the show and I'll definitely share links to your podcast onto the epistle do we were we were referring to so yeah thank you so much thank you thank you..

Allie Nick Cave Mike Canada Cuba Peyton
"nick cave" Discussed on X96

X96

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on X96

"As he was you know getting ready for the next song doing that a woman shouted out red I fall asleep to your voice every and he went covered his face in like oh god I am that guy aren't I and then for three minutes he stood there as the crowd went wild and he went I'm going to choose to take that as a compliment thank you least I don't like he was he was a beard and a flannel shirt that's all for someone and that's all they maybe that's all they need no man that's all they need if if he's if he's your thing terrific enjoy it just not mine that's all so yeah like when I went to Nick Cave I think my wife was not as thrilled with Nick Cave design she was a good wife and went with me to make a claim okay this next song is only three and a half but she you know she knew like I know why you're here and it's not for us and we just have to do this like our our friend I don't know how but they found me there their song nobody cares about the opening men have you been have you ever been to a show I've I've been shows where the opening band really kills his and his maybe even better than their there been occasions where you're surprised by the opening act it's rare but it happens alright so we will take a break we will be back Park City culinary institute here we go this is the Salt Lake City campus of course we know it's down there on State.

Nick Cave Park City Salt Lake City three minutes
"nick cave" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're a fan of the TV series peaky blinders that is Nick Cave and the bad seeds with red a right hand the theme song for that series it's also appeared in a bunch of other shows and movies like the scream franchise and a cue this music panel Superman Elise Christiansen is wondering if any of this is finally translating into a wider popularity for Nick Cave who just today dropped is seventeen studio album with his band the bad seeds the following this seems to be building Stewart you you it by will say and ambience but as you brought this up Nick Cave is still not really a household name to a lot of folks what what people need to know about him well he came out of the Australian punk scene in the late seventies and he first gained notoriety as lead singer band called the birthday party and back then you would have thought this guy's not gonna live past thirty because he kind of took that like Iggy Pop style of performance to like a much more confrontational violent extreme and he's at various well documented substance abuse problems over the years. but since he's gone solo in the early eighties like he's gradually like reigned in the kind of more volatile aspects of his music and kind of like matured into like like the punk rock Leonard Cohen he's you know often referred to as the dark prince of alternative rock and you could almost describe it sounds like the awful music for Goths and you know because our music yes. thank you very much with the right training he races very intensely biblically charge songs about people have done terrible things that are paying the price for it and you know the body count in his songs can like rival that of like a gangster rap song means albums called murder ballads yeah he's. but he's also written I think someone was beautiful love songs of our time so he's he's a mass isn't great body of work that I put up against any of the greats lately so I'll ask you about this in a second is when it gets to a to expand one thing because I I would I would mean we're talk about doing this panel the thing that was brought up to me that Stewart said that what I found really interesting stood up you don't mind if I put you on the spot here it is a panel I try I guess it's not but is that go back to something you said he sort of filling the void of performers like Leonard Cohen and even though it's a big statement yeah I mean we've lost a lot of these big icons over recent years like Lou Reed being another one and you know the there isn't really that figure that sort of rally his it's rallying the misfits you know in the same way and he's you know Nick Cave is really stepped into that role in his the amazing thing about him is he's like forty years into his career his audience just keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger last year he went on his first arena tour he played like Scotiabank arena here in Toronto and you know that's just wild like who I can't think of another performer who keeps getting more popular like for decades and the list what you make of us yeah I mean I think it's it's nice because he also you know is an adult you know he's a man that wear suits and he carries himself well and you know one day Dave Grohl might start wearing suits and we'll call him an elder statesman but right now he's still rocking the tee shirts and the long hair but and you know another artist I was thinking of is Tom Waits and we don't really see much of him in that sort of role in what's interesting to me about a Nick Cave is that also the other icons were mentioning like David Bowie and Leonard Cohen very reclusive but Nick really lives out loud like we know what he's thinking he answers questions to listeners that's a big part of this new tour so he's you know he has a really interesting place where he should be that dos living on the top of the castle that you can't see but he's actually not he's out there you know mingling with people and interacting and talking about like his own life. herbal tragedies in his life and he shares those he talks about grief so it's a really interesting combination the house you know the interesting thing is like even though you like the society carried himself this dignity wearing cities also like still an extremely electrifying performer like I think that's a big part of his like ongoing appeals people see him live and it's like okay you tell everybody you know that you have to see this this is like an experience he even though he's in the sixties now you can still like white before with any like twenty year old punk and another thing I'd say is like any artist that's been around this long like say Neil Young or Bob Dylan they've all at some point put out like a cracked record or they made so much ill advised turned into lakes sent pop or techno rockabilly trying to like you know hop on a train at Nick Cave never done that like he's never I don't think it's ever put out of that album he's and he's continue to involve like his most recent work is like among the most experimental stuff he's done but yet it's also proven to be less popular so I am I am I I'm that's one to ward off the email that actually really love the million rockabilly record and I I want I want to say that I want to thank you both for dropping by and I think I we both have a lot of Garth Brooks and because at least I don't know about you but it came as one of these artists that I feel like everyone who I have respect for musically really likes but I've never been able to get into yeah I mean he's really I don't know that yet if you have to really decide to go there because it's sad and dark and and makes me feel cold and so so you know maybe we've just give people some help and once you do the Nick Cave just throw on a Garth Brooks and run around with a head set now Lisa get ready for Garth that I think that both these Christians in America reporter and a producer was CBC's on the coast in Vancouver store Berman is a contributor to the music site pitch fork and a producer here on.

Nick Cave Elise Christiansen forty years twenty year one day
"nick cave" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"York. All right. We're here with Nick cave. A Chicago artists from all the way from Kansas City, matoco home. I really want to congratulate you on the new station. I'm crazy. I said to my family last night. I said it's something you'll not experience anywhere else. And they'll never I hope no other ultimate look at it. Because they're going to say, I don't want that station anymore. I want that one over there. It's really, and it's going to be such a gateway. No, yeah. I've already contacted a the Obama foundation of making sure that when the president of first lady are back that they go see it because I really do think it's going to be I need to open up a performance for their or you need to get yourself. An agent. My. I'll be free after three months from now. Hey. Bob. And I were both take ten percent there. It has. That's so. So shake him. That's right now, I'll introduce you. I I think I told them when I when he was talking about the library Osama build a new station that was actually a federal grant that tiger grant. It's a department of transportation grandpa. I said we're going to build a new station that will is people come in. They'll come there when we went to a bus service. I said it will just totally be stage one of their immersion into your library. And I it's a chief everything and more than I've ever thought. And we're redoing the whole streetscape from there all the way to a library from your L station that will now go we're changing the name of the Garfield L station to the Nick cave guard ELS day, would you like that thing? Snap snap. It. The cake. Thank you. It was great. Thank you. You've been listening to Chicago stories with mayor Rahm Emanuel. You can subscribe and leave a review on apple podcasts and tweet your guest ideas, using hashtag shy stories. Thanks for listening.

Garfield L station Nick cave Bob Chicago Rahm Emanuel Obama foundation Kansas City president matoco Osama three months ten percent
"nick cave" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

12:21 min | 3 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"You're listening to Chicago stories a podcast from city hall, featuring the stories of everyday Chicagoans and special guests as told to mayor Rahm Emanuel. This is mayor Rahm Emanuel. Chicago stories were with world famous artists Nick cave who just did a beautiful station Garfield station in Chicago on the south side. What was the inspiration for that station? I think the inspiration sort of came from a number of things was Eunice not just putting a work of art in the station. But it's you know, the ideas or sort of incorporated within the architecture that was a real sort of interesting way of working, but then it was really own stats perspective of that part of the south side in looking at the parks and the landscape set the first project you've ever done with the city on a public works as anybody else any other city. Where you've done either a library or museum or or park district facility now nothing permanent. So you've done installations. Oh, yeah. I kind of like. Yeah. Capital type thing investment type thing you, and this is really sort of a phony phone call when we called over and said, we'd like you to do now because I know Lee, well, we've been doing a number of things there. But I think it was really sort of also, you know, that was the entry into the sort of world's fair the the expo eighteen extra. The sort of transportation to get there. And I loved that whole idea that, you know, this is an immersive installation. So it's not that you once you come out the train, you're like in this experience. And so that was really important. Also the way that I work in terms of my sort of connection with floral and pattern, and how do you how do you? How do you sort of welcome one coming to the station to go into the city as well as coming back home, and they have the sort of amazing sort of transition sort of space. You know, some people think I've lost my mind in the sense of making art in almost now eight months stages. I'm it's never that is gold standard. I'm not sure we're ever going to replicate or be able and it's it's it's my daughter before she goes back to school wants to go see it. So. Yeah. Yeah. So let me I read in your background you worked with Alvin Ailey. You don't know my background? I had a scholarship to the Joffrey ballet. Oh, really? Yeah. So how did I doesn't every mayor have background with Jaffe? So how how do you think Alvin Ailey in dance as a form influences your work today and Muniz Elvin as one of the great dancers and companies United States worldwide. What what did you learn there? And how did you think it influences your work today as an artist, you know, I think that it influences my work in sort of two major ways and one is how I look at space. Unite look at spaces. I would look at the way in which one coral Griffey's of work can how does the audience entered the space what is that encounter? What are they surrounded by? What is the rhythm of how things sort of fit and flow together? And so it all becomes part of this sort of inaccurate kind of sort of experience and the other part is performance. You know, I do a lot of performance work in particularly with the sound sued said do a lot of work. Throughout the entire world where we will bring fifty performance suits. And then we will build the performance working with the community. What was the background to the sound sued? I've read before it had to do with the Rodney King. Yeah. You know, it was really sort of my sort of response to the Rodney King verdict in ninety two in that was the first time that we I saw anything recorded too. And just the impact of that alone was just overwhelming. And so it was really meet sort of you know, trying to sort of put the pieces together. And I happened to be in the park one day grant park sitting and I looked down on the ground. And there was a twig and that twig was the catalyst for the first sound too. I started to collect all the twigs in the park because that twigs sort of represented, you know, what does it feel like to fill? Carded less than dismissed if I started collect all the twigs went home built this sculpture. But didn't realize I could put it on the moment that I put it on and started to move it made sound, and so that's how sounds suit came about. And then when I made sound the ninth start to think about the role of protests and audit to be heard you gotta speak louder. And so just sort of kept sort of evolving, you're the youngest seven now, I'm the second to the oldest second to the old seven boys. I'm going to build a statue for your mother. I'm one of three boys. And I've said we've worked our mother crazy, and we're joined if your mother can survive seven boys, you should be nice to her. I'm very. We're one year apart. I mean, like really like how no that's not. What was she thinking? But I realize about your dad. What was he think he was the only child and my mother only child? Yeah. And my mother came from a family of sixteen she was the first. So my mother had been raising her brothers and sisters anyway. So it was like she had fully under control. We should we should we book the wrong cave to talk to we should have booked, mama cave and had a conversation with. Oh my God. Now, you close to all your brothers. Yeah. One also lived here in Chicago, Jack. And which one is Jack Jack is the oldest. And what is Jack? He's also an artist. He also teaches at the school of the city of Chicago. So both of you. Yeah. We're kind of materials does work works primarily in the design sort of program. And so he makes amazing sort of accessories amazing leather bags. How did both of you get in? Into the arts. Can I think it was or anything in the family back? Earn your parents expose you. It is there, you know, through quilt making, you know, my grandparents were sort of would makers, and you know, construction and things of that sort. So I think that that was sort of our vision of what we saw. But I think it's you know, parents just sort of giving us the independence to sort of. Explored. Yeah. When not sort of, you know, shun that idea that we wanna go to art school. Where'd you grow Missouri? And how'd you make it to a no you go to Michigan? Hi, Jamaica, disaccord ago. I grew up in Missouri. Went to the Kansas City on institute for my end grid. Then went to Cranbrook for my masters, and then at my clothes Zine sort of meeting with my professor he goes, oh, by the way, you have a job in Chicago at the school of the do. And that that's why I'm here you got your bus ticket. He got right here. I was like, okay. Like, all right. How do you find making her in Chicago? How do you do you think Chicago's welcoming to earth? What would do? I mean, Chicago's been great for me. You know, I think it's a great art sort of center. I think there's a lot of amazing young artist here. I think it's a great environment to Chicago's very forgiving in terms of you know, you can like do. Performance June assimilation and exhibition it could fail, and they you know, will give you another chance. It's not like New York or not one hundred percent agree York you fail you might as well just leave forget about don't even you know, don't come up for another like a Lear. I think that's the sort of amazing thing about Chicago is that we collaborate, and we do a lot of work in Chicago. With a lot of dancers a lot of. Boone genie, gang. So we're like really invested in being here and really looking at and how did you look at it as a form of service at the same time? Now that you've done one CTO station. Would you want to work on another project with the city? Yeah. Might not know it was it a good experience. It was a great experience. Really, really good. You know, we go into these projects we understand when we're working within corporate sort of sector in when things aren't ready, and what's ready, and it's just part of have works. I think the most important thing is that, you know, my vision can be realized, and I think that's why it was a great experience at that point where you know, I have an idea, and can if your own board, can we really sort of make it as to what dinner last night, Amy Alana, and I were sitting down. I was the one thing with the tile. And the pictures I said the only thing I was thinking of is I was waiting for the sound of birds and nature in the background to be. I mean, it's really you don't think you're in the train station. No. Well, and I think too with the Lynn tick, you're as you sort of moved from one side to the since you've there's a rhythm that happens. There's movement built within the design, and so that really sort of shifts your experience, and I think just be named to look up at the ceiling, and you're just sort of mass memorized with pattern and imagery that also sort of inspires. And so tell me about televised about the place an older neighbourhood. Why did you pick that neighborhood? And what's the vision for that space? No, thirty six north Milwaukee. Of new park not far from my old congressional office. Really that was an Irving and Elston. Okay. Bartle I've been looking for a building for probably six years, and every place that we looked it really came down to zoning. They we can get this owning changed in the number of places. Why did we come to you? I don't I don't know. Yeah. You mayors have inability to solve these things like that it would. But and so were there other neighborhoods. You looked at. Okay. Well, you know, we were on the south side, and we just going to stay there. But then also the cost of things were going up. And then we found this amazing building. We were looking for space where the studios could also be on one floor you stood out on one floor solo. Then you all of a sudden, you know, you're galleries that you need to hire five assistance. And then you're like, okay, I'll take another room. And then you before you know, you've got twelve and you're like three rooms. Sort of for like from one floor to the other. And it was just crazy. And so we want all facilities on one floor. So it's just easy to make move into the shipping receiving them photograph and then ship out to New York, and it was just really about the flow and then also looking for the right kind of live work situation. And so Philip is what the new building is called. And it's really going to be the sort of special project the space that will facilitate projects working with the public school working with local artist. So people come in there be able to work they will be to work. They will be able to come there in experiences, you know, performances or installations, and you know, we want to start a scholarship

Chicago Alvin Ailey Rodney King Rahm Emanuel New York Nick cave Jack Jack Eunice Garfield station Lee city hall mama cave Joffrey ballet Jaffe Missouri Kansas City Muniz Elvin United States Philip Boone genie
"nick cave" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"nick cave" Discussed on KCRW

"Pursuing it. That's cool. Tell me about acting, and you know, what drew you to that? And and kind of what do you what's the relationship to to the music side? Well, the acting kind of came out of thin air. But it it started when I accepted a tour supporting Nick cave in two thousand thirteen and a casting director was in the audience in two years later when I was two weeks into school manager got a call for me to audition for not flexes Netflixing the. Oh, yeah. And. I had to kind of pivot my schedule that I had in mind and say, okay. Well, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. I'm going to go for it in for the part. I connected very deeply to the role who who grew up inquire and moved away from home to pursue music and on the way to pursue her dreams something terrible happened in it changed for life. And and even though it is sci-fi a connected very deeply with her experience and got to sit perform my own song for the audition and one neither part you performed the song in the audition. Yes, it was from I record. I wish I knew and I sing it a cappella. And I think that's what ended up getting me. And you're you're enjoying the whole acting part. I have so much to learn I even quaver when I when I use the word, I I'm acting because. I think something that's similar is that you take something from a real place in order to bring it out in the performance. And I think the main differences I'm drunk from a personal space to be somebody else. Whereas now, I'm for my music,.

Nick cave Netflixing director two weeks two years