8 Burst results for "Nick Carraway"

"nick carraway" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The next closer look, the next thing I knew I was on my knees. And I was calling out to God out loud and I said, God take all those people with no pain 20 years since September, 11th veteran news anchor Scott Pelley recalls the morning of 9 11. Also, how U. S policy on terrorism has changed tomorrow at one Here on 90.1 W A. B. Yeah. True friends may be among the purest sources of joy in our lives as companions we cherish without any expectation of sexual fidelity economic support or even lifelong commitment. Particular people can be incredibly important to us for just a particular season of life and then drift to the periphery as we grow up or move on, without any dramatic parting of the ways. That unique reality is one of the beauties of friendship. But it also presents challenges for depicting friendship in art from K E. R A in Dallas. This is think I'm Chris Boyd. Writer B. D. McLay is a contributing editor at the Hedgehog Review. Her essay, Summer Glorious Summer published in Lapham's quarterly, explores the idea that dramatized friendships often present them in retrospect, so that books and movies look back on a friendship that has already reached its peak and then ended. Sometimes through the death of one friend in a way that summer inevitably gives way to autumn. She's here now to talk about it, Barbara. Welcome to think. Hi. Uh, thank you so much for having me on you start by reminding us of a very classic story of a friendship that lasted just a single season or a slight bit longer than that between Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby. But we're not entirely sure that the relationship would have lasted right if Gatsby had survived. Right. I think What you see in Gatsby is there's a possibility that this would be a sort of transformative friendship for neck, possibly for Gatsby, two. Had The conditions where they could have been true friends been been present. Which I think are mostly prevented through the fact that Nick Carraway is fundamentally a coward. And so he can't. He can't respond to overtures of friendship. The way that he should. He can only sort of shout. You're worth the whole damn bunch of them put together. From across the lawn and then walk away. And so throughout Gatsby. You have these kinds of statements of his like discussed along with his approval. He can't let himself enter into this as a friendship, But I think that There is no version of the story where they become lifelong friends. Right like you were saying, it's always it's always a summer relationship. And Gatsby's whole problem in Gatsby is that he wants more out of these ephemeral relationships. Than he can have. You know, Daisy was a sort of youthful courtship. But for him, Daisy is is his true love. And he can't situate that is something that was in the past. That was Pleasant. Beautiful even but which has no future and no place in the present. He needs to make it real again. And similarly, I think if if some sort of more reciprocal relationship between him and Nick had existed, it would have been the same thing. He would have been kind of forcing this. Longer intimacy. That wouldn't be real. How did F Scott Fitzgerald use summer as a metaphor in that story? Is it a metaphor that's supposed to say something about the nature of the relationship between these two men in particular? I think that it's the train your little relationship of of Nick Gatsby and Daisy. Uh, the because the summer is such a big character in Gatsby and what it does is it forces everyone To stay very still, essentially, uh and it has this sort of drug feeling. This. Stillness. But also everybody is still on edge because it's just so unbearably hot. So you feel as if you're trapped in these long days. That will never end. But also at any moment this could tip over into something violent. You know, Otherwise, that could be a thunderstorm. Not just autumn. Uh, but in terms of personality, it could be the kind of push From, um You know, there's a scene where they're all sitting around in the Buchanans and suddenly the all start saying, Let's go into town and you can tell it's a very dangerous Yeah, that That's that. The decision that causes everything that will eventually caused Gatsby's death. Yeah, but the The kind of Paralysis of summer. Which is married with it. The fact that you know that summer doesn't actually last that long. Especially the really hot really long days of summer. You know, it's actually a very short time out of the year. But when you're in it, it feels like it lasts forever. So thinking about this. It occurs to you that summer is the natural season of friendship. What do you mean by that? Well, I sort of It partly was an observation from looking at a lot of these books and realizing that Uh, Right. Well, I shouldn't say that they all took place in summer because some of them I think I just remembered taking place in summer and then I went back and looked at them and I was like, Oh, Um But that I think, especially when summer represents sorry when, when friendship represents The end of childhood when the friendship and because One person is moving toward adulthood and the other person either isn't because they've died or you know they're moving in different directions. The end of summer is also like the end of A particular kind of childhood where you have these sort of lazy Leave these stretches of time. Where it's hard to imagine. Not just having time. You know, a kind of future. That's Big and always in front of you. And then.

Nick Carraway Jay Gatsby Barbara Chris Boyd Scott Pelley B. D. McLay Dallas F Scott Fitzgerald 20 years Nick Daisy Gatsby two men K E. R A two Summer Glorious Summer Nick Gatsby tomorrow one friend September, 11th
"nick carraway" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Don t tell me we find the upside to being locked inside. I wish I could have gotten divorced by Zoom. That would have been a lot of divorce. You just log off right? Leave meeting the ultimately meeting. Oh, my God. I'm Peter Sagal. Join us as we face time with the news every week on Wait, wait. Don t tell me from NPR. Wait, wait. Don t tell me Saturdays and Sundays at 10 am on news 88 7. Mm hmm. True friends may be among the purest sources of joy in our lives as companions we cherish without any expectation of sexual fidelity economic support or even lifelong commitment. Particular people can be incredibly important to us for just a particular season of life and then drift to the periphery as we grow up or move on, without any dramatic parting of the ways. That unique reality is one of the beauties of friendship. But it also presents challenges for depicting friendship in art from K E. R A in Dallas. This is think I'm Chris Boyd. Writer B. D. McLay is a contributing editor at the Hedgehog Review. Her essay, Summer Glorious Summer published in Lapham's quarterly, explores the idea that dramatized friendships often present them in retrospect, so that books and movies look back on a friendship that has already reached its peak and then ended. Sometimes through the death of one friend in a way that summer inevitably gives way to autumn. She's here now to talk about it, Barbara. Welcome to think. Hi. Thank you so much for having me on you start by reminding us of a very classic story of a friendship that lasted just a single season or a slight bit longer than that between Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby. But we're not entirely sure that the relationship would have lasted right if Gatsby had survived. Right. I think What you see in Gatsby is there's a possibility that This would be a sort of transformative friendship for neck possibly forgot to be, too had The conditions where they could have been true friends been been present. Which I think are mostly prevented through the fact that Nick Carraway is fundamentally a coward. And so he can't He can't respond to overtures of friendship. The way that he should. He can only sort of shout. You're worth the whole damn bunch of them put together. From across the lawn and then walk away. And so throughout Gatsby. You have these kinds of statements of his like discussed along with his approval. He can't let himself enter into this as a friendship, But I think that There is no version of the story where they become lifelong friends. Right like you were saying, it's always it's always the summer relationship. And Gatsby's whole problem in Gatsby is that he wants more out of these ephemeral relationships than he can have. You know, Daisy was a sort of youthful courtship. But for him, Daisy is is his true love, and he can't situate that as something that was in the past. That was Pleasant. Beautiful even but which has no future and no place in the present. He needs to make it real again. And similarly, I think if if some sort of more reciprocal relationship between him and Nick had existed, it would have been the same thing. He would have been kind of forcing this. Longer intimacy. That wouldn't be real. How did F Scott Fitzgerald use summer as a metaphor in that story? Is it a metaphor that's supposed to say something about the nature of the relationship between these two men in particular? I think that it's the train your little relationship of of Nick Gatsby and Daisy. Uh, the because the summer is such a big character and Gatsby and what it does. Is it forces everyone To stay very still, essentially, uh and it has this sort of drug feeling. This. Stillness. But also everybody is so on edge because it's just so unbearably hot. So you feel as if you're trapped in these long days. That will never end. But also at any moment this could tip over into something violent. You know Otherwise, that could be a thunderstorm, not just autumn. But in terms of personality, it could be the kind of push From, um You know, there's a scene where they're all sitting around in the Buchanans and suddenly the all start saying, Let's go into town and you can tell it's a very dangerous Yeah, that that that's the the decision that causes everything that will eventually cause Gatsby's death. Yeah. But The kind of Paralysis of summer. Which is married with it. The fact that you know that summer doesn't actually last that long. Especially the really hot really long days of summer. You know, it's actually a very short time out of the year. But when you're in it, it feels like it last forever. So thinking about this. It occurs to you that summer is the natural season of friendship. What do you mean by that? Well, I sort of It partly was an observation from looking at a lot of these books and realizing that Uh, Right. Well, I shouldn't say that they all took place in summer because some of them I think I just remembered taking place in summer and then I went back and looked at them and I was like, Oh, Um But that I think, especially when summer represents sorry when, when friendship represents The end of childhood when and the friendship and because One person is moving toward adulthood and the other person. Either isn't because they've died or you know they're moving in different directions. Uh, the end of summer is also like the end of A particular kind of childhood where you have these sort of lazy Lisi stretches of time. Where it's hard to imagine. future. That's Big and always in front of you. And then.

Nick Carraway Jay Gatsby Peter Sagal Barbara B. D. McLay Nick Gatsby Chris Boyd Dallas Nick F Scott Fitzgerald NPR Saturdays Daisy K E. R A two men Gatsby Summer Glorious Summer one friend Sundays at 10 am 88 7
"nick carraway" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Arafat and Michael Farris Smith Zane. Our effort is a Palestinian American living in New York, who's DePue novel? You exist too much told the story of a queer Arab woman addressing issues of intergenerational trauma. Michael Farris Smith is a writer from Mississippi, whose work explores gritty personal stories and journeys of redemption in the US South. His latest book, Nick Is a prequel to F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby following the earlier life of narrator Nick Carraway. Head of the inauguration. I spoke to Michael and Zana about how they reflect the America They live in through their writing. The America I know is one of overlapping identities, especially as it becomes, you know, increasingly diversified. We have immigrant communities that are really proliferating on marginalized groups as well. But of course, all of these have been Really under threat In the last four years, however, I think that's given me greater impetus to reflect those communities, the sort of overlapping seemingly maybe contradictory identities that a person and 21st century America can inhabit like you can be. American. You could be Muslim. You can be Palestinian. You can be queer. You could be all of these things together in one person, And I think that's something that I really wanted to reflect, as sort of unique to what America is made up of right now. But what about you, Michael? Think Zana just said about you can be more than one thing is also much of my experience. I think the America That I first knew was small town America being from South Mississippi, but then growing up and leaving a small town and moving to a city like Atlanta and living there for a while and spending a little time in Philadelphia and then also living abroad. I think what I began to see Is. There are many different types of people in many different ways of being in many different ways of doing things. I think the people in my work are reflected in the kinds of people that are probably here and exist in small town, Mississippi but face many of the complexities, both with identity and Their roles and how they fit in or how they don't fit in. That kind of encompasses all all great characters. I think it might be changing world Well, you certainly shows itself through the characters who Have created in the smaller places how the events of the last four years and the presidency of Donald Trump shaped you was a writer Michael. I wish I would have been more surprised by the last four years, one of the first reactions I had when Trump was elected. As I wrote a piece called The United States of Mississippi, which was published by the bitter Southerner in which I essentially said everyone in this country needs to get ready for what it feels like to live in Mississippi with kind of government the kind of decisions in the kind of policies that really work hard to maintain the status quo that does not work for everyone and I I knew it was coming. I had no idea the extent to The nightmare This would be when we look back on this time. You know, writers and artists very often reflect the mood of the cultural period. They're living in, and I think we'll probably look back and see the work coming out of this era is mirroring a lot of the feelings of confusion and pessimism and hopelessness, but also at the same time. I think there's a great courage that has to be found to and I hope that will also we'll have points of light in that to that show us what we are capable of overcoming. Saying how the last four years How have you reflected them in your work? Well, I think that the last four years have really given me an added urgency as a writer to sort of validate a kind of existence on Elevate a certain voice one that is under threat. One. That is sort of being denied, which is, you know. The voice of a first generation American from an immigrant background As a woman of color. I feel like rather than pessimism. I've seen a lot of Optimism and stories just because I've just seen such a proliferation of the narratives, and I think what I found to be really exciting is that there is such an appetite for that among readers. There's a hunger for those voices. Then why did you choose to tell the story that you did in your book, You exist too much. I was interested in creating a character who sort of sets her sights on the unattainable on for her on attainable. Itty existed on three levels, the first being romantic love, and then the second level was on a kind of cultural level as a Palestinian American growing up in between these two worlds and Feeling like she can't really attain full access full belonging to either And then, of course, on a more macro political level as a Palestinian, the unattainable itty of statehood and self determination, Aunt How are all of these unattainable it ease affecting her as a person? Did the politics off Donald Trump impact your working anyway? It's really led me to want to be very sort of specific about showing American readers may be what Palestine actually is versus like what we are seeing in the rhetoric of people like Donald Trump. Or just like in mainstream media, and I wanted to really combat a lot of those stereotypes, particularly as I heard more and more of the sort of I guess. Hate speech that was coming from Trump in the kind of like falsehoods on misrepresentations. Michael, can you tell me why you chose to tell the stories you did in your book, Nick? You know when I wrote Nick, you know, considering the care away from Gatsby, like the thing that always struck me about him was his detachment and his disillusionment. He was a very lonely character, and I feel like you know, over time. Like there wasn't ever the glitz and glamour of Gatsby that interested me, But it was those feelings because I felt them myself. I think we all felt those feelings in our lives. I was really struck by just how timely the novel felt We were talking about a country and a great deal of transition. Gender roles being changed pretty dynamically during World War one, the rich and the greedy taking over and away. They haven't taken over four because of prohibition and country coming off a pandemic. And that's all Nick. He felt the way that I feel now. I think a lot of people feel now when he was coming back home..

America Donald Trump Michael Mississippi writer Nick Carraway Michael Farris Smith Zana United States Michael Farris Smith Zane F. Scott Fitzgerald Trump New York Arafat Gatsby South Mississippi Itty Palestine Atlanta
"nick carraway" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on KQED Radio

"M. C Foundation at E. C. M c foundation dot work. I'm Jenn White. This is one a tomorrow We will run faster, stretch out our arms farther, and so we beat on boats against the current borne back ceaselessly into the past. The final image from the Great Gatsby is a handy summation of the American experience, at least according to author F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby is about a changing America. At one point, the white protagonist notes, a passing car of stylish African Americans, driven by a white chauffeur and thinks anything can happen now, anything at all, but just like in reality. This change is examined but never fully embraced. Who gets to achieve the American dream and is achieving that dream even possible in America, shackled by old ideas about race class and capitalism. The Great Gatsby entered the public domain this year. And despite being almost 100 years old, those questions sound just as relevant today as they did in 1925 Joining us to talk about the Great Gatsby in our current moment is Maureen Corrigan. She's a book critic for NPR's fresh air. She's also the author of So We read on how the Great Gatsby came to be and why it endures Marine Welcome to the program. Thank you, Jen. It's good to be here. We're also joined by men. Jin Lee, author of the novel Pachinko. She wrote the introduction to the New Penguin Classic edition of the Great Gatsby. Men. It's great to have you The pleasure to be here and also with us is Michael Nowlin. He's the professor and chair of the English department at the University of Victoria. Michael. Welcome to 180. Thank you very much for having me. Somewhere in a lot of people have read the Great Gatsby. Nearly 30 million copies have sold worldwide as a 2020. But for those who haven't or maybe it's been a few years since they have give us a brief synopsis. The brief synopsis is it's the story of a man named Jay Gatsby, who starts out life as James Gatz. And he remakes himself into the image of what he thinks of as an upper class sort of tycoon. His money comes from bootlegging, so he's got a criminal past. And he has been in love with the same woman for over five years. Daisy Buchanan. She's now married and he's when the novel Sort of opens. He is trying to reconnect with Daisy. The novel, by the Way, is told. In retrospect, it's told by a narrator named Nick Carraway. And Nick is remembering the events of the summer of 1922. Two years later in 1924, and I think the fact that the novelist told in retrospect and not none of the events of the novel can be changed, already says something about how Fitzgerald regarded possibility that You know, you could only reach so far and Your attempts to change the past to grab hold of that green light. They were always going to fall short and they were always going to be doomed. Well, part of the reason the novel is resurfacing now is because it went into the public domain earlier this month. What is that effectively mean? It means the gates are open. I just got a notice this morning of the publication of a new novel called The Great Gatsby Undead, which is a vampire version of a great Gatsby s O. You know, it basically means that the Fitzgerald estate and Scribner's, which, which has been publishing the novel since 1925 that they no longer have exclusive rights to the novel or exclusive, say over what people conduce with it. Then I'll come to you. In the new introduction to the Penguin Classic edition of the book, You write that The Great Gatsby quote remains a modern novel by exploring the intersection of social hierarchy, white femininity, white male love and unfettered capitalism. Talk about the novel is a case study on whiteness in America. Oh, I think it was really important for me to specify the whiteness of this book, because even though it is a great novel for many, many reasons, I think the whiteness is a brace specific experience off this era, and I think the specificity of it Of its whiteness has actually made it much more universal, and I wanted to bring that to the forefront in terms of the capitalism That's really scary about this book is that I think that that's Gerald was really exploring what happens when you have greed and lust and idolatry, and I think those things were informed by a sense of Um, moral judgment. I think this is a moral fable, and I think that's the reason why we keep turning to it as young people and then we keep telling young people to read it well. After the book was published, Fitzgerald said he'd wished he'd fleshed out his female characters. More. But what commentary does the novel make on white womanhood? I think it's really unfair to white women of that era then and now because very much so he saw women as objects and even I think that's Gerald. Even though I think he's a very strong Writer and as a strong writer. He has compassion for people. I don't think he really got women. And of course, I have to give him some credit for the fact that he's a really young man at this point in this life, and at that time when he was writing the Gatsby He was going through a very difficult time in his marriage. So I did some biographical criticism in my introduction, explaining how he was literally going through his wife, having either At least an emotional affair with a man and she had asked for a divorce. And that's when he was writing this book. So I think a lot of this anger is in this book and therefore his women characters. You seem very two dimensional. Michael it as we said before the book was published in 1925 nearly 100 years ago to your mind, why is it remained so popular? Well, I think it always he'll remain popular because he harnessed the story to a very kind of simple love. There's as a simple love story has core and I think that's something that appeals to students and they also like this. They see a missed their You know the myth of the American dream. Students readily understand that is this desire to remake yourself and make a fortune in America. And, of course, she ends up feeling so I think that's the one source of his popularity. It's enduring popularity. As well as many of its really memorable lines. I mean, that's that's disgusting, great lines that students like to remember and quote and readers like to remember in quotes, so I think that's certainly a key source of it. Complex novel, but it has a sort of simple facade. Marine. One of the greatest tensions in the book is around this question of who gets to participate in the American dream and who was shut out of it. Talk about that tension and what Fitzgerald was trying to explore with this Well, Fitzgerald said that Gatsby was about aspiration. And you know, just to pick up on what Michael just mentioned. I do think students and most of us readers, um, you know, really respond to that sense of aspiration of speaking to Our best Selves of you know, Aziz, you read at the opening of this this segment running faster, holding out our arms stretching all of that. We love that, but, um The novel is also complicated. It's very aware that not everybody is going to have equal access to what we're reaching out our arms for, you know, we're not going to have equal access to wealth. Class mobility, and that's why you have this. The first three chapters. We start with the Buchanans old money but very quickly in Chapter two were in the Valley of Ashes where we're in the land of the have nots. And the third chapter is his new money is Gatsby's mansion. So the non was really aware of the fact that America is a stratified place when it comes to class. And it's also very aware of race. You know, we we get right away in Chapter one. Tom Buchanan, the Daisy's husband, the literal heavy of the novel, talking about eugenics, and the white race being threatened being submerged..

Jay Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald America Michael Nowlin The Great Gatsby Undead Gatsby Jenn White professor and chair Gerald Nick Carraway Maureen Corrigan book critic Daisy Buchanan Fitzgerald estate M. C Foundation Writer Jin Lee Jen
"nick carraway" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on KCRW

"Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's and Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School, she says a lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in Blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Pro. Off it, Jenkins says. The works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more? Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits, and I think it makes people worry Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins YouTube Nick That Nick Carraway Glenn Fleishman Inskeep. Khalil Gibran Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway NPR Congress Duke Law School Flashman director
"nick carraway" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla fold in and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involved lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR News Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway KQED NPR YouTube Flashman Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"nick carraway" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite. Remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years, it didn't happen. 1998 Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Farris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Farris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway YouTube Flashman NPR Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"nick carraway" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"nick carraway" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Possible. Rita Chatterjee. NPR news, among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago. So everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what. Another Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits and I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR Nick Carraway Rita Chatterjee YouTube Flashman Petra Mayer Glenn Fleishman Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director