17 Burst results for "Nick Beg"

"nick berg" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:42 min | 4 months ago

"nick berg" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Before audio playlists before CDs before cassette tapes even before vinyl there were wax cylinders By the late 1890s sliding a wax cylinder onto a Thomas Edison phonograph was the way you listen to commercial music It was also the way you could record yourself Today June the 21st the day before my birthday Thousands of these recordings live in public collections NPR's Jennifer Venezuela was in Manhattan when a machine arrived to play recordings that may not have been heard for a century Deep in the basement of the New York public library for the performing arts there's a new machine about the size of a small suitcase It has two screens and intimidating number of buttons and dials a laser and an arm holding a stylus like the kind of needle that plays records on a turntable It's called the endpoint cylinder and dick belt machine And we're going to hear audio that no one else has heard likely since around the turn of the last century And a lot of times no one even knows what's on these cylinders They're blank No label space or add a nice label so you get a priceless thing next to something that is just a common cylinder That's Nick Berg the inventor of the endpoint This is a laser and back up here and it's looking He flew here from Burbank California with his machine and a trunk full of tools And now he's setting it up One of the first recordings he's going to try to digitize was found by curator Jessica wood in 2016 The music division did not keep very careful acquisitions records back in the 1930s I just know that the big wooden box that I found on the inside of the lid it said gift of Mary Dana to the New York public library in 1935 She's hoping we'll hear a birthday party or something that tells us more about the social history of the time Even someone shouting their name and explaining their testing the machine which is a pretty common thing to hear on these recordings Because the important thing about wax cylinders is not just that they played the earliest recordings of commercial music and comedy sketches is that for the first time people were able to record themselves And many did or they were recorded by other people like ethnographers Nick Berg Native American recordings are very rewarding to work on because a lot of times those communities are relearning their language and such and there are other stories And so some of the projects I work on they're now cutting those up into words and the phrases to use in the classrooms They're on the reservations and such There are about 2700 cylinders in the collection of the New York public library 90 are mysteries The endpoint not only produces clearer recordings than earlier machines but the laser it can read cylinders that are cracked or broken Curator wood takes a box wrapped in brown paper out of a large red cooler Like you'd have a picnic We usually put it in a cooler because the temperature fluctuation is high enough that it could sort of upset the cylinder could cause it to crack Holding it to be careful just because of the heat of your hands you have to kind of rotate You want to hold it for too long or it could crack just by by holding it It's a light putty brown color which means it's an early recording Black wax cylinders came later It's also fairly smooth grooves are barely visible and the cylinder itself is thin Berg says these are signs that it's a home recording but also that the levels are very low and may be hard to hear These are all acoustically recorded They had to yell into a horn essentially So often you know if they're a distance away from the horn it's a very low recording level Most of the people doing these recordings were hobbyists who were experimenting One of the most famous is Lionel mapleson He recorded his family But he was also the librarian from the metropolitan opera and in the early 1900s he recorded dozens of rehearsals and performances listening to his work is the only way you can hear pre World War I upper singers with a full orchestra They represent the first extensive recording live recordings in recorded history Bob kazaki it's a librarian and the music and recorded sound division He says mapleson was a pioneer And then he started capturing sounds from the Met stage from various places first from the prompter's box and then he went to the fly system and he got really good results and he became a kind of fanatic and kept on doing it and doing it The library knew right away how important these recordings were Over the years librarians tried to transfer them to other media several times They sent them out to the Library of Congress to.

Jennifer Venezuela New York public library Nick Berg Jessica wood Mary Dana Thomas Edison NPR Manhattan Burbank California Lionel mapleson Berg wood New York Bob kazaki mapleson Library of Congress
"nick berg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"nick berg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today June the 21st a day before by birthday Thousands of these live in public collections NPR's Jennifer the Nazca was in Manhattan when a machine arrived to play recordings that may not have been heard in a century Deep in the basement of the New York public library for the performing arts there's a new machine about the size of a small suitcase It has two screens and intimidating number of buttons and dials a laser and an arm holding a stylus like the kind of needle that plays records on a turntable It's called the endpoint cylinder and dick belt machine And we're going to hear audio that no one else has heard likely since around the turn of the last century And a lot of times no one even knows what's on these cylinders They're blank No label space or add a nice label so you get a priceless thing next to something that's just a common cylinder That's Nick Burke the inventor of the endpoint This is a laser in back of here and it's looking he flew here from Burbank California with its machine and a trunk full of tools And now he's setting it up One of the first recordings he's going to try to digitize was found by curator Jessica wood in 2016 The music division did not keep very careful acquisitions records back in the 1930s I just know that the big wooden box that I found on the inside of the lid it said gift of Mary Dana to the New York public library in 1935 She's hoping we'll hear a birthday party or something that tells us more about the social history of the time Even someone shouting their name and explaining their testing the machine which is a pretty common thing to hear on these recordings Because the important thing about wax cylinders is not just that they played the earliest recordings of commercial music and comedy sketches is that for the first time people were able to record themselves And many did or they were recorded by other people like ethnographers Nick Berg Native American recordings are very rewarding to work on because a lot of times those communities are relearning their language and such and there are other stories And so some of the projects I work on they're now cutting those up into words and the phrases to using the classrooms they're on the reservations and such There are about 2700 cylinders in the collection of the New York public library 90 are mysteries The endpoint not only produces clearer recordings than earlier machines but the laser can read cylinders that are cracked or broken Curator wood takes a box wrapped in brown paper out of a large red cooler like you'd have to picnic We usually put it in a cooler because the temperature fluctuation is high enough that it could sort of upset the cylinder could cause it to crack Holding it to be careful just because of the heat of your hands you have to kind of rotate you want to hold it for too long or it could crack just by by holding it It's a light putty brown color which means it's an early recording Black wax cylinders came later It's also fairly smooth grooves are barely visible and the cylinder itself is thin Berg says these are signs that it's a home recording but also that the levels are very low and may be hard to hear These are all acoustically recorded so they had to yell into a horn essentially So often if they're a distance away from the horn it's a very low recording level Most of the people doing these recordings were hobbyists who were experimenting One of the most famous is Lionel mapleson He recorded his family But he was also the librarian from the metropolitan opera and in the early 1900s he recorded dozens of rehearsals and performances listening to his work is the only way you can hear pre World War I upper singers with a full orchestra They represent the first extensive recording live recordings in recorded history Bob 'cause it's a librarian and the music and recorded sound division He says mapleson was a pioneer And then he started capturing sounds from the Met stage from various places first from the prompter's box and then he went to the fly system and he got really good results And he became a kind of fanatic and kept on doing it and doing it The library knew right away how important these recordings were Over the years librarians tried to transfer them to other media several times They sent them out to the Library of Congress.

New York public library Jennifer the Nazca Nick Burke curator Jessica wood Mary Dana NPR Manhattan Nick Berg Burbank California Lionel mapleson Berg mapleson Bob Library of Congress
"nick berg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | 4 months ago

"nick berg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"June the 21st a day before my birthday Thousands of these live in public collections NPR's Jennifer of the Nazca was in Manhattan when a machine arrived to play recordings that may not have been heard in a century Deep in the basement of the New York public library for the performing arts there's a new machine about the size of a small suitcase It has two screens and intimidating number of buttons and dials a laser and an arm holding a stylus like the kind of needle that plays records on a turntable It's called the endpoint cylinder and dict belt machine And we're going to hear audio that no one else has heard likely since around the turn of the last century And a lot of times no one even knows what's on these cylinders They're blank No label space or at a nice label so you get a priceless thing next to something that's just a common cylinder That's Nick Berg the inventor of the endpoint This is a laser and back of here and it's looking good He flew here from Burbank California with his machine and a trunk full of tools and now he's setting it up One of the first recordings he's going to try to digitize was found by curator Jessica wood in 2016 The music division did not keep very careful acquisitions records back in the 1930s I just know that the big wooden box that I found on the inside of the lid it said gift of Mary Dana to the New York public library in 1935 She's hoping we'll hear a birthday party or something that tells us more about the social history of the time Even someone shouting their name and explaining their testing the machine which is a pretty common thing to hear on these recordings Because the important thing about wax cylinders is not just that they played the earliest recordings of commercial music and comedy sketches is that for the first time people were able to record themselves And many did or they were recorded by other people like ethnographers Nick Berg Native American recordings are very rewarding to work on because a lot of times those communities are relearning their language and such and there are other stories And so some of the projects I work on they're now cutting those up into words and the phrases to use in the classrooms They're on the reservations and such There are about 2700 cylinders in the collection of the New York public library 90 are mysteries The endpoint not only produces clearer recordings than earlier machines but the laser can read cylinders that are cracked or broken Curator would takes a box wrapped in brown paper out of a large red cooler Like you'd have that picnic We usually put it in a cooler because the temperature fluctuation is high enough that it could sort of upset the cylinder could cause it to crack Holding it to be careful just because of the heat of your hands you have to kind of rotate you want to hold it for too long or it could crack just by by holding it It's a light putty brown color which means it's an early recording Black wax cylinders came later It's also fairly smooth the grooves are barely visible and the cylinder itself is thin Berg says these are signs that it's a home recording but also that the levels are very low and may be hard to hear These are all acoustically recorded they had to yell into a horn essentially So often you know if they're a distance away from the horn it's a very low recording level Most of the people doing these recordings were hobbyists who were experimenting One of the most famous is Lionel mapleson He recorded his family But he was also the librarian from the metropolitan opera and in the early 1900s he recorded dozens of rehearsals and performances listening to his work is the only way you can hear pre World War I upper singers with a full orchestra They represent the first extensive recording live recordings in recorded history Bob 'cause it's a librarian and the music and recorded sound division He says mapleson was a pioneer And then he started capturing sounds from the next stage from various places first from the prompter's box and then he went to the fly system and he got really good results And he became a kind of fanatic and kept on doing it and doing it The library knew right away how important these recordings were Over the years librarians tried to transfer them to other media several times They sent them out to the Library of Congress to Germany Once.

New York public library Nick Berg Jessica wood Mary Dana NPR Manhattan Burbank Jennifer California Lionel mapleson Berg New York mapleson Bob Library of Congress Germany
"nick berg" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"nick berg" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

"I teach their graduate school of program on intel analysis some foreign policy and so forth and i do a bunch of other things to virtual the things you'd have to kill us see james. That's a lot of paperwork. So i am glad that the thing that said he'd be in. That is paper. I don't know about that before. We started recording did have a skeleton on his desk. So that's true that's true. He's got ways to get around the paperwork. Yeah i know. I when you when you when you're in the bureaucracy. You know how to do paperwork really fast and really well and so but still hate donut. So so well interesting so counterterrorism type in asia. How much of the how. Much of your life is in the cyber wral or the like working on I would say working with with not necessarily threats in that manner but pulling data off the off the cyber realm the well twitter's that the internet sort of with funny You know it's like it's like cream cyber rules everything around me Everything that we touch everything that we do. In modern digitize society can in some way be connected to cybersecurity or cyber related activities outright. What i think about this and this is something that a lot of people forget. Is that cyber. have you wanted to find. It is just people. People acting in certain ways using a different tool in this case Some sort of digital tool to activates they actually want to do or achieve whatever goal. They want to do so. I actually. When i was working at the agency. I did a lot of work on propaganda terrorist propaganda and so between two thousand four to six Al qaeda in iraq would turn out these videos about People being murdered online. Grab american or bread or or a bunch of iraqis and and essentially murder them online. Amer them on video and then post their their videos online and when this happened in two thousand four There's a there's a philadelphia native nick berg who's grabbed an killed and then his video was placed online. It was a huge deal and so fast forward now to two thousand fourteen. Two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen so now a decade later. We now have Isis murdering people. I think you probably remember that Virtually i remember that All they had to do was filmed there there video and then place it online and then he went from the digital realm to the I guess in real life around like your grandparents who read newspapers on on on pieces of paper you're dead trees Everybody knew about in so basically even though they were using a an internet platform on internet mechanism to get message across. They're still achieving the things they used to do. In the pre the pre Like hugh social media world so yeah it is when they wanna get things on tv. Al qaeda in iraq. Fifteen years ago would would contact aljazeera. Now all i have to do is put it online. Put it in. They have their own distribution channels. What we're seeing about. Let's say right now. In two thousand twenty one is. The taliban have become pretty sophisticated about what they're doing they're they have achieved As we're talking right..

intel james Al qaeda asia nick berg twitter iraq philadelphia aljazeera taliban
"nick berg" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"nick berg" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Elder Next. What character? Stupid, idiotic stories about you and your Yes. Habit. All of them are false. Not what is that shoot? I'm sure that you were treated by your if you had the legitimate parents Like a piece of shit. You know why? Because Nick hate other Chris. That's why they don't have a complete family like the rest of us. So Everything you say, of course, is a lie. What terms? That's the stupid stories. Oh, my gosh. The only reason I listened to that idiotic station, which is the wrong and certainly not that the answer is the wrong answer. The only reason I listen, so I can monitor and laughing out loud at to everything you people say it's a lie. Especially you. You Nick Berg. You want people to think that you're normal with a normal family, But you know what? You never had a normal family. You were abandoned because they hate each other. Remember that next hate each other. And they throw the kids out. They hate them. Have a great day capitated. Wow. Damn damn day, man. Goodness. But you know that wasn't just directed towards me. She said. Your whole station Not the answer. So she doesn't like any of us. Especially me. We pretty much have the same opinion on most of the major issues. But I guess since I am I am a black conservative..

Nick Berg Chris
"nick berg" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"nick berg" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"For well for kids got cut off during the pandemic, and she knows others who lost access to food stamps or lost their jobs, making them more vulnerable to opportunistic sex traffickers, she said. The racial inequalities and sex trafficking run deep. There are so many of us that are overwhelmingly black and brown with a disproportionate over 85% of sex buyers being middle aged white men discretionary income. I think that once we address the realities of the racism systemically than me, Address. How and why So many of people that look like me are being exploited and how so many of us end up being raped and how our read kids are the ones that set on the shelves For all these years, several speakers shared stories of their rape kits languishing in police storage, like pastoral counselor and advocate Gayle Gardner, who told the task force her rape kids sat on a shelf in Florida for 31 years this October at the age of 73. She found out that her kid had finally been tested and that she had been a victim of a serial rapist. She asked how many women might have been spared had she been white and taken seriously love any a master's of Texas stressed the need for laws to prevent these testing backlogs, she told Congress members how her rape kit went untested for more than 21 years. Through two statutes of limitations. She described being questioned by police at the age of 13 when she had just been raped at knifepoint. I'm a virgin child. I don't know what happened. I don't know this person that came to my house, but I have police officers standing there saying Are you sure it's not your boyfriend? Are you treating at him in the window? And are you sure you're not having sex? You don't want your mama to find out. I was I was blown away by that I was like, Wow, is this what happens? So you think of other victims, especially of colors? As we said in the projects at the time of what they endure of the fears they have, If they have to deal with peace officers with these attitudes of these mentalities are like the condescending or they're They're being sarcastic with you are you know this is your culture. This is this is what you used to and You know those type of behaviors have to seize Congress members agreed. The police need training on how to interact with victims of sexual violence. Representative John Cat Co. Of New York, who spent many years as a prosecutor said that the police is job is to secure the seam, but that once that's done the people most vital to the scene are the ones who know how to talk to the witnesses. She thinks an advocate should accompany police officers on sexual violence calls get some of the experts intertwined the law enforcement I Don't think you'll be that much more expensive to do it, he said. A hotline could be created so that officers and victims could access and advocate remotely began to empower the advocates and the counselors to be on the front lines with us even if they're not physically on the front lines. Well, the activists at the round table pushed for rape kit backlog, laws and mandatory police training and trauma response. Lawmakers gave no timelines or specifics, but they pledged to continue the dialogue for K P A Fae and Pacifica radio. This is Katherine Monahan in Oakland. Ah, big. Thank you. To those of you who have recently responded to my my plea for some help getting up. On top of that hill that $2000 film, including Stephen of Panel, Barbara of Richmond, who says Thanks so much for the K P f a news. I depend on it. Martha of Green Break Peter of Point Reyes Station. Uh, Carrie, of Rockport, Washington. Who says Thank you So important. David. Second time. A second pledge tonight from David of Walnut Creek. Who says I'm donating a second time tonight in respect and remembrance for my friend Nick Berg, Tony On now, for a year. He used to say expletive. What would we do without KPs? A mark of loom or donating in memory of Detroit? Dan? Thanks to all of you, another places just come in Eric from Richmond. If you can help us out if you.

rape Congress Richmond Gayle Gardner Tony On John Cat Co Detroit Katherine Monahan Florida Point Reyes Station Nick Berg Dan Texas Representative Pacifica Eric Walnut Creek
"nick berg" Discussed on Candid Conversations with James

Candid Conversations with James

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on Candid Conversations with James

"Abuse her and her dad was proactive and off corded the drop offs exchanges between the two of them and one of them there was a couple of different instances one where she was talking to the mother's lawyer. I think it was and she was screaming. I don't want to go back. She he he's touching me. You know, it's just I can't I don't want to go into because it's absolutely heartbreaking and thought the grandmother was just completely gaslighting this poor child and it turned into he had to give the baby back because that was court-ordered or he'd go wrong email. and then what good would he be to his daughter or his his there's two boys in the picture too and they ended up putting the mother and in the children in protective custody because the internet blew up about it and just went full force and they went a little too far in my opinion because they made them run and go hide in a hotel under protective custody, but still hm and The poor thing was still abused under her mother's care police officers were supposed to be doing welfare checks and they didn't talk to the child. They didn't see how she was doing. And if they had talked to her she would have told them that she was being abused. It was so bad that her father while he had her over the long weekend had to take her to the hospital because she had suffered injuries from the abuse. Oh Lord. Yeah now and I I appreciate your sparing the details as you continue to unless they're needed but I'm curious so since he had to take her to the hospital. I assume that there was some type of evidence that could be used in his fight to get the daughter. Is that correct? Yes. Yeah. Yeah, there was documented proof that she had been abused the judge the original judges. I think there was by the by the time all this will be over. There should have been three digits. If I'm following the story, right the original judge gave the Dad full custody something with that changed and it went back to mom having most of it while Dad had zoomed and then like once a month weekend visitations. Mhm and dad and stepmom was taking Sophie to the hospital when they had her because she was complaining of pain and the doctors were documenting it. So that's you know, we're sitting here and we're hearing this and his lawyer is saying there's documentation that she has been victimized. The system failed post-soviet her brothers and the dad because there was even drugs in one of the brothers system. And these are children younger than 10. Hm. So, you know in this case. It's interesting. I don't even know the word. It's it's I guess it's a little surprising that it would get reversed in the first place. But the video that Nick Berg when you talk about it, I did see the video. Although I didn't know all the context but I did remember the video now and was that video of the worker basically forcing the girl in back to the car after the initial decision and then reversal or is this prior to the initial decision that gave her to her dad just like this is my one after they it was the 31st said okay, and then there was a reversal and and she didn't want to go back to her mom's house or obvious reasons. And like I said, I can't I don't know. I've heard two different stories about someone said it was CPS. And another one said it was the mom's lawyer and they've never really given any indication as to who she was and if they had I've missed it somewhere along the way home. Which is entirely possible because I've been trying to keep up with it as all over the place. I'll go ahead and that was in my opinion and should not have been said to the child. She should not have if you don't go with your mom your dad's going to go to jail. Like I understand telling a kid the truth cuz I don't lie to mine. But I also don't give them that much information. You know, I'm sure they could have they definitely could have phrased it differently or you know, eight years of or sugarcoat but for you know a kid that maybe is the most appropriate thing to do but also, you know, it's I don't know if it's a little bit dumbfounding to me how that whatever wage how that situation happens. Although I know, you know, I do know that it happens obviously. Yeah, so I guess I'm a little and so this is where I get I find myself a little bit torn on things. And this is kind of how Irish original conversation started. But you know, like I get a little bit torn on on when I see young hashtags about anything. My concern is always that we're going to take a super complicated issue and we're going to try to squeeze it down into a you know, hashtag because that's easy, right that's going to be right and then my fear is exactly what you pointed out where it's like well then we're going to have people that are running for fear of their lives because the the internet's angry at God and that's that's scary when nobody's been convicted of anything yet, right it is. Yeah and so but then on the same hand I can understand some of the outrage or or desire to bring attention when you hear cases like this where the system is is failing, right? And I think we're seeing that obviously this is not limited to CPS or that we're seeing Systems Failing across the country and a lot of different ways and.

Dad Nick Berg Mhm Sophie
"nick berg" Discussed on Neue Encounter

Neue Encounter

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on Neue Encounter

"So we had to watch movies that I had already seen and this was one of them and this is one them which walk in my review for it. I just said I initially watched this movie and like eighth or ninth grade during my Prime Tumblr years like staying up late till 5 in the morning for no reason at all. Just scrolling through Tumblr, you know, just just vibing like home. I'd really don't know. What all you do is repost pictures. Yeah. I don't know why I still have Tumblr my phone. I just don't know why like, I mean I get it but like when I think about it, I'm like all I'm doing is reposting someone else's picture on my page. And I don't know anyways, this movie is clearly a very big tumbler movie. It's just that type of vibe and that's where I initially found it was on Tumblr cuz like a cute photo set cuz it's yeah, it's probably the biggest compliment I can give is the set design. It's cute production design. It's cute. It's like they keep with the color schemes of the girls are pink and boys are blue. So everything. It's very Barbie Dreamhouse. Yeah. It's just a great movie. It's I would also described as cartoony in the beginning to I don't know. I was just really don't often the beginning but then I kind of settled in so I would say in the beginning where it's the cheerleaders just jumping around home. Yeah, I was like, what is this voyeuristic shape but also just I don't know just like with seeing like the little meeting that they have with the parents and the frame and everyone and just the way they're all talking and they're like look at this poster and you you just touch us all the time and you don't even like kissing me her boyfriend and everything then when she gets to the correction area place and just the second to the set design and everything. I was like, what is this but if you just settle in and just accept it for what is. It's it's pretty enjoyable. Yeah, Nick Berg. Not Nick doesn't not like movies that are like this but he just doesn't watch movies that are like this they're just not in his comfort zone. Basically, you know, yeah, it's not it's just not like you don't need them. You just you can't free you're just kind of like, okay. All.

Tumblr Nick Berg Barbie Dreamhouse
"nick berg" Discussed on CATtales

CATtales

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on CATtales

"Know less. And it was claverdon Jordan him what we were on on not we Nikki and I would say to you know we could have stopped doing things professionally Charlie kind of likes to I were all used to use for like to work in. Chaotic kind of why where you know who? gig To. You know. Whatever came along and he would say, yes to things like that. We've got to do proper Tov and. Organize. Things we gotta do you know we have an and do an album and into and then free up some time? So we can get other places like South America Australia Hero. And He. Didn't live books. Some some pub on a upon ten we've been planning to my twenty thousand people and night you know hockey stadiums and was probably to teen costs or something we've been challenging I. Felt We. You know we agreed that. We were going to do this move this random. So gig thing. And he's hot. Well, she you guys are out do with without the papal is simpler. That's fine. You know if you WANNA do as the been dog. So Charlie Opera friends. But. You'll see you do you case shops because we're the UK subsidies nine I'm going to do it but I but people on, it's going to be the case ups. So Nicky, really angry and simple if he thinks so little wove mark contribution to the dining that you think just got some guitar player in case ups and I quit I wish point I said Yeah I, feel the same about me. I quit and then came. On out to you know so did. So that's how I that's the first time. And then went to America my first wife, this is different. my parents proxy American and with London but we just got fed up. We've learned a at that point I know music was changing punt was on the on the roads really there was it was electric music coming coming through. And I just thought well, I just need to change and to be bent to initially San Francisco. And I was like five years and I and I. Don Nick Berg Glass, and we go deal with Christmas records. was just about to go into. I and now call cool from Andy McCoy. He's playing rock saying. Hey, look come can do this to a with he? He needs a bass player She really did a say it's of course and some that he and. And that was I was off on a eight month world tour of He around the world and it was it was fantastic. It was the best experience of my my whole career. then. After I was on a China from Meka, you know just to keep keep me available but nothing was happening. Nothing seemed to be going on and then another guy roxy starting now she says time out said Hey I've got to give a cheap and nasty and we've go dealing in go do line management. We need advice plan we need to some right to. WOULD YOU BE UP COMING BACK TO LONDON? I'm joining up to you know you'd be on the White Stripe doillon stuff and there's you know publishing money and among wife even though she was American she. Studied she she went to London. She was rule anglophile. She hates Los Angeles in particular. So I say well. Enough. So I saw this is an opportunity to play her idol. So go back and have work waiting you know and so I joined this country Steve Knight. To albums. Did a lot of toiling. In Japan that was our main market retargeting in Scandinavia in the UK as well and I, it was good. It was a good five six years with then and then basically nasty less the by and he left his wife and moved to Tokyo to leave woman demand for that. Followed it. and. Then you know Charlie was signed me up from time to time and say, Oh, you know whenever fitted him for some shows For us or do you WanNa decent urban dopes gigs with us or whatever and. then. I did nothing dogs out and I think in ninety. Oh, now hang on. Yeah. Yeah. Ninety seven that's right. the he fund up and said he's going to do reunion album we myself Charlie. So we went to San Francisco and we ended up to ended up being to albums recording. And such an amount of material ended up being to echoes credentials and the on a second album Cobra. I am we told around the states. And then I came back ill at this neurological illness, it put me out of the game for about two years and then I can't even playing for doing an album Waikoloa h with the dogs and then we did some shows. then. To play more move with the subs philly more more and undo minimal and ended up doing the a sort of a big European over the subs in two thousand. And pretty much. All I got back into it So but I was still sued if. I was doing certain toes and then. I wasn't doing and then I suppose since about the last twelve years of. Also, because I bet news to France type some time off to so things out. I started lost twelve years. I've been. It's been. It's been a full time member of the substance. Donald Pretty Much Donald Tours and gigs and everything. So it's become a bind again proper diane to come full circle for human away hasn't really. Yeah. Yeah. He's yeah. Yeah, and so far it's like everyone's you know go well, we had a top political jet who basically five years ago. We actually sort of exchange in for Steve Strong who now plays this because? I think, JEB, just didn't WanNa do it anymore ready to hit become a semi-detached member that I really wasn't Infused anymore. He was just going through the motions and So we You know where the chop. He decided to you know the best friend. Yeah. Especially to go. So yeah that was fine line isn't it? If he's like that it's not so bad I mean I was reading upon you all and founded the quite a few former members. Of the band. Crikey of captured on one list of seventy two I, think it on the other list of like sixty five. That's that's a lot of people been in the UK sub. Why? Really Often Nikki. Our myself from commodity left in. Ninety three. Charlie two I said about you know. He used to like to do things how how's it looks? Very chaotic you know and it was just an. Door policy you know it was available wherever could do something which is why east me from time to time I mean I remember turning out as house a few times and Boys flat on. He'd be on the phone sit down and it told me you know we call Gigi new costs. On a Gigi Manchester so be at my house at too. So I get to his place to they'd be on the phone and you'd be I'll ooh.

Charlie Opera London UK San Francisco South America Gigi Manchester claverdon Jordan Nikki Andy McCoy hockey Los Angeles Don Nick Berg Glass Donald Pretty Nicky Steve Knight Japan France roxy America
"nick berg" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on No Agenda

"Mike Bloomberg is the man to lead us guys will create more jobs much not afraid that they had already not one bit. Trust me those tweet. Lighten Mike I like Mike. I Lick Mike Nick Berg Stalk dismissing. I'm Mike Bloomberg and I approve this message. Dogs in the door to voting apparently the only thing on his second. You're getting pummeled by ADS. For for Bloomberg Bernie and stare and even though star reviews spent much that was real by the way. That's that's not what I'm asking because I've not seen this saddened California. What is the point of this Ad? What do you think I think it was put together quickly as a joke because of the weird way he shook that Khalis head? If you saw that video thing about this key he was he was doing a meet and greet somewhere and someone had a dog. The dog comes up to him. He grabs the dog by the knows. The dog opens his amount so he just he basically grabs the top part of the dog's nose and head and shakes it like shaking. Someone's hand it. It's very disturbing wait wait you grabbed the dog's muzzle and shook the muzzle jet. But just the dog's mouth is open to just the top part of the muzzle. Put his hand in the dogs. Yes Ah the dog didn't clampdown sadly no otherwise you would have heard about it. He had to know that dog. Nobody in their right mind does that. He unless he's as a reptile. Well there's that dogs supporters. Maybe the dogs will vote for him. I don't know maybe I haven't Eyeso- for the potential end of the show. Okay is it the Bloomberg. Yeah okay. I'm I'm Mike Bloomberg and I approve. This message ended up show contender. I got another one later. Okay okay let me see what else we have going on in the twenty twenty Oh yeah you know Five three eight media the the a great pollsters who predicted who got one thing right twenty years ago and have never gotten anything right sense those guys pretty much Silverman or whatever his name is the Yes that Guy Silver Silver Grad silver. Something brass up. This it's the guy that everyone trusted when he said the Hillary will win ninety eight percent. Sure that's the guy Nate nate silver. There you go. So they interview Stacey. Abrams a quick quote. Stacey Abrams Bramsen Malone of five three media says do you think the country will elect elect a black woman president in the next twenty years Abrahams says yes. Question do do you think they'll elect you abrahams says. Yes that's my plan. I'm very pragmatic Lee. She admits she wants to be the president. Wow how does she gets her talking points from the far and that's what she says I don't know maybe she had living there. I think that this is not the way to do things. Well pretty bold. Yeah so that's kind of your own board with it because you think you're on your. I think she bought bought into it. You bought into the Stacey Abrams hide. She's I really do. I really don't know what to think anymore. I mean we clearly differ on the Biden stuff. So I want to see what happens. I I think we'll know very quickly actually almost getting to to to warm up to the idea which has been kermode at this has also been promoted in zero hedging elsewhere that Hillary is going to be the Vice President Biden. Well this was this was you laughed at my autumn's razor. Where did this literally literally what I suggested? It's even on animated no agenda. That must've pushed you over the edge. Well it got me. Th the weather logic was different than yours and it was and I started reading it and at something what fell on my head. The apple it fell on my head was that Oh wait a minute. There has to be song reason SAMBA. Rational some reason my original concept at Hilary's GonNa a jump in at the end is coming to fruition. This could be it okay. Not quite sure how different so no is still my idea. Only now you just wasn't but I'm just saying that I've now coming around to thinking OK. Supplies makes I can see see. I can see where it could happen. It's a charitable ticket. I'm as you to people with walkers. Running for president is pretty bad. uh-huh oh my goodness A. It's a great ship. The whole idea is great did you. I have a lip. I'm Dave Posting did you have any any combos with your Lib. Joe Friends after the no two witnesses and documents vote uh which essentially was a dour moment for many. No I didn't I I'm trying to keep trying to minimize my Approaching it's like getting the edge where there's a rift in demand the dimensional rift the way I'm seeing these things yes and there a and you. Don't I try not to approach. I'm still irked about the Putin's calling the shots beliefs. Oh it's also if it's only gotten worse I could be. I felt it's not healthy to get too close to You start to have it's like The Time Space Space Continuum you know pieces of your anatomy start to dissolve by dangerous. Here is A posting from my lips friend and it's titled Epitaph for America Uh posted on Friday. It looks like the impeachment trial will be over tonight. I've been trying to come to grips with how the REPUB 's confronted with such clear. Evidence of the corruption of the president could go along with it. I figured it had to be blackmail or a threat of force. We now have a Russian style government and this is a right of passage like the confirmation mation or Bar Mitzvah of the new autocracy in in Russia. The parliament has no power that seems to be the message bouncing around the twitter sphere. Congress isn't going to do anything about this. What comes next? It's new territory for Americans really for everyone. Because the last time a great power went down this path was before the Internet and it. It just goes on and on on on more well Instead of that let me and I have a couple of things first of all. I learned something completely a new after this vote and I'm very pleased with Chuck Schumer because not often that I learned something new from Chuck Schumer and I've met this guy. I ain't too once way back in the day and he's a creep but I learned a new word. I learned a new word. He came out after the vote of no witnesses. No documents documents heard this word to allow. They witnessed a document no witnesses no documents in an impeachment trial Perfectly I was like what perfidy perfectly. That's an oldest kind of an arcane. Cain word I kind of know what it means of course not. Disloyalty faithlessness falseness these are all synonyms of course. But it's an act or or an instance of disloyalty is the deceitful. So why not. Just say that. What's this perfidy? That was so odd toed. E-eh E-eh could be code you right so well. So there's a couple of couple of paths now that the m five M is taking it. I have a super cuts montage. We always I love doing those So the initial response from the M five. Am is if you didn't have a witness if you didn't have documents even though you have witness in his testimony and documents from the house impeachment then it's not an acquittal it may be an acquittal. But it's certainly not an exoneration. He little nappy acquitted. You cannot be acquitted. If you don't have trial the president's acquittal will be a meaningless this can be a real acquittal you cannot have a true acquittal if you've not had a fair trial cannot be true acquittal if there's not a fair trial acquitted but he really can't say he was exonerated getting a quick quick to get an exoneration. It's not an exoneration. We can't let it be seen as that always asterisk. It should be fair to the president who will not benefit from an acquittal or dismissal if the trial is not viewed as fair trial. And it's not a real exoneration in fact we we do have a not guilty. Finding it's going to be questioned in the absence of a fair trial. How can the American people conclude that justice was done? Yeah through the senators deliberate mode on trial or Shan. You're right the next step is convicted or acquitted. Mr President without a fair trial the value of your acquittal. Quibble will be zero zero very very little okay. So that's Shaping the message there from the M Five.

president Mike Bloomberg Mike Nick Berg Bloomberg Bernie Hillary Bloomberg Khalis Mike Chuck Schumer Stacey Abrams Bramsen Malone Stacey Abrams Mr President California Abrahams Nate nate Biden Abrams Vice President Stacey Russia
"nick berg" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"Still here at Berlinger. Chitral conference to Nineteen and I have great pleasure to have a small tract with Christiane Amer. WHO's one of the exhibiting exhibiting artists? Here Hi Christian Nice to have you thank you very much. What is opportunity? I saw your economic cycle which is exhibited visited in the venue of of the conference. Really Nice to know if this is work in progress or if it's if it's something that's already like it's it has been finished for you and you move on to other projects. No this project has always progress. I started dotted with one. I mean just to make it clear. It's it's the idea came you by Rean Econ Nick Berg suburbia as a Christian art history. The picture for God Jesus Mariah so I took this gods from the chronometer and made aikins out of this God allow Ben. I recognize that there's are archetypes of fear. Fear that these are kind of from the psychological view the human fear the person as a person Uh yes dreams and nightmares and from from outer space and south lease and then I started the first one and then the hope project you want bigger and bigger are so many yet demons and feared forces in the in the world that only to be he painted on this because I give them holiness I give these suppressed ideas holiness them back and we don't need to feel them we need to invite them so it's like a kind of a shadow work yes it is a lot of people come to me they say oh I dreamed of this or that or this or that fear and I don't know how to work with it how to integrate this fear into my life and then I yeah when when you have picture and the speech is peach of of holiness of then you have is a it's either for you to get in contact with Oh of course it's for human yeah this is it so it's kind of like if you have the examples in the Bible if you can name it you have Powell weight and if you can see it you can get into contact with it it is my our gates gates to the subconscious consciousness log gates to universe whatever you call it they are gates and when you enter the skates get in touch with this energy above this visual thing I don't I don't sign them I not because often I did the first one it was clear that it wasn't really me I was I want to channel it Maureen and I won I don't want to be it's it's not about me it's about the anti teeth okay that's about the energy that has to come through and uses your AH skills to manifest itself and I work every I is I always invoke the power the power behind I get in touch with with it get familiar with it and then I paint it. It's not like I don't read about and then of course I do as well but not just treating you know. I want to know what it is. It was something I wanted to us because Many many accords autism to have a practice tied to the artwork in some ways. And and so this is your.

Christiane Amer Berlinger Rean Econ Nick Berg Ben Powell Maureen
"nick berg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

10:32 min | 2 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Your deal les maxi actual audio that is was there in Syria that is the first audio of the actual raid yeah about Daddy's compound we have a radio the birdie and such a great job yeah I don't think so but again if you would David go on ABC we may take credit I see what you did there see that well I'm happy Monday morning everybody this is a celibate Tory Monday on the burning and said show because of what we just alluded to which is one of the most dangerous man in the world one of the biggest scumbags ever walked the face of the earth has been killed and an excellent job you by president trump and his administration in not getting that done and I got to tell you my favorite tweet of all and was a lot of coverage on this obviously the last couple of days since this one down comes from Robert o'neill if you don't know Robert o'neill is he's the man that killed Osama bin laden put a bullet right between his eyes many years ago and exactly seventeen hours ago Robert o'neal tweeted this a scumbag tell bin laden what's up so this is a yeah this is in the same spirit of course back Dadi the the leader of ISIS when he started as a ground guy that eventually took over became the go to guy and their leader it took awhile but trump in his administration found him they did get a little bit of a trip this summer when they arrested one about Daddy's wives and courier and they kind of intimated where Baghdadi may be and a couple of months later here we are back Daddy is dead and I'll say they so we'll get all the specifics of the political ramifications and who's giving trump quite it more than himself and who's not just look at this from a human standpoint for a second the name of the mission it was named after Kayla Mueller we don't know who she is he's an American girl who was captured by ISIS and this Baghdadi years ago as she made her way from Turkey to Syria to visit a hospital she was captured by Baghdadi eventually she was made to be one of Baghdad he's wives this fact sweaty disgusting piece of garbage Heidi's way with Kayla Mueller sexually time and time again six layers essentially yeah and eventually when he got tired of him you know we first but we're told that she was killed in a U. explosion in a building in Syria that's not true eventually one Baghdadi got tired of Kayla yet to be headed in two thousand fifteen and this mission was named after her so what do you James Foley god rest his soul Steven Sotloff even folks earlier people like you know Nick Berg and Richard Perle just from the human standpoint put the politics aside for a second for Kayla Mueller who this mission was named after this is a great job great job congratulations to president trump and his administration would take in this low life out let's listen to what trump said about her Kayla molar take a listen what he did to her was incredible it's a well known story and I'm not going to say it but you know that capturing captivity for a long period of time he kept her in his captivity his personal captivity she was a beautiful woman beautiful young woman helped people she was there to help people and he saw her and he thought she was beautiful and he brought her into captivity for a long period of time and then he killed her he was an animal and he was a gutless animal cutlass animal he was indeed he died just as the president said like a dog using three kids as human shields in a tunnel not just any kids his kids whether I'm I'm not sure if yeah they said they were his children have said that but either way use kids kids and hit even worse his own kids he will any use as wives of course two of them were shot and killed a prior to his ending in that tunnel his of a service dog was injured couple of soldiers injured in a minor way in and out of the hospital the same day and it is a good day for America very good day I will say the you talk about suites of the Washington post's axles tweeted this out that there's a I'm not making this up Abu Bakar al Baghdadi extremist extremist leader of the Islamic state dies at forty eight that's it that's it yeah won't listen to what the downed plane this whole thing you know and your own mind that I did watch Joe Biden on sixty minutes last night we'll get to that later before I watched Joe went to result in the clubhouse on the adult you talk about two different two sides of the spectrum from Joe Biden on sixty minutes so we'll house wives on Bravo but Joe Biden once said bin laden is dead and general motors is still alive the beat their chests and ran up and down the holes and yelled and screamed when in fact Osama bin laden was executed by Robert o'neill when Barack Obama was in power now they refused to give Donald Trump any credit here of course some out goes back to the fact that trump elected not to tell these folks including the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi what was going on here because he feared the league's which is great I thought that was great loose lips sink ships we're gonna blame it to where the tough tell symbol yet done on the hill I mean the somebody who's notorious for spreading leaks in people let's see here the house Intel committee is Adam Schefter you gonna tell that people are you supposed to it's a part of the protocol to tell the speaker of the house it might be but throw that out the window well he did with these people these people are garbage I mean you can't trust them no doubt about and the the truck went went when Obama did have what he did I will some of bin laden killed Donald J. trump tweeted this I want to personally congratulate president Obama and the men and women of the armed forces for a job well done yeah actually mention Obama by name do you think any of the candidates that the same not on that they're actually saying that this is not that big a deal that this guy you know because at one point during his all talk their Ciampi said this was bigger than bin laden I disagree with trump on that that's fine but the left is is making this out to be a big nothing burger which I don't know how you do that again again if you if you see how killing humans life ended and the poll lease on the stop loss and all these folks going back to jihadi John I don't know how you don't this is a very big deal I don't think the symbol of some of the presidential candidates are not the diminishing the event itself they just wouldn't use the president's name for example Joe Biden I congressional gradually no special forces Intel community in all our brave military professionals for delivering justice to the terrorists the world is better and safe without a let's Joe Biden Bernie Sanders doesn't even thank our military never my trunk that need neither trump nor the military Abu al that god was a murderer and terrorist responsible for terrible suffering and death the fight against ISIS would not be possible without the brave efforts of the Kurds and all the US dollars and that's it nothing about our troops or the president while classless creeps yeah he may want to read the transcript of how eight of our helicopters and dozens of our on the elite army personnel our guys were the ones who storm not compound and got the job done it was not the current two is the Americans no I mean I know that the that the courts may have helped in Turkey and I don't want well actually give a little shout out to Russia Syria Turkey Russia right Iraq which really has some people did not all my god he just I wanna be a port we needed the help of the people in the region so they didn't shoot down our helicopter yes by hello hello a stupid are you people it was a great day and the other than diminishing at hello trying again any any way they can they they they hate trump more than they like or care about the people who were victimized by this animal which is a guy I keep driving that point home that's what you need to pay attention to take to get about politics and Donald Trump Kayla Mueller for that beautiful American girl who the last three years of whole life live the most awful awful existence anymore being can live just for her folks just for hugs the via a B. skews me James Foley Steven Sotloff Europe of others and of the people who work a mode down on Halloween day a few years ago the guy still has been brought to trial no yes I mean something off and whose of of course his mom is still a very very very dear friend of mine you know that and Foley were were killed by Jeff hardy John who was killed when Obama was still in power thank god he really was the one who took advantage of cable he was the one he raped her time and time again and the header so just for her alone this is a victorious day but I you know you see that people still hate this present doesn't matter shows up at the Washington nationals World Series game last night and the chance the booze and the chance of lock him up were deafening actually felt badly for trump last night that was disgusting what are the ones who do you guys have you guys get that or do you by any chance let's listen to what it sounds like but I don't know learn shift statement killing Baghdadi a cynical attempt to meddle in the twenty twenty elections by bolstering president's approval ratings with the American people how disgusting is that well it does come with a good time I actually never really yes what would you be surprised not would be surprised if it does come at a good time if you want to talk about the political ramifications which I you know I don't want to talk about initially I think it's more about Caitlyn and killing a really really bad man that's not that's a win like that it's a big one that's a patriots won but if you do want to talk about political ramifications stuff come at a good time for presidential the problem with that anything good that's done for the country by a politician or include a specially president is good for his political prospects you can't separate the two that's just that's just a fact always has been on the Bernie in search we have a lot more coming up WABC this morning five forty here at seventy seven WABC right on the dot as a.

Syria ABC David
"nick berg" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Two night stay at an Indian resort does. choice of a ticket to see either bad bunny the Latin Grammys or Michael Jackson once we got five hundred dollars in gift cards so if you have a minute yeah before coming out tomorrow. in down away from work home phone you know where ever you are just going to hang out with. that is Nick Berg came down and try to. as well believe that is about ten times would make you forgive me he gave the ones up anyone up at one PM and I got that Drake Rick Ross money in the great thank you a little so with that truth hurts both coming up in this Mickey fifty Meg if you stick on your radio got blue phasing in the neighborhood of our being interviewed S. at nine twenty Big Boy. it was most. I was. plus with. more what they. best double. it was not. legendary. right. the level that across the. single moms work. stick around your radios me he is in the neighborhood blue face first are welcome back to the neighborhood I will face in the neighborhood now. I mean where should I really need to start. to get back to. I need to charge. a little mix we need a way is a big gap between us and the gang in the next life insurance they pay..

"nick berg" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:02 min | 3 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Intermission report. Here's Greg Llanelli. Well, the Tampa Bay Lightning explode a little bit there in the second period, as they lead the sense now three one it was one one at the end of one. But then mckell surrogate chefs scored his sixth year from kucherov and co weren't at seven forty eight to give Tampa Bay a two one lead. Then it was Brayden points in the slot. Getting his forty first from Gordon kucherov to make it three one that happened at thirteen forty three Nikita kucherov now three points on the night. He's got a hundred and twenty five on the year. What a season he is having shots on goal presented by Yegor. Meister the Fisher shot of the Tampa Bay Lightning. It's even fifteen fifteen keep in mind Ottawa was out shooting. Tampa Bay eleven five after one that was ten four Tampa Bay in the second period and here to talk about it a little bit more. If you wanna get a question, you can use the hashtag ask e and hit us up on Twitter at Eric Rowlinson at Eric underscore Earl and Senate at Greg led Elliot we will get those questions and comments on the air. The segment presented by the newly reimagined Tam. Marriott. Waterside stay and play. With exclusive offers for lightning ticket holders. Just steps from Emily arena. Boy, Nikita kucherov just continues to pile up points again three tonight's one hundred twenty five on the year. It's pretty incredible. Isn't it? Chess ridiculous. Hundred twenty five points. Most anybody score in the league since oh five oh six when show stored and had one hundred twenty five points gambling, ninety two assists that year for for San Jose. And you know, is he you're not gonna keep him down for long. You've got a couple of quiet games. You got that power play goal weight at the end of the third period. The other night against Washington you'd like to call those garbage goals in situations where guys are chasing titles. You know? So I think they kind of got him back feeling good about his game a little bit. And he had a couple of really really good place tonight really involved wants the puck on a stick. And when he wants the puck on a you. That's that's a dangerous guy that we see that we've seen really all your you think Tyler Johnson saying guys don't don't make this permanent this switching of the lines. Because you ought to look pretty good with Brandon point Hasni with coach. Yeah. You know, after the same reasons that we've discussed why I I've liked Johnny gore. When he plays with Steven stamkos. He gets it on the four check. He uses that speed. He puts pressure on the defense behind the goal line. He wins pox. And you know when you can win parks. You get them into the hands of guys like kucherov for when you're too Gordo's playing with stamkos. That's that's when you can really start to get your offense of guys involved so much, and yeah, I mean, you already Gordon who's playing fourth line role there for a while. I got the suspension continue to play online role. I get into border here tonight. And he's been deeply involved in in the goals. Scored any they had a lot of guys that give you position flexibility. Don't they gourd can plant a fourth line? He also complained with skilled players JT Miller the same way we've seen that with Alex. And you know, even some of the younger guys Joseph Ernie sorelle, even if he had to these are guys that can go up and down the lineup. It's it's the strength of the depth that this team has is that anybody can play with anybody in anybody can play any role. Yes, to you know, brining Blom has the line calls JT Miller a Swiss army knife. Well, you got a lot of guys like gourds one of them. Caloric is one of them. We see our top line rolls before not as much this year. But he has done it in the past. So you've got a lot of these guys. I can play whatever's asked of them they can go out and do they wanna be physical? All JT Miller can be a physical player you want to be a top line guy. He can be a top line guide as well. And I it's that's what makes matchups against this team so difficult because if you think you can match up against them while they can just kind of change things around a little bit that that totally mixes up what other teams will try and do against them already. Let's get some questions from our audience again use the hashtag ask ee at Greg Llanelli at Eric underscore Earl sin. Gary says everyone's a little banged up. This time of year with the players that are out right now. Do you think it's more resting? Players than actual injuries. Yeah. That's really hard to say. Because we're not sure the nature of the injuries. All we get is the vague upper or lower body, we do know that this team does like to air side of caution with players, especially right now where the season was but knocking to play for in terms of the stain is or anything like that. So I don't know if it's necessarily that because they're just being cautious with them you'd like to think that's the case. Especially after hearing John Cooper say earlier today that they're hopeful that everybody would be back for the start of game. One of that clues Dan Girardi who we haven't seen much here on the last little while as he's been banged up. So I don't know if it's rest if it's if it's more that you'd like to think so either way hopefully, everybody's going to be back and ready to go next Wednesday. Conor Kenna says who do you think the lightning once in the first round if they could choose? If they choose they probably choose the Ottawa Senators. Not a knock on that. Right. That's always a tough question to answer. Because you kind of get yourself in trouble a little bit. I I can tell you who they probably wouldn't wanna play of those teams that are down there fighting for wildcard spot and to give you could avoid Columbus. I think that's a better situation for you. Because Columbus can play heavy game. They're starting to find their game a little bit Sergei Brodsky's playing really well if he's going to play well in the postseason back you create problems for another team, whoever they add the facing. So I don't know if there's necessarily a better match up, but I didn't Columbus is the more difficult match up. Tell you what. Montreal huge game smart nightie. They are right there with Carolina Carolina faltering just a bit. And now they find themselves in a situation where they they just need to win the rest of their games to get in. Yeah. It's gonna be fun little situation to watch here down the stretch to see who's going to be able to seize control of it. You know? And and I and I don't wonder if this will enter into Tampa Bay's mindset for tomorrow night's game against Montreal. Because I remember back in two thousand eleven the final game of the regular season. The lightning had nothing to play for. They were locked into that five seed against the Pittsburgh Penguins. Carolina was the last opponent that season. All Carolina had to do was win and they'd be in and the lightning with their opponent. And I remember keeping Shay saying that when you have a chance to prevent the team from getting the playoffs knock him out because you don't want to come back to bite you. And I wonder if that's on Tampa Bay's mind as they look towards tomorrow night's game because that's a massive game for Montreal to try and stay keep pace with Carolina and Columbus here. So that'll be very interesting to kind of watch tomorrow. And we have the revenge game tomorrow as good friend. Nick Berg, always says right with Jonathan Drouin and Mekelle circuit chef which is always fun. And actually Nick had a question. He uses the hashtag Ascii because he listens. Why wasn't he? What would revenge tastes like if it were in food form? This is right up. Your alley. All this is perfect. This is perfect. Well, find the right recipe for what any NHL revenge taste like it, would it would definitely have a little spice to it. Some throw some cinnamon in there. They have a little bite to it. There's gotta be some sweetness to it. So let's throw in a little bit of chocolate. So you get the chocolate you've got the the cinnamon to kind of make it spicy. And why don't we throw in a couple of of shoes while they kind of make it just give it that eloquent taste? So you've got spicy sweet. And eloquence let's go with cinnamon chocolate and cashews my thought about this a really long time. Didn't you that's scaring me? Hey, pops up on my screen, and and we know we're going to address it. I gotta come up with a really good answer. I hope that was one the tremendous. That was the best answer all night. My goodness hurt. We're gonna we're gonna stop there. Now, we've got the last call after the game exclusively on lightning power place. Make sure people who are listening right now if you want to get some questions and after the game you can and I'll talk about this game and the rest of the season coming up for about twenty five thirty minutes, and we look forward to doing that. He. Great looks work. We'll talk to you a bit. Yeah. Sounds good. All right. Let's take a look at the road ahead when we return and the second intermission scores right here on leading radio nothing. Crates up the excitement.

Tampa Bay Tampa Bay Lightning JT Miller Columbus Nikita kucherov Greg Llanelli Gordon kucherov Ottawa Montreal Steven stamkos Carolina Brayden Twitter Nick Berg Tyler Johnson Fisher San Jose Conor Kenna Eric underscore Earl
"nick berg" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

14:42 min | 3 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"He was personally charismatic brooding personality that come out of five years in prison with that. But he was a very good leader. And what he found is his power is a leader became. Came from being more pious more focus more committed when he was imprisoned. He tried to remove these tattoos you head with bleach. And when that wouldn't work he had a razor blade smuggled in any cut a tattoo off every other prisoner saw that. And you think about it when you're around somebody whose more committed than you are there's this sort of grudging admiration. Wow. I wouldn't have done that. But he will. And so he was able to lead Qaeda in Iraq, thousands of Iraqis and other people from around the region came to Iraq and fought for Al Qaeda in Iraq when they didn't share his extreme beliefs. But because he was so committed so focused they came and they became part of that. And then when he was killed when we killed him in June of two thousand six we just about, you know, gotten over the hump and by two thousand eight we defeated Al Qaeda in Iraq. But today's the godfather of ISIS, they don't Geis's never talks about Osama bin Laden, they talk about here. And it's interesting you used the. Grudging admiration. It sounds like even though he was your enemy. You have more than grudging admiration for his these qualities that you admire. Yeah. It's funny at the very beginning of my fight against him in early two thousand four he beheaded a young American Nick Berg and filmed it, and we captured the video before it was posted online, but they brought it into our headquarters outside of Baghdad where I was and then put this laptop in front of me. And they said, sir, you gotta see this, and I stood there and they play their six guys standard and black outfits and black hoods and a young American seated in front of him in an orange jumpsuit, and they talk a while. Then the Senator guy standing behind Nick Burr pulls out a large butcher knife, grabs. Berg pushes him on the side and saw his head off on a video. And then they post that. I remember watching it my fists Lynch I had to consciously unclenched. I remember swearing to myself. We're going to kill him. We are going to kill him. And of course, the command got the same kind of passion, and we stayed in the fight against for two and a half years. And he was really good at what he did. I mean, he. Killed bunch of our people we kill a bunch of his he killed thousands of Iraqis, but he was just extraordinarily powerful in creating a movement, then creating a civil war in Iraq. And to be honest will before we killed him. I had started with this idea that he's an inhuman psychopath. We're just gonna wipe him out like vermin and before long. I started saying, wait a minute. He's a really effective opponent. He's charismatic. He's committed. He believes in this cause and a good leader. And a good leader the name on one of the names in your book surprised me not for his accomplishments, but for the on the subject of leadership, and that's Elbert Einstein. Yeah. You think about armored hybrid Einstein's a leader? What did he ever lead in the answer's nothing? He was never in charge of anything was never elected appointed. Or or anything like that? We pair them with Leonard Bernstein who only ever lead the New York New York Philharmonic. But I'm Stein in nineteen twenty three was the most famous person in the world that was they did a poll, and he's it and you see now, wait a minute. Here's a pattern. And clerk who writes in one thousand nine five these five amazing papers one of which pushes the special theory of relativity and changes physics forever. And really after doing the general theory of relativity in one thousand nine hundred fifteen and then completing at nine thousand nine hundred and he doesn't really contribute that much physics directly. After that. In fact, he's not the ingen of thought after that. But what he is. He's the engine of connecting people. He makes physics connected. He helps make physics connected in Europe. And in the world, he brings young physicists. And he writes thirty thousand letters encouraging helping other physicists to do things. He creates the sense that physics is not only possible. But it's approachable, you know, he looks like your ankle. He's got the big mustache and the hair and the rumpled suit. So now, you're not frightened about genius now. Genius seems okay. We all know, we're not geniuses. But we're not frightened by. Him as a genius because he has a man or about in that says come on in. We'll make this believable. He he then serves as a leader in a selfless way. You know? There's a lot of stories about him. Write a letter to president Roosevelt suggesting that we build the atomic bomb before the Germans do. He did sign. The letter did write it though, other physicists wrote it, and they went to Albert Einstein because he had such stature they said if you sign it, the president will read it, and so he did he was later offered the presidency of the new state of Israel. And they were they were frankly, a little worried he take it because they had no idea what happened. Pretty quite honestly says I don't I don't have to be president visual. But he became a symbol and a leader in a different kind of way. Which means you don't have to be elected or appointed or have a rancor badge before we change the subject to other matters. I'm gonna do one more from your book, which is someone. I think that everyone in this room would agree. Absolutely. Was a leader. And would love to know what more you learned about him. And that's Martin Luther King junior. Yeah. That's that's actually in the thirteen leaders we cover. He is the one that I came away admiring the most. And the problem is I grew up my family's from the south. My mother was very connected to the civil rights movement, a great believer. So I sorta reflexively believe in it. And of course, I remember when Dr king on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in August, nineteen sixty three gave the I have a dream speech. And so you we wanna think of Dr king is a great guy and this incredible eloquent spokesperson. But the reality is when he got on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial day. He was the eleventh speaker he'd written a speech until four in the morning. He got up that afternoon. He started speaking he spoke for eleven minutes. And then he wasn't connected with the crab may Jackson. The gospel singer were standing behind him. And she goes Martin tell them about the dream. He shifts from the text and goes to this familiar riff that he had used before any went to I have a dream. And that's what we remember. He connected with the crowd two hundred and fifty thousand people on a warm summer afternoon. He connected with the crowd in a way that's now history. But even that's not that impressive to me. Instead what's impressive to me. And fifty five is a twenty six year old pastor from Alabama. I'm sorry from Atlanta. He goes to Montgomery, Alabama becomes passed over new church, and they decide to try to desegregate public transportation in Montgomery, and it really had been. Precipitated one by they've been thinking about this for a while. But a seamstress name, Rosa Parks had come out of our store right on main street there in Montgomery she'd sat at a at a bus on a bus bench. I sat there this summer. I went and sat on that bench. The bus came. She got on. She sat down the bus started moving. Then a white patron got on a later thing and asked told her to move to the back of the bus to take her seat, which was which was the regulation and she refused. So they used her as a symbol and the Montgomery African American community started to coalesce around. Okay. We're gonna try to desegregate by policy public transportation, and they get together to do this. But not quite sure how to do it. They're not even quite sure what they want at first. They just want more black bus drivers and more equitable treatment. They didn't know exactly what the policy should be. But they elected this young twenty six year old pastor. To be their leader. And it's sorta not sure why they did that because he wasn't the natural person. They had civil rights leaders in Montgomery already established ones. But they asked him to do it for the next three hundred eighty two days. The African American population of Montgomery walk to work. They carpool to work. They did whatever they could avoid using the buses which put pressure on the public transportation fund revenues and also on businesses, and they knew it would. And the thing that was brilliant about it is every citizen African American citizen had to recommit every day. Because if they if after a week, they got tired of it, they could just get on the bus pay their money and ride and the whole thing would collapse, but they recommitted every day. And then they met at night in churches, and this young pastor lead this for three hundred and eighty two days, and then they want you say, okay, we saw problem solved. No. This was one tiny part of segregation laws in the south instead for the next twelve years. Dr king leads. This disparate group of civil rights groups who had big personalities different approaches to it someone to be nonviolent summer to be violent. He had to corral this very different group of people many of whom had been at it. For decades had to go against stiff opposition from the the white dominated south with tepid political support at the national level, and he navigated this not with this zealot approach that Robespierres Cobb we would've used but instead with his deft hand, sometimes he pushed hard sometimes he retreated at Selma. He walked across the bridge. And then by prearrangement with the authorities. They they said a prayer and turned around even though his followers were livid again in for it. And so it was a level of leadership that was flexible adaptable. But never wavered from the overall goal, and he did that for thirteen total years until he's murdered in nineteen sixty eight that was masterful. He died before he was h forty and yet he showed the level leadership that that I almost never have seen around before. And yet we we wanna think of him because of the the righteousness of his 'cause he's actually the most effective manager leader that jumps out in the book as well. And I didn't expect that I'm going to pull you out of the history books and give you an opportunity to talk about some of the leaders that you've interacted with I'm gonna I'm gonna start with the the most obvious one which is President Obama. Yeah. Talk about him as a as a leader. And briefly remind the audience that you have a you have a you have a a very, personal and complicated. Perspective on that question. Sure. In in. In June, two thousand ten I was commanding an F ghanistan and article came out and Rolling Stone magazine v commander of allied troops. In saying I'm sorry to help help you out there. Correct. Yeah. -bility biting your way of storytelling here. But go ahead and. I've been there year, and it was a high profile job because at Afghanistan was controversial at the point. And you know, I was pushing the bounds of things and an article came out and Rolling Stone. And when it came out, we thought it was going to be a puff piece. You know, because we're trying to do a lot of media to get support for the war and it came out of two in the morning, Afghan time and the title was runaway general. Soon as I saw I said, this is not good. Nor was it. Good. But it it portrayed. My team is being kind of locker room antics and disloyal or dismissive, vice president Biden, particularly and others. And so within twenty four hours I'd flown back to the United States and offered by resignation to President Obama, and he'd accepted it. He was gentle meant to me my entire time working for him and that day and since when we've interacted, but that's awkward. You know, I've been in the army thirty eight years in Bumi, accept my resignation. And now, I'm on the ticker tape of every TV show for the next until I got a new story about disgraced general, and so two that that hurt dealing with his administration was really interesting because I've been in Iraq for five years, and then I'd come back, and I was in a joint staff during the election and transition. And what had happened was President Bush's administration left President Obama's came in. And they wanted to be anything. But like the Bush administration and the thing that jumped out at me as President Obama is a thoughtful analytical person he listens. He he takes in information. He is willing to sort of withhold his opinion until all of them come out and from that standpoint, it's it's really powerful. But I become convinced we shouldn't elect a president anymore. We should elect a team because that's what you get the president has a role. But the reality is the White House and the administration is a team. And when the team comes in particularly in a new administration, you think of them as this team, and they are not that they come in some people were on the campaign and they've got tight relations at some. Negative relations. Some people are brought in from other places, and they're scar tissue, huge egos. Differing agendas, all these things. So when you're trying to deal with this administration, you're dealing with this thing that's constantly changing and coming from different directions. I would get calls in Afghanistan. At first I was concerned that they'd say the White House is angry with you. And at first you go out, and then I I'd start saying, okay? What part is it the window? If it is President Obama, you have my attention of it's not I don't care, and that was the big takeaway from me that the genius of a great president is to build a team that works, but it's so easy not to and in today's world where we put the spotlight on an individual, and they can be brave and strong and charismatic and all like that. But they can have a team impersonal bama's team for the entire time. I worked there was challenging J. They weren't trying to do bad for America. But they were challenging challenging I believe in Washington DC means something like a pain in the rear end. Yeah. That's exactly right. And they were and I also dealt with the previous administration prison, George W Bush's. But I dealt with them primarily in the second term. So I was seen a team after they shaken out a.

Iraq President Obama president Montgomery Dr king President Bush Nick Berg Afghanistan White House Osama bin Laden president Roosevelt Alabama Lincoln Memorial Baghdad Qaeda Geis Montgomery African American co Leonard Bernstein
"nick berg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

14:35 min | 3 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"He was personally charismatic brooding personality that come out of five years in this prison with that. But he was a very good leader. And what he found is his power is a leader became came from being more pious more focus more committed when he was in prison. He tried to remove these tattoos e head with bleach. And when that wouldn't. He had a razor blade smuggled in he cut a tattoo off every other prisoner saw that. And you think about it when you're around somebody whose more committed than you are there's this sort of grudging admiration. Wow. I wouldn't have done that. But he will. And so he was able to lead al-qaeda in Iraq, thousands of Iraqis and other people from around the region came to Iraq and fought fraud Qaeda in Iraq when they didn't share his extreme beliefs. But because he was so committed so focused they came and they became part of that. And then when he was killed when we killed him in June of two thousand six we just about got over the hump and by two thousand eight we defeated Al Qaeda in Iraq. But today's the godfather of ISIS, they don't dice says never talks about Osama bin Laden, they talk about here. And it's interesting you used the expression grudging admiration. It sounds like even though he was your enemy. You have more than grudging admiration for his these qualities that you admire. Yeah. You know, it's funny at the very beginning of my fight against him in early two thousand four he beheaded a young American Nick Berg, and he filmed it, and we captured the video before it was posted online, but they brought it into our headquarters outside of Baghdad where I was and then put this laptop in front of me, and they said, so you've got to see this, and I stood there and they play their six guy standard in black outfits and black hoods and a young American seated in front of him in an orange jumpsuit, and they talk a while. Then the center guy standing behind. Nick Berg, pulls out a large butcher knife, grabs. Berg pushes them on the side and saw his head off on a video. And then they post that. I remember watching it my fists clench I had to consciously unclench him. And I remember swearing to myself. We're going to kill him. We're gonna kill him. And of course, the command got the same kind of passion, and we stayed in the fight against it for two and a half years. And he was really good at what he did. I mean, he. She killed a bunch of our people we kill a bunch of his he killed thousands of his and Iraqis, but he was just extraordinarily powerful in creating a movement, then creating a civil war in Iraq. And to be honest will before we killed him. I had started with this idea that he's an inhuman psychopath. We're just gonna wipe him out like vermin and before long. I started saying, wait a minute. He's a really effective opponent. He's charismatic. He's committed. He believes in his cause and a good leader. And a good leader the name on one of the names on your books. Surprised me not for his accomplishments before the on the subject of leadership, and that's our nine Stein. Yeah. You think about armored? I Albert Einstein's leader. What did he ever lead in the answer's nothing? He was never in charge of anything was never elected appointed. Or or anything like that? We pair them with Leonard Bernstein who only ever lead the New York New York Philharmonic, but Einstein in one thousand nine hundred eighty three was the most famous person in the world that was they did a poll, and he's it and you say now, wait a minute. Here's a patent clerk. Mark who writes in nineteen o five these five amazing papers one of which pushes the special theory of relativity and changes physics forever. And really after doing the general theory of relativity in one thousand nine hundred fifteen and then completing at nine thousand nine hundred and he doesn't really contribute that much to physics directly after that. In fact, he's not the engine of thought after that. But what he is. He's the engine of connecting people. He makes physics connected. He helps make physics connected in Europe. And in the world, he brings young physicists. And he writes thirty thousand letters encouraging helping other physicists to do things. He creates this sense. That physics is not only possible. But it's approachable. You looks like your Onckelinks got the big mustache and the hair and the rumpled suit. So now, you're not frightened about genius now. Genius seems okay. We all know, we're not geniuses. But we're not frightened by him as a genius because. He has a man or about in that says come on in. We'll make this believable. He then serves as a leader in a selfless way. You know? There's a lot of stories about him. Right. The letter to president Roosevelt suggesting that we build the atomic bomb before the Germans do. He did sign the letter. He did write it though, other physicists wrote it, and they went to Albert Einstein because he had such stature they said if you sign it, the president will read it, and so he did he was later offered the presidency of new state of Israel. And they were they were frankly, a little worried he'd take it because they had no idea what happened. But he quite honestly says I don't I don't know how to be president visual, but he became a symbol and a leader in a different kind of way. Which means you don't have to be elected or appointed or have a rancor badge before we change the subject to other matters. I'm gonna do one more from your book, which is someone. I think that everyone in this room would agree. Absolutely. Was a leader. And would love to know what more you learned about him. And that's Martin Luther King junior. Yeah. That's that's actually in the thirteen leaders we cover. He is the one that I came away admiring the most. And the problem is I grew up my family's from the south. My mother was very connected to the civil rights movement, a great believer. So I sort of reflexively believe in it. And of course, I remember when Dr king on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in August of nineteen sixty three gave the I have a dream speech. And so you we wanna think of Dr king is a great guy and this incredible eloquent spokesperson, but. Reality is when he got on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial day. He was the eleventh speaker he'd written a speech until four in the morning. He got up that afternoon. He started speaking he spoke for eleven minutes. And then he wasn't connected with the crowd. Mayor jackson. The gospel singer were standing behind him. And she goes Martin tell them about the dream. He shifts from the texting goes to this familiar riff that he had used before any went to I have a dream. And that's what we remember. He connected with the crowd two hundred and fifty thousand people on a warm summer afternoon. He connected with the crowd in a way that's now history. But even that's not that impressive to me. Instead what's impressive to me is a nineteen fifty five is a twenty six year old pastor from Alabama. I'm sorry from Atlanta. He goes to Montgomery, Alabama becomes passed over new church, and they decide to try to desegregate public transportation in Montgomery, and it really had been precipitated one by the. He'd been thinking about this for a while. But a seamstress name, Rosa Parks had come out of our store right on main street there in Montgomery she'd sat at a at a bus on a bus bench. I sat there this summer. I went and sat on that bench. The bus came. She got on. She sat down the bus started moving then a white patron got on and later thing and asked told her to move to the back of the bus to take her seat, which was which was the regulation and she refused. So they used her as a symbol and the Montgomery African American community started to coalesce around. Okay. We're going to try to desegregate by policy public transportation, and they get together to do this. But not quite sure how to do it. They're not even quite sure what they want at first. They just want more black bus drivers and more equitable treatment. They didn't know exactly what the policy should be. But they elected this young twenty six year old pastor to be their leader. And it's not. Sure why they did that because he wasn't the natural person. They had civil rights leaders in Montgomery already established ones. But they asked him to do it for the next three hundred and eighty two days, the African American population of Montgomery walked to work. They carpool to work. They did whatever they could avoid using the buses which put pressure on the public transportation fund revenues and also on businesses, and they knew it would. And the thing that was brilliant about it is every citizen African American citizen had to recommit every day. Because if they if after a week, they get tired of it. They could just get on the bus pay their money and ride and the whole thing would have collapsed, but they recommitted every day. And then they met at night in churches, and this young pastor lead this for three hundred and eighty two days, and then they want you say, okay, we saw problem solved. No. This was one tiny part of segregation laws in the south instead for the next twelve years. Dr king leads this disparate group of civil rights. Groups who had big personalities different approaches to it someone to be nonviolent somewhere to be violent. He had to corral this very different group of people many of whom had been at it. For decades had to go against stiff opposition from the the white dominated south with tepid political support at the national level, and he navigated this not with this zealot approach that Robespierres are we would've used but instead with his deft hand, sometimes he pushed hard sometimes he retreated at Selma. He walked across the bridge. And then by prearrangement with the authorities. They they said a prayer and turned around, even though his followers were livid against him for it. So it was a level of leadership that was flexible adaptable. But never wavered from the overall goal, and he did that for thirteen total years until he's murdered in nine hundred sixty eight that was masterful. He. Died before he was age forty and yet he showed the level leadership that that I almost never have seen around before. And yet we we wanna think of him because of the the righteousness of his 'cause he's actually the most effective manager leader that jumps out in the book as well. And I didn't expect that I'm going to pull you out of the history books Leon and give you an opportunity to talk about some of the leaders that you've interacted with. I'm gonna I'm gonna start with the most obvious one which is President Obama. Yeah. Talk about him as a as a leader. And briefly remind the audience that you have a, you know, you have a you have a a very, personal and complicated. Perspective on that question. Sure. In in June, two thousand ten I was commanding in Afghanistan and article came out and Rolling Stone magazine. We're the commander of allied troops in saying I'm sorry to help help you out there. Correct. Yeah. I way. Storytelling. But go ahead. And I've been there a year, and it was a high profile job because at Afghanistan was controversial at the point. And you know, I was pushing the bounds of things and an article came out and Rolling Stone. And when it came out, we thought it was going to be a puff piece. You know, because we're trying to do a lot of media to get support for the war and it came out at two in the morning, Afghan time and the title was runaway general. Soon as I saw the tall. I said this is not good. Nor was it. Good. But it it portrayed. My team is being kind of locker room, Mannix, and disloyal or dismissive, a vice president Biden, particularly and others. And so within twenty four hours I'd flown back to the United States and offered by resignation to President Obama, and he'd accepted it. He was a gentle meant to me my entire time working for him and that day and since when we've interacted, but that's awkward. You know, I've been in the army thirty eight years in Bumi, accept my resignation. And now, I'm on the ticker tape of every TV show for the next until I got a new story about disgraced general, and so two that that hurt dealing with his administration was really interesting because I've been in Iraq for five years, and then I'd come back, and I was in the joint staff during the election and transition. And what had happened was President Bush's administration left President Obama's came in. And they wanted to be anything. But like the Bush administration and the thing that jumped out at me as President Obama is a thoughtful analytical person he listens. He he takes in information. He is willing to sort of withhold his opinion until all of them come out and from that standpoint, it's it's really powerful. But I become convinced we shouldn't elect a president anymore. We should elect a team because that's what you get the president has a role. But the reality is the White House and the administration is a team. And when the team comes in particularly in a new administration, you think of them as this team, and they are not that they come in some people were on the campaign and they've got tight relations at some have. Negative relations. Some people are brought in from other places, and they're scar tissue, huge egos. Differing agendas, all these things. So when you're trying to deal with this administration, you're dealing with this thing that's constantly changing and coming from different directions. I would get calls in Afghanistan. And at first I was concerned, they'd say the White House is angry with you. And at first you go out, and then I I'd start saying, okay? What part is it the window? If it is President Obama, you have my attention of it's not I don't care, and that was the big takeaway from me that the genius of a great president is to build a team that works, but it's so easy not to and in today's world where we put the spotlight on an individual, and they can be brave and strong and charismatic and all like that. But they can have a team in President Obama's team for the entire time. I worked there was challenging they weren't. They weren't trying to do bad for America. But they were challenging challenging I believe in Washington DC means something like a pain in the rear end. Yeah. That's exactly right. And they were and I had also dealt with the previous administration prison, George W Bush's. But I dealt with them primarily in the second term. So I was she a team after they shaken out a lot of interesting..

President Obama Iraq president Montgomery Nick Berg Dr king President Bush Afghanistan Albert Einstein Osama bin Laden White House president Roosevelt Alabama al-qaeda Lincoln Memorial Baghdad Europe Leonard Bernstein
"nick berg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:35 min | 3 years ago

"nick berg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He was personally charismatic brooding personality that come out of five years in this prison with that. But he was a very good leader. And what he found is his power is a leader became came from being more pious more focus more committed when he was in prison. He tried to remove these tattoos e head with bleach. And when that wouldn't work he had a raise your blade smuggled in any cut a tattoo off every other prisoners saw that and you think about it when you're around somebody whose more committed than you are there's just sort of grudging admiration. Wow. I wouldn't have done that. But he will. And so he was able to lead Al Qaeda in Iraq, thousands of Iraqis and other people from around the region came to Iraq and fought fraud Qaeda in Iraq when they didn't share his extreme beliefs. But because he was so committed so focused they came and they became part of that. And then when? He was killed when we killed him in June of two thousand six we just about gotten over the hump and by two thousand eight we defeated Al Qaeda and Iraq. But today's the godfather of ISIS. They don't die says never talks about Osama bin Laden, they talk about here. And it's interesting. You used the expression grudging admiration. It sounds like even though he was your enemy. You have more than grudging admiration for his these qualities that you admire. Yeah. It's funny at the very beginning of my fight against him in early two thousand four he beheaded a young American Nick Berg, and he filmed it, and we captured video before it was posted online, but they brought it into our headquarters outside of Baghdad where I was and then put this laptop in front of me. And they said, sir, you got to see this, and I stood there and they play their six guys standing and black outfits and black hoods and a young American seated in front of him in an orange jumpsuit, and they talk a while. Then the center guy standing behind. Nick Berg, pulls out a large butcher knife, grabs. Berg pushes him on the side and saw his head off on a video. And then they post that. I remember watching it my fists clench I had to consciously unclench him. And I remember swearing to myself. We're going to kill him. We're gonna kill him. And of course, the command got the same kind of passion, and we stayed in the fight against it for two and a half years, and he was really good at what he did. I mean he killed. A bunch of our people we kill bunch of his he killed thousands of Iraqis, but he was just extraordinarily powerful in creating a movement in creating a civil war in Iraq. And to be honest will before we killed him. I had started with this idea that he's an inhuman psychopath. We're just gonna wipe him out like vermin and before long. I started saying, wait a minute. He's a really effective opponent. He's charismatic. He's committed. He believes in this cause and a good leader. And a good leader the name on one of the names in your book surprised me not for his accomplishments before the on the subject of leadership, and that's Elbert Einstein. Yeah. You think about armored Aberdeen stanza leader? What did he ever lied in the answer's nothing? He was never in charge of anything was never elected appointed. Or or anything like that? We pair them with Leonard Bernstein who only ever lead the New York New York Philharmonic, but Einstein in one thousand nine hundred three was the most famous person in the world that was they did a poll, and he's it and you say now, wait a minute. Here's a patent clerk who writes in nineteen o five these five amazing papers one of which pushes the special theory of relativity and changes physics forever. And really after doing the general theory of relativity in one thousand nine hundred fifteen and then completing at nine hundred nineteen he doesn't really contribute that much to physics directly after that. In fact, he's not the engine of fought after that. But what he is. He's the engine of connecting people. He makes physics connected. He helps make physics connected in Europe. And in the world, he brings young physicists. And he writes, thirty thousand letters encouraging helping. Other physicists to do things. He creates this sense. That physics is not only possible. But it's approachable, you know, he looks like your uncle he's got the big mustache and the hair and the rumpled suit. So now, you're not frightened about genius now. Genius seems okay. We all know, we're not geniuses. But we're not frightened by him as a genius because he has a or about in that says come on in. We'll make this believable. He he then serves as a leader in a selfless way. You know? There's a lot of stories about him. Write a letter to president Roosevelt suggesting that we build the atomic bomb before the Germans do. He did sign. The letter didn't write it though, other physicists wrote it, and they went to Albert Einstein because he had such stature they said if you sign it the president will read it. And so we did he was later offered the presidency of the new state of Israel. And they were they were frankly, a little worried you take it because they had no idea what happened. But he quite honestly says, I don't know. I don't have to be present of visual. But he became a symbol in a leader. In a different kind of way. Which means you don't have to be elected or appointed or have a rancor badge before we change the subject to other matters. I'm going to do one more from your book, which is someone. I think that everyone in this room would agree. Absolutely. Was the leader. And would love to know what more you learned about him. And that's Martin Luther King junior. Yeah. That's that's actually in the thirteen leaders we cover. He is the one that I came away admiring the most. And the problem is I grew up my family's from the south. My mother was very connected to the civil rights movement, a great believer. So I sorta reflexively believe in it. And of course, I remember when Dr king on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in August, nineteen sixty three gave the I have a dream speech. And so you we wanna think of Dr king is a great guy and this incredible eloquent spokesperson, but the. Reality is when he got on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that day. He was the eleventh speaker he'd written a speech until four in the morning. He got up that afternoon. He started speaking he spoke for eleven minutes. And then he wasn't connected with the crowd may Jackson. The gospel singer were standing behind him. And she goes Martin tell them about the dream. He shifts from the texting goes to this familiar riff that he had used before any went. I have a dream. And that's what we remember. He connected with the crowd two hundred and fifty thousand people on a warm summer afternoon. He connected with the crowd in a way that's now history. But even that's not that impressive to me. Instead what's impressive to me is in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a twenty six year old pastor from Alabama. I'm sorry from Atlanta. He goes to Montgomery, Alabama becomes passed over new church, and they decide to try to desegregate public transportation in Montgomery, and it really had been precipitated one by. They'd been thinking about this for a while. But a seamstress named Rosa Parks had come out of our store right on main street there in Montgomery she'd sat at a at a bus on a bus bench. I sat there this summer. I went and sat on that bench. The bus came. She got on. She sat down the bus started moving. Then a white patron got on a later thing and asked told her to move to the back of the bus to take her seat, which was which was the regulation and she refused. So they used her as a symbol and the Montgomery African American community started to coalesce around. Okay. We're gonna try to desegregate by policy public transportation, and they get together to do this. But they're not quite sure how to do it. They're not even quite sure what they want at first. They just want more black bus drivers and more equitable treatment. They didn't know exactly what the policy should be. But they elected this young twenty six year old pastor to be their leader. And it's. It's sort of not sure why they did that because he wasn't the natural person. They had civil rights leaders in Montgomery already established ones. But they asked him to do it for the next three hundred and eighty two days, the African American population of Montgomery walk to work. They carpool to work. They did whatever they could avoid using the buses which put pressure on the public transportation fund revenues and also on businesses, and they knew it would. And the thing that was brilliant about it is every citizen African American citizen had to recommit every day. Because if they if after a week, they got tired of it. They could just get on the bus pay their money and ride and the whole thing would have collapsed, but they recommitted every day. And then they met at night in churches, and this young pastor lead this for three hundred and eighty two days, and then they want you say, okay, we saw problem solved. No. This was one tiny part of segregation laws in the south instead for the next twelve years. Dr king leads this disparate group of. Civil rights groups who had big personalities different approaches to it someone to be nonviolent summer to be violent. He had to corral this very different group of people many of whom had been at it. For decades had to go against stiff opposition from the the white dominated south with tepid political support at the national level, and he navigated this not with this zealot approach that Robespierres we would've used but instead with his deft hand, sometimes he pushed hard sometimes he retreated at Selma. He walked across the bridge. And then by prearrangement with the authorities. They they said a prayer and turned around, even though his followers were livid against it for it. And so it was a level of leadership that was flexible adaptable. But never wavered from the overall goal. And he did that for thirteen years until he's murdered a nine hundred sixty eight that was masterful. He died before he was age forty and yet he showed the level leadership that that I almost never have seen around before. And yet we we wanna think of him because of the the righteousness of his 'cause he's actually the most effective manager leader that jumps out in the book as well. And I didn't expect that I'm going to pull you out of the history books and give you an opportunity to talk about some of the leaders that you've interacted with. I'm going to start with the most obvious one which is President Obama. Yeah. Talk about him as a as a leader. And briefly remind the audience that you have a, you know, you have a you have a a very, personal and complicated. Perspective on that question. Sure. In in June of two thousand ten I was commanding in Afghanistan and article came out and Rolling Stone magazine for the commander of allied troops in and I'm sorry to help help you out there. Correct. Yeah. I on your way of storytelling here, but go ahead and. I've been there a year, and it was a high profile job because at Afghanistan was controversial at the point. I was pushing the bounds of things and an article came out and Rolling Stone. And when it came out, we thought it was going to be a puff piece. You know, because we're trying to do a lot of media to get support for the war and it came out of two in the morning, Afghan time and the title was runaway general. Soon as I saw I said, this is not good. Nor was it. Good. But it it portrayed. My team is being kind of locker room annex and disloyal or dismissive vice president Biden, particularly and others. And so within twenty four hours I'd flown back to the United States and offered by resignation to President Obama, and he'd accepted it. He was a gentle meant to me my entire time working for him and that day and since when we've interacted, but that's awkward. You know, I've been in the army thirty eight years in Bumi, accept my resignation. And now, I'm on the ticker tape of every TV show for the next until I got a new story about disgraced general. And so that that hurt dealing with his administration was really interesting because I've been in Iraq for five years, and then I'd come back, and I was in the joint staff during the election and transition. And what had happened was President Bush's administration left President Obama's came in. And they wanted to be anything. But like the Bush administration and the thing that jumped out at me as President Obama is a thoughtful analytical person he listens. He he takes in information. He is willing to withhold his opinion until all of them come out and from that standpoint, it's it's really powerful. But I become convinced we shouldn't elect a president anymore. We should elect a team because that's what you get the president has a role. But the reality is the White House and the administration is a team. And when the team comes in particularly in a new administration, you think of them as this team, and they are not that they come in some people were on the campaign and they've got tight relations at some have. Negative relations. Some people are brought in from other places, and they're scar tissue, huge egos. Differing agendas, all these things. So when you're trying to deal with this administration, you're dealing with this thing that's constantly changing and coming from different directions. I would get calls in Afghanistan. And at first I was concerned, and they'd say the White House is angry with you. And at I you go out, and then I start saying, okay? What part is it the window? If it is President Obama, you have my attention of it's not I don't care, and that was the big takeaway from me that the genius of a great president is to build a team that works, but it's so easy not to and in today's world where we put the spotlight on an individual, and they can be brave and strong and charismatic and all like that. But they can have a team in President Obama's team for the entire time. I worked there was challenging they work. They weren't trying to do bad for America. But they were challenging challenging I believe in Washington DC means something like a pain in the rear end. Yeah. That's exactly right. And they were and I also dealt with the previous administration prison, George W Bush's, but I dealt with them primarily in the second term. So I wish she a team after they shaken out a lot of interesting..

President Obama Iraq president Montgomery Dr king Nick Berg Afghanistan President Bush Osama bin Laden White House president Roosevelt Alabama Lincoln Memorial Baghdad Elbert Einstein Albert Einstein Qaeda Europe