19 Burst results for "Nichole Davis"

"nichole davis" Discussed on Southern Tomfoolery Plays

Southern Tomfoolery Plays

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on Southern Tomfoolery Plays

"Nichole davis the next time i get the chance to do like a one shot as a player. I'll make copper. What's next i mean. That's about it man now. We we finally got through that fight. We got onto the ship and where we're at now is. Our plan is to versus and try to stop this assertion can bet well also there's only one starship mine got fucking left behind because bullshit shenanigans. Adam decided bud man. You're on your epic tracer now bro. Don't worry about it. The tracers much nicer than your ship eighty. Okay is named cazador. Well i think you should understand. We kill babies. Okay punch babies. We didn't kill anybody. Yeah baby got out of the corner. Probably the shadow plane. I would imagine like to speak to kuyper kind of missing out an opportunity to get to ship for one like. Did you really think adam was gonna let the party have two ships. That's not gonna no absolutely not. But also i do think it was very cool like you know. I've talked a lot about mike. And aren bonding through the combats and through the experiences that they've had and mike was incredibly antagonistic kuyper and outright hated him just did not like him which really was tied into the apollo protection agency was protection agency. Safeguarded people from from people. Like you like you. His from slavers not bounty honors. There are different kinds different people there. Okay did the apollo protection agency was not founded about slavers. It was about getting people to court and you know who stops people from doing that. Assassins and bounty hunters. That's it so they really are. Diametrically opposed but i will say in that moment of realizing your ship wasn't available it was trashed or whatever. What was it the oil fuel. I'm your mom was just connected. So i think there was a bonding moment. In that combat there really was of like mike being the last one with kuyper and youtube. Being the guys to hold back this swarm and save the party. You together made it to where the party could get away and get to the ship and safely get through this combat and through this entire book so they really have bonded in a way now how that will express itself is to be seen. I.

kuyper mike Adam Nichole davis
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:51 min | 1 year ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then <hes>. Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups <unk> countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

nichole davis Eleanor riley university of edinburgh professor
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 1 year ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"They can sniff out counselors late blood sugar levels in diabetics, , drugs, , explosive chemicals used in bombs, , and as many dog owners know any food in one hundred meter radius. . dokes have notorious powerful noses with hundreds of millions of central sceptres that can pick up traces of substances at just one pop trillion. . And so now teams around the world from Lebanon to the UK attesting out dog's olfactory abilities when it comes to sniffing out cubic nineteen. . One of those putting hounds on the viral hunt is Dominic Cork a professor at the National Veterinary School of. . In front first phase is to train the dog to put his nose in coon and sniff. . So we knew that if he story then we put some positive sample in this goal and dogs are going to one whole week but they'll in the cones and everything is made as a game I'm Nichole Davis, , and this is science weekly. . We Got Dominique on the line to ask him a bit more about how you actually train dogs to sniff out a disease. . Unfortunately, , the audio isn't great so about that but the first question I wanted to ask Monique was exactly when he first decided to ton his dogs noses towards K. Nineteen well, it's , <hes> I'm a I'm head of a Canine Sports Medicine unit that the vet, , school in our fault. . And and we are working a lot on working dog I'm also involved in search and rescue dogs instead thirty five years as firefighters. . And I've always been working on Doug affection actually. So . <hes>, , we also have a big program in the. . Vet. . School, , which is Naza. . He's in the goal of the program is to develop the medical detection dogs in in France and so when when the COVID did show up, , we had a meeting <hes>. . It was on the ninth of March I remember and. . The. . First question was, , what are we going to use samples? ? So we checked everything in the graffiti and we saw that the the the sweat under the armpit that would be very few chance of bessie of contamination and actually has no passive condemnation. . The dog is not sensible. . So <hes> we make so that the dogs do not tach at any moment, , the samples than we started with such rescue dog from different fire departments. . Minute Ducasse <hes> what two weeks to consider that it was working in the. . And that's what we've been doing for six months. . So, , let's get to the nuts and bolts here. . What is it that the dogs are sniffing Anita? ? You say you take samples from People's armpits. . Similarly, , people use an awful lot of deodorants and other toiletries at does that get in the way of things dogs sniffing the virus sniffing the? ? Effects of the virus when the virus enters add a sale, , the viruses replicating also using the Senate. . To produce his own proteins he's on molecules and these chemical molecules they have to go out of the buddy. . They can go out food the European through the feces for the tears and through the sweat. . So that's what the dogs are looking for, , and that's been a quite a few studies in the past showing that insalled cultures different virus were producing different others. . Let's go nemo. . Valetta. . Organic compounds. . And that's what we are looking for now to answer questions regarding the utterance in perfumes and so on. . The key point for these dogs is to have some top quality and fresh positive samples in all the to make the in printing. . So we're GONNA need roughly eighteen positive samples that are fresh. . We don't rely only on a on A. . Positive results also asked samples to hospitals coming from people who have chemical symptoms. . The scan that he's <hes> typical etcetera etcetera, , and if you do it this way while the dogs reading in memory, , the specific other and you can put any type of the. . or perfume this is not a problem. . It would be a problem if the people who are using only one brand of the audience in the same product. . But the Zillions of different types of the in perfume. . So the only Common Otter, , the dogs are finding in the eighty something samples that they are sniffing at the beginning is the the covid and that's what we want to focus on that. . Domini, , how do you train the dogs I'm what do they do? Once ? they find a positive sample today sit down or bark or how do they signal that they found something <music>. . To train, , the dogs are using some what we call a faction guns that. . Developed that's a good way to not have the dog in contact with the samples and so the first phases to train the dog to put his nose in the cone in sniff, , and so we do that too. . If he story then we put some positive sample in this in the dogs are going to for one whole week. . Now going to put down those in the cones so that the imprinted with the specific honor of the positives and then with more. . With some neutral, , which means the swabs without anything, , and then we put some negative samples and wing prisoner amount of corns. We . increase the amount of negative samples. . We put some some lines. . We've only negatives on the positives and everything is made as a game. . In other words, , the dog is getting his story when he finds the positive most of the time, , we asked the doctor sit in front of the. . That's pretty easy to obtain. . But if the dog is marking differently barking or scratching or whatever I don't care because it's the important thing is to have the dog marking correct simple. . What is important is to keep the motivation of the dog and the motivation of the dog is coming through the interaction with the duck hander and through the fact that he's rewarded when he works good and plays with his a duck handler. . Happiness is to keep going for working dogs. . A key issue that some skeptics of this approach have raised is that you might be able to tell someone with covert from somebody who doesn't have cable but can you really tell apart someone who has covered from someone who has another virus like flu? ? For example what do you say to that? ? We are starting right now to check if the dogs are mocking? ? Some people <hes> with other types of virus infections or other type chronic disease like lung cancers, , auditees, , and so on. . But there has been some studies a lot of studies trying to identify the volatile organic compounds coming from different types of virus that have been put in south counter and each time it shows that the other print of the virus coming from these vetting are any compounds is specific to a virus. . Would we see in terms of practical results is that there's a lot of times where the dog has been more accurate than the PCR. . We've got some people with negative that were marked by the dogs. . Samples were remarkably the dogs we send back the anonymous number of these <hes> samples to the hospitals, , the remade the PCR, , the our positive. . We also have some negative people that were marked by the dogs. . We have a refugee at ten cases like this where we told the hospital. . Okay. . These people are positive for us and they couldn't get in touch with these people but these people went back to the hospital a few days later and they were clinically covid nineteen and most of the time they were with digestive simple. . You have to keep in mind also that that when you when you look for virus in the nose. . You don't look for the virus at the other end of the buddy. . Just. . How accurate is this at? ? What kind of results are you getting with dogs? ? The accuracy of the dogs is measured for two terms of sensitivity which means that the doug doesn't miss some positives and specificity which means deduct doesn't miss some negatives. . Sensitivity is the most important and. . The values that we obtained are between ninety up to nine hundred, , nine point five percent in Dora sensitivity and the specificity is always close to a hundred percent. . So this entity is that say ninety five percent while it means that you might have some false positive, , but it's no big dipped. . One or two percent of positives. . The big deal would be to miss some positives and actually this is not something that happens with the dog. . So you can take that in any sense results are good as long as the dogs are well trained. .

France US doug Dauga gene Kennedy Hendy Myers
Training dogs to sniff out COVID-19

The Guardian's Science Weekly

09:28 min | 1 year ago

Training dogs to sniff out COVID-19

"They can sniff out counselors late blood sugar levels in diabetics, drugs, explosive chemicals used in bombs, and as many dog owners know any food in one hundred meter radius. dokes have notorious powerful noses with hundreds of millions of central sceptres that can pick up traces of substances at just one pop trillion. And so now teams around the world from Lebanon to the UK attesting out dog's olfactory abilities when it comes to sniffing out cubic nineteen. One of those putting hounds on the viral hunt is Dominic Cork a professor at the National Veterinary School of. In front first phase is to train the dog to put his nose in coon and sniff. So we knew that if he story then we put some positive sample in this goal and dogs are going to one whole week but they'll in the cones and everything is made as a game I'm Nichole Davis, and this is science weekly. We Got Dominique on the line to ask him a bit more about how you actually train dogs to sniff out a disease. Unfortunately, the audio isn't great so about that but the first question I wanted to ask Monique was exactly when he first decided to ton his dogs noses towards K. Nineteen well, it's I'm a I'm head of a Canine Sports Medicine unit that the vet, school in our fault. And and we are working a lot on working dog I'm also involved in search and rescue dogs instead thirty five years as firefighters. And I've always been working on Doug affection actually. So we also have a big program in the. Vet. School, which is Naza. He's in the goal of the program is to develop the medical detection dogs in in France and so when when the COVID did show up, we had a meeting It was on the ninth of March I remember and. The. First question was, what are we going to use samples? So we checked everything in the graffiti and we saw that the the the sweat under the armpit that would be very few chance of bessie of contamination and actually has no passive condemnation. The dog is not sensible. So we make so that the dogs do not tach at any moment, the samples than we started with such rescue dog from different fire departments. Minute Ducasse what two weeks to consider that it was working in the. And that's what we've been doing for six months. So, let's get to the nuts and bolts here. What is it that the dogs are sniffing Anita? You say you take samples from People's armpits. Similarly, people use an awful lot of deodorants and other toiletries at does that get in the way of things dogs sniffing the virus sniffing the? Effects of the virus when the virus enters add a sale, the viruses replicating also using the Senate. To produce his own proteins he's on molecules and these chemical molecules they have to go out of the buddy. They can go out food the European through the feces for the tears and through the sweat. So that's what the dogs are looking for, and that's been a quite a few studies in the past showing that insalled cultures different virus were producing different others. Let's go nemo. Valetta. Organic compounds. And that's what we are looking for now to answer questions regarding the utterance in perfumes and so on. The key point for these dogs is to have some top quality and fresh positive samples in all the to make the in printing. So we're GONNA need roughly eighteen positive samples that are fresh. We don't rely only on a on A. Positive results also asked samples to hospitals coming from people who have chemical symptoms. The scan that he's typical etcetera etcetera, and if you do it this way while the dogs reading in memory, the specific other and you can put any type of the. or perfume this is not a problem. It would be a problem if the people who are using only one brand of the audience in the same product. But the Zillions of different types of the in perfume. So the only Common Otter, the dogs are finding in the eighty something samples that they are sniffing at the beginning is the the covid and that's what we want to focus on that. Domini, how do you train the dogs I'm what do they do? Once they find a positive sample today sit down or bark or how do they signal that they found something To train, the dogs are using some what we call a faction guns that. Developed that's a good way to not have the dog in contact with the samples and so the first phases to train the dog to put his nose in the cone in sniff, and so we do that too. If he story then we put some positive sample in this in the dogs are going to for one whole week. Now going to put down those in the cones so that the imprinted with the specific honor of the positives and then with more. With some neutral, which means the swabs without anything, and then we put some negative samples and wing prisoner amount of corns. We increase the amount of negative samples. We put some some lines. We've only negatives on the positives and everything is made as a game. In other words, the dog is getting his story when he finds the positive most of the time, we asked the doctor sit in front of the. That's pretty easy to obtain. But if the dog is marking differently barking or scratching or whatever I don't care because it's the important thing is to have the dog marking correct simple. What is important is to keep the motivation of the dog and the motivation of the dog is coming through the interaction with the duck hander and through the fact that he's rewarded when he works good and plays with his a duck handler. Happiness is to keep going for working dogs. A key issue that some skeptics of this approach have raised is that you might be able to tell someone with covert from somebody who doesn't have cable but can you really tell apart someone who has covered from someone who has another virus like flu? For example what do you say to that? We are starting right now to check if the dogs are mocking? Some people with other types of virus infections or other type chronic disease like lung cancers, auditees, and so on. But there has been some studies a lot of studies trying to identify the volatile organic compounds coming from different types of virus that have been put in south counter and each time it shows that the other print of the virus coming from these vetting are any compounds is specific to a virus. Would we see in terms of practical results is that there's a lot of times where the dog has been more accurate than the PCR. We've got some people with negative that were marked by the dogs. Samples were remarkably the dogs we send back the anonymous number of these samples to the hospitals, the remade the PCR, the our positive. We also have some negative people that were marked by the dogs. We have a refugee at ten cases like this where we told the hospital. Okay. These people are positive for us and they couldn't get in touch with these people but these people went back to the hospital a few days later and they were clinically covid nineteen and most of the time they were with digestive simple. You have to keep in mind also that that when you when you look for virus in the nose. You don't look for the virus at the other end of the buddy. Just. How accurate is this at? What kind of results are you getting with dogs? The accuracy of the dogs is measured for two terms of sensitivity which means that the doug doesn't miss some positives and specificity which means deduct doesn't miss some negatives. Sensitivity is the most important and. The values that we obtained are between ninety up to nine hundred, nine point five percent in Dora sensitivity and the specificity is always close to a hundred percent. So this entity is that say ninety five percent while it means that you might have some false positive, but it's no big dipped. One or two percent of positives. The big deal would be to miss some positives and actually this is not something that happens with the dog. So you can take that in any sense results are good as long as the dogs are well trained.

Covid Doug Dominic Cork Nichole Davis Coon Dominique Naza Monique Senate Professor Canine Sports Medicine Lebanon National Veterinary School Ducasse UK Bessie Common Otter Anita
"nichole davis" Discussed on ChupaCast

ChupaCast

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on ChupaCast

"Itchy near defending ancient wisdom does he followed the jerking level. She Needs Hulu Do. Yes at Nichole Davis Museum victim causing theaters. I'll be a star who later on the fly on water. Boy Scotus you've got given. What could it be Donahue Fujita salvage kind of my din- promise? The Ashok backward was vice city so follow those according big poodle moving would would you be. No System's GONNA dookie with a way. He just shocked to his safe logo as well. We'll see basis that non. I see too much business associates accusing equity from an district. You Know Mon on CS Lewis viable by my seven on my op. Ed Days percentage of someone seemed edge of income for Saint canceled as eating older casino. Humil- his school here. You've messed up the Bush late for dangerous killer pro spittle stearns here of water to picked of his big. Yeah you give uncle the F. A. Dot Gov Georgie immoral. Incan forgetting Takada. So I don't teach equal care the Damore support see a to speak our vision all back. Assessor Leeming UH so Louis Provo tomatoes good scheduled for December four apple. Watch thick into mice. Gorgona quote on a bookkeeper Sundays at TACO him. As you've got closer to me to feed those subjects Corpus Christi. No people talk seat on school. A couple good gear savage these. Vj thing that you got an e e King Presenter Jiamusi Cowie Group Contest. Want to put you guy I talk to now not to do. I see boudoir apologised.

Nichole Davis Museum Donahue Fujita Hulu F. A. Dot Gov Jiamusi Cowie Scotus Corpus Christi Leeming Saint Bush TACO apple Louis Provo Gorgona
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"But while US we're exploring some of the most pressing questions surrounding the virus. We don't want to miss out on all the other incredible science happening and form your emails. It seems you don't either. It's been great to hear you enjoyed a bit of scientific escapism as much as we have this week. We're looking at moody teenagers. But not the human ones. I'm Nichole Davis and this is science. Weekly puppies go through what we call a sensitive period and this is quite early on in their life and that sensitive period has an impact on the whole the rest of their life. That's Lissi Asher. Senior lecturer in the School of natural and Environmental Sciences at Newcastle University studies behavior patents primarily in chickens and humans. Best Friends dokes lease. See you've been studying. The Pavia of adolescent would be guide dogs which sounds like one of the Mace Fund research topic. She could possibly choose. Just tell me what do we mean by adolescent? Dog's what age we talking about here in the threes. We stopped eight. We believe outer doesn't starts around six months of age so we start to see changes in behavior around that time and it seems to start to improve around twelve months of age. Now's you said this is studying guide dogs so we're looking at upper door. Retrievers golden retrievers German shepherd dogs and crosses at those so it could be different in different breeds of dog. And what do we mean by adolescence? Dog So is adolescent sort of something that happens to animals lesson to something that we know to happen in mammals at least and it is this period of time where we change from a juvenile to an adult so we know that the brain actually models itself so their physical changes in the brain. Happen between being a juvenile. I'm being an adult. We know that there's lots of changes in terms of reproduction. I'M THE HORMONAL. Changes that go with that so we neither these physical changes. Why did you want to start looking at behavior? What we knew. Is that a lot of dog. Trainers had previously reported this change in behavior around the edge of essence. But we didn't have any proper evidence to support it and working with guy talks a lot of their focuses. How can we better understand? Behavior in order to provide better for folks that can train the blind or partially-sighted. Godo gainers say they need to understand behavior from a very practical point of view. I'm this was an under-researched time if life has very little done on the outer lesson phase across lots of different species but almost nothing had been done in dogs. So how do you go about looking at this? So we're trying to understand specifically if there was an adolescent phase behavior so this is changes in behavior that curve around adolescence and in people. We knew that there was this low level conflict behavior that happens between parents and their teenager adolescent children. So we look for something analogous to this kind of conflict. Not Behavior which is generally ignoring. You parents these kinds of behaviors so we started with looking dogs to their response to training one of the commands that we're particularly interested in was the Sitka Monde. And that's because it's the first mom that you'll training a dog so when we're able to study before adolescence. Who are able to see that. There's a before during an after effect of adolescence on this command because you can see it on. He sits so we're able to studies that command and then we were able to look more generally responses to training. And we do this using question. Now these aren't just any. Oh questionnaires. These questionnaires that we have very carefully validated over a number of years against observations of behavior. So we know they're measuring what we think they're measuring am. We're able to use those to reach bigger population of dogs and so with the with dogs that are sitting. Hopefully if there were behaved in front of you what did you find? So we found that dogs `obedient reduced around the time of of adolescence or puberty before puberty at five months we find dogs respond to the sick man. If we focus on on that response eight months it's reduced and then if we look at the questionnaire data we find the same effect so five months dogs are rated by their caregiving quite trainable and then around eight months that reduces so that not as trainable and it pops back up it bounces back up to the levels. We see before around twelve months. That's very interesting. Because we find the specifically in response to the person who's caring for the dog but the response to a stranger or another trainer is very different. So they do tend to be more responsive even during adolescence to a trainer or a stranger whereas for the caregiver responsive during so there is a sort of parallel that almost with a human teenagers about kicking back against your immediate carers rather than necessarily everybody. Yeah you hear anecdates. Don't you about people who who have real difficulties with their children at home and they go to parents evening and the teachers say they're fantastic? So you definitely do do here. Anecdotes of of that in human teenagers too. And that there's some scientific evidence to support as well see you also looked at the links to security. How secure dog was in that bond to their care key. Just tell me what. We mean by these secure and insecure attachments. But what does that mean? Dogs form attachment to values. And anybody WHO's owned? A dog.

School of natural and Environm Nichole Davis Lissi Asher Sitka Monde Senior lecturer Mace Fund Newcastle University
"nichole davis" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

12:13 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"This point no word on any charges i'm nichole davis Wealthy nation again. Is that makes sense? Okay with me. but then ever gonna do if they take in five or six years they gotta have a nuclear weapon that came into the country illegally go to be removed from the country everybody knows that it starts during the course of this next week maybe even a little bit earlier that price tag one point six trillion dollars paid for with attacks on wall street speculation this idea of taking on radical action deal with student loan debt crisis nothing new for sanders but this is the first time what a tangible plan on paper crash randolph that killed seventy three others to the hospital pickup truck slammed into a group of motorcycle riders Everybody was saying. Family. Neither one of those. With common sense. this is our number three in the middle of antiques eighty w._r. k._o. there's there's a lot of that inter-lining but you know what the part that i liked the least in that intro is what I can assume but song. oh okay i like that song but every time i hear it i that song is in my head now it is one of those cannot get that song out i know why you're playing was it was it the b._t. awards what it was not awards performance got so much attention and it was it was a i thought it was a good performance i mean i didn't watch the live i just started trending online and the crowd went wild did he actually sing this time really doesn't even sing the lyrics kind of dances and start on youtube it looked lips inked the one i saw was on twitter but i could tell like it's not like his vocal quality was the best so i thought he really was singing like they never stayed on the guys either one of them what is worth but it still was a cool performing dancing that was cool i thought it was a corporal in the outfits i mean i couldn't get past little losses it was just unbelievable his on his on samba i don't spend a lot of time in elizabeth warren thing other than i i want you to be aware of it however Some of the some of the texts on this, like six three gay reparations that's just plain stupid. I think that would be as reaction for a lot of people. Right. But you know how this goes. I'm surprised debate Wednesday her to betas Wednesday night. Right. The kitty table and one is Thursday night. So do you think they're not going to bring this up? they're going to do is series of show of hands and reparations though so it's going to be show of who's in favor of eliminating all student debt and no one i don't think that first table i don't know she can't she's for half of it i don't know we even i the next night when bernie's there that's the one you're gonna want like this biden put his hand up then cory booker put his hand up like you wanna see that but they're going to do are we for eliminating all student debt are we for slavery reparations are they gonna ask this quick show of ant whose for gay and lesbian reparations Because you know what happened this, this was. who was the candidate was asked what are you doing for the l._g._b._t._q. dot community and how are you going to help them get ahead and they said right off well let's start with this how do you define yourself in the person i don't define myself and they got the big round of applause wasn't it wasn't booker i forget which one it was and they got scolded bad on it and so i- warranties this and immediately goes i gotta get i gotta get good there and so we'll just row fifty million bucks out i wanna know how buddha judge would respond i'm just curious i mean you can assume how he would respond they really wanna hear his take on it his take would be no it doesn't that speak volumes about like him i mean i think that that would be if that would make elizabeth warren look ridiculous for her claims of buddha judge comes out there and says no absolutely no doing reparations for those of the l._g._b._t._q. community seventy-one says so wait a second lightning and waffles don't get a check From this one, so they're against it, but they get a check for the other one. So therefore it. Millennials. Hello. And also the I didn't say I mean, I wasn't just talking about this particular reparations. I wasn't talking about all reparations, so. Exactly seventy one. Am I the only one of the things that maybe she had herself? One too many beers when she came up with this proposal. I also noticed about her and someone pointed this out on Twitter was, but she washes her dog and awful lot that dog. that dog it's more bass than any dog should she puts it in the shower was that what she did you put it in the tub but like a look like this big stand up shower which was i was the price she put it in her own personal shower if that was the case i can't imagine with more and putting her dog and her own personal shower does he washes the dog one hundred bruce not only bruce do that it's not their personal bathroom that's to an enthralling i think there are pictures of bruce under the bed with the thing in the nose just hanging out like oh god because bruce knows he's gotta do stuff that he doesn't wanna do that she's making them do and bruce in that dog i think gruesome that dog very much get along i think i believe very much bruce's dog than it is her she just plays it up obviously well when did she get the dog lining year ago no she got one day before she amount yeah well it was only like within the dog's name waffles we'll see if you remember I don't know. Bailey, bailey. There you go. Yes. Waffles. Nice job. yeah no do my thing on that is this lightning if you're gonna use something the news it if you're gonna do the prop thing then do it i was an old friend of mine who used to be shifted said if you're gonna use an ingredient make sure that people know it's there if you're gonna have the dog you might as well go all in on the dogs she's done the all in the i still do wonder if if and when she's out of the race to she put the dog up for adoption or do you think she calls refers to self as dogma yeah i think so she would be smart to do that if she wanted the millennial at some point there will be a picture of her in some heart cambridge dog park just all look i'm here Don't minding my own business me. I'm just walking my. like a plastic bag her hand for show i could see that it will be looking inspecting that and just seeing i'll be zooming in on that picture of video to see if there's actually dog waste in that bag because i wouldn't believe it five i want my white wasp male u._s. citizen reparations well again would you gotta make your claim as to how you were what what it costs you at least warrants case she's telling you look they technically they couldn't get the marriage tax deduction they couldn't file jointly so they were paying more if you believe It's silly. But yes. so yeah you have to tell me how you got burned that's how she's claiming they got burned stephenville bill rick steve you're next on our kale being i i just it's ultimately swope i was thinking about the algae gave to the screener was with the winter chill in the seventy for two cigarettes and lost two years salary and i wasn't promoted at my job now i'm a middle whole because i would kill for something that's now i so you're that's excellent calls because what happens in case like this you've got to think like that right i put his lightning with what steve just said to you Does that seem that far fetched that Cory Booker would say that? not at all that guy went to jail for marijuana and wasted as he put it two years of his life and then he had trouble getting a job when he came out and we now realize the sins of that because marijuana's legal and we think marijuana's awesome so that guy got screwed by society why doesn't he get paid back doesn't he have as much claim as as a gay person in the seventy everybody has something that's the bottom line it's just seems like we're paying everybody for for every little thing that that's what's come down to this is why keep telling took waffles awhile to realize what it would why do we talk so much about the democrats use always say like but they're sport here there's things to be had when you look at it right now it is a free for all with these guys any one of them will write a huge check for you in theory just give me a reason as i was ghosted get reparations waffles emotional toll waffles society told you that you needed to have to go to waffles lightning's wedding so you tried to get one and now you're feeling the sting of that i i you know i think lightning should pay me blame her oh yeah that's my fault no you gotta steal your story about the student loans that's your referee reparation you can only get one yes Everybody gets one. What's visa if you're an African American? But you also have student loans you get only, either, get the if you have slaved, which one's going to pay you more distant relatives that were is that how it works? It's whatever pays the most. phoebe was kicked by donkey can walk right for a week so he needs reparations for that you have to be able to show some sort of loss that guy right there that was brilliant by steve he literally was not allowed to earn an income for something that he should have been allowed to do in would have been allowed to do in this day and age if warren's logic is right than steph's logic is one hundred percent right he makes a compelling point yeah but steve was joking i think i is a joke i think the more they hear that the more someone is going to say that actually kind of surprised that nobody has well wouldn't be steve though what they will do is they'll figure out it'll be for wrongly incarcerated now there is the kim kardashian things people do get paid for that depending on what it is but it's more likely going to be i don't think it would be for steve particularly but i would not be shocked at all if in this democratic primary someone doesn't come up with sort of steve bill here here's what we're going to do now for people that have been to jail things that they shouldn't have been in jail for we're going to give them x._y._z. based on years of non service as it were six seven to sixty eight sixty eight quick break i want to tell you about dr bruce out and why because dr bruce out of perfectsmiles national hampshire is the dentist that you need to see if you need to improve your smile why do i say that well first of all he's in nashua new hampshire which is just twenty five miles north of burlington yet people come from all over to see him how car car for example barry armstrong for example they've gone to see dr bruce why 'cause dr bruce is.

dr bruce elizabeth warren steve bill cory booker twitter nichole davis marijuana sanders randolph rick steve kim kardashian barry armstrong bernie perfectsmiles national hampshi Bailey phoebe cambridge biden nashua new hampshire steph
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Ten thirty station. Sixty nine degrees. Mostly cloudy in Boston at one thirty. Good afternoon. I'm nichole Davis. And here's what's happening. Officials say Lawrence man is behind bars this afternoon. Forty seven year old Carlos Rivera facing several charges in the death of thirteen year old khloe Ricardo's amesbury, the Essex County DA says, according to police regarding another teenage girl, were at Rivera's apartment on Bellevue street Sunday night. And most of the day, Monday is Rivera allegedly dropped off Ricard at the Lawrence, general ER later that day where she was pronounced dead. Brian Dolan, is Ricard stepfather, any tells WBZ's Chris Fhimah. He never could've imagined. This was the outcome when he dropped his daughter off on Sunday. I'm still Batum by all this, totally baffled, you know, because kids today they, you know, talked to someone online, talk to someone on the phone, and they think who they supposed to be. They are in the nod and, you know, these little things can happen. A blink of an eye. And you know nobody. Nobody really knows what the other side of the until they get their you know what I mean. And it's sad because, you know, khloe lost a life over it, you know, it is it's really sad. Officials don't yet know exactly what caused chloe's death. But Rivera faces several charges, including indecent assault, and battery on a girl under fifteen and distribution of class b drugs to a minor being held right now on seven hundred fifty thousand dollars fail. Dating story. This hour, we've been following on WBZ radio state police say they've now identified the man who vandalized the Vietnam, vets memorial endorse Chester. This week say the man is thirty three year old from Dorchester. They won't give us his name because he's being sent for mental health, valuation officials say the man will eventually face charges and putting tagging.

Carlos Rivera Chris Fhimah khloe Ricardo WBZ Ricard nichole Davis Boston Brian Dolan Lawrence Essex County Dorchester Chester Vietnam chloe Batum assault seven hundred fifty thousand d Sixty nine degrees thirty three year
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On the threes. Pretty windy out there tonight, a couple of clouds scuttling across the sky, but otherwise not a bad evening, getting down tonight to about fifty downtown forties, north and west tomorrow. Another great day, sunny skies of the high in the upper sixties tomorrow night. Partly cloudy low in the mid fifty s again forties. It outside the city Thursday, partly sunny with a high of seventy but then some showers coming in Thursday night. WBZ News Radio, ten thirty where the news watch never stops. Good evening. I'm nichole Davis. And here are the five things you need to know at six forty five state. Health department says a food handler at Kelly's roast beef and Saugus has tested positive for salmonella that location now shut down until further notice investigators are trying to find out what caused thirteen year old khloe Ricard's death body was brought to Lawrence general last night in Washington. The House Judiciary committee has two more subpoenas tonight to former White House staffers after the former White House counsel refused to show up for plan. Testimony Boston police say they need your help to find two men accused of beating another man in south Boston video on our website, WBZ ten thirty dot com. Federal regulators are looking at at plans now to sell retiring nuclear reactors to a nuclear waste management company for accelerated decommissioning whole tech international says it can complete the job of cleanup and demolition in just eight years, rather than the sixty year plans offered by current owners among the facilities on this. List is the pilgrim nuclear power plants scheduled to shutdown next week. The NRC will have any final say in any proposed.

White House Boston House Judiciary committee nichole Davis NRC khloe Ricard salmonella Health department Washington Kelly Lawrence thirteen year eight years sixty year
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Sixty seven degrees. Some clouds in Boston at two thirty afternoon. I'm nichole Davis. Here's what's happening. Investigators looking into the death of a thirteen year old girl in Lawrence. Let's go live now to WBZ's Karyn regal for the latest on this situation. Karen, what do we know? Well, we don't know her name, but we do know where she is from Nicole. This thirteen-year-old girl whose body was just left at the ER at Lawrence General Hospital in Lawrence yesterday, just before five o'clock, according to the Essex County, DA was a thirteen year old girl, apparently from amesbury once again, according to the Essex County district attorney's office. The girl's body was left at the ER, and the ER called Lawrence police to alert them to the situation. The body has been transported to Boston today for an autopsy performed to determine the exact cause of death and neck and take some time Nicole for that examination to be done that kind of work is a thorough as, as they need to make their way through that process. A witness. Be a while before we find out precisely what happened to that girl. However, this is, of course, an active investigation, the term the as DA us was fluid in Lawrence, Karyn, regal WBZ, Boston's NewsRadio. And of course, we're keeping an eye on this situation. Stay with us tonight. When you get home for updates very easy to do just pull up on your smart. Speaker all you have to say play WBZ NewsRadio on iheartradio to thirty one and on the north shore today, nonprofit arts group says they want to transform a piece of Linz waterfront. WBZ's Carl Stevens went up there to talk to them about it. Profit group beyond walls has already transformed parts of downtown Lind with art projects. Now they're raising money to transform three acres or try to on the Lynn waterfront adjacent to an unused ferry terminal with a project called the launch Pedro Soto is with beyond walls. We were looking at this as an opportunity to put a stake in the ground for the community and really demonstrate what meaningful public access to public waterfront is there'd be everything from a performance space to shipping containers that become works of art playground space, if they raise fifty thousand dollars mass development will match it and they can get it done. If you're interested, you can log onto patronage dot com slash the lunch Lynn from Lynn Carl Stephen WBZ, Boston's NewsRadio today in every state across the country, rallies are being held in protest against highly restrictive abortion laws making their way through state legislatures thousands of these rallies are taking place in all today. At least one in Massachusetts over at the state house. That's what we find UB's Mike Macklin. They marched on beacon hill in lockstep with women across the nation supporters of abortion rights protected by the supreme court's Roe v. Wade decision. They spoke out against recently enacted state laws, restricting abortion rights, Antigone, woodland is an OBGYN nurse who says those new laws and other states are part of an effort to overturn Roe v way. Has been working towards us for a very long time. And we're just catching up. I think we need to be out here in the streets expressing our displeasure and calling our legislators, both at the state and the federal level, to tell them how we feel about the issue because the other side is doing and mass at the state house, Mike Macklin WBZ, Boston's NewsRadio. To thirty three and every ten minutes..

WBZ Boston Lawrence Mike Macklin WBZ Lynn Carl Stephen WBZ Karyn regal Roe nichole Davis Lawrence General Hospital Nicole Essex County Linz waterfront Lynn Mike Macklin Pedro Soto Massachusetts Karen Carl Stevens
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Nichole Davis. Here's what's happening. In iraq. The State Department has ordered the departure of some some government employees both from the embassy in Baghdad and the consulate in Erbil, and they want them to leave as soon as possible. Those affected are being told to leave by commercial transportation other advice to avoid US facilities within Iraq, monitor local media and review personal security plans on these giant tola Ali Khamenei says no one is seeking more. But he also states it wouldn't be difficult for Iran to enrich uranium up to weapons grade levels if it ever decided to do. So meanwhile, neighboring Iraq the US embassy in Baghdad has ordered all non-essential diplomatic staff to leave to what send to be heightened potential threats from militants there. Tom rivers reporting from the foreign desk in London, it's eleven eight and last night in Alabama. The state Senate gave the final go-ahead to what will potentially become the most restrictive abortion law in the US state of Alabama be ashamed of a cell after a passionate fight the. The Alabama Senate passing a Bill effectively banning abortion by making it a felony for the doctor to perform the procedure. The bill's authors say they hope to appeal to the supreme court to challenge the decision over Lovie, wait, or they're trying to keep it deficit was was to address the issue that Roe versus Wade was founded on the Alabama measure only allows exemptions where the women's health is at risk in cases of rape or incest. The woman would still have to carry a pregnancy to term Trevor alt- ABC news Washington and coming up in less than ten minutes ABC, Sherry Preston. And I take a closer look at the Bill expected legal challenges around it as well. That's just ahead at eleven fifteen. So be sure to keep it here. Just pulling into work. Maybe you have a smart speaker inside pretty easy to actually pull us up. And listen all you have to do with say play WBZ NewsRadio on iheartradio. It's eleven to and today on beacon hill. The state house will vote on a Bill that could ban the use of handheld cell phones. While you drive this Bill passes Massachusetts joined sixteen other say states with sin. Policies against touching phones. While behind the wheel house version of the Bill would also impose fines from one hundred to five hundred dollars for fences drivers.

Bill iraq Alabama US Baghdad Alabama Senate Nichole Davis State Department Senate Ali Khamenei Erbil Iran beacon hill Tom rivers ABC Massachusetts Sherry Preston Trevor rape
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Change. This is because cancer is a disease. The genome is caused by changes in our genes. Make healthy cells mutate into counselors ones. This was such is really promising but challenges do lie ahead. I can't Swiss cheese excrete, miniscule amounts of material into the blood. And as we've heard this lots of other stuff in blood too. Is any recently that scientific instruments have been sensitive enough to pick up on these small amounts, and sometimes it can still fly under the radar. And there are other complexities. To for instance, pregnant women have DNA from their baby floating around in the blood meeting. This even more to pick through to try to find DNA released by consoles. To avoid false alarms. Doctors have to be able to retain Lee unreliable pick up on circulating DNA from councils. Finally, Jackie says, it will be very difficult to have a test. That detects all types of council. That's because different cancers have different genetic fingerprints you either for broad brush approach or you try to focus on specific kinds difficult combined both in one test. So these tests are really trying to achieve two things. So that's the ability to pick up more than one cancer type, but then having a sensitive test. So that you can pick up the cancer in early stage disease and actually by doing that, the focus will inevitably have come from one particular cancer type and the profile of genetic changes, which might be common in that cancer. So the alterations which is seen in colorectal cancer, for example, maybe less. Applicable to another cancer such as an individual cancer. So therefore, the test will have limited or less value in a different cancer types. You have to hone your test to the kind of cancer that you're trying to look for. Yes. Exactly. So they're looking for common changes, which characterize different common cancers. But inevitably that means that some comes as will fall through the loop because they don't have those changes presence. This means some kinds will be missed if this tool was used solely a routine screening. So it would need to be using injunction with other tests to pick up all kinds of cancer diagnosis based on having looking forward. Jackie sees liquid biopsies being more than just an early warning sign. She hopes it would also lead to more effective treatments. So for me, the promise is is multiple. So in terms of monitoring treatment success earlier intervention in changing treatment for treatments not successful. Ross with them. Waiting for evidence by imaging which may be several months later, and then equally the holy grail really is to push a stage shifts or detection of more cancers at an earlier stage where actually we have very good treatments already. So a a small early stage cancer can predominantly cured by surgery attachment therapy. So you might be able to reduce the Montessori chemotherapy, and these very aggressive therapies that. People have experienced to me the analogy is a good analogies is story. Obata so diabetes is well managed by regular flood monitoring tests. So can we move to the point where cancer can be managed equally boy regular monitoring tests? So there are obstacles in the way. But if we can harness this concept and make a reliable blood test, the consequences could be huge even in developed countries. Nearly fifty percents of cancers a dive news too, late stage detection, the disease much earlier and being able to monitor how cheese responding to treatment could save millions of lives on the approach might be useful beyond cancer. So there's definitely interest in other diseases as well, so for example, cardiovascular disease, the some evidence that we see an increased amount of this free DNA in the blood impatience who have heart failure, for example to this an idea that blood based test may have utility across the number of these diseases of the aging population. Many thanks to our guests making time to be interviewed this week. They would Jackie show and Beverley hunt. If you'd like to get in touch with us about anything you've heard on the podcast, you can Email us it science weekly at the guardian dot com. That's it for now. I'm nichole Davis. Thanks for listening. And until next time goodbye. For more great podcasts from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash podcasts. Seventy five percent of Americans believe that poverty in the US is an unsolvable problem. But what if we can prove them wrong, you can make a difference? Find out more at stand together against poverty dot org.

cancer Jackie Ross US Lee nichole Davis Beverley hunt Seventy five percent
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Limitations. Beverly says counselors Cheam is often biopsy because it's one of the main ways in which definitive diagnosis can be made. Usually it involves a trip to the hospital and a little static. But what if we could detect cancer with a simple blood test? And what if we could use it as a screening tool to catch council in its early stages, and then equally the holy grail really is to push a stage, shifts or detection of more cancers at an earlier stage. Where actually we have very good treatments already. After the break. We'll be looking at the exciting and emerging field of liquid biopsies. Seventy five percent of Americans believe that poverty in the US is an unsolvable problem. But what if we can prove them wrong, you can make a difference? Find out more at stand together against poverty dot org. The voice from the guardian. Hey, do you have a one quick catch up on the knees? Headlines. Best thing in the morning while making breakfast all getting dressed. Well, if you have a legal assistant Ogle home, we can help with that. The guardian briefing is an experiment from the voice lab, which undertain minutes brings up to speed with what you need to know about the day's top stories. We'll make sure you don't miss a thing to listen anytime, just say, hey, Google speak to the guardian briefing. Welcome back to science weekly. I'm nichole Davis. Before the break, we got into the background on blood, and it's important role in diagnosing many diseases. Cancer. However has been a tough nut to crack. Nonetheless. This area of research is booming and research is believe it holds the promise to detect cancer early before symptoms show, potentially saving many many lives. But how do these liquid biopsies work? My name's Jackie show. I'm a professor of translational cancer research at the university of LeicesteR and I'm the direct Lester precision medicine institute. So Jackie tell me a bit about how we detect cancer today. So if you go to your doctor, and they suspect that there might be cancer involved. What happens how how do they go about confirming that, okay, so cancers are very broad across different types and stages. So detection of council vary, depending on Kaneko presentation. But basically there will be a number of different tests carried out to confirm diagnosis and currently diagnosis is based on having some form of surgery or biopsy to remove tissue from the suspected cancer. And that's thing confirmed by pathologist through looking all using Marcus to analyze that tissue. So one of the things that has been happening in recent years has been a real push to develop a blood test to detect. Cancer. He so cool liquid biopsies. Can you tell me about why that would be such a useful tool to have? So the potential of this liquid biopsy is is sort of coming to the fore now various chemical studies and trials reports. But basically the excitement is around the idea that you can take blood sample from the majority of individuals that's well tolerated. And that can be repeated. So that we could do a test repeat that test to three months down the line and see how the tests compare taking a blood sunflower. She potentially to look across multiple types an identified an individual with early cancer in their body, irrespective of the cancer type Sogeti, what is it that scientists aren't she looking for in the blood to give signs telltale signs that might be a cancer present. He's told me the kinds of molecules talking about. Yes. So the liquid biopsies. Really looking for a signature or evidence that the patient has cancer up that point in time, and we predominantly looking at the also collecting chimney DNA. And that's DNA that Speen basically shut by dying cancer cells or has been actively released from cancer cells into the blood. We're also looking at cancer cells themselves, and these circulating tumor cells. And then there are other molecules which are in the blood, which again can be homeworks of cancer, and these include RAM proteins, many Kansas is shed material into the blood like also STI one of these substances is DNA, and that's important because the DNA in council is slightly different from the DNA in healthy cells. So a tumor will only survive because it's provided with a source of oxygen through blood vessels. And therefore, the cancer cells themselves are in intimate contact with the blood supply association. Consoles die than their kogo that contents can be released into the bloodstream, but also sometimes as active secretion. So the councils of checking out there cocoa as they grow in change.

cancer Cheam Marcus US Beverly Google nichole Davis Ogle Kansas university of LeicesteR Sogeti professor Jackie Lester Seventy five percent three months
"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Yeah. The guardian. As population grows and grows older. So the number of cancer sufferers increase. Screening test to detect constantly developers. That are still feel healthy. They have no symptoms that will be easier to treat and two to three and save their lives. And as a lot of work still to be done to really work out whether cannon fruit, the cure rights of cancer, but it's a really promising. First blood test, though, are cheap and easy. And this new research is a step towards using them to transform cancer treatment. A blood test that could detect concert earlier than current methods has long been a dream phone colleges. Taking blood some Pelosi potentially to look across multiple cancer types, identify an individual with early cancer in their body, irrespective of the cancer type. The hope is that the so-called liquid biopsies could save countless lives by helping dogs is to diagnose cancer before symptoms appear plus them, less invasive and faster the most of what's available. Now, if you were to do something like take a biopsy out of a kidney you doing much more risky procedure. You've got to risk of bleeding and actually a tiny risk of actually dying from it. Whereas having a blood tests done is usually very safe and can be done very quickly. I'm nichole Davis on science weekly. We look at how these liquid biopsies work and explore their exciting potential as well as their limitations. Hello up overly. Yes holiday. It's nichole Davis here from the guardian. I wanted to start by getting to goods with what is in our blood beyond what we might have learned at school, the plasma red and white blood cells. And so on. So I doubt up festive Beverley hunt. She's a hematologist working in central London. Well, tweet caught all of the proteins that make up say internal Milia all hormones or circulating to affect the function of Oley organs. We've got the clotting factors which would make you clot. When y'all blood vessel wall is breached, and then we've got the physiological blood sinners Santa coagulant to balance those coaching factors. You don't have excessive clotting. And of course, you've got the DNA in the white cells. So you got excessive oil DNA to do genetic studies to it sounds like blood is a lot more complex than some of us might originally have thought its use as a diagnostic tool, which is what's interesting me. How reliant are we on blood for diagnosing different diseases now? I think we hugely reliant. It is the number one thing we use for diagnosis. And if you think about having blood taken it may be a little bit uncomfortable. But it's very low risk. Whereas if you to do something like take a biopsy out of a kidney, you are doing much more risky procedure, go to risk of bleeding and actually a tiny risk of actually dying from it. Whereas having a blood tests done is usually very safe and could be done very quickly. So it's the number one way of diagnosing to ceases in this age icon, sit changing in the future. Can you just talk me through what happens as you say a lot of had blood tests various things over the years. You have your blood sample taken into one of these chips off it goes the lab. What is it exactly? You can give us an example of what would happen when not blood sample gets. The little bartering. Okay. So as you know, when you have a blood tests done, we use a shopsmall needle attached to syringe or chip and poppet into vein and take the some people, and then the sample will be collected into a specific tube. So we've got lots of different types of tubes. Some have anti coagulant ten or some have nothing in. So that you actually clot the blood. And then the sample will be taken to the laboratory, and depending on what test you're going to do. And remember this hundreds thousands of different tests. They some people will be put through Shane. Now, what Beverly is looking for with that machine is a biomarker? It could be gene a protein or even the numbers of common components, like red blood cells to give a clue as to what the problem might be Beverly explains how it works by using an example of a blood count test. When we do a blood count, we actually count the number of cells within the blood. So we're looking at the red cells, the white cells, and the platelets, and we often do a blood count on people. It's routine tests, probably the communist nutritional problem in the world is iron deficiency. Children often iron-deficient women Inessa tell years often, I deficient. So we often do a full blood count looking for iron deficient. Same. What would expect to see is? We have a low hemoglobin and that the red cells would be small and pale because the short of iron. It's anything you can't diagnose using blood. We hear a lot about the tend to test for cancer or even Cetin signs of dementia. Been picked up in blood some things where it's not enough. So I think you can pick up almost all genetic disorders that inherited. If you have a local consists skin cancer, clearly, you can't look at the genome of that cancer, you'd have to actually take a biopsy says so yes there there are some limitations.

cancer nichole Davis Beverly Beverley hunt Pelosi London Santa Inessa Shane
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fifty five degrees. Cloudy skies in Boston at ten thirty. Good morning. I'm nichole Davis. Here's what's happening. Grief sorrow and despair a nation morning halfway around the world at least forty nine people are dead dozens hurt after the horrific attack unleashed earlier today at two mosques in Christ's church New Zealand as worshipers took part in morning prayer. An Australian men under arrest charged with murder, and he left behind a detailed manifesto of his plans rife with racist and nationalist rhetoric. Joining me now live from the foreign desk in London ABC's. Tom rivers, Tom, tell us more about what we've learned. Yeah. Well, you said at the top forty nine sadly, that's the new death toll could rise. An equal number are being treated in area hospitals in Christ Church about twenty of them are said to be pretty serious condition. The attack began at the all nor mosque forty one people. This was streamed. This is really sick in this day and age streams, this attack on these people went in there and emptied is bullets went back out to his car. You can see him doing that. Getting another rifle getting more ammo going back in shooting people outside as well. Going back in eventually getting back to his car taking off to a second. Mosque three miles away seven people dead, and that one going through this this manifesto. It is chilling. It is really chilling to read this go through it. He actually asked foreign received the blessing of unders Breivik, the kind of the right wing if you will white supremacist up in Norway nearly eight years ago who killed seventy seven people in Oslo and outside of the capital there as well. Push back if you will against what he sees as Islam ick fundamentalist extremists out there. And he would hope is hope is that he would strike a civil war. Between peoples of not only Zealand, but people around the world. All right. That's ABC's. Tom rivers with the latest details in this attack in Christ's church. New Zealand, thanks for joining us, Tom. Now whenever violence of this nature strikes leaders from around the world are forced then to consider their own backyard and address as WBZ's reports the possibility of violence here at home a gun man's pledge of more violence to come Boston. Mayor Marty Walsh vows that his city will be ready to face any potential threats are fortunate. It's not the first time that we've had to do this. We'll have a presence this weekend. Synagogues and churches letting them know that it's a little continue to make sure that people coming to worship feel safe patrols are already in position here in Roxbury where they arrived just after eight AM and stood in the mornings warm air as the rain fell from above a calming presence to members of the city's Muslim community that are doing good work for all people from all religion to come together and spread awareness. Always Windsor is such accidents in Roxbury, Chris bomb WBZ Boston's NewsRadio. Again, this story continues to develop this hour in New Zealand reaction pouring in from all around the world. We're following all of this right here on WBZ radio. Stay connected using the iheartradio app..

Tom rivers WBZ New Zealand Boston Roxbury nichole Davis Christ Church Zealand London ABC ABC Mayor Marty Walsh murder iheartradio Christ Oslo Norway Windsor Breivik Chris
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Good afternoon. One forty five. We have made it to Friday. I'm nichole Davis. Top stories. Now patriots owner Robert Kraft will be charged with solicitation of prostitution in Jupiter Florida video evidence arrest records say this is part of an international sex trafficking. Staying record show. Many of the workers were being held against their will spokesperson for craft categorically denies craft took part in any illegal activity. Other news we're following the Boston police officer shot during a traffic. Stop today in Roxbury is expected to survive. And on Capitol Hill House Democrats have introduced a brand new resolution to stop the president's national emergency declaration, Mr. Trump declaring that emergency last week to secure more cash for his proposed border wall. The measure was introduced by congressman Joaquin Castro of Texas, no emergency at the border border crossings, heredity, decades, low we have more resources committed to the border, then we've ever had. Our nation's history when you look at the federal state and local resources house speaker Nancy Pelosi says this resolution we'll go to the rules committee on Monday night. And it's expected to make it to the house floor as early as Tuesday where there is a possibility it could be voted on on the same day. Now, it's not it's not clear whether if the resolution we'll make it through the Senate at some Republicans have expressed concern about the declaration of a national emergency. But many others have actually expressed support including South Carolina, Senator Lindsey Graham, and Florida Senator Rick Scott, meantime, there's a new request to the feds that would force. The government to disclose details about more than fourteen hundred private entities in hospitals and schools received access to parts of the government's terror watch list council on American Islamic relations has now sued to challenge the constitutionality of that list care wants the judge to disclose exactly who got the list, which by the way has hundreds of thousands of names on it. They believe this list is inaccurate. And they say it causes grief for innocent people who are on it by mistake. One. Forty-seven and another fall from grace today for actor jussie smollet as his time on empire now drops to the editing room floor. We have a statement from the executive producers of the big show empire on FOX which says to avoid further disruption onset, we have decided to remove the role of Jamal from the final two episodes of the season. Jamal lion was the character that jussie smollet played on the show empire. And the CBS's dean Reynolds reporting small lead is accused of faking a hate crime with himself as the victim and filing a false police report. Please say he did it because he wasn't happy with his salary on empire. American-born ISIS bride holder. Moussana is now suing the Trump administration to let her back here to the United States. She says there should be no problem. Coming home. I read the papers..

Jamal lion Moussana congressman Joaquin Castro jussie smollet Senator Lindsey Graham dean Reynolds Capitol Hill House Senator Rick Scott nichole Davis Robert Kraft Nancy Pelosi Mr. Trump Boston Roxbury Senate Trump South Carolina Texas
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Where will you turn making news, and the weather turns this year? Stormy need to get there on time. And where will you turn easy news watch never stops? WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty. Always always local this is Boston's NewsRadio WBZ ten thirty. Iheartradio station. Twenty-five partly cloudy skies right now in Boston at one thirty. We've got a winter storm watch out for Saturday afternoon. More details on that storm in just a second. I'm I'm nichole Davis. Good afternoon. Here is what's happening. Yes. We do have the first big winter storm of twenty nine thousand nine on our doorstep. Forecasters have their eyes on Saturday. That's when the storm is expected to move in after we get a little bit of rain and snow tonight. WBZ TV's Terry Eliason says if you're north and west of four ninety five you are getting the jackpot Dale very easily foot of snow. I think that's probably at this point. That's very conservative. I think there could be much probably one to two feet of snow and a lot of areas north and west of four ninety five and certainly up into the central and northern mountains of New England. And it's not just the snow. We have to worry about. Forecasters say rain will fall along the coast can even see some sleet mixing in with all this and then on Sunday night temps will start to free fall into the single digits. It'll be in. In the forty s on Sunday and Saturday. So this means everything that falls is then going to freeze, of course, you can turn to us throughout the storm for traffic and weather together every ten minutes, we have it.

Boston nichole Davis Terry Eliason Iheartradio station New England Dale ten minutes two feet
"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"nichole davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Ten thirty. Iheartradio station. Thirty six degrees. Mostly cloudy skies in Boston at two thirty good afternoon. I'm nichole Davis. And here's what's happening. In the UK. British Prime Minister Theresa may has survived. A no confidence vote in parliament that boat coming down minutes ago. It was a slim margin three twenty five to three oh six. This. Now means the may government will stand and a snap. Election will not take place in the coming weeks. Today's vote came after yesterday's resounding defeat for Mace. Brexit plan in parliament and earlier today, I spoke with Tom rivers that what could come next for Brexit European Commission. President said look if you want Britain, you could just kind of kind of revoke called article fifty and it's just like it never happened. Okay. And you guys are in the European Union club, and nothing has changed. And that was about half the people in the country here, the other half still want a clean Brexit, a cutting severing all ties from Europe. And of course, the Theresa May plan, which is dead in the water. Now had been kind of a compromise that neither of. These two factions like so that is the problem, how do you threaten us needle satisfy everybody at least a majority to get passage through parliament. That's ABC's. Tom rivers in London, again, Prime Minister, Theresa may surviving. A no confidence vote last hour in parliament. We are watching this in the newsroom, and when we get updates. We'll bring them right out to you here on WBZ radio. It's two thirty one. And we are now in day. Twenty six of the partial government shutdown more meetings are taking place today at the White House. But ABC's Karen Travers reports there's not much optimism. There's a deal to open the government. The White House says President Trump had a constructive meeting with Republican Democratic lawmakers. The bipartisan members of the problem solvers caucus sat down with the president in the situation room press secretary, Sarah Sanders, said in a statement that both sides listen to each other and quote now both have a good understanding of what the other one's a major breakthrough to end the government shutdown was not expected in this meeting. But White House officials said they will cord to more conversations like this. Karen Travers, ABC news, the white. Also today. House speaker Nancy Pelosi sending a letter to the Whitehouse telling President Trump she's concerned about security for the upcoming state of the union. She notes the secret service and homeland security both dealing with furloughs due to the shutdown and she says with several high profile officials attending that speech. It could be a problem. Now, she's calling on President Trump to put the speech off until after the government reopens or she says he can just submit it in writing. Instead CBS's Nancy Cortez says this is not about security just or just about security the reason that she's doing this is because a if he doesn't agree, and he says, no I want to go ahead with state of the union as planned then Democrats can portray him as being insensitive to federal workers and and the plight that they're facing right now. And if Democrats are successful and the state of the union does not take place. Well, then they robbed the president of one hour primetime rats when you've got the entire congress the entire country looking on and just ahead. We'll get the latest on this morning's bombing attack in Syria. It.

President Trump White House Karen Travers Prime Minister Theresa Tom rivers nichole Davis ABC Boston Iheartradio station European Union club Nancy Pelosi Nancy Cortez Brexit European Commission Europe UK Mace