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35 Burst results for "Nicholas K"

Boris Johnson and Carrie Symonds Have a Baby Boy

WBBM Morning News

00:25 sec | 4 d ago

Boris Johnson and Carrie Symonds Have a Baby Boy

"Says he's having a wonderful time being a dad. He and his fiancee, Carrie Simon's welcomed Wilfred Laurie Nicholas at the end of April. That was right after Johnson was treated for the Corona virus. Today, the prime minister told reporters. He's a pretty hands on father Tio what he calls a wonderful kid. He says he was way too busy with work to take paternity leave. Deborah

Wilfred Laurie Nicholas Carrie Simon Deborah Prime Minister Johnson
"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:02 min | Last week

"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Learning about the people in your community and the people in the arts and I I learned so much by following different people their appearance of time where I'm more active than others because it definitely it's not always conducive to me writing music when you know, but but that being said there are times you know. It's just like another time to be ready music time Sonapur writing music. And I think especially these days learning about the world and seeing in being. I think it's important to to live with the times and to be aware of what's going on, so I think that's if there's one thing that social media may be one of the better parts of to me, it's it's keeping US apprised of events. And We'll Shit Nah. And where do people find us? We'll do our APP up in a minute when you're, but thanks so much, nick, it's guys. It's so good to talk to you. Let's let's keep the conversation going and whenever in the future. Honestly anytime I have to say this is what we ended but I have. This is so funny. It was called the changeling that the Clint Eastwood Angelina Jolie One are. The entire time watching that movie I'm like. Why is this music so horrendous? This is awful now. What's going? We get to the end of it. Composer Clint Eastwood. I went. Oh, no own. It was so it's it it just. It just wasn't more. No wasn't very good, but I. Always Thinking that accident makes me laugh. It's my God. It's almost one of those like just because you can doesn't mean you should. My God. You know it's it's also like I think again off the record of course I, mean I I feel you know different. Different people really do not. Everyone's going to have every skill set, you know. Sarah. And rare exactly and like you know He's. You know he can do a lot. He can do a lot of things like I feel. Like you know on different movies like when you see what some of the people in different departments are such virtuosos, what they do like I can't imagine being a costume designer. The amount I would have to know you know 'cause I just know even learning another instrument like you know. When I picked up the violin, the reason I stop besides it hurting was I was like Oh God this is. Dead even halfway. Good is GonNa take me. Decades? I can't start now. I love the piano when you didn't have space 'cause I would do. Such A. Great Life Lesson, you know. We have priorities your your assignment upright. Those are great. Great it. You've had it for forty years. And I still I call it the magic piano because it for some reason, the keys just feel really nice in any of my friends. Sit down to play. This is. This is really good so a magic piano. But, that's great. Siamese skyways fantastic I. mean I'm a I'm buying I grew up of being obsessive I'm a stymied artists now. which is amazing because what they do, is they? If you'RE A steinway artist, wherever in the world you are. If you need a piano, they'll get you a piano to play they the only thing is they'll I think you or the organization has to pay for just the cartage of it, but they'll just get you so like it's been. It's been a lifesaver actually sometimes when I've had to do an event or something and we didn't event like at Amoeba music right rebel years ago, and and we were like we can use over like a beautiful brand Gan on their. When Wendy, you need it. It's like the coolest like. The I..

Clint Eastwood Sonapur Angelina Jolie nick Gan Wendy Sarah Decades
"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:23 min | Last week

"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I had been cocktail honest in high school and in college where I would lay in bars, tales and I love doing that. That is a lot of fun and and she said you know there's a scene in the movie in the short film where actually in the scene It was a scene with Lauren Bacall and Ben Geserum and Natalie, and says quite a quite a screen debut of for me and she was like. We need a cocktail pianist to play in this restaurant scene. And I said you know I said. Unfortunately I'm really busy. Actually don't I got all this work to do. I don't know and I remember calling a friend of mine, really close friend of Mine Jake and he said He said you said no like. What. How are you not just go do it, you're you're crazy and I said Oh. My God I'm so crazy. Why did I say that? So so I called back and I was like okay now. Totally do this pseudo like and. When I got to said I said to Natalie. Maybe maybe I'll play piece. I wrote actually for the seat. You know so it's really original to this moment right? And she said Great. Go ahead, so I played this peace of mind, and that was really the first. That was the first piece of originally guide that anyone I think ever heard, and it's me playing cocktail piano as Lauren bacall walks by. And and adds a piece called. Forgotten Waltz number two which actually I. Really I feel very close that piece I love the piece, but also that peace will always have a special place in my heart because it really was the first kind of. the first piece I had officially was in a movie that I think. An audience might have seen. Who cares if they so lauren because conservatives McCall. Lauren Bacall hurt. I beg there. That was the craziest thing was so surreal. And! And I you know I remember walking away from the set and just just realizing like why? Why am I not doing this old time? That was not. Not The acting part but but just the music part you know I, think At that point, it had been a four years basically since I graduated in I, had been you know trying to play music in city in doing you know working with friends on things.

Lauren Bacall Natalie Jake Ben Geserum McCall
"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:00 min | Last week

"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Absolutely I remember them asking Danny, often about about Simpson's. They said you know what's it like his. You don't want me to tell you how much work it takes. You want me to tell you, but it's not. It's a lot of. It is it is? It is it's fascinating, actually the length of time I mean it really this is. It's all I do it. It's just a constant. It's a and I'm enamored of it, so there's no, it's not I mean I love it. To US tonight a lot of work. How much music? A one hour. Is So. It's interesting it depends on. It depends on the episode. It depends on the project. You know successions the first TV series that I've worked done. At, you know end in each I would say on average in an episode of a sixty minute episode there is about of score. There is about twenty two twenty three minutes music about twenty twenty music, and that's composed of different things, maybe maybe with a few digestive tracts to you know, something you here in a bar or etcetera. Kendall's wrapping to the Beastie boys or something. Great but yeah. But those are those those I Yeah I would say it's probably around twenty two twenty three minutes, and then there could be an episode where it's less end end. It's it's we never have a preconceived notion of what that amount is. It's totally determined by. Our own sense of the rhythm of of the episode where There's never a, it's not like there's a a template or a map where we say a when this happens, we what's amazing is how how much you relearn it every single time now there's no there's there's there's a sense of of ideas of course, and there's a sense of character development, and there's a sense of tone. I mean one of the things that succession does in such a strong way is explored a the duality of gravitas and absurdity each equally. You know there's no, there's both of those things but because of that you know moment to moment. I don't know what the right answer is and We'll look at the episodes. The editor is will have thoughts my amazing music. Editors will have thoughts. Jesse Armstrong showrunner creator of the show on I will talk. I'll do I'll usually do a pass at an episode of Hey. Here's the nick pass of his. You know here's what I bank here and then I'll have every time. I have a conversation with Jesse and say You know he at this I, mean generally we? We are on the same page about things, but what's fascinating is still. I really trust his instincts on wear. Things should start and stop tone. You know like if I'm always worried like I was saying I'm always worried to am I in my overstaying my welcome here like and there's so many times where I'll say. Is Am I getting in the way of the humor. Emma, you know the stop earlier and and it. It's different. Every time there were times they'll say to me. Actually I want music in this whole scene. And, and that's what fascinates me. Is that no matter how long you do this now? I you you're always newly learning more which to me, that's why it's not a. it's not a science. It's really an art. It's really there's no. There's no rules. Also says a lot about you that that is your. It excites you to do things it's. It's a challenge, and it's interesting because some people would not. Some people want it to be against simple. But that's that's no fun. Fun No. Way If it became formula that would be. A drink. Oh, yeah, be a drag. You would wouldn't be interesting. I think you would You know you'd want to do something else..

editor Emma Simpson Jesse Armstrong US Danny Jesse Kendall twenty twenty
"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:05 min | Last week

"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Now John Williams is the name most people know? But there's a reason is a very specific reason because of the sounds that you associate with life. Come from him. You know and that it will raise agent. Crazy thing when you sort of sit down and go. Oh, God that was that was the end that was and that was you. It's mind incredible you know work is incredible is incredible. Of I'm thinking. I didn't even think about this, too. We started seeking television feeds. Yeah, when I was growing up was I was a TV junkie. I watch star Near. so many of the theme songs were really So closely intertwined with the show. It was a big hit on seventy seven sunset strip snap snap and before Jesse's Tommy, thank you. And they they had a real connections of the show whether it's musically or lyrically and. Law and order where they just a strong. And seinfeld where they little while base the base space plot, Yup right and yeah, and then just recently. Shits Creek use a snare drum, yeah! As their intermittent cute. It's like now there's. Not Not mental music almost non music. Yeah, we're orig- inches. Changes Yeah, yeah yeah in all. I think that's one of the fascinating things. Exactly like there. There are times. I'd. Millions, and billions there, there was just this sort of like a growing sound, and that's it. It plays for that one second, but again I think with something like succession. It makes sense because. The music to me downs Shakespearean it sounds like something grand in that's what got family is not that show is that show needs something a little bit evil. And and what it is, it's it all. It also reminded me a little bit of Monte using capulets. Writes that gets used because all for coffee of course. Unique POW. Yes, this, it's clearly I'm a nerd and this excites me greatly. It's great, though no, but there's it's interesting. 'cause there's there is a an end for me. I think every project is a new opportunity to learn something, and I think that's really what. What certainly would draws me into each new project is? There's almost this assignment. You're given where it's. Here's a world. Here's a set of stories. Here's a set of characters. What would we do now you know, and and so it's kind of exploring that you go and I think in hindsight now. It's clear to me that there was something. In the DNA of the obsession that. Totally actually has this sort of grandeur and this almost like operatic kind of character. You know but at the time I remember I mean my early thoughts warrant to go there. Because because honestly. When I'm scoring stuff, usually my my biggest worry. Is that ever going to step on the toes of the story or then I'm GonNa. Get you know I I'm always very concerned about the you know. It's almost like the hippocratic oath. First do no harm. Like that's above all that my greatest fear is getting in the way, somehow you know, and and I learned over time you see what the creative team is interested. You see what what moves you in the project as you're going, and I think with a film you learn over the course of ninety to one hundred twenty minutes with television. What's really fascinating as you learn over now? This is twenty hours that we have done so far and you know and counting and I think it's a whole other architecture to think about that. As you were saying the idea of like TV I've always thing for me..

John Williams seinfeld Shits Creek Monte Jesse Tommy
"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

05:28 min | Last week

"nicholas k" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Too. Everybody this Maltin on movies I'm wanted an Jessie Nelson. We're talking today to Nicholas Patel via the magic of Zoom. A. Thing thing none of us had ever heard. Handed Scape. But if if it doesn't sound exactly recording quality, perfect, declaration but Nikolas. You have a good speaking. Voice Senate. I'm flattered that you would say so. We're doing our best over here. And we are recording on theoretically a good Mike I'm sure you are we on areas, our dogs like to come in and out as we do this and each time record I keep saying to people I would shut the door to keep them out within the noise. You would hear them saying you've got getting me. No one tells me. I don't go everywhere in my house, so. Little pair patter jingles, just Hercules and jude. Just before we signed on so this week, we were talking about a New York City. Because that's where you grew up. Where you live you and your wife and you don't just live in New York you live in in inside of of inside of New York. You're you are WICCANS, center? Residents. You're like the. Top of the tree. I mean we are. We're in the I think we're in sort of like the epicenter of some some of the arts. In your argument, there's so many wonderful parts of the city, obviously growing up I grew up on the upper west side. right at eighty eight in west end avenue and. We lived in we moved to Connecticut when I was thirteen, and then I would start commuting into the city because I went to high school in Connecticut, and then I would commute to juilliard pre college for lessons, and for classes every weekend and I remember just coming to this part of the city to Lincoln, center and. You know spending those very sort of musically formative years here and I remember a friend of mine at the time. Had An. Apartment in this building here and I remember just visiting the apartment one day, and it's Sorta blew my mind that you could actually live at Lincoln. Center. And and so you know fast forward, you know, let's say what. Twelve twelve thirteen years later. I had been living in little Italy after college, and I bought a grand piano in it legitimately could not fit in my apartment, and so I was like okay. I'M GONNA. Move Uptown, I wanNA move to aside. And I realized I, checked in this building where my friend had lived years ago and they had a rental available, so that was that was about fifteen years ago. I moved into this building and still in this building. I didn't give you a proper bill offer introduction today. We'll get into your your. CV. In the course of things it's just people listening to us right now..

New York City Nikolas Handed Scape Nicholas Patel Jessie Nelson Lincoln Senate little Italy Mike I Connecticut jude
When Denis Met Patty

Optimal Living Daily

05:37 min | 2 weeks ago

When Denis Met Patty

Miami - Death Penalty Trial Of Confessed Parkland Shooter Postponed Indefinitely

Orlando's Evening News

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

Miami - Death Penalty Trial Of Confessed Parkland Shooter Postponed Indefinitely

"Still no trial date yet for the parkland school shooter today attorneys for Nicholas Cruz met with the judge for a status hearing on zoom Cruz is accused of killing seventeen people and wounding seventeen others in twenty eighteen at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school police say Cruz confessed to the shooting and prosecutors are seeking the death penalty the next hearing is set for August twenty

Nicholas Cruz Parkland School Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
Vegas cop shot in head during George Floyd protest is paralyzed

Lee Matthews

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Vegas cop shot in head during George Floyd protest is paralyzed

"Amid all the debate over police reform an officer who came under attack in Las Vegas is in bad shape officer who was shot in the head during the Las Vegas protest is paralyzed from the neck down is on a ventilator and unable to speak officers shape middle lotus we shop on June first during protests over the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police the Nicholas family says the twenty nine year old is expected to stay on the ventilator and was tentatively accepted as a spine rehabilitation center a twenty year old man is charged in the shooting his appointed public defender says his client will plead

Officer Las Vegas George Floyd Minneapolis Nicholas
Truth vs Hollywood

Filmspotting

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Truth vs Hollywood

"Welcome to truth versus Hollywood I'm David, Chen and A. Truth versus Hollywood is look at films that are based on a true story, but we don't just talk about the film. We also talk about that true story. On this podcast will touch on what really happened. How that differs from the film and why and we're not just talking, heads will hear about the true story through interviews from experts, witnesses and people who were involved in it. It's both the real facts and the real facts are l. fix. What do you think that Joanna I loved it today Ridge? Today! We're talking about Martin. Scorsese's classic film Goodfellas Goodfellas is based on the book Wiseguy. Nicholas Pathology which, in turn is based on life of Mobster Henry Hill Hill was actually alive when the film came out and was very pleased with his film based on him, and as we'll talk about later, it definitely had an effect on his life. Pathology worked with Scorsese to write the screenplay and the film was. was a complete. It nominated for six Academy Awards and won one Joe Pesci for supporting actor. It's considered one of the best gangster movies of all times. If I put it on their list of one hundred years, one hundred movies and the Library of Congress decided that it was culturally important and added it to its preservation archives all right well. Let's get to the movie itself. It stars Ray Liotta. Hill Robert Deniro as Jimmy, the Gent Conway, who's based on Jimmy the Gent? Burke Joe Pesci as Tommy devito based on Tommy desimone Paul Sorvino Paul cicero based on Paul Vario and Lorraine Bracco as Henry's wife Karen Hill. Many real life figures at this movie was based off of an apparently Henry Hill ended up getting paid five hundred eighty thousand dollars because of the use of historian, this movie, which is a lot of money to pay to a mobster who has done very horrible things you know in watching this movie again. John Robinson one of the things that. I kind of realized you know or reflected on is the fact that we've been lost you decades seen so many movies about bad men, doing bad things, and that this movie kind of one of the prototypical examples of how they can be glorified an elevated in this. Movie makes that lifestyle look really glamorous while at the same time depicting some of the negative consequence lifestyle, but at the same time it does rubbed me the wrong way that like the people who are involved often are rewarded. We also saw this Martin. Scorsese's Will Wall Street as well. Similar dynamic, there so I'm kind of curious like as you're reflecting on your overall experience of watching the movie, and now that we know little bit more about what happened with the real life characters, and we're GONNA. Talk about it during the courses podcast like. How did it strike you that? This is based off of Real Person I. Think Scar says he couldn't have picked a better release. Go subject to to glum onto here than Henry Hill because though he is gangster and he's fully involved in this gangster life, he is a the likability of this character, which is really what's Cortesi was going for I've seen interviews. We talked about the nineteen thirty two scarface, which was the first time he ever saw. Gangsters depicted as really likable. When you Henry Hill. And he does terrible things, but he's a gangster who is a little squeamish. We see this the film and it's corroborated by true story of his life. He was violent crimes, but he wasn't a a mass murderer and You know the the charisma of him. I think is really important. He wasn't one of the most vicious people in this story. And so I think you're making good point that like. If you're GONNA choose an entry way into this world. Henry Hill is probably the ideal candidate in this case so. Well, the film opens with three men driving in a car, having a seemingly normal evening. It's then revealed that there is a captive in the trunk and than shortly after him, we mmediately get Henry's voiceover with the iconic line as far back as I can remember I always wanted to be a gangster. It's one of the most. Openings and Awesome History Joanna Robinson after nearly three decades. How effective did you find this opening? Well, it's funny. I did not see I was eight years old when fellows came out, or maybe nine so I did not see it in theaters and I didn't see it until later in life and but by then it already seats into the culture because it was so iconic. You know there's. Maniacs good feathers, pigeon parody, and like all sorts of stuff, so I'm going to wear of the beats of it, even though the first exposure to goodfellas was. Is what you're saying. Thousand percent absolutely. But you know so by the time I had seen it. I had also seen so many things that had imitated it, and this is true of like so many of our great films like by the time you get around to watching it. Maybe you seen a bunch of people. Knock it off and so you're like well. How groundbreaking? Is this

Karen Hill Henry Hill Hill Scorsese Joe Pesci John Robinson Goodfellas Goodfellas Henry Nicholas Pathology Martin Joanna I Ray Liotta Hollywood Library Of Congress Academy Awards Tommy Desimone Paul Sorvino Pa Robert Deniro Joanna Robinson A. Truth Jimmy Paul Vario
The Kindness Of Healthcare Workers

Kind World

06:23 min | Last month

The Kindness Of Healthcare Workers

"Let's start with a two thousand fifteen story about how a doctor. Her young patient and his family created an inspiring connection during the darkest of times. Here's the story sheer members at all. One night. I was giving my son Nick a bath as he turned his head I noticed the lump on them. It kind of fell like swollen glands, but it was big. First thing the next morning we were at the doctor's. He said he has cancer. I remember like falling to the floor crying. You know he's six years old. And I said we need to get him to Boston. We had gotten a call from the ambulance transport that he was coming I laid on the stretcher, and then they put him on top of me unbelted us in I remember pacing the floor before he arrived they open the doors and took the stretcher out I. Mean to me. It felt like there was like one hundred people standing there. And I remember melody being there and I remember her just comforting me as we got off of the ambulance. I didn't realize who she was, but I just remembered thinking all right. I'm glad that she's with me. My name is Rosemary Jensen my name's Melody Cunningham. Malady was Knicks Oncologist Nicholas was he had a hard time adjusting to people and melody he never did. He really didn't talk a whole lot. At first in Q. is just angry and afraid, but he loved practical jokes and I am more than happy to be the recipient of practical jokes, so he would put a whoopie cushion in the chair, and then of course it down and. Neck with chest, roar with laughter over and over and over and just. Swiped the heart. Right out of your chest. Knicks doctor for two and a half years, but at that point she went to a different department. Even though she wasn't his doctor, she was still involved. He loves the. Three and a half years he had twenty three surgeries. When he said to us, you know mom cannot gonNA. Die I didn't say no. I said I don't know. Nick was really sick at that point and melody came to the House. which is like a two hour drive from her house to my house? You don't see doctors doing that. Nicholas was all about the army. She had brought down her dad's purple heart. And Nicholas wishes like in awe of it. I remember bringing the Purple Heart out and talking about what it meant. And it. My father died in a car accident when I was actually Knicks Age. He. Pondered that. After I left. I know rose talk to me about the fact that he seemed. Uplifted and strengthened. And so though he never said the words and asked about dying, think in that moment we had that talk about him dying. One morning his breathing was really heavy. His nurse came in and she said. Is there anybody you want me to call when I said I need to call melody. Rose called me. It's like five thirty in the morning. Absolutely no question in my mind that I was going to be there. Off She didn't have to be there. She wasn't as Dr. But she was there. We were laying in the bed pretty much the whole day and I remember her just like. Hold my ankle. Charlie my husband someone side. I was on the other. She was behind me. She was there the whole she didn't move. I truly believe that when you can't care you. Can always he'll? Or try to heal simply by our presence, and often that presence is a silent present. And then when I felt like they needed, it lightened I would tell stories. We laughed because they were quintessential nick stories, and then of course we cried. For many many many hours. Fifteen or eighteen hours. These breaths were continuous. And then they slowed. And then they stopped. I remember laying in bed with them is holding them. And just waiting for that next breath tocom. But, it didn't come. And then I remember hair melody say he's gone rose. I knew he was gone. I just didn't want it. I didn't want him to be. That reality comes in. I think like a Su- NAMI. The funeral parlor came to get him. And she helped me dress some. She walked out with him. The constant communication with melody helps me remember Nick and brings back all of the joys I had with him. I'VE BEEN LIVING DOWN IN MEMPHIS, for the last nine years, but we still stayed in touch, even after all these years later like I'll be talking to her, and she'll tell me a funny story that I forgot. He's to rollerblade around the hospital all the time. Over the loudspeaker we had to be like Nicholas Johnson get back to your room or you're grounded. She remembers it all. Care for a family. Am there for the duration?

Nick Knicks Oncologist Nicholas Nicholas Johnson Melody Cunningham Boston Rose Dr. But Rosemary Jensen Su- Nami Memphis Charlie
Diocese Of Brooklyn, New York Reopens Churches For Private Prayer

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:24 sec | Last month

Diocese Of Brooklyn, New York Reopens Churches For Private Prayer

"Churches in the diocese of Brooklyn re opened today but only for private prayer and devotion funerals baptisms and weddings could also take place spot with a maximum of ten people anyone who enters a church will have to wear a mask the Brooklyn bishop Nicholas dimarzio says he hopes were opening their churches will help provide comfort to the

Nicholas Dimarzio Brooklyn
UConn student accused of murder last seen in Pennsylvania: Police

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:02 min | Last month

UConn student accused of murder last seen in Pennsylvania: Police

"A UConn student and double murder suspect is still on the loose twenty three year old Peter Manfredonia allegedly killed two people in Connecticut a twenty three year old woman whose boyfriend twenty three year old Nicholas Eisele was found shot to death in derby Conn said that she was abducted by Manfredonia she was eventually found safe at a rest stop near Paterson New Jersey with her car which she said Manfredonia had used as a getaway vehicle Michael Dolan is a lawyer for the suspect's family either if you're listening you are logged your parents your sister's your entire family loves you Manfredonia who is from sandy hook Connecticut is also suspected of killing a sixty two year old man with the sword or machete in Willington Connecticut on Friday he was last spotted walking along some railroad tracks in east Stroudsburg Pennsylvania he's believed to be armed with several guns stolen during a home invasion Connecticut state police should have more in a news conference

Peter Manfredonia Connecticut Nicholas Eisele Conn Paterson New Jersey Michael Dolan Willington Connecticut Pennsylvania Uconn Murder Sandy Hook Connecticut Stroudsburg
The rise of Wikipedia as a source of medical information

WBBM Programming

06:47 min | Last month

The rise of Wikipedia as a source of medical information

"Any number of US wikipedia is the go to website for the latest on covert nineteen so how's it measuring up wired magazine editor in chief Nicholas Thompson went searching for answers one of the strangest things about the modern internet has been the rise of wikipedia it's just a decade ago when we talked about the site as let's be blunt please for lies and nonsense wikipedia is the best thing ever anyone in the world can write anything they want about any subject so you know you are getting the best possible information but since then the site is transformed today we keep pedia is regularly the first place many of us check for information about everything in fact we could PDS pages of Corbett nineteen in the pandemic are viewed more than a million times a day an edited almost every hour of the day chances are good that when you visit the page thank you James Heilman may have just finished editing we don't have a vaccine but we do know that this disease can be stocks James Heilman or doctor James as he is known is one of the hundred editors are so with wiki project medicine which edits and reviews all the medical content on wikipedia his view the only proven way to stop coping nineteen is through social distancing do you think that social distancing is working yes definitely we have a good understanding of the transmission of disease you know if everybody was too old and currently still for four weeks this disease would be eradicated in his other life Heilman is an ER doctor at a small hospital in Canada I do not recommend people trust wikipedia blindly you know I think doing so would be silly yeah you know people shouldn't trust other sources of information blindly either wikipedia runs solely on the good will of volunteers like Dr Hileman some of your typical denizens of the internet others are academics and retirees like Rosie goodnight Stevenson we are diverse of wikipedia are really like a learning machine we collaborate we have networks of people who work in various areas she wrote English wikipedia six million article last year we've learned that what we did initially which were write articles that maybe didn't have a reference or enough references that that wasn't the best choice for encyclopedia article she says references and transparency are critical to wikipedia's success you can check every added if something is wrong you can go ahead and fix it it relies on reliable sources Catherine Morris the CEO of the wikimedia foundation the nonprofit that runs wikipedia she says that in comparison to the news we get off social media wikipedia almost always wins it turns out there's a lot of challenges with social networks when it comes to information distribution a lot of questions about whether they can be trusted with monitoring for that Moore says having your own private newsfeed can actually divide us what's the problem that we keep pedia doesn't have there's just one front page wikipedia doesn't matter if you are in Iran or in Italy or in Japan or sitting here in New York City you're all looking at the same information still even though medical pages are strictly monitored by the wiki med project and hot topics to get a lot of page views are carefully edited inaccurate information persists on some of wikipedia's less red pages when I started working on the story I looked myself up on wikipedia and someone had edited my entry to describe me as a Martian who is Nicholas Thompson according to wikipedia Nicholas Thompson is a Martian technology journalist so how do you keep information accurate and wikipedia wikipedia feels the answers to recruit more and more diverse editors one way in fact wikipedia has tried to expand its pool of editors is to edit a thoughts like this one held in Hong Kong in March with the PD becomes more important because of people using it in a more and more widely difference organization with their own political aims and goals what try influencing wikipedia companies governments and politicians try to edit wikipedia entries for their own benefit but we keep pedia editors are using computer programming to fight back now every time someone makes an edit from the White House the computer algorithm notes the edits and sends out a tweet about it but it's no secret why someone would want to influence wikipedia knowledge is power and that means that it is fundamentally disruptive often to those in power if you think about the history of what wikipedia is it's actually pretty radical and I don't mean that in like a political sort of left right away I mean that it is an inversion of power structures this idea the information can and should be available to all but it's no secret why someone would want to influence wikipedia which explains why lowly wikipedia which was founded in two thousand one by Larry Sanger and Jimmy Wales almost as a kind of experiment has grown to be one of the most visited websites on the planet it also explains why it's banned in China in fact one in three Americans now gets their medical information from the web which is fine with doctor how I don't mind having an educated patient and you think that having accurate information about Kobe nineteen on wikipedia can save lives you know right now the only tools we have at our disposal to combat this virus is education around how it spreads you know what this disease can be stopped by knowledge I genuinely think that Peter runs on generosity and care somehow this encyclopedia on the internet has given an outlet to millions of people to show that good in case you were wondering on March thirtieth an anonymous internet user base in Hillsboro Oregon using a cellphone decided to make two changes to wikipedia one was a detail about baseball's opening day and the other was about me I'm no longer a Martian technology journalist I am an American technology journalist so thank you anonymous internet user

United States
Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

Bob and Sheri

05:03 min | Last month

Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

"Time now are for the drinking People's movie a lot critic more and alcohol I demand. sales up He is fifty three percent dead to me too on much? Netflix. Make you do strange How you doing things? Like listen to excellent? this but Tennessee This is woman another was arrested winner from for Netflix. repeatedly calling That I nine probably one one would not asking have seen police the bring if a helicopter my wife hadn't because kept talking Blake about Shelton people was trying telling to kill her her about it I. and I do like Christina He seems applegate like a nice and I've been man watching her since married with children we were just talking and she's about turned him out to on be the voice a fantastic and I mean Gwen actor Stefani and she when I just picture keeps hers getting better living somewhere. and also like I picture Linda. her living somewhere Chiarinelli like London that Senate. or She's New York so or La. She's loose living on. and crazy. Blake Shelton's farm She's perfect for in the part. Now this is Oklahoma. one of those reviews I just where don't think her an sadly Oklahoma so he I can't must really tell he must you anything really be something. you This all lady I also can give. claimed You is the that there big was picture a man in the woods with no with a details knife and and I urge you to That be she's careful dating if Eric. you start Church reading about and this show Dolly. or Parton talking was to people flying about in that night always to see remember. her. Her name Just is Mary. let Myers my education. police they pair The less of visit you to know make sure she the was okay better off. You and are they found of course an open bottle of vodka because on the table because in if smelled if if of alcohol I tell and had slurred speech. anything that goes She was on charged with in misusing. the first episode Nine one one then so it's I just know not it's the stuff same. It's just not Staying the same. in You just all have the to time sit down but and watch it. you gotta But back off I will from the say bottle there folks. Christina applegate. I'm She plays with Jin you Blake. Shelton a really wouldn't be my first uptight. pick as my Real celebrity estate agent assassin. living in California. No not She's at got all. two Although and she has he was just probably lost a crack her husband shot he's to a real a hit outdoorsy and guy. run He driver. just doesn't seem to have that She's kind of Mollison. really sad she's Let's go very to today's very more of mad the day. and It's Scott she's completely wearing who frustrated says that because he has discovered not only has she lost her husband. what he believes It seems is the like entrance the police to an underground are alien just not base. working hard enough to find Google the person Earth helped who ran him him find down. it. I mean It's there's on a lot a small other cases uninhabited island but you know for in her. Indonesia. This only thing And he believes an it desperation. is a doorway to She's an underground joined alien grief base counseling because it group. doesn't fit in with its I environment. really believe It's you in could a secluded probably location. made a pretty good Where show. quote Just aliens based on love the to Grief have Counseling a hidden base? Group. It's it's really But I've good looked at these pictures. but It's there. also She meets an his secluded hippie location. woman. Where Nicholas And it's Cage around would her. love She's to have around a summer her age house and her something? name is That's Judy not necessarily and she's aliens. played by Linda Carter. Using Nellie Google and Earth tools. they He could measured not the opening be defined. more. It was twenty meters across Judy is which free he says spirit. is She's big enough so to calm. fit Not a a lot care of in the alien world. ships Jan is wrapped so up text tied as the word a two dollar Moron watch two and gene eight eight gene winds two up six spilling two her guts seven to judy four three seven. and We'll they send wind it up to you moving and judy you can into decide the for guest yourself house. of Scott has And found if the that doorway were to all an underground the show was ufo about station. it would be well When you worth text the word watching Moron to eight eight eight but two six wait. two seven three seven There's you're automatically more registered to win a bottle of our secret. very own hand sanitizer. Judy It's has called secret. people Gm me say. has secrets. I think Jen's he actually dead found husband a has secrets door and so to does a liquor just store about every character in this show so while warning we're found captivated that by the raw emotion I tell you what that it. shows You're a pervert between and Jin. you are Judy really focused on one we're area. also The entertained. I don't understand By how funny but the the the back pull and forth must be between really them something is. a serial We are still underwear intensely thief in Singapore trying to solve admitted the multiple in court that mysteries he snuck that out are being during uncovered lockdown and those to mysteries. steal a bunch of bras We are dying and underwear to know the answer to Number is what one makes us you don't click mess around the next with episode police. sterner In Singapore instead of it is off they the TV. will cain you literally The show is designed and when for they say been it's watching. a lockdown. You know They like probably crack cocaine. mean it. A The mayor government third designed over there for repeat so sales. sneaking It's out to steal people's it's exactly Bras the and same underwear. thing. I Each episode you know if is I thirty were if minutes I had that rated Rook R Liberty. for language. I don't know where There's I would ten go episodes per because season. none of my neighbors Two hanged seasons their underwear are on out. Netflix. Online's Right now where this where is would I an go extinct. to steal bras Just and underwear awesome to awesome. break into Awesome their house show and going to the is drawers? dramatic I guess is so extremely literally funny. and you know But the thing it's is a thriller like with at the same time the Internet. at all You of this could especially in theory have all the if women's underwear your past you want forty delivered to your and you've lived role through some for stuff these guys is not because I just was talking owning to the underwear. my daughter about It it needs and to she's the full married long. just Someone got married needs to and have she been goes. stolen I'm just I just. like It's not the this same particular. for me. I don't Category get to show of and pervert I said that's because as you have law going lived some on life. here You have to live a little bit of the life. transcends I think to really underwear. share you. Watch I some of this know right. but you're right. He Yeah would have I to don't break want into to say somebody's house like you. or to store I right want to give anything away. because It this is the you show know for some stealing grown people. women's Yeah underwear you've off got to of have had the clotheslines. life slap you in the face a few times That's and see in some stuff the same I mean and era that's what as makes it above so so stealing so good a pie my score from on this the farmer's is five wife's solid. kitchen Budweiser's window this house. right I just and this I is just another finished example up watching of why Hollywood. any woman So could trust I'm done you with that because and given I liked the choice very much y'all probably and all I between see skill you underwear is and stealing What a you're pie talking about the show you're talking about dead's meet Netflix love pie but I would take Netflix's the pie. I pushing this so coke hard. exterior When when did they first release it? trust full Nineteen of a suspicious released in nineteen also in nineteen. for your painting. I don't So I don't why want do to you be think known bobbling as up under a serial the radar for a underwear while? Now thing it's just you it's know. exploded I because mean people okay. are looking I for stuff got to a little watch. drunk one night and You I stole can't stop. somebody's I mean underwear once you start but cereal an episode says at the that end is. That's what you I just want to be known for. the only Let's thirty awful minutes is okay. that There when are only you thirty die minutes so it won't be in your newspaper. you just you Obituary gotta you gotTa but know people what's going will go on. They leave you back. right Serial at the perfect Pani. time that you want That's to exactly know. What's that right. little mix? I don't have many times. I said Let's let's close just watch out the first we. five We minutes have not just mentioned the first this five yet. minutes But we have to shout stop. out porn You can't star stop Ron Jeremy you sold who me. has I'm to become an environmental watching activist. so He's five. fighting Frosty to buds save a tree. for That is deadly. dad

Judy It Blake Shelton Netflix Christina Applegate Scott Christina He JIN Singapore Indonesia Slurred Speech. Tennessee Ron Jeremy Senate. Google Crack Cocaine. Nellie Google Myers Linda Carter Oklahoma California
New York - Man Armed With Knife Fatally Shot By Police In Harlem, Woman Found Dead At Scene

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | Last month

New York - Man Armed With Knife Fatally Shot By Police In Harlem, Woman Found Dead At Scene

"Well he's still trying to put together their reasons for a while standing and shooting that left two people dead including the suspect shot dead by police but it's seven o'clock Wednesday evening a one St Nicholas terrace near west one hundred twenty seventh street Harlem man armed with a knife and a gun shot and killed the woman answering the door police tell ten ten wins the woman was a man sister in law chief of patrol Fastow Ricciardo says the police quickly arrived on the scene that confronted the attacks verbal commands

Fastow Ricciardo Harlem
Has the Pandemic Changed You?

Money For the Rest of Us

08:42 min | Last month

Has the Pandemic Changed You?

"We don't really know what's going to happen with the economy with financial markets with monetary policy with the pandemic. The world is a constant series of endless surprises. Both good and bad and then as things happen that we and others don't anticipate we emotionally react to them and often overreact. Those surprises we become fearful in greedy asset bubbles conform well other acid categories. That might get too cheap. This pandemic the coronavirus pandemic has been a major shock to me and I think to most people. We certainly didn't anticipate it. And now we're coping with a dramatically different world in previous episodes. I've discussed the economic monetary and investment impact of the pandemic and its aftermath in this episode. I want to focus on how this change has impacted US personally. I see three patterns that are emerging two of which I've discussed in an earlier episode of the podcast episode one ninety seven the power of less and local these three emerging patterns are less local and leap less the principal. I've discussed a lot the same. Nicholas tile up in his book skin in the game talked about a principle called via negative. He wrote that. Knowledge grows by subtraction by identifying things. That aren't working. And removing those things he says the act of removing is powerful and less error prone then acting by addition as we've been isolated lockdown in our homes. It's given us time to think about the things that we have and do. We really need them. I'll give you a simple example this past Friday the prelude I my daughter. My daughter-in-law and my son drove three cars for seventeen hours straight through FROM PHOENIX TO IDAHO. And once we arrived here the pro. I went up to our cabinet. Open it up because we're going to spend most of the summer here in Teton Valley. We have a bit of a mice problem at this cabin. There were mice droppings everywhere. We had to clean them up. My approach to combat adding mice is to put out bait boxes with Barbie poison. I spoke to the previous owners about this. And they said they didn't have any problem with mice although they lived here full time and maybe they had a cat but my approach this time is. I took all the boxes away because for one thing when mice would come in and start eating it would wake me up and so I figured just them all out. Don't attract mice by giving them something to eat and then we'll see what happens now. This is a simple example. Simple experiment to see how it works out. But I suspect there's other things that you're doing less of gyms have been closed for most of this time. I bought a kettle bell and have been using that for strength training. So I'm canceling my gym membership. A new listener wrote me. The other day said he couldn't go to the gym so he discovered podcasting and discovered my podcast. We're travelling less. Airline travel is down ninety percent from a year ago. There was an article recently in the Wall Street. Journal talked about how air travel is going to change less direct flights slower boarding process as they board from the rear. First temperature checks before you get on the plane. Perhaps immunity passports everyone wearing mask not going to be as much fun to travel by. Plane Anymore. What are you doing less of are considering doing less of perhaps less going out less business less travel most people are doing less their subtracting things from their lives and it can be powerful. We can give us a sense of relief when we remove something from our life. Now it means we need to be strategic when we add something. We can't just extract ourselves from the economy but we can be strategic in our purchases which brings us to the second emerging pattern of local. Many many people have started working remotely and have loved it. I've had two friends that mentioned to me recently that they never want to have to go back to the office again. One of the outstanding questions is how permanent will this be? And the potential impact on commercial real estate commercial real estate prices were down ten percent year over year in April. We've seen this tram go back and forth. There was a phase where remote work was very much in fashion. And then the CEO's wanted to bring the workers back so they could all collaborate. So I don't see all companies doing this but I certainly do believe you'll see much more remote work because you can be more productive. I have worked remotely for almost twenty years now and you can be highly productive. Other aspects of local supply. Chains have been severely disrupted by this pandemic companies realized that maybe such an extensive global supply chain has some weaknesses. Will we see more? Local domestic manufacturing you're seeing modes of transportation be more local. New York Times reported in March nationwide sales of bicycles equipment and repair services almost doubled from the past year. A lot of people don't want to commute on the subway anymore or the buses and so they want to commute by bicycle. See how that goes when winter comes. These are local trans. The pro and I are going to do much more local travel. We are purchasing a camper conversion. This is a two thousand. Chevy suburban converted into a camper with solar panels. Abedin back no kitchen. But we'll be doing a lot more distributed camping on bureau of Land Management and National Forest Land in Idaho Wyoming and Montana more local with bet your local pattern for shopping. How has that changed? We've done a lot more curbside. Pickup of groceries takes more planning. It can be a little more frustrating. We busted on instant card that can be frustrating to the other day at the grocery store. We ordered two pounds of bananas and two Carrots and we got two bananas and two pounds of Carrots with institute. We Wanted Rama noodles. They didn't have any says. They substituted two huge bags of cheese and CARAMEL. Popcorn mixed together. How you interact locally with WHO? This is one of the biggest changes that I see. We can't be locked down in our homes forever. We're going to have choose to interact. If you have kids they want to interact and so deciding how. And what type of social distancing any social distancing will you use will be critical? We're going to have to kind of navigate this new culture until there's a vaccine if we get a vaccine. I was somewhat surprised as we drove those many miles from Phoenix to Idaho. How FEW PEOPLE? We saw wearing masks and how many people we saw gathering together strangers at restaurants or stores. It's almost as if people think government says the economy's open so we're back Enormou- now maybe the pandemic will just go away. But that doesn't appear to be with. The science suggests the infection rate was very high before the economic shutdown and now the curve has been flattened but everything. I've seen suggests the coronavirus has not gone away bowl. See and we have to figure out how are we going to navigate our social interactions locally

Idaho Phoenix Teton Valley Bureau Of Land Management Enormou Principal Chevy New York Times CEO Journal National Forest Land Suburban Idaho Wyoming
Escapism vs Essentialism - Short Term vs Long Term

Trent365

02:42 min | Last month

Escapism vs Essentialism - Short Term vs Long Term

"The discussion about escapism verses essentially is really question about short term versus long term. Now what does that mean for Your Business? My Buddy Nicholas Ronco headed into the other day with my other buddy rod gun tools on his show the rod life now put a link to that video in the comments below so that you can go and check it out but one of the discussions that one of the parts of this discussion. That became really interesting was when they talk about spas and this concept of escapism versus essentially. And what Nicole was saying was basically much. Spas tend to offer escapism. Whether that's in the form of pampering beauty. It's an escapism. Whereas what we really need to be focused on for the long term sustainability of a business is the essentially which might be things like I guess. Health Nutrition exercise and look my views on the idea of spas once on needs a pretty well known. So why go into that but I do think it's an interesting lens to look at things through escapism and essentially them because to me. It's a question of short term versus long term. Escapism is all about that. Short-term response from reality whereas essentially is about more of a long term sustainable view two things and look I think in the context of every business both the fine and certainly a market for both certainly right now during this crisis. No one would begrudge you a little bit of escapism. Let's be honest but at some point you need to get back to reality. You need to move on to more long-term more essential things so I think when you look at Your Business. It's good to look at it through these lanes of essentially escapism. What are you actually selling? You selling essential items or are you selling escapees and again either is fine and the reality is most businesses have probably selling both. But I think it's important to know at which point you're selling escapism versus essentially them. Because that to me informs how you'RE GONNA message it informs me what the price point. He's IT informs. Even the timing of when you're offering it so I think looking at your business through a lens of escapism versus essentially short term versus long term. I think it's a really powerful thing to help. I guess redefined what you'll really selling them. What the real value is that your bringing to the market. So do yourself a favor gone have looked you'll business through that lanes of escapism. Essentially I think it might be pretty revealing orbiting. That is it for today. I do thank you for your time and I. We'll be back again tomorrow.

Nicole Nicholas Ronco
11 Firefighters Hurt After Explosion, Fire In Downtown Los Angeles

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | Last month

11 Firefighters Hurt After Explosion, Fire In Downtown Los Angeles

"Eleven firefighters are injured after an explosion in downtown Los Angeles the explosion happened around six thirty Pacific time while firefighters were putting out the building fire the Los Angeles fire department says the firefighter sustained burns and other injuries in more than two hundred and thirty firefighters responded to the blaze before it was extinguished about two hours after it was reported Los Angeles fire department spokesman Nicholas park branch spoke with K. C. B. S. T. V. now we have the medical aspect and a fire aspect and so crews jumped in to continue each leg of that now we have over two hundred thirty firefighters responding and we have a defensive firefight which we were fighting the fire from outside the structure at

Los Angeles Nicholas Park K. C. B. S. T.
10 firefighters hurt in explosion, fire in Los Angeles

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | Last month

10 firefighters hurt in explosion, fire in Los Angeles

"Six eleven firefighters are injured after an explosion in downtown Los Angeles the explosion happened around six thirty Pacific time while firefighters were putting out a burning building the Los Angeles fire department says eleven firefighters sustained burns or other injuries and more than two hundred and thirty firefighters responded to the blaze before it was extinguished about two hours after it was first reported Los Angeles fire department spokesman Nicholas prying reports with Casey B. S. TV now we have the medical aspect and a fire aspect and so crews jumped in to continue each leg of that now we have over two hundred thirty firefighters responding and we have a defensive firefight which we were fighting the fire from outside the structure at this time the cause of the incident is now under

Los Angeles Nicholas Prying Casey B.
Venezuela's Ongoing Political Saga

Latino Rebels Radio

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Venezuela's Ongoing Political Saga

"Venezuela is in the news again. There's a failed raid. Actually two of the advisors of one guy lull have resigned. They resigned Monday so I wanted to talk about Venezuela a little bit third rail topic of Latin America so over the weekend. I had the opportunity to connect with Gabriel Hetland Assistant Professor of Latin American Caribbean and US. Latino studies at the University of Albany and here is the conversation. Hey Gabriel thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio great to be here. Venezuela seems to be doesn't seem to go away before we get into the deeper issues regarding Venezuela. I would love to get your reaction about what has happened over the last Last week in continuing this whole notion of this ex green beret with a raid. That was going to go after. Nicholas model can you begin to breakdown your reaction or or give your take on all this. I'll do my best. I'm shaking my head as you say. This almost makes me chuckle. And I've heard so many accurate ways to describe it tragedy meets farce handler with Alaska historian at nyu said someone else. From the Obama X. Obama said described it as keystone cops meets failed Bay of Pigs invasion someone else a bad rambo movie. I mean it's almost absurd if it weren't tragic at the same time so you know the sort of short story is that there's a a ex green beret Jordan gaudreau based in Florida. He's apparently guarded trump at a rally at some point in the last couple of years He seems to be described as totally out of touch with reality by everyone. Who's met him over the last several years he got involved into that. Anna's Waylon really randomly was last February at this concert. That March I guess when Richard Branson people was having a concert in Kuku Columbia on the border blah to raise for humanitarian aid and basically for an armed invasion of Venezuela by the opposition at failed utterly but from that point on Goo throw with his Sort OF SECURITY OPS Company in Florida Silver Corp got interested in Venezuela and the money that might be involved with toppling meadow and it as more and more of the details. Come out it's truly scandalous and Lurid and it's GonNa Impact Venezuela for a long time to come but There was a armed invasion. Which happened just over week ago on Sunday. and You know about little less than two dozen Folks got got off a boat An eight of them were killed and another fifteen or so were captured by the Venezuelan army. Apparently fisherman actually are the ones who initially captured them and their plan was to sort of invade Venezuela's through the ocean. You Know Landa boat make their way to cut off us. Topple them Dodo administration free Venezuela goto warehouses filled with cash. Us dollars take the cash leave and be treated as heroes Total absurd but what really makes it know scandalous as the main opposition leader. One Guy Dough is involved in this And there's more and more evidence coming out that he knew something about what was going to happen. It's not entirely clear how much he now and how much he knew and it appears that he didn't know a whole lot but in over last year he had a series of meetings. I think by phone basically with Guerrero and there's recordings with his voice and he's been invited to save. These are not true and he hasn't done so to my knowledge so far where he you know says it will support the agreement and one of his deputies apparently gave fifty thousand dollars as an initial payment which was supposed to go up to two hundred some million dollars And other Guido officials apparently had some level of knowledge the trump administration has denied it but in very interesting terms where Secretary Pompeo has said the US was not directly involved and so his use of the word directly suggests that they were somehow involved. That's what I mean exactly. And here's the thing that I would say about all this. Given how third rail of an issue Venezuela is there because it's so damn partisan this topic you could literally make a case that each party involved could have been involved. You know what I'm saying. I'm not trying to be like that's how messed up. Venezuela's right now in terms of the understanding because I'm sure that there are people who are saying well. This is his mother will conspiracy. You know he just created all this because you know the opposition and goes like I don't know anything about it the US. I feel like it was being taken from like amateur hour so it Kinda to me speaks to how Venezuela is often misunderstood misrepresented because it is being seen through a very hyper partisan lens that is so complex that I don't think it's reality right now in this is sort of an example of this absurd story that this sort of like bad. Hollywood

Venezuela United States Guy Dough Gabriel Hetland Assistant Prof Gabriel University Of Albany Latin America Venezuelan Army Barack Obama Florida Alaska Guerrero NYU Richard Branson Lurid Keystone Nicholas Landa Hollywood
Princeton names its first black valedictorian

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Princeton names its first black valedictorian

"Princeton University has named a black valedictorian Nicholas Johnson is a Canadian student majoring in operations research and financial engineering he tells CNN the honor is empowering particularly given the school's historical ties to slavery and he hopes the achievement helps motivate and inspire younger black students particularly those interested in stem

Princeton University Nicholas Johnson CNN
What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

Short Wave

05:17 min | 2 months ago

What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

"So you're way to find out why you were feeling high. After talking to random people you delved into the science of strangers. Yeah I I started looking into it and it turns out. There's this Newish Line of research examining this very question. When is the last time you yourself talk to a stranger? Who Gosh usually that would be so easy to answer this. Is Elizabeth done a psychology professor who studies happiness at the University of British Columbia? So done I started thinking about the importance of strangers when she noticed something odd happening with her boyfriend. Back in Grad School. Benjamin was a lovely person but Benjamin happened to be in a little bit of a bad mood. He would act a bit cranky grumpy around me longtime girlfriend now that that was okay and I would. I would stuff with it. We are crankiest around the ones. We Love True True. But but then they'd run into a stranger on their way to dinner or something and her boyfriend would perk right up like he would suddenly become pleasant and cheerful and he'd often stay that way being a better mood even after the running Like a little stranger boost. Yeah and wanted to know why. So she conducted a study. She got a bunch of couples together in a lab and she asked everyone to predict if they'd feel happier interacting with their own beloved partner or complete stranger from one of the other couples. I'm guessing they chose their own partner. Like that feels like the safest choice. That's definitely what they chose but with done found was that people actually ended up reporting feeling just as good after interacting with a total stranger as they did after interacting with their own partner. Ooh Drama Drama Ya. I know it was also surprising because for a long time. Researchers had mainly focused on the effects of spending time with intimates like our friends and family not complete randoms. You know I think we consider these interactions to be trivial. They happen quickly and spontaneously most of the time. We don't really give them a second thought so don't want it to know like what is up with. These stranger interactions and over the next decade she conducted a few more studies looking at how these interactions affect our wellbeing including the study at a coffee shop in Vancouver where she got people to either have a conversation with a Barista or to just get their coffee and get out. Be Totally Utilitarian about it. Which by the way is how done usually likes to roll. I really like efficiency. This is a woman after my own heart. Yeah me too but what done founded that just. Having brief interactions with the BARISTA would on a scale of one to five make people feel happier like six tenths of a point better in terms of positive affect and a half. A point might not sound like that big a difference but actually compared to a lot of other findings in our field. It's pretty solid given how minimal the intervention that we're using here is do we know why your way well. There's only been a handful of studies so far so researchers don't really know what's happening just yet but Dunne's theory. Is that when you talk to a stranger? You generally try to be friendly and cheerful. Because that's the social norm in a lot of places right and so just by acting more cheerful. That can shape how you feel and I imagine like you know bumping into a stranger kind of jerks you out of the routine of daily life maybe makes you feel like. I don't know I feel like a little more awake after I have a nice interaction with a stranger And I think when these interactions go well it can also affirm your existence There's this study that showed when participants were given I contact by stranger passing them on the street. They reported feeling more socially connected than when a stranger looked through them. As if they weren't there are such fleeting moments in our daily lives and yet be really powerful and just making people feel you know I am seen. I'm connected people around me notice my presence but what about people who? Maybe don't like talking to strangers. Yeah I looked into it. And there's this interesting study. By behavioral scientists Nicholas Julia Schroeder that found that commuters on trains and buses routinely reported a more positive experience when they talk to strangers even when they said they preferred writing alone in solitude. Oh yes I remember this study. There was this like big gap between how they thought interacting with a stranger would make them feel and what actually happened. Which Kinda loved. Yeah I mean I think it's also kind of tragic because it means that there are people who think they don't like talking to strangers and so don Even though it would probably make them happier in the moment and then the cycle just goes on and

Benjamin Partner Elizabeth Nicholas Julia Schroeder Grad School University Of British Columbia Don Even Vancouver Dunne Professor
"nicholas k" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:55 min | 3 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nicholas moulder noted that the idea of a war economy has come to mean many things productivity sacrifice reform solidarity and resourcefulness and that the rhetoric of wartime idealism spills over into economic policy I can have an impact lasting long after the armistice is signed Nicholas welcome to the show thanks very much for having me wrote you wrote war economies don't suspend politics they raise the stakes that's right right now for example when you look at approval ratings trump's approval ratings have gone up a bit and in many other democracies the approval ratings of incumbent leaders have gone up to so it seems like a huge incumbency advantage but only time will tell whether of the corona virus crisis will provide a lasting political benefit because it's exactly because people now seem to have put a lot of faith in leaders that these leaders can also squandered that trust much more quickly so I think that what seems to be a kind of rallying around the flag effect could very quickly turn into mass disillusionment you wrote that there is a tendency for more progressive policies to come out of work on it means I'm not convinced your skepticism is very understandable because four sweet assisted them with this fact where politics is sort of suspended and everyone just agrees to do with the government tells them but if we actually look at both World War one and World War two that was a little old what came out of those wars in fact the organization of militancy of labor also the claims of veterans of windows disenfranchised groups like African Americans in the United States made much larger claims to participation in society afterwards forces are unleashed in a wartime economy is that even governments that have conservative politics we'll find it quite difficult to restrain but writing in dissent last week historian Tim Barker did you read that piece yes he urged us to stay away from war analogies or more to the point to stay away from using national security as a basis for action because it could also be used as a rationale for even more draconian immigration policies for xenophobia do you worry when we pull the lever that is so associated with the real war to markers arguments is very cute about warning about the dangers and and I agree with that I would just differ slightly from him in emphasizing that we currently are of course not in a war I've actually been quite surprised that it has taken so relatively long for trump and trump is to turn corona virus into arguments against immigration I would have thought they would have done that much more quickly but even as they are doing that they're still reliance on China and other east Asian countries are now for providing supplies last Sunday there was a big error lift of supplies from East Asia that arrived at JFK of Moscow's gloves thermometers and I think that that was already happening in the verse one and two which are remembered as moments of increased nationalism of course none of national self reliance and self sufficiency but in fact already at that point there were very globalized supply chains and even the American war efforts was dependent not just on the raw materials from abroad so Robert from Latin America and Africa and Asia ten aluminium in center of America was using its productive base in order to build equipment that the rest of the world used in order to fight fascism that's something that right now interestingly is kind of inverters were in it lendlease in reverse situation because most of the production of medical equipment happens in East Asia and so both the United States and Europe are having to rely on an average now that is being established from East Asia to Europe and the United States we're still in a very international moment it's just that the flows are going in the other direction this time you wrote that this wasn't so much a problem of prioritizing X. Bender chairs are limited resources the big issue in this case maybe the unique issue is sustaining circulation when people are locked down you call this the ventilation or butter di Lemah as opposed to the old guns and butter one could you fill that out for me the old dilemma of guns and butter is essentially about priority what do you do when you have a limited set of resources and you must choose in the short term to spend them on defense on military production that's the gums park or on civilian production at that's better now a lot of people have been arguing that what we face now is this choice between saving lives and restarting the economy what we're really dealing with here is whether we can freeze the economy for as long as is needed to control the virus or sacrificed enormous amounts of lives to continue with the circulation and that's why I called and ventilation or butter because whether we keep the economy on a sort of life support or want to continue production and circulation at all costs you said that the war itself will not necessarily give us what we want politically for the future but we can see that it creates a common morality but for how long if you look at what works to the kind of moral economy that came out of that conflict the idea that when people have to mobilize to confront a common threats they have to put their lives on the line fighting or they have to put their neighbor forego wage increases for growth freedoms that they have in peacetime then they will also Dimond a look back forward when that situation ends World War two created a kind of moral order that I think persisted for decades in the United States and when it came to burden sharing redistribution what sort of public services our Jeanne normal and general and shared the end of that order didn't come until the late seventies and early nineteen eighties it persisted for four decades after the war so I think that the changes can be quite long lost but I mean you're looking at our government now right at president trump and this Congress you think that this crisis and this use of wartime economic policies can ignite a similar sense of responsibility from them I think it's important to look beyond trump in this regard having the right institutions and policies also matters and I still think that there is a lot that we can do that will be in place for the next president I find it very difficult to predict what the ultimate political upshot of this crisis will be for politics but it's certain that the challenge of climate change is exactly the kind of long run problem for which we need to state capacity state capacity that this crisis has exposed is missing in the United States the point of building a strong health care and planning and administrative states is that you have a well functioning government no matter who's in power thank you very much thank you very much for having me on birth Nicolas molders in economic historian at Cornell University his article in foreign policy is called the corona virus war economy will change the world one other thing worth saying it's just there's this expression that we're all Keynesians in a foxhole so the ideas of John Maynard Keynes and which was basically the idea out underneath a lot of war economics in the welfare state because we all you know even people who normally don't panic governments and state action in an emergency situation will intervene in order to save themselves using the power of government and the state George Orwell once said never use a metaphor simile or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print he said worn out metaphors have lost all of market power and are merely used because they save people the trouble of inventing phrases for themselves we asked listeners which coronavirus metaphors were dominating when they happened when French president Emmanuel.

Nicholas moulder
"nicholas k" Discussed on Geeks Under the Influence

Geeks Under the Influence

04:52 min | 3 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Geeks Under the Influence

"The views and opinions expressed on Geeks or the influence or that of the panelists and our sponsors Amazon.com mtpa. Parental discretion is advised. Are you saying that? Nicholas cage created country pop Pickup no no fuck I watch con air and it was like I have an idea I would never put that on him. Thank you for that allows you put on. A cage is not one of them. There are a lot of things the first uncle kracker record is I want to and Nicholas K Nick Cage for making this possible because his terrible accident made this thing we. Why didn't you just put the bunny back in the boss? Put the body back in the box. But why couldn't he have just used is like a wild at heart accent that he no? He had just create some random. Like I don't know what the fuck was shooting for is that I've met people melanoma. They do not talk like that bought to say I mean they barely speak English truth but also Nicholas Cage evening even when he's talking normally doesn't talk like a real person. Yeah Watch recently where he talks about his most famous roles most roles that he was proud of right and he he goes into like who he was channeling. All this stuff and lists watching like a fifteen minute man. He does not tolerate nor person at all like at all no he talks like Nicholas Cage. Nobody he has to throw it if you had to put Nicolas Cage's accent somewhere. Where would you put it? I would put it in I mean he's American. So Oh could put is that I had. I had a buddy whose I will name. I will leave out the drinks so much that I thought he was from Boston. And it turned out no us from Virginia. It's just drank to the point. Where his accent changed. I think that's not surly Boston accent. But I think that's what Nicholas cage slightly drunk he did. He did drugs and drank to the point where his accent literally changed right right so where the ends of his words and they made it specifically his own accent but he leaving Las Vegas is yes. That's Meyer. Yeah nobody can place where Nick Cage trump did do we know. So He's related to the Copeland's I know that. So but he doesn't like he's from an Italian vineyard somewhere. Yeah right so real talk. We actually found out on over the valley during this is exactly where the dude from From fucking the rooms Rom. They're from the same area. Tommy Wiso Cage Ohi Nick. Oh one town that creates mysterious. Weirdos that randomize accent is not fit he is Long Beach California. Of course he talking. Yeah I've been to Long Beach. The number of times guessing. Guess how people talk in. Long Beach laid out like fucking Bradley. No from sublime. Lbc Yeah Yeah. It's like hippy. Gangster. Yeah exactly yeah back. I don't know where would place nick cage from coming from but not not want why. This is the first time I've seen. Why the fuck would you have your signature? A picture of you're seeing your on your wikipedia page nice like no. Why why? Why does that need it? If he's from long does that mean that he knows Snoop Dogg. And he is a critic Yes Sir is wearing blue. In this picture I would go to here biggest. Gay Jesus Cage is a trip. And be killed biggie. So we're getting into the nitty gritty. We're we're at bats. It's an expose on Nicholas. Cage the subset of inside knowledge. But I'm saying Nick H. G. Y. K. G. G. Y. investigation. This all about Nicholas Gate forgetting your teeth and dark about Nicholas Cage on this episode up Pallet Cleanser after all the work that we did at Gallagher. Oh by the way I want to thank everybody that came out to Galaxy Khan and check out the live. Show thank you so much for talking to us. After the show's being there for the events at taking time to actually out of all the stuff happening I know it coincided with like pause play wrestling all sorts of other stuff. Thank you for coming out enjoying. Gyi Live and I'm really excited to have this conversation because this is like a easy one for me. This is a alleyoop of an episode about. Yeah Yeah so. Thank you for joining us and welcome. I'm Nicholas Cage.

Nicholas Cage Nicholas K Long Beach Nicholas Nicholas Gate Long Beach California Boston Nick H. G. Y. K. G. G. Y. Galaxy Khan Las Vegas Copeland Virginia Tommy Wiso Meyer Bradley
"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:16 min | 5 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Where that was? That wasn't necessarily the case And so very quickly I was like. Oh Yeah it's here you're estra logical work. Eventually drew the attention celebrities and major publications. Today you have more than three hundred thousand followers on instagram over a million monthly readers on your website eight you keep your celebrity client list private but can you talk a little bit about the reading that you did for Liz. Oh because it was conducted live. What was that like for you? Can you talk a little bit about her chart only guidelines those so incredible she just is such a beautiful example of what it is to really live out your chart so in the reading being I did for the cosmic playlist launch last year. We talked about the fact that she has Sun Jupiter and so the sun rules her ascendant. So it's very important. Talks about how she gets to where she needs to get to. And what area of life and it's in the Tenth House of career so her life purpose is to shine on the world stage in in here and she has son Junk. Jupiter which is Jupiter is the planet of optimism positivity Spirituality Acceptance Inclusion and abundance and confidence. I don't know if you would say that. Lonzo really embodies that on the world stage in a very joyous way but it's I think she's just a incredible example of that and also her first song to go big was called. Juice and Jupiter is as a deity and the Greco Roman system. Jupiter was very very very very much about fertility and slept with a lot of people and he's the god of lightning and thunder and so the lightning and the rain gene and the rain was thought to be a fertility ritual and the way it hit the ground. And what would happen when that would go on. So Jupiter is really juicy in a percents in terms that he's the the planet that's connected with the rain and the fertility of it and so that that was her first song to go big. I also thought was quite poignant. Can't you know she's about taking up space in being big and loud and positive and giving very very generous and she's a very generous generous and very humorous and that's all it's so Sun Jupiter the to like big royal bodies that are about self expression and and all all those things I mentioned. I know that you don't really do private readings anymore because the demand was just too much but I believe you just started a really really really cool new resource on your website channing. Nicholas Dot Com. Where where our listeners can look up their charts? It seems that this is now a really crucial tool all that. You wanted to have in place for your your readers and your fans and followers talk about how that is going to change change. What you're doing well? It is a companion tool to the book. So if you know looking at your chart makes you once you close your computer or shut your phone off because it's so complicated and feels like there's so much information coming at you. We devised a tool where we lay everything out for you in the simplest helpfully the prettiest way possible where all that Info is put out and you can just read the parts of the book that apply to you and we're going to be building building out that whole framework more and more so we also talked about every planet in your chart with sites in with that a little bit about what that might mean in what house it's in and so it's a way for the general public to be more engaged with their chart. Because I really do feel like this is your map. This is the map of of your life and I want to give you the tools so that you feel like you can have a conversation with it and that you feel empowered enough to be getting the information from it that could set something and you free or like me. Give you permission to do the thing that you're here to do. And this is all free right. This is all free yet. Incredible Janney I have. I have one last question for you. You've come so far in in a life that really was started with so much trauma and of turn that trauma into something that so positive for the world and one of the things that I really love to talk to the people that I interview about is the trajectory of their lives. Hell they've become who they are and we're living in a day and age now where young people feel so much pressure to make early end. You've described yourself both both today on our show as well as in your book as a lately bloomer and I would also describe myself as as a late bloomer. I'm wondering if you can give my listeners. Some advice about what it means to be a late bloomer and all of the extraordinary gifts and possibilities that that can ken bring Yeah I don't know what would have happened to my psyche. Have I had social media in my twenties and thirties. I think it would have kind have broken me in a place because there was so much that I needed to do in private and so much that I needed to do in my own way and the pressure to you perform who we are to perform success or to perform even understanding is really incredible. My heart goes out to to folks that feel in any way pressure to do that. And don't quite have the wherewithal to either not do it to abstain or to do it in a way that feels positive for them but the thing that age teaches us is so incredible because if we are going to be partners in our own life then we get to recede from the outer shell of it and deepen deepen our relationship with ourself and in order to deepen our relationship with ourselves we have to also deepen our relationship with our wounds and the places leases in us that really hurt and that takes time and it just takes consistent effort. It's like when a child is really upset sat and in the throes of a Tantrum. They won't just stop most likely automatically. It's like there has to be a unwinding of what happened in Parsing arcing out in an understanding of what went on and that just takes years and years of consistent thoughtful compassionate approaching approaching our of ourselves our and the ways in which we work. And so what I can say is that when we do have have that commitment to herself into our own growth things do get better i. We can't change anybody else and certainly the world is is full of disaster and complications and things that feel insurmountable but that my relationship with myself only gets. It's Richard and deeper which means that I get to experience so many things that I couldn't even have dreamed and had zero. Oh access to our understanding of how to access and now that I have a relationship with that or that I have access to things like joy and pleasure visger and relaxation things that I didn't have much of a relationship with it all so many more things are possible like connection and relationships nations ships and depth and an understanding of what my talents are and how I can serve them best and so there is no greater investment Smith that we can make I think in our youth then besides a 401k. The investment of our own healing and every we single moment that we spend trying to be more self self aware or trying to understand how we got here and what's occurring. Ah every single investment adds up in ways that are unfathomable later in life. All of it is worth it but please. You don't think you have to have any of it figured out or the have to be any certain place at any certain age. It's such a lie and it will rob you of the ability to be present in the moment. Where and this is the only place where the good stuff is where the juices were? The creative energy is is where the healing is and where the possibility is channy. Thank you so much for trying to kill the world with your work and thank you for joining joining me today on design matters. Thank you so much for having me. It's an honor. Cheney Nicholas's book is now officially a New York Times bestselling selling book. And it's called. You were born for this the astrology for radical self acceptance..

Liz Lonzo Cheney Nicholas New York Times ken Richard Smith
"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

14:27 min | 5 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You know like I feel like we really do need different ways to access the same information and so two skeptics. I think great. I just want to know what they're into actually just really interested in people. And how. How do you function and where do you find? Meaning where do you. How do you heal? And how how do you connect to yourself and I want to know about that and also I think you know people that are really skeptical of astrology. I doubt they know much chip bowed it in. It's kind of depth thinned. Also it's history. How would you describe it? How would you describe astrology to somebody that is either a skeptic or knows is absolutely nothing about it yeah? Astrology is a snapshot of time. So it's the moment something comes into forms. The moment we start a business the moment we we started meeting the moment somebody takes her first breath. We take a snapshot of The sky and we look to see the ways in which the whole sky is shaped shaped and how things are communicating with each other. It is a representation of you or of that moment and so we're all walking talking breathing or moving amulets of the moment of the celestial moment that we were born. If that sounds really strange to you I get it but and also we remember that. It's born out of a system and out of Understanding that the world the Earth Sky everything in nature is alive. And we're in conversation with it and there's a way to speak to and listened to everything in the universe and so most ancient cultures believed that nature was having a conversation with with us and so in all of our different cultural ways. We studied the way in which we felt. Nature was speaking to us and so we would be able go to glean information from it or at least be in that kind of call and response and so the sky is something that we always looked which to that. Sky Has always been a map even if it's not been a psychological map or a predictive map it's always been a map of where we are like being pneumatic or or traveling you know before we had. GPS before we had phones before he had actual paper maps we the map of the sky and it would would tell us you know the North Star like our that ability to understand where we are in time and space and what season it is. We always look to the stars. We always look to see eh what was happening to understand where we were both physically I think and also in terms of our life in its purpose and the meaning of it so so it's really ancient relationship that we have and even if you don't want anybody to ever tell you anything about being Aquarius that's fine. I get it. It gets weird sometimes sometimes and very stereotypical but just to understand our ancient relationship to Sun Moon Stars Sky Seasons and the way in which we were always in this kind of call and response with that I think is important because it reminds us that we are. Actually we come out of off systems and cultures that were felt like we were part of everything around us. I think we've really lost that. I want to talk to you a little bit. About the methodology in the process of astrology achieve described Sun signs horoscope says the things you read in papers or online as one crumb of astrology cake. Why is is that horoscopes are really really new? In terms of astrology is history. So they're only like a couple hundred years. Old and astrology is a couple of thousand years. There's old and we used it. Estrellas used it as a way to start to speak to the general public because everybody knows not everybody but most people know the day that they are born and therefore you can pretty easily understand what sign the sun was in when you were born and the sun is a big part of your astrological makeup and so- astrologers were we're like hey we can start a conversation with general public from that one point of view and so then there's a way in which you write a horoscope from the point of view of the sun is called a son consign horoscope or sunshine astrology. And it's something that anybody can pick up and use and work with and so it was never ever ever never meant to replace a reading of your specific astrological chart which was taken at the moment that you were born at the place in which you were born it was just a way to say. Hey here's a little gateway into astrology for the general public and if you like it come with us and there's more much much much more over here. You're brand new book. You were born for this. The astrology for radical self acceptance is both a workbook and to guide and you like a Ah bid to choose your own adventure book. What made you decide to structure it in that way in all honesty my wife? Sonia Passi who who edited this book and who helped me to structure it. I just wanted to write and talk about and teach everything I knew and she was like hold on. Let's pull the reins is back and actually try to form at this in a way where people that don't know anything about their chart might feel like they have access to it and so she really has has taught me everything I know about how to structure information in a way that feels accessible to people. And so we wanted to do An intro book like this really is an intro to the most important parts of your chart and it's a way of starting to like again. Open that door just a little. You bet so that everybody might get to understand a little bit more than just their sun sign. You have three key frameworks in your book. The son Your Life's purpose. Has the Moon your physical and emotional needs in the ascendant in. Its ruler your motivation for living in the direction your life is steered in. Can you talk a little bit about why you structured it that way yet. Those are the cornerstones of any chart. So whether we're looking at chart for a business for a wedding for somebody's buddies life we we need to know those things and if we get lost or too far away from those keys we don't really have a very thorough understanding standing of the chart itself. We think of those places. The ascendant is the sign. That's rising up over the eastern horizon. The moment we take our first breath. It's a very specific point. It changes really quickly throughout the day because the sky always looks to be moving. And so that is the marker when we take our first inhale and the whole chart is but it starts with the rising signer the ascendant. It's the invocation of life. It's the way in which if you want to speak in in terms of spirit it's the moment your spirit said yes. I will come into body. And then the sun and moon because they're not planets there we call luminaries as their bodies of late light and life are always equated like shining shimmering the ability for planet or or planetary body body to produce late is very important in astrology and so the sun being this ever present source of light and energy and life and warmth empath has always been thought of the divine mind the divine spark the soul the essential self and the moon because it waxes and wanes and a so close was to us. It's our it's our neighbor. It's the reflection of the Sun's light. And so it's the reflection of that is our body it's physical manifestation of our soul and so these places I'll speak to the quality of life and the power of the life source that we have to work with in the timeframe that we're here and in the planet and at that rules. The ascendant is steering the life in a specific direction. And so if we know those things we know those places in our chart and if we can fully live into the I guarantee we'll find a sense of satisfaction and fulfilment and feel much more aligned with our life's purpose long before you wrote your book. You started writing horoscopes for your friends and began to send them via email. But I understand that when you first started writing you would literally be doubled over in shame and pain and self doubt but it also felt like something you had to do. Where was that Ping coming from? An how has it dissipated. I wish it dissipated it felt so big with the book I was just you know suffering from a little bit like last night in the night before I think there's something and folks that have similar issues or similar experiences as me will probably resonate with this us. They think that when you are when there's a lot of neglect or you feel invisible is either by family or culture. I think when you bring yourself off into form by writing something or acting something or building something or making something that other people can see that you're giving it out to them There's a way in which all of a sudden for me I become more real. I'm defining myself by writing these things and putting them out for for me being somebody that was so low on the priority list of of the adults in my life it just this brings up the feeling of having been left and denied and betrayed and abandoned. And so it's this is weird thing it's like I am actually trying to heal this and bring myself into form and bring myself into the world and yet my experience of being the forgotten and invisible is becomes more pronounced as I do that so it is a experience experience that comes in tandem. There's like this. Yeah I put something out. And a feeling of releasing a creative spirit from myself for creative energy energy into the world and at the same time all of my survival mechanisms like stay small. Stay quiet stay invisible so that you don't get Harassed or something bad doesn't happen like there's so much chaos in the world and in my life that I had to just keep everything as small and still as possible people so it's just that all that fear and that the trauma response I think of being more present in the world. But you've kept writing you've stated that as you you were writing. I The horoscopes and then your blog that you could sense that it was the start of something that you've been searching for your whole life Did you also see that in your chart we able to self identify. Some of your own possible destinies Dmitri George. My teacher did did for me when we started studying. She was like look. I get your really intuitive and I get that you probably have amazing dreams that tell you things which I did and and she was like what I want you to put that aside and I wanNA teach you a system that will never fail if she didn't say it like this but this is taught me never fails me. It's a it's a great structure Grin and she said and then put on on top of it back all of your intuitive stuff. But I want you to get the structure I and so when she taught me the structure all of a sudden my chart made sense to me and it was clear to me that all the things that I felt I wanted to do but I was really unsure of basically the writing and teaching teaching. That was so clearly defined in my chart that the ruler of my ascendant is in the place of teaching and writing once. I saw that confirmation. I gave gave myself a permission that I had never before. And that's when things really started to work for me to meet your George has stated that astrology is self self secret system which is just gorgeous. But I don't quite understand what it means. Yeah it's kind of secret in itself so that it's like when the when when the student is ready. The teacher appears it's like you can read something a million times and think that you understand it and then you'll do a piece of healing learning or growth and you read it again and you're like oh now I really get it in. So astrology can be captivated by it and feel intrigued by for a long time as I did and I studied it for a long time but until her and I started to work together. I didn't feel like it fully revealed itself to me until I committed to it in a way and so I feel like it remained kind of shrouded or just out of reach until she gave me these tools And and then I felt much more engaged with it from the outset. You have not shied away from lending your horoscopes with your lips on politics in the world. The New York Times jabbed dubbed you a kind of social justice astrologer and just a sampling of topics. You've tackled in your astrology. In the years since he began the metoo movement net neutrality Alexandria Ocasio Cortez the president trump and early on. You thought that people would hate it. You saw yourself in the space ace between spiritual people who don't politics and people who want politics but not any spirituality or astrology. How did you find your audience? Sean's or how did they find you. You know I hadn't been living in San Francisco at that point and once I moved there I really understood what I was missing. But Queer Culture Queer community I think really found me and dug in and and shared my work in a way that set me a up in such a phenomenal position. I felt really really loved and really accepted and very very very supported by career community. That's the point that I had missed up until then when I moved to San Francisco for school I was like Oh. Everyone's an astrologer here and everyone's incredibly we political and everyone's very educated. And you know everyone that's already happening. I just didn't know that it was happening because I was in the Westside of Los Angeles..

Sky San Francisco Dmitri George Los Angeles Sonia Passi Estrellas Ocasio Cortez Sean president The New York Times
"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

14:34 min | 5 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Nicholas Rapes AIDS astrology is a relentless reminder that we are the way we are on purpose this book from an astrologer who never ignores the social official forces. Bearing down on us is a serious invitation for each of us to explore what our purpose place in this universe is Cheney channing Nicholas joins me from a steel in Los Angeles channy. Welcome to design manners. Thank you thank you for having me. Oh my absolute pleasure channing. In my research I stumbled upon the fact that there's an actress from Canada named Johnny Nicholas. who had parts in the slasher flick? Nick the long weekend the action movie crews and the horror film slices with these early acting cuts. I don't know her. You're I should've known I was like. What is Debbie going to dig up? I didn't even think of that. Yes that was an earlier incarnation. Oh it is get care possibly be of. It's wonderful so so what persuaded you to move away from acting well the Industry wouldn't have me so it was my It's the reason why I moved to L. A. is because my mom is a landed immigrant in Canada so she never gave up her American citizenship. And I was acting at the time so I went in and out of acting and social work and community work in my twenty s in Toronto and I really wanted to give it a try in. La and I had citizenship. So unlike every other struggling actor in Toronto Santo Actually Really Easy for me to move here and I moved here and gave it my all for three to four years and I made a commitment to myself that if I ever ever started to become bitter about the industry that I would get out and I did I started to become bitter and I really it just kind of sat down and prayed when for probably a series of days about what to do next and I really did feel released from the industry. The desire to be an actor I feel like I really gave it what I wanted to. And I got so much out of it and I feel like I utilize all aspects of everything that I learned in it and it's still a great great love of mine but the industry in me are not. We're not very compatible especially at that point and then I I started to more seriously. Go back into things that had do with healing and kind of awakening. I guess well I guess the universe had other plans for you. Yeah you're you're a tiny town called Nelson British Columbia in the far west of Canada population. Ten thousand six hundred read. Your father was from there. Your mom was from the Bronx. That's a range of influences. You've described your upbringing as a cross between the Neil Neil Simon play and the trailer Park Boys. Can you elaborate on what that means of it. I grew up in that very rural town and I grew up before the Internet. So when you're in a town that's isolated geographically and also so by climate so in the winter it's very isolating experience to be in the base of the Rocky Mountains and pre Internet and and pre phones you. You couldn't talk on you. Know it was like a big deal to make a long distance call and so when we were in Nelson we were very much just in Nelson and because it was such a small town it was a very specific experience. I grew up in large part in a trailer park. At least when I was with my dad and my father was one of the poorest best families in the very small town and so he grew up with like thirteen brothers and sisters and they were just known one is like the roughest kids in their school days and then really kind of rough around the edges. My Dad was a logger and you. Yeah the trailer park that we grew up in tried to kick us out well because they were a little too wild and crazy they. They partied a little too hard and there was a lot of chaos. They were as a lot of upheaval in our trailer and the other trailers in the in the park. It didn't really appreciate it so I had that and then we would go to New York. Every year and my mom's family was all born and raised and very prideful New York Jews news and it was such an incredible opposite experience to most of my life Nelson Cheney. You write this in the the introduction to your new born for this end it stopped me in my tracks. You write this while the adults in my life. Partied and self destructed did with wanton abandoned. I watched the cosby show and dreamed of a life with parents siblings grandparents and lineage to claim me when when the party came home I felt a different kind of loneliness an overdose a fatal accident a shotgun fired a conviction and I knew what cocaine tasted like. By the time I was five. Channy Jammie how is this possible. How did you survive this? Well I think a lot of us are miracles. I've I've sat with thousands of the people and I've looked at their chart and I've looked into their past and I've seen so many of us and saddened circles and social justice spaces aces and to bear witness to the miracle of what we survive as humans is one of the greatest gifts of my work for those of us that grew up in in environments. Like that it's that experience and it's really normal to me and it was normal to a lot of of the kids. I grew up with so that when we get together I was just in my hometown over the holidays and I was sitting around the table of the kids of all the people that used to party together. And you know we grew up out of all all of that but it was so comforting to be sitting around a table of people where I could say something about my life setup and everybody understood and it really was this collective experience that we had because we were living in a town against so isolated in in the seventies and eighties when when culture was kind of like you know getting ripped open and it was after the sixties but there is this upheaval in like end an experimentation and just a free for all and the amount of bad behavior that people can get away with in a space where everyone else else's doing it is can be quite extraordinary and I think folks just weren't really into being parents. They just were really into doing what they wanted to do. And it was a childhood that was terrifying. I mean I really was quite terrified. My whole we'll childhood and also grew up in this incredible beauty and the abundance of beauty and the nature that I grew up in was was a lifesaver for sure and also the the people I grew up with my friends and the groups of us that kind of helped each other through all of that. If you were exposed to cocaine by the time you were five how did you not become addicted. And why weren't you taken away by child services. Well I definitely struggled with addiction and I have in a lot of my life. I don't drink or or do drugs at this point and they haven't about ten years so I am sober and it was a really important thing for me because while I made a very conscious decision probably probably by the time I was six or seven or eight that I would never become a drug addict because I grew up around so many I never had a normal or normal. I never had a a good relationship with substances. They were always used in a harmful way or my engagement with them was always around self hate or some kind of harm or I would. It's too easy for me to go there when I use substances so I just don't but it took me a long time and many many atrocious mistakes and a lot of wrong turns and a lot of living out the stuff that I grew up in the book. I'm a really really late bloomer. I messed up a lot and and I struggled a lot and then you know I fell in love and everything came together at that point in your life. Where you pondering your a future or were you just really solely in survival mode? When I met my no no child? Oh Yeah I was desperate for any kind of adult I was. I was desperate for anybody with any any sense of maturity and any sense incisive like authority and so when I met the woman who became my step grandmother. My Dad's third wife's mom who I write about in the book. I met her when I was eleven and it was a spiritual experience I met her and I felt like a voice like rose up in me and said follow this woman. She knows knows how to make it out so I was always just trying to make it out. Something in me told me there's more to life than what was happening around me and if I could just get out I would be okay and so then it was just this desire and this hunting relief for some adult or something to help me find my way out and to find my way towards really towards healing. I mean like I was asking. I was begging her. She is ricky master. She was begging egging her at the age of twelve to let me come to rake you workshops with her. 'cause I just knew I needed a space where I could start to sort things out. I know that when you were eight years old you had the first experience of feeling seen can. Can you talk about that a little bit. Yeah it's a hazy memory but I do remember. I was taking on a lot of adventures by adults that were not necessarily early obtaining good so it felt like one of those things where it was a drug run so there was a drug deal happening and I was along for the ride. It was one of those things where I spent a lot of my childhood. Either in a car for in a backroom of a bar or in some back room of a party or kind of like shut away a lot of times so that adults could do whatever they wanted so when an adult would actually see me or see you know the kids that were around. It was always a little startling. And this time I was sitting there minding honeyman business While some transaction was happening and I just remember this woman that the person I was talking to and she was like what's her birthday and she was told my birthday and she opened up. What I can only assume isn't a famous and looked down and calculated so you know my planets and looked up at me and said you're very judgmental and I thought yes yes I am really? Oh you but I didn't even really know what it meant but I felt like it had power and I felt like I. It inferred to me that she was saying I had discernment and I don't know if that's is what she meant. But that's what I took from it and I just always a year earned for someone in my life to say this is wrong long. This should not be happening. This child should not be witnessed to this. Likes somebody stop and do something to protect this child elder these children and because no one ever did I became somebody who is quite protective and protected and a little harsh sometimes in my judgment so when that astrologer or when that person said that about what. I'm assuming is my astrology. I felt really seen. I was like cool. I'm judgmental aw I really hung onto it. Had some pride about it. Tell us about your second interaction. The second major interaction you had with this strategy. You're about twelve. I believe yeah it was twelve. which is a really beautiful moment? astrologically also psychologically which a lot of astrological cycles of course curse come together with psychological cycles. But it's like that pre little prepubescent or kind of right right on the edge of it and we're all seeking like more self knowledge and its Jupiter Return and Jupiter is about knowledge and wisdom and Expansion and Growth and my dad had laughed that small town with his third wife. They flew the coop so to speak because she was in a very abusive relationship and everyone was kind of in a very abusive relationship but she was in a severe one and they laughed and my dad left my sister and I we both have different moms but we were we you were left behind in Nelson and they would start to fly me out to Toronto where they moved to and I knew the woman who became my stepmom and I knew her children really well I've actually grown up with them. I was their babysitter and we were all together all the time and so when they laughed it was really an incredible will break for me. Psychologically because it was an escape route all of a sudden had been built for me they were out of Nelson. They were in a big city and her parents. It's were like well educated and also her mom was really into the healing arts and so when we won I think the first summer I was out there her mom again. Iraqi master had friends that were psychics and Tarot card readers and astrologers and she was like hey you should all go out to this woman and got an astrology reading and so we did and I just remember sitting down in this woman's house and we were all sitting around and everyone everyone kind of paying attention and in and out in my step brother and sister were.

Canada Toronto Nelson Cheney cocaine New York channing Nicholas Nelson Neil Neil Simon Nelson British Columbia Rocky Mountains Los Angeles Debbie Nick Expansion and Growth Johnny Nicholas. official L. A. cosby
"nicholas k" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:20 min | 7 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Jordan down. This is the daytime all set. You're really like a couple of months out really. Would you even exact change. It can. Yeah I'll have to look something else up but yeah okay. Yeah but it's like really you know what you went was harrowing. It's not you don't. You're not like Oh Yay. That's going to happen if you're astrology. Oh Fuck what is GonNa but you gotTa go through it and your the time of having to choose yourself. Yeah that's right heartedly but you didn't need an astrologer probably to tell you that I am very excited to find out. This exact take a Cambridge put away. Calendar came into on that date. I'm serious cannot wait. Yeah the last thing life will stop being life. But I'm saying that Taylor. I thought I thought we agreed. We're going to be all that is going to be all set this very to the phrasing. man. How is it that we that we are at fifty nine fifty nine? We really are go because I would love to talk more about at this point. We talking about astrology. Yeah Yeah Friend yes Please before I send you back into your life I was wondering if you would like to shout out a Queiro person place thing made you feel like you could be who you. You're today in in the past in the present you can do whatever you want. Can I be super cheap. You'RE GONNA say in the past or can it be in the future. I was like fully motherfucker the fuck targeted anyway. Who brought her here so can can meet cheesy? Please give me that cheese my wife. Yeah Great. Don't tell me Sonia Passi is She is an activist and a business partner and She is teaches me so much about integrity and being true to myself and also really the most beautiful ways how to care for and create community. She somebody who's like really knows how to remember people and be really thoughtful full with them and I get really despondent and can feel rejected and dejected really easily. And she's always like be bigger than that. Just call. Call Them. Invite them over. You know she's really resilient in a way That helps helps me in heels me heels a lot of those really kind of core places. Wow that's awesome. Yeah my little that and I think that's and she does so much work and so much of it is behind the scenes like she works tirelessly and I just think that women fem that work like she does. She rarely gets the accolades. I think she deserves me. She gets a lot of accolades but she. She does so much more than anybody ever sees mall. That's awesome that you are remembering her here on the podcast today. And and Thank you for being here and as soon as I stopped recording. Can we hear.

Sonia Passi Jordan Cambridge Taylor Queiro partner
"nicholas k" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

13:41 min | 10 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"What's the news. What's what's going on. How good this sick fashion. We call a good penthouses gone. Yeah i mean i'm sure i could be way better. I just don't know how what what take what happened with your your house. Oh i'm <hes> got rid of it smelt of rava the rich yeah yeah yeah. That's the nicest hotel been of course it's. I'm sorry new york apartment in it's a hotel room. Well there are aw. I can't give away things if they haven't been on yet but tears. The greg is hunting for apartments to live and and in subsequent episodes. There are amazing thing so you going up into that. The bed is like the size of this door you a._m. Squeeze into it knocking my head on the ceiling right but it's a loft so that's cool but i've yeah it's a very real thing you can't in an apartment in new york for any i mean shopping for apartments and you've got to spend money to just have room to move around even in my apartment right now. I can't even like do do a push up on the ground not that i try to do push ups all the time but like sometimes i do round and sometimes they just want to stretch you know like do like like stretch stretch my legs or something again that what are you six four. I'm six seven what that short. I take it back when i was younger in auditions editions and now at this point i'm on popcorn with peter travers so i feel like i can be honestly. I'm six seven. Wow yeah no yeah. There's a lot sometimes times. When you're auditioning actresses who are five one yeah well yeah i pretty much any any rule so if i if there's a father and and he's shorter than six to like i have no chance of playing his son really picking yoon about it. Yeah yeah yeah oh. I've lost a lot roles because of my height because because you know it's hard to photograph maybe for some people or or they don't want to put the lead actors on apple boxes which i understand india now on a movie once where it was a walk and talk through high school and they're actress that was playing my love interest she and and i were walking in the gave her a track of apple boxes like twenty pieces of wood lined up together leap almost white. Luckily they weren't saying. I thought maybe it was like a jump. No she had this nice wooden pass to walk on and then she couldn't walk loudly because it would make noise on the wood so i sorta stuff is awkward. I guess maybe in a stone age of movies when alan ladd was with field rent in the boy on a dolphin. He was like five four so they they dug a trench for fielder renter walker right that you should make them do that. This should dig up flooring for they should do. You should be haulage. You are yeah yeah vetco star walk in the trench except wouldn't i need to walk. You would walk in the trash you were. I would need to walk you wouldn't they would need to stay. Stay on grounds. That's it none of that for you so i walked down the trench there on the boxes. Maybe i should bring a little if i'm just so confused now into image of you as zach attack yeah. That was the first sky sky high of course i'm film critic that would in fact that those fifteen years ago had a clip because is there was hair like yeah what leads blonde bleached platinum blonde thing. I glowed in the dark if you if if you turn the lights off and look real close you could see glowing but you couldn't in the light. That was one of the sad parts of that character yeah that that's a good that was my first big part yeah and when that happened what happened to you did you. You've got that part and you said i'm gonna make it in this business. It's gonna be great. I don't know if you ever say that. I don't know i don't know if you ever know sixteen and and i i remember getting it. The moment i got the call and i screamed and screamed for some amount of time and it was just the greatest moment of my life screaming screaming with my friends. I was just screaming but you know i did think this is the real version of my dream. This is a big real movie. You know it's not a play. It's a in connecticut is doing small plays a little short films student films and things but this this was like a real. I was gonna get paid like real real money and <hes> go do it in l._a. You know so that that did feel like the moment where maybe i thought oh. Maybe i'm i keep doing this but i don't think you ever know that you're gonna well connect you going to that's never going to be eh. What happens it's going to be do. I get another job exactly who i ever work again. That's part of the deal. Exactly you have to get. I used to it. I can't get used to it. It's like it's not i never well. I guess maybe right now. I feel like the shows come out and and we're we're gonna have another seasons so that's technically another job. Oh and they'll be h._b._o. Will be just wheeling wheelbarrows full of money to your door to what happens season three. Oh wow cool yeah and you cash. He warned his show that about this great wealth and you grew up and knowing your father you know so there. There must have been up to billions that you grew up yeah. The also votes both before five yachts. I can't remember when we were young. When your father author craig brown did design some of the great album covers of our time he designed the sticky fingered stevie wonder you know he did all of that a big big time people but now being the jealous bastardy is he's become an actor yeah after your job. He started. I why he started started for. He's the reason that i started to give him his son. Come and sit down next to me and i'm gonna tell you he he said. I don't have anybody to run my lines with for this audition. We read them with me. I don't wanna talk to my voice memo anymore. So i was was just learning how to read six seven down. I wanna go outside and play you know. Please let me go outside. No sit here and read. These me helped me prepare child. It was really intense bar jail me repair repair. I have a big audition but there was a great encouragement of you to do this. Yes they're getting get good critiques from him. Yeah yeah i do i do. I think i think yeah i think he tells me that i'm good. Critique isn't good then. You need to have some honest response. I should have them. Write an article for for me or something right up nice document to build. You know this kind of thing because you did that you had t._v. Shows <hes> ten things. I hate about about you know. You're really good at comedy but i've seen you play really creepy horrible people as well <hes> stanford prison experiment fair menu. This guard red state. What goes on when you get apart like that. You look to break it up. Do you say don't want to be funny now. I want to be something yeah. I well. I don't know i think i always liked being funny. I eh but i usually i got a lot of rules where i played a good guy good ernest fella and so when those parts came along. I thought this is a really a good opportunity to look at those darker parts of myself and show some colors off that i haven't gotten to show before stanford prison was was interesting because is a lotta. My friends were in that movie so i got to just treat them. Horribly always a good thing yeah yeah so just got to yell at them and force them to do things and fight fight them like ezra miller. He and i were wrestling a lot in that movie and that was really fun just sort of bashing into each other. I like those opportunities where you just get to. I don't know i get to be meaner. Tougher have amine side dip yeah and and how does it manifest itself no no sorry. I'm sorry i'm sorry even didn't seem so me. No no wasn't wasn't before. I go to a couple of questions from the world of the internet. Oh my gosh they're here. I have to ask you about your music career. Oh wow because that must be discussed. Cool devoted are you to it. What is it <hes>. I love i love. I love to write songs. I love to sing. Gosh i just remember you're going to have yeah yeah so i was just at a great song you though so we'll stay to the end but are you. Do you go on a tour with the band. Since succession started like it's been tougher to do music becomes it's okay you know i understand just greg it does and brain space the whole rockstar thing will come later. Yeah i can do it into my thirties. Forties right look mick jagger hundreds. There's there's no stopping it but i do love it. I love i love music. It's it's something that i think about all the time but it's not right now in my periphery but but i i yeah i love doing and i love making stuff and <hes> yeah so good. We'll see. I hope i hope i get to we'll see in a minute when you when you think on but right now let's take a couple of questions from the world outside from mike h. What is your favorite seeing you filmed for succession my favorite scene. I filmed for succession <hes> very good reading. What's my favorite scene for success. What is my sorry going to do that whole bit. It was done minutes. I think there was a scene where sure i was really high on the patio during the thanksgiving episode last season where matthew comes out and he tells me i'm going to have to shred the documents and and i really liked playing. I liked playing drugs. That's always fun. Actually the scene where i got such can integral part of your life. I guess and e._s. Wanna play it on screen right. You bring right now. I i get that. We want to bring in who we are too. Yeah mike satisfied with that. That should be good and then yeah. I also liked other drugs scenes snorting. The cocaine with kendall was really was really fun. There's a theme here. It's great okay. Let's throw one. I'm greg greg. Did that would venture another question now from terence k of the three roy siblings. Who do you think would be best to lead waste because i guess schiff i think shift. I think we need a female c._e._o. When a company company like this we need some tenderness you know it's not that tender but he's not at all but you know i think she has her moments and <hes> and i think she has. We need a female perspective all right. It's time time for the song. Oh gosh come on you to hold over. People sat in that chair who sang their heart out. We'll have this one song. It's kind of old song okay so you didn't write it. I didn't read it but it goes happy birthday on the it's your birthday but to have the birthday birthday. They're happy birthday to you all very very move but at the same time that was such a cop out you know it was it was nice and it's rare air to see any of your roles. Do something so really nice. Yeah you know so you want. Something meaner removed this but the next time you're on. We're gonna gonna do some kind of rock and roll something sexy version of mama. I promise thank you bye..

greg greg mike h new york apple peter travers alan ladd wrestling stanford ezra miller yoon mick jagger connecticut zach l._a schiff craig brown ernest fella india
"nicholas k" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

05:17 min | 10 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"Hi everybody. I'm peter travers is this is popcorn where i tell you what is popping in the culture and h._b._o. Has a show called succession which i love. I love every minute of it. I'd even seen the i five episodes of season two how you know things and my guest today nicholas braun place cousin greg makes him a fan favorite and one of the great things about succession. That's rare and television is that season two is better than season one. It's even more decadent than delicious a what do to you. Nick thank you so. Our work is done here all right. That's it. Well yeah thank you well. Let's start by saying the poor benighted souls that had had yet to watch it. They need to know cousin. Greg is yeah yeah yeah. Is this dude cousin greg so the shows about a very very wealthy family billionaire family the movie studios news networks newspapers and amusement parks cruises and cousin greg greg comes in luckily at the right time when the patriots of the family is giving his company to his next to the two one of his children altern and the other kids. Maybe want the job too but this kid kendall's gotten in the pilot. He's gotten chosen and greg comes in. He was working working in the amusement parks. He got a little bit too high. One day ended up throwing throwing up a publicly through his mascot costume through the eye. Holes has one you you know one of those bad trips <hes> we'd can do that. You know he hasn't seen the family and a while and he comes in and <hes> something about him. Strike slogan gene is appealing logan's play by brian cox the hidden in the headman turning eighty and at the end of the pilot everyone's thrown into flux and for whatever reason greg is still in the mix and so i guess that my my arc is sort of finding out. Can i stay in here get in deeper than she does because i think it's great that he can play dumb really well yeah. Is he playing window. You know well. No i mean there's calculation like no tomorrow to do that. So i was gonna say. Why did whoever said we. We want nick braun to play cousin greg. Was it about you that made them say. Nick must play cousin grech. What was that audition like. I got to use my nerves in the in the in the room with adam mckay and i got to be sort of. I got to transfer my nerves about out this thing wrong. This big audition into what greg is i think he's nervous in a room but i think he's also ambitious highly ambitious and and so the audition it was like i don't know i was i kind of let whatever comes out of greg's mouth whatever wants to come out and hung out an an atom gave me permission to and and so it was a lot of writers think that they should. They like <hes> improv going on. They do that then that's heaven to do that. Yeah they do like it. I do get recognized now as cousin greg. Are you walking around the city or and people say there. He is because we look at it. They love him yeah but nobody is really marley a model for anybody on this whole show. I don't know anybody anybody that you aren't suspicious too but yeah yeah do they come up and say cousin grad. They do yeah they shout cousin greg the show greg deeg so yeah i gotta the law. You're going to get the whole thing. You know. You're going to get the company you know. I think it should happen. I wonder if they even know 'cause you just been renewed for season season three. We have indeed yeah. Congratulations thank you. That's kinda great yeah. I've never been a part of some kind of is the new game of thrones just with people wearing suits and you know dragging insulator slogan. They're they're dragging unconcern. That's what kind of show is happening. It looks like everybody's having a fun time. Are they definitely yeah because it's a lot of improv. It's you know it's it's a lot of different personalities in a room <hes> different styles of acting. You know you're you're curious. Got one style and jeremy's army's got another and and brian is always ferocious in a room and every scene i get to do with matthew is just pleasure right yeah. I hear so you know there's a whole thing online that there should be a spin off with tom and greg yeah yeah. It's too premature. You know we still have now. Come out of romance left to well well. There's a lot of people think in the future. All the time. It's t big area is working. It can work again. Spend it all do that. Let's let's look at a clip from succession so that those people who have been because they'll look at it and they'll say i'm watching. What's it over. You can all watch it you okay. What's.

greg greg nick braun greg deeg peter travers adam mckay Holes brian cox kendall logan jeremy grech tom matthew One day
"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:12 min | 11 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The something show that the truman show throw roman shows to the little kids are like a real truman show stay they were they were they were you know so so what they did is they cultivated this strong long sense of solidarity and then about a week into the experiment or the demonstration they said actually there's another group of boys over there and they put them in two zero sum competition with those those boys. They were like you know. They'll be like a tug of war. The winner would get a prize and so forth and so they each group began to hate the other group and the demonstration was how easy it was to to to cultivate this outgrew patriot and then in the last phase of the experiment they created was known as a superordinate threat. They <hes> like an alien invasion. The trope in science fiction of all the peoples of the earth are fighting and then the aliens attack the earth and then we all unite to fight the common enemy. It showed that he could do you. Could you can manipulate this. They contrived for example to have the water supply to the camp dry up and so all the boys from both both groups had to work together to figure out the problem and solve it and and then they began to like each other because they were facing a common enemy so the the point of the experiment was to show show how easy it is to cultivate this kind of in group bias and also how to undo it by fostering a sense of solidarity principally principally by being united against a common enemy and and one thing that's occurred to me when we look at the ascendancy of tribalism both on the far left and on the far right which which is amazing to me like the way these two extremes are so interested in differences between people however defined when we look at the rise of that is so prominent in our society in the united states today. I can't help but wonder whether it's partially a result of the fall of the of the iron curtain somebody other people have mentioned that yeah that has been brought up a number of times yeah. I think that you know when we were united against the russians. You know our internal. We always had intro kind of pollyannaish view of history. I understand that we haven't talked about but i totally understand that. Every century is replete with horrors. I i'm familiar with pogroms inquisition in the holocaust and colonialism and all of the awful things that human beings have done but but nevertheless i think that right now we're seeing a kind of cendant tribalism which may partly relate to the loss of a common enemy it really interesting. Well listen. I have been very kind kind with your time. I i have worked over well. The book is blueprint the evolutionary origins of good society. It's available now on amazon. Azzawi can follow us on twitter at n._a. Crack ac- h._r._i._s. t. a. k. i s. Website is human nature lab dot net which is imagining yes. That's human nature abbott at yale and just before just as a parting question going forward. What's what's occupying you would you want to my laboratory has a very active research agenda. We're working on artificial intelligence and how to add with what we call hybrid systems of humans and machines and how the addition of machines in our midst will reshape the kind of social order we make where we have a very active research program on the microbiome and how the bacteria within us are living among us as well and we're doing some ongoing experiments with with social networks we have a huge which field trial that is supported by the gates foundation and by the nomads foundation and by the totta conglomerate in honduras where we're we're trying to improve public health maternal and child health in rural areas. We we're doing a lot of cool things with a bright young people in the lab so we got a lot going on now and plenty of more work to do. Do you exceeded my expectations is a real privilege to talk to. You and i would love to do another pod with you about the death and dying stuff but <hes> for another day take time all right. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for colin..

truman united states cendant amazon yale twitter colin Azzawi gates foundation honduras nomads foundation
"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:17 min | 11 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You know it's like come on. Yes that's right. That's right that's exactly right and and but the point is you don't even need to get the hallucinogens i i used to it. You know it was so gratifying. When i was a hospice doctor he and i would go. I would go into this. This suffering patients room and the family was distraught rod. The patient was in agony and and we would be consulted and and in those days this was twenty years ago or twenty five years ago and nobody really knew how to dose opioids opioids and you would just go in and you had to put in an i._v. and you would push a few milligrams of morphine slowly and and you would just watch the patients relief yes relief relief and then the family would the first patient would talk to their children or their spouse in the spouses phases would light up and it wasn't quite so simple to do some other things too but just was i mean it was just so amazing to be able to to use his very ancient drug in this very modern way yeah so yeah so. I don't think we need to necessarily reach silence. I been and all the other kind of loosen agendas before the l._s._d.'s and everything else. I i think just opioids alone is a huge thing but fair enough. I see you know just a tangent. You know like one of the things that i write about in the book and blueprint is <hes> grief because actually the intellectual history here was going to how i was started as a doctor then became interested the widowhood effect which is how your spouse dies your risk of death goes up and then i realized that was a special case of network effect i said became interested social networks and then from that i making interested in the evolution of sociology so my i've done a lot of things but anyway grief is astonishing and we have grief and so do elephants vincent so do killer whales and soda chimpanzees and and it's astonishing that we all all these creatures have grief and i believe i talk about this in the book. I believe that this capacity for grief is a function of a reflection of our capacity for identity because you grieve for people you know you might be sad about strangers who die but you don't agree for them to grieve for someone they can use special individual and you have to know them could be connected it to them and so i think grief is also a reflection of our sociology. This heavy burden we carry for living social animals. It might be part of what caused us to defend against loss so fiercely. We don't wanna feel that grief and i would argue having been in deep psychotherapy psychotherapy myself. You have a grief reaction. When you change you spend it against all forms of loss. Yes that's one of the theories as to the origin. You're exactly right one of the theories of city origins of grief. It's hard to know why such a painful experience would why it was selected for you avoid it. We a fight to avoid it right. So one of the theories is is anticipate. Tori grief what you do is one of the theories is that the feeling is so unpleasant <hes> that you struggle to keep your partners alive to avoid dying so that's one of the and do you have a particular philosopher that helps guide you in your current. You'd mentioned your philosophical orientation. After it's very personal but is there a philosopher you're attached to obviously friendship and aristotle figures prominently yeah well. I won't profess to being any greek philosopher or anything like that or even overly familiar with fleming. Yes i have a passing familiarity and quite a few philosophers but but i will say that i read the last days of socrates of four com component dialogues every two or three years and it just moves me to tears. You can't just an astonishing just to watch us just to watch. Socrates died is just so unworthy and watched the fools that put him to death. He's vino ignorant. People who think so highly of themselves elves and here this great man goes willing to his death out of respect for the laws of his city modelling for others..

Socrates morphine Tori fleming twenty five years twenty years three years
"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:50 min | 11 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Injury though the regions of our genome that are responsible for the structure and appearance of our faces are very variable deliberately variable so like every pancreas should work the same to produce insulin and insulin should do the following things with respect to sugar metabolism and so forth but every face should not be the same. Every face should be different. We think it is different so this is an evolutionary luxury that we have this capacity of different places and not only that but we have a capacity to tell the difference between faces so we've all this machinery in our brains that is responsible for seeing people's faces and detecting these differences which is also a luxury. So why do we have all this capacity well. The reason we have this capacity. I need a single identity is that it's crucial living. Socially you need to be able to tell the difference between your friends and who are your enemies. Your mother needs to be able to tell this is you and she you should breastfeed you and not some strange kid who she should not breastfeed a unique to win. You cooperate with people you need to be able to do. This is a person i favor to versus this does not personnel and so forth and so on so so in order to live socially we have to have distinctive identities which is completely different. Take for example. The antelope heard an antelope antelopes will move in herds. They live in agglomerations but as far as we know what antelope doesn't and care who the adjoining antelope is whereas kick fact some of the zebra the evolutionary adaptation is to you. The individual gets lost in a sea of other zebras. Yes and actually it's amazing. Yes you're exactly right and there's a famous experiment which you're probably alluding to put collars on zebras and writing right right and they're likely but anyway zebra gets killed boom yeah. We're we're moving fast but but the gist is we have the special capacity to have an identity entity to detect this identity and it's as crucial for the kind of social order. We make especially between unrelated individuals. I want to do two more north things if you if you don't mind if you'll indulge me one is let's go back over the robert k. Because i did allude to it. I wanted to just quickly break it down what was learned and i know it's been sort of reconfigure. Configure it and reanalyzing reason modern history. We learn from it and then if you don't mind i want to talk about the halloween thing very quickly but let's halloween. That's ridiculous killers. You don't talk about it on fifteen. It's like you know something to say really. I mean nothing nothing to say anyway. Okay that's it. I was interested in how you're able to move past it which i love just forget because i mean i i've been a scientist is for twenty five years. You know and i had a lab to run and i i. I love what i do. I like teaching young people. I like being a professor and you know we walked. We were in the walk into to a propeller and we did the best. We could my wife and i we we we. We did the best that we could and i don't want to. I don't don't want to be defined by those events and i don't i don't want to i do not want to abandon my optimistic love of humanity. Hey you know what i i feel like. Scientists were better equipped to do that. Somehow like people get steeped in ideologies and things can't can pass these things sort of fascinated able to is to. I was even aware of it until tonight. Yeah yeah i mean i think <hes> you know i think i think i'm just amazed that guy was a hospice doctor for fifteen fifteen or twenty years i took care of people who were dying and you know you can't be a hospice doctor. Go into people's homes. I worked on the south side of chicago. Go for six years are you are you an internal training and i specialize in hospice care and then i when i went to harvard from the university of chicago in two thousand in.

scientist robert k agglomerations chicago harvard professor university of chicago twenty five years twenty years six years
"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:20 min | 11 months ago

"nicholas k" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Other. We formed long-term non-reproductive unions with other members of our species who are unrelated to us. Elephants do that too don't they. Elephants do certain primates not all primates certain certain primates and certain wales but but that's it i mean there are some other cases but you know so. It's very rare the animal kingdom this capacity for friendship and the insects sex like and termites loss use social insects insects that doesn't count because they're clones. They're all identical twins to each other so it's it's not hard to explain why one aunt is nice to another aunt and third the same basically interesting but we're not the same so hold on so here's the thing so we have on this capacity for friendship french ship which also has a lot of ideas as to why we've all this capacity interesting ideas but from the moment that each of us is forming friendships with each other in this population of one thousand now everyone has. Let's say about four or five friends which is the typical amount of social intimates that each person has it ranges but it's about four and a half so everyone now has their own friends but everyone has different friends and so you you create structure in this network of this of these thousand people so now you just tell everybody. The rule is just be nice to your friends. Well now again just like the in group is everyone can be a little bit nicer than they otherwise would have been so this trick also increases the cooperation increases the niceness in the population so friendship is is another path to fostering nice relationships between people in large groups in parallel and in group bias all that seems bright and interesting and and make sense i i'm wondering if the more negative qualities the out group <hes> acting out could be explained on the basis that maybe this is over simplistic just malthusian pressures you just the malthusian pressures and the people there are some theories that we under resource constraints right which was which was the involuted collusion reviewed adaptiveness with lots of constraints well yes and no so so there are some arguments that during periods of greater environmental the variability when there were periodic fans for instance those groups that had a greater sense of solidarity when in competition with other groups when they were meant when my group had individuals within it that we're willing to sacrifice themselves for the good of the group was competing with another group which didn't have that type of wenas you know the type of sense of solidarity we are all in it together then my group would be triumphant and the other group would be exterminated and so therefore in times of the competition and and there's a biologist by the name of circuit governance was a very nice model about this and a number of people that studied this topic and so there's so that's one theory for the emergence of of this type of in group bias was intergroup competition in times of scarcity in all of these forces. I'm sure we're operating. Yeah that's exactly right. They're not either or and you know our history. Revolutionary history is complicated and and you know uh is it very active area of scientific research over the last ten or twenty years and his ongoing so let's get into love of it do you do you define love in the book..

wales twenty years