35 Burst results for "Next Week"

Medics: 200 Palestinians hurt in Al-Aqsa clashes with police

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 hr ago

Medics: 200 Palestinians hurt in Al-Aqsa clashes with police

"Palestinian worshipers have clashed with Israeli police at the al Aqsa mosque compound major holy sites sacred to Muslims and Jews the computations marking this condition for weeks of violence in Jerusalem that has been reflected across the region the Palestinian red crescent emergency service said hundred thirty six people were wounded in clashes with police that and elsewhere in Jerusalem including eighty three who were hospitalized it says most of the wounded in the face and eyes by rubber coated bullets and shrapnel from stomach remains Israel said six police officers were wounded I'm sorry yes checking

Al Aqsa Mosque Palestinian Red Crescent Emerg Jerusalem Israel
Chinese Rocket Debris Expected to Hit Earth This Weekend

KTLK Programming

01:58 min | 4 hrs ago

Chinese Rocket Debris Expected to Hit Earth This Weekend

"Air blasting the United States for making too big a deal about their 100 FT rocket that's due to come crashing to earth sometime this weekend. I didn't know we were making that big of a deal about it, apparently just the fact that we are talking about it. It all has China very upset. Well, don't launch rockets in the space and then not have a plan for them to come back. You idiots. Apparently, we don't know, but apparently we're not gonna be shooting it down, either they because people were talking about is doing that. I don't know how you're gonna be able. If you don't know where it's gonna land. Are you gonna be able to anyway? I think they're going to get like a couple of hours. They'll have like a two hour window window of when it you know, sort of re enters the atmosphere when they'll be like Okay. Now we know basically the radius of of impact. In a story published by the country state media, the officials criticized Western hype of the China threat and space technology advancement, adding. It's Completely normal for rocket debris to return to earth. Chinese experts conclude The rocket, which helped carry the country's new space station in orbit last week, will likely fall in international waters, and they're right. Yeah, my most likely cause a lot of water on the planet. You know, there's a chance. What if it doesn't if there's if there's a there's a possibility here, Um, it could land on the third Precinct. It's still a shell E mean that zero notice to say it way. Just be our luck. It would just be our Like that The rocket would land like, you know, somewhere in the twin cities, something that just got rebuilt from the right right right. And that's something that the DFL ongoing capitalize on and try to get more money from the taxpayers to fix. Us. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin agrees. There's not a strong chance the rocket will. There's a strong chance the rocket will land in the ocean, he says. There's also a chance it won't For those of us who operate in the space domain. There should be a requirement to operate in a safe and thoughtful mode and make sure we take those kinds of things into consideration, adding. We had the capability to do a lot of things. We don't plan to shoot it. Down as we speak, he says. We don't have a plan to shoot it down as we speak, and that could be interpreted in a few different ways. That's true that could be interpreted as we don't think it will be necessary to shoot it down or

China Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin United States DFL
Debris From Chinese Rocket Expected To Land On Earth This Weekend

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:55 sec | 4 hrs ago

Debris From Chinese Rocket Expected To Land On Earth This Weekend

"FT. Tall piece of Chinese space junk is tumbling out of control and could slam through. The atmosphere is early as today but Brendan Byrne of member station W. M. F. E Reports of chances of debris landing in a populated area or slept. The 24 ton piece of junk is part of a Chinese rocket that launched last week after deploying a piece of China's next space station. It was discarded and began coming back to earth. Its large size means part of it could survive the heat of reentry. The U. S. Space Command is tracking the object ahead of its return. But because of its size and speed, it's traveling at some 18,000 MPH pinpointing its exact landing is difficulty. Experts say it's likely to splash down in the ocean, which covers some 70% of the planet. Current tracking efforts predicted will make impact sometime this weekend, although that window is several hours wide. For NPR

Brendan Byrne W. M. F. U. S. Space Command China NPR
California Population Declines for First Time in Recorded History

Money Matters with Ken Moraif

00:42 sec | 4 hrs ago

California Population Declines for First Time in Recorded History

"California may have more people than any other state, but it's numbers aren't growing like they used to California's population has declined for the first time in its history, state officials say this state laws more than 182,000 people in 2020, California's population now just under 39, a half million Had shown only very small annual increases for the last several years, said officials blamed the loss on a declining birth rate reductions in immigration and increase in deaths because of the Corona virus, which killed 51,000 people there in 2020. Just last week. U S Census Girl announcer Golden State would lose a congressional seat for the first time because they grew more slowly than other states over the past

California
Facebook's Trump Ban Upheld by Oversight Board

Slate Money

02:03 min | 7 hrs ago

Facebook's Trump Ban Upheld by Oversight Board

"In not grim news. Stacy we have the news. The donald trump is still banned from facebook. That's good news right. Donald trump is still banned from facebook. Well if you're into democracy there there certainly arguments to be made to that end. Yeah this is the week in. Which if people hadn't heard of the facebook oversight board they definitely at least heard of it. I think one of the elements that continues to be under reported is that this is a board peed by facebook. This is not an independent external hands-off universe of people. It's twenty folks who were really hands. Elected and in most cases hand selected by nick clegg who convened at great lengths and facebook. A series of questions. I believe they said they were forty. Six questions and facebook declined to answer several of them and ruled as it were that they would not overturn the ban on donald trump. But not because they agreed with facebook but because they want facebook to go back and do a little bit more work and come up with an actual concrete policy that isn't just capricious as it were as to. Why and under what circumstances. These kinds of bands are appropriate and then assess weather. If the policy exists would that policy say that trump should be banned from the platform. On an ongoing. They did find a policy that they said justified the ban and they made it pretty clear that facebook's given reasons for banning trump were adequate and sufficient reasons for banning trump the band. They basically agreed with what they disagreed with was the indefinite nature of the bat. They said if you're gonna ban for a set amount of time you can always we ban him once. That set amount of time is up but don't do it indefinitely do it for fixed amount of time or just do it permanently. My guess is if they just bent him permanently and said your kicks off the platform. The facebook site board said. Yep okay. what you were doing was very dangerousness. Condign punishment it's the vagueness of the duration and this is basically the oversight board saying we are not going to make policy for you facebook. Can you please grow

Facebook Donald Trump Stacy Nick Clegg
Anti-Government Protests Continue in Colombia

BBC Assignment

02:02 min | 12 hrs ago

Anti-Government Protests Continue in Colombia

"Has been a week of violent protests in Colombia that have left at least 24 people dead and more than 1000 other people injured. We'll demonstrate his first took to the streets to oppose tax reforms is part of a general strike in the country, prompting President even Dok to withdraw the proposals on the country's finance minister to resign. But they haven't been enough to stop the protests, which have become a wider call for change, a time when the country is being hit hard by the Corona virus Pandemic. Matthew Chance reports from Bogota Tens of thousands of Colombians have been taken to the streets. At times, it's appeared more like a festival than a protest. But despite the party atmosphere, the message is a serious one Iraqi people are resisting, says this demonstrator. We're tired of suffering tired of being ignored. Yeah. With the number of covert 19 infections and deaths at their highest levels. Authorities are worried about the impact of the demonstrations on the country's already overstretched health system, but these concerns are rejected by protesters. A local Indiana. The people are tired of corruption, says this man. If the people come out to protest during a pandemic, it's because they think the government is more dangerous than the virus. Protest quickly turned violent video posted on Social media showed a heavy handed response by the police. But they also showed unprovoked attacks against the security forces to Kelly and Mary Jean, Colombia's biggest cities. Test is attacked and burned public transport colombianos give us a less again to Clara's gone in companion mysteries of presente allowed to Martin, Jeremy's president. Even Dok appeared on television to condemn what he called Vandals. He said the violence was being coordinated by narco gangs operating in the country Comments rejected by the country's opposition political parties.

Matthew Chance DOK Colombia Bogota Indiana Mary Jean Kelly Clara Jeremy Martin
Judge Orders Release of DOJ Memo Justifying Not Prosecuting Trump

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:40 min | 13 hrs ago

Judge Orders Release of DOJ Memo Justifying Not Prosecuting Trump

"Judge in dc ordered the justice department to release a document that they've been trying to keep secret for years. Now it's the document. The justice department drew up to justify not bringing criminal charges against then president donald trump for obstruction of justice. Judge amy berman jackson and her blistering ruling this week said that trump attorney general bill barr and other trump justice department officials had essentially lied to the public and lied to the court about bars decision. That trump wouldn't be prosecuted despite the muller investigation laying out more than ten potentially criminal instances in which the president acted to obstruct the investigation into russia. Interfering in the two thousand sixteen election to help trump win the presidency of the justice department is under very very very new management. It's going to be interesting to see if the justice department. Now under attorney-general merrick garland follows judge jackson's ruling and releases document about not prosecuting trump. Or will they appeal to continue the trump justice department's efforts to keep that documents secret. The clock is ticking. On that we've been watching this every day. Now because they've got less than two weeks to either file that appeal or let that document see the light of day and in either case it's to be a really big deal. If we do see that document and as the judge hinted in her ruling it turns out that bar and the trump justice department never substantively considered the evidence evidence against trump if it turns out the evidence that trump committed obstruction was just ignored. Well that puts a very hot potato. In the lap of the new justice department leadership under president biden as to whether they might pursue those charges against trump nail

Justice Department Judge Amy Berman Jackson Bill Barr Trump Justice Department General Merrick Garland Judge Jackson Donald Trump Muller DC Russia President Biden
Bill, Melinda Gates' split after 27 years of marriage

Week In Review

01:28 min | 18 hrs ago

Bill, Melinda Gates' split after 27 years of marriage

"Final topic is that one of the people. I follow on twitter posted quote after a great deal of thought a lot of work on our relationship. We have made the decision to end our marriage over the last twenty seven years. We have raged three incredible children and built foundation that works all over the world to enable all people to lead healthy productive lives. We continue to share a belief in that mission and will continue our work together at the foundation. But we no longer believe we can grow together as a couple in this next phase of our lives melinda gates and bill gates and had a a reaction or to wonder about you brian. How did you what what went through your mind when you heard the news. The only point of comparison. I can really think of with. This is two thousand. Nineteen when jeff bezos split from his. Wife mackenzie scott and she immediately started donating to a number of different Philanthropic causes but that couple when they split really didn't have the philanthropic reach that bill and melinda gates do clearly so i think melinda gates from what i understand of that foundation really does get involved with decisions. That are involved. That happened there. And i get the feeling that if she wants to make any changes to what this foundation does. It's going to involve a lot of time in planning but i really think this is one of those stories where it is. Certainly something personal. I'm sorry that it happened. But i also look at this as something that really could affect a lot of things when i think about philanthropy when i think about public policy and how that's by these dollars that's coming in this is potentially something really big. We're talking about here.

Melinda Gates Mackenzie Scott Bill Gates Jeff Bezos Twitter Brian Bill
Justice Dept. Rule Would Aim to Crack Down on 'Ghost Guns'

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 19 hrs ago

Justice Dept. Rule Would Aim to Crack Down on 'Ghost Guns'

"The justice department has released a proposed a rule aimed at cracking down on so called ghost guns the move comes several weeks after president Biden urged action against the home made guns I want to see these kids treated as firearms the justice department's rule would broaden the definition of a firearm requiring that some kids used to make ghost guns include a serial number he would also force retailers to run background checks before selling some kids with the parts needed to make a gun at home law enforcement officials have been warning about what they call a federal firearms law loophole that allows people who are generally not allowed to own guns to get around that by making the weapons themselves Sager made Donnie Washington

President Biden Justice Department Sager Donnie Washington
Wall Street Rises Toward Records Despite Grim Jobs Report

John Williams

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

Wall Street Rises Toward Records Despite Grim Jobs Report

"Towards records on Wall Street today, despite a grim jobs report that shows hiring fell off sharply across the country last year. Right now, the Dow is up 155 points that asked act is up. 183 almost 2% and a half Now the S and P 500 almost 2% 32 points. The jobs report showed disappointing 266,000 jobs created last month, We were expecting a million jobs created that jolted the bond market. Just a little bit, also seemed to calm some inflation fears that have overhung markets for a couple of weeks Now, the data also showing average wages Rose more than expected. I'm Steve

Steve
Alex Taub on Digital Horse Racing

The Pomp Podcast

01:34 min | 1 d ago

Alex Taub on Digital Horse Racing

"Our guys bang bang. I've got alex here with me. What's up man is going on. We're doing it in miami is. we're all right. What the hell is z. Said zette dot. Ron has taken over. The world is digital horse racing. Yes so i got into it about a month and a half ago all right. That scares everyone immediately when it's only six weeks but that's shown contacts. Yeah i've got. I got into about a month and a half almost two months ago Some like backstory. I've a friend drew drostan. His great guy runs a thing called red beard ventures and He tried to get me into. Mba top shot in like early will try to get into mba top shot like october november december time over the past year and that was only twenty of the and that was really early. That would've been a good time to get the shot. And then he was in miami actually at the end of the year beginning of beginning of january and december. And we're sitting down at some hotel and he's like showing me he's like. I just spent like fifteen hundred bucks. I bought his zion williamson cosmic hollow. Like one out of fifty. I might do. What are you doing like. Why are you spending just flushed. Fifteen hundred bucks toilet. And he's acknowledged. John moran i bought. This is vince. Carlos show all these like cosmic hollows whatever. I was like what's going on. He's like just by pack. Experience it to me about a week to buy a pack and when i did all this is really cool like the opening of it and Anyway flash forward about a month later. His portfolio is worth about over two million dollars on a graph thousand dollar investment.

Drew Drostan Red Beard Ventures Miami Alex RON John Moran Vince Carlos
Gov. Eric Holcomb Vetoes Bill Limiting Local Health Orders

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Gov. Eric Holcomb Vetoes Bill Limiting Local Health Orders

"Is speaking out against a proposal in the State house that would limit local health order. See Indiana Public Health Association says the legislation could significantly damage public health in the state. At issue is the measure the governor vetoed earlier this week. General Assembly wants to allow county commissioners and mayors to put together emergency orders and reverse decisions by local health departments. The I P H A is asking to collaborate with lawmakers for what it calls a more comprehensive approach. A simple majority vote in both state House chambers could override the veto. One thing that we learned over the course of the last year and a half is things shift and things moved. So I don't want to. I don't want to give up that solid ground. I think the proof is in the pudding. When you look at the number The Public Health Association is holding a news conference this afternoon. At one. The state

Indiana Public Health Associat State House General Assembly Public Health Association
New President, New FCC, New Net Neutrality Rules?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:45 min | 1 d ago

New President, New FCC, New Net Neutrality Rules?

"Throughout the pandemic. we've covered. How the internet is everything this week. We're talking about the policy that affects the internet one policy issue that has haunted every fcc commissioner in the past decade and then some isn't it neutrality. That's the idea that isp's treat all content equally and can't slow down or charge more for certain kinds of content rules have ping pong between administrations obama's fcc put net neutrality rules in place. In two thousand fifteen trump's appointee repealed them twenty seventeen the new acting chairwoman of the fcc jessica rosenworcel supports net neutrality rules. I asked her if it's time for congress to make something permanent you know. I think things are always sturdier when they're written into law but i also think that when the fcc chose in two thousand fifteen to update its rules and make sure that net neutrality was in its policies. That decision was ultimately upheld in the courts. So i think that's the agency can move here to one of the big loopholes in net neutrality rules. Even when they've been in place has been wireless and now. We're sort of on the cusp. Potentially we've been on the cusp for awhile of big five g rollout. Do you think that any future rules need to be sort of a to include all the ways that we get broadband access. Not just fixed. Yeah i mean. I think that technology is changing at a really fast clip. It's very exciting. To see the speeds we might all be able to enjoy. With five g wireless. It's exciting to see what's happening with. Low earth orbiting satellite systems. I think they're going to be many more technologies that can deliver us high speed broadband in the not too distant future and whenever we change our policies. We're going to have to take that into consideration

FCC Jessica Rosenworcel ISP Donald Trump Barack Obama Congress
Down to Brash Tax: Colombias Protests Grow

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:42 min | 1 d ago

Down to Brash Tax: Colombias Protests Grow

"Protests in columbia continued overnight after more than a week of clashes rioters looted shops burned buses and police stations and blocked major roads leading to shortages of medicines and groceries in cali colombia's third largest city. The government has responded violently. Deploying the army against them. Dozens of people are dead or missing. Hundreds more have been injured president. Yvonne duquet has said he will listen to the protesters concerns but their fury with him seems only to be growing and gustavo. Petro a hard left senator. Who's leading polls to be mr duquet successor. In next year's election is encouraging people to demonstrate. Thousands have come up to the streets in opposition to tax reform. Bill that the government to congress and mid april that's what triggered the protests. Mariana polo about for the economist. But as of last few days they've come to include a broader set of shoes mostly about the economy. But there's also a lot of resentment against president of on duke will. Let's start with tax reform. That kicked things off what was in that. Legislation sought to increase tax revenue for the government. So what would have done a lot of things that economists have long pleaded the government to do for example it would remove many vat exemptions which mostly benefit the rich it would increase the number of people paying income tax. It would have even taxed pensions which aren't tax right now. In columbia

Yvonne Duquet Mr Duquet Mariana Polo Cali Colombia Gustavo Petro Columbia Army Government Congress Bill
Is NASCARs NextGen Car Going Electric?

The Final Lap

01:20 min | 1 d ago

Is NASCARs NextGen Car Going Electric?

"This week. Nascar unveiled our next gen cup series race car. That's gonna make its debut next season and from the first glance look amazing. Let's check out the styling. It's similar to the cars that you can buy at your local show remorse. Oh than ever ford mustang. Chevrolet camaro and toyota camry looked just like these race cars now. Some of the components feature things found on your car right now and for the last few decades actually otherwise not seen in nascar like independent rear suspension rack and pinion steering and bigger breaks and they have an eye on the future. The gearing package will feature the ability to incorporate electrification that martha turning point. I think we will hear a ton more about these future cars all year long for now. Let's get some thoughts from the defending cup series champion. Chase elliott miami guys coming in. Who don't have those. You know five years or ten years or fifteen years of experience and they don't know any better right so there's no bad habits to have to be broke my vantage point change to me. This is my sixth year which is crazy but with those six years i have created habits and things that i do inside the car that i'm curious to see apply if they apply next year nod and i think i'm not the only guy in that boat so looking forward to to seeing seeing what the challenges are and how to work through

Nascar Camry Chase Elliott Camaro Mustang Chevrolet Toyota Ford Martha Miami
Are Banks Getting Nervous About Competition From DeFi?

The Breakdown with NLW

02:02 min | 1 d ago

Are Banks Getting Nervous About Competition From DeFi?

"What's going on guys. It is thursday may sixth and today we are asking whether banks are getting nervous about competition from defy first step however. Let's do the brief. I on the brief today makoto. Lebron is the latest company to add bitcoin to its balance sheet. This is a massive latin-american e commerce and fintech company. You may remember them for being one of the founding members of the libra association and then leaving that association a few months later. It's a company that is based in argentina but listed on nasdaq they announce as part of their q one reporting the they had added seven point. Eight million dollars worth of bitcoin to their balance sheet now in some ways. This isn't that surprising. Ricardo libra has a long history of interaction with bitcoin. In two thousand fifteen the integrated. Bitcoin is a payment option on their makoto. Pago platform just last week. The company announced a real estate platform exclusively for properties available for sale and bitcoin launching with seventy five initial properties. Some on twitter pointed out that a latin american company investing in bitcoin to protect itself from currency devaluation was even more poignant than some of its american counterparts given how frequently bouts of inflation have destroyed savers in places like mocatta libraries home of argentina and speaking of latin american unicorns. The mexico based crypto exchange. Bit so has just raised a new round of funding that values at two point. Two billion dollars making it. The first latin american crypto unicorn. Next up on the brief today a digital has bought bit go for one point two billion dollars one of the key things. We've been watching here at the break. Down is crypto emanate. Emanate can tell us a lot about wearing. Industry is when times are tough as a survival strategy for companies that might otherwise go under when times are good as often. Something very different. This time around. There are two broad categories. I'm seeing. I is a joining of forces not because one party is at risk of dying but because together they see more chance to win important category

Bitcoin Libra Association Ricardo Libra Makoto Argentina Lebron Twitter Mexico
Jobless Claims Fall to 498,000

Marketplace Minute

00:19 sec | 2 d ago

Jobless Claims Fall to 498,000

"For the first time since the pandemic triggered massive layoffs the number of initial claims filed with state unemployment programs dipped to just below five hundred thousand last week. We'll get a fuller picture of the job market tomorrow. When the government issues it's monthly report for april analysts are forecasting nearly one million jobs

The June War Led to the Suez Canal’s Worst Stuck-Ship Fiasco

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:22 min | 2 d ago

The June War Led to the Suez Canal’s Worst Stuck-Ship Fiasco

"On june fifth of nineteen sixty seven israel went to war against egypt and syria in what came to be known as the june war however due to the surprising length of the fights it also went by another name the six day war. The conflict was over by june tenth with egypt retreating west however as they crossed the canal egyptian forces blocked it on both sides to keep the israelis from using it. What they didn't realize was that their actions had inadvertently stranded convoy fifteen ships travelling through the canal at the same time. Every vessel dropped anchor as egypt's sunk various other boats and even destroyed a bridge to prevent israeli access. They also deployed underwater minds for good measure. The ships having originally come from places like britain. America sweden germany and bulgaria among others were stuck crews use. Their radios to reach family loved ones to alert them of what had happened. But were forced to cease communications at the request of the egyptians. Times got tough after that first month which initially seemed like a vacation as the days and weeks moron however crew men grew lonely and isolated boredom eroded their mental health the weeks turned into months and countries negotiated crew swaps for their respective ships though. They were moving. The vessel still require maintenance in order to stay afloat so one crew would stay on for three or four months until another crew could be brought in to relieve them. The men with nowhere to go and very little to keep themselves occupied eventually got to know each other in a way. Each vessel became like a house in a small community. And that's how all the crew members treated their situation. Every ship served a different purpose. The largest one with its enormous deck became a soccer field. The men watching movies on the bulgarian freighter and printed stamps on the polish ship which the egyptian authorities were kind enough to honor legal. Postage many of the crew race lifeboats in the canal and attended church services on board the west german ship. And if they want to unwind. They took a dip in the pool on the swedish vessel. Supplies were delivered regularly. During the brutally hot summer months one could look out at the ships and see hundreds of beer bottles floating alongside their hulls after a year without movement. The convoy even created its own version of the olympics with the various crews representing eight countries. Across fourteen sports

Egypt Syria Israel Bulgaria Sweden Britain Germany America Soccer Olympics
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

07:38 min | 2 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Good evening thanks so much for being with us tonight. My name is megan. Folco and i have the privilege to serve as the director of the term member program at the council on foreign relations. We have a really special program plan for this evening. And i wanna take a minute to say a few words about who is joining us and why we are doing this. Today is the one year anniversary of the first diagnosed case of covid nineteen in new york city. The past year has been full of stress and trauma for all of us and no one has borne that burden more than our frontline workers including those we are honored to be joined by tonight sharing their experiences with us tonight. Our dr marwat adullah. She's an assistant professor of cardiology and director of education for the cardiac intensive care unit at newyork presbyterian columbia university medical center. Dr mckinney chisholm. Stryker an associate professor of emergency medicine at the mount sinai. Icahn school of medicine. Doctor craig spencer. An associate professor of emergency medicine and director of global health at newyork presbyterian columbia university medical center dr sonia stokes who in addition to being an assistant professor of emergency medicine and global health at the mount sinai. Icahn school of medicine. She's also one of your fellow members. I also want to welcome the twelve front line. Emergency professionals who are joining us as guest. This evening they generously offered to lead. Small informal breakout discussions following the first hour of conversation. And i hope you'll be able to stick around and participate in those discussions. Finally i wanna give a special thanks to sonia. Who's the reason. This discussion is happening here tonight. Almost exactly one year ago in washington. Dc many of you heard her speak. Candidly at cf are about kobe. And she issued warnings that not even our government and health officials were issuing yet she was really the canary in the coal mine for a lot of us and i'm extremely grateful to her for her generosity and the guidance she's given me in many of her fellow see of our members throughout this past year. I don't think there's a better person to lead this conversation with her colleagues sonia. So thank you all for being here this evening and my heartfelt. Thanks go to more. Wa- mckean creggan sonia for taking precious time to be with us this evening and for all that they do and now altering the evening over to sonia in q. Megan and thank you to the council on foreign relations for hosting us this evening before we begin. I would like to dedicate the session to dr lorna brie. And to all our frontline healthcare workers who have died from covid nineteen. We are remembering you today. Not only to honor their lives and their work but also to remind us of why we're here today to have this conversation. The reasons for that are one. We need to acknowledge that we are grieving. Simply mean for those of us on the front lines of covid nineteen. I mean all of us to to share ongoing fears. We have about her pandemic response three to take action make real change that will protect us now and for the future and i will take a moment to explain these three points the first one grief many of us on the front lines of the covid nineteen response have avoided showing our emotions because being emotional might be misinterpreted as being unprofessional. And i think this has in. Some ways hurt our ability to communicate to our patients into the public effectively. Communication is not just about information there. Is that emotional component. That i believe we are missing and the sterility of information without that it's not effective and it's not fair to you to keep telling you do this. Don't do that. I wanna ask you those of us attending today. How many of you hear the statistics. You're the warnings and feel numb. I have to tell you that even those of us on the front lines feel it too. That is a trauma response. And don't let anyone tell you otherwise because the body will respond. To repeated a protracted crisis by trying to protect itself numbness. though. I don't wanna say it's normal. It is in a way natural and i don't think we can actually have an honest conversation about pandemic preparedness until we acknowledge that and make space for it so that we actually move forward. That brings me to my second point. Fear something else that we don't normally talk about louis. The reason for that is because we worry as front-line providers that we will overwhelm you The we because doing. And i think this is causing so much confusion because responding to our confusion you're either not perceiving a danger or you're feeling the urge to panic and both are not effective. They're not useful. And i think that that's because we don't necessarily bring our personal experiences with fear to the conversation so to do that. I want to give you some of my experiences. To help scribe that. When i think back to march i in shortly after when many of our colleagues became sick and some of them died my first thoughts rent. My parents doctor. Stokes dr deepak stokes. They are to the smartest hardworking physicians. That i know there is a buys but i think some of their colleagues would agree with me and i thought of them because they're in their stuff and deeds they're seeing covid patients and there is nothing that i do leading up to march first end onwards. That is a reaction to that fear for their safety. I suspect that that's true for most of you out there. I don't mean just the medical community. I think all of us are having response. We feel that urge. it's comes from a deep desire to protect the ones we love but to beautiful response and willow alert guys. That's actually what's gonna get us through this. We have to remember this because that will lead us to our third point action. You are going to be listening to frontline providers with some real concrete steps that they can offer you that will actually help us with Pandemic preparedness just for the future or the next wave or even for next week. I mean today. And so i want you to really listen to them when you go to the breakout rooms meeting some of our colleagues from not just in new york city but actually from across the country who can also help to give some guidance on this because the reality is the future is going to come. We know this we could actually sit back be passive but active participation will actually make a difference in what is going to be like on the other side. Mckean was actually one of the first people to tell this as well as another friend and colleague suzy okay. We don't wanna go back. We want to get to somewhere better in part of that is going to be actually taking a look back and then finding out where we made our mistakes make those corrections How we make those corrections is by staying educated staying organized. These conversations are held. That happens on that note.

megan washington Today Stryker sonia tonight next week marwat adullah craig spencer mckinney chisholm today one year ago Mckean louis both second point first third point this evening mount sinai
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

09:28 min | 3 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"To ensure that the islamic state can't come back and that over time we actually do achieve the enduring defeat of isis which is going to require a number of other activities by host nation partners on the ground which we should support to some degree but we want them to do those for themselves. And i think what you're going to see is a bit of a gradual. I wouldn't say hardening but at least it will some degree of acceptance that there's going to be a us syrian democratic force area of northeastern syria There'll still be that camp. Also down near the border with between iraq and syria and at some point in time when there's a recognition that we are not going away were not taking significant. Cavalry's at all We lost more in training accidents. I think last year then We lost in the battlefield. So this this is a sustainable issue For us a superpower can easily keep a modest number of troops and by the way also in places such as again modest numbers and somalian and so forth. We pulled out smalley by the way in the last few weeks and already al-shabaab is expanding into the areas where we no longer have influence in no longer support the somali forces that we helped to build an obviously maintaining a stable. Us presence around the world only sends a deterrence message to our adversaries but also since reassuring message to our allies. As what sound -solutely and. I think you can look back in the past where we have not done that. Were perhaps we're our rhetoric outstripped what it was that we were willing to do and suggests that that sent the opposite message. Well this is a time when again deterrence is going to be hugely important in that. Most important of all relationships says it is built And that's how i think you establish deterrence after all is the adversaries perception of your capability and your will employ it. Michelle one of them. More complicated relationships biden will be have navigates that with russia and britain which in We saw those mass demonstrations over the weekend a in in moscow and one hundred cities route russia's eleven time zones following the arrest of navan and all of his supporters. They're reacting not only his arrest but also new videos and investigative reports on just the level of corruption surrounding ladimir puccini and we heard strong words from the. Us state department at president biden has vowed to respond aggressively in ways his predecessor have not but my question to you is in addition in strong words. And sort of going back in a typical. Us response How else can we affectively navigate or and we at this point effectively navigate sort of two pronged relationship with russia where we cooperate in areas out. We can such as extending new start with which They both seem to agree. On and also Responding to the lawlessness and the aggressive behavior that we've seen over the past few years from vladimir putin. It's a great question. I think one of the things you will see from the new administration isn't approach that puts allies front and center at doing as we can by with and through allies. So you're gonna see them reach out particularly to our. Nato allies have first of all show up second of all have deep consultations with through nato but also bilaterally on this question of how do we assess the russian set of threats. Whether it's you know the the the kind of threats to him human rights and democracy that we've seen recently whether it's their raise on behavior the poisoning of navalny cyberattacks the interference democratic systems in europe. And here and so forth But how do we together assess those threads. How do we Work together to be more effective in deterring them preventing them and when necessary responding to them and so forth But i think the the basic premises were going to be much more powerful and effective if we work together not just as on a bilateral basis. So i think you'll see already. President biden has asked the new director of national intelligence to do a deep dive assessing russian behavior across the board. I think that will be the basis for that. Engaging allies to come up with a shared strategy and i do think you'll see them pushback particularly on demain Anti democracy efforts from hooton. But also in we've just had this unprecedented cyber attack The solar winds attack. And i think there'll be a lot of attention focused on how do we shore up deterrence in cyberspace. What kind of costs. We need to impose on on putin and so forth. But russia at is a classic example of this blend of shoring up deterrents reassuring allies mobilizing allies to be to to come alongside us and then engagement engaging with to press where we have issues with russian behavior but also to pursue areas of cooperation. Like new start. I was very very pleased to see that right out of the box. The administration acted to keep that strategic framework. Which is very much beneficial to. Us interests in place historically would let him a putin's been sort of backed into a corner. He reacts aggressively And we saw that unrest domestically and twenty eight and two thousand fourteen With the crimean invasion And i'm wondering because i'm reading reports from neighboring countries in particular former soviet republics that are worried that increased domestic unrest. There will sort of put him in a position where he's got to flex and perhaps acting aggressively towards other countries and in a us and logo western response would look like is in fact. That happens right. I mean i do think wait year. You're playing three dimensional chess not checkers vladimir putin then you have to think multiple steps down the road as you craft a strategy and you have to make sure you have alliance solidarity for those multiple steps down the road. I think at the same time we think about additional pressure. We need to think about shoring up deterrence in zero where we think he might go under pressure. My own view is the thing we should be. Focusing on is his use of chemical weapons against nevada. There's absolutely no international disagreement there On the prohibitions. Against that and that was sort of outside the bounds of international norms and air. National laws And i think that there's a strong case to be made about additional sanctions. They're my own view and again. I'm not an intelligence analyst. But i would like to see us more pressure on the people who keep putin power Oaks around him who do have money in the west who do have assets in the west. That are vulnerable the sanction and that those are the the names of the list that novon neom celts. And it's people did. Did his group finds would be more effective. Union sanctioning purse to The the country as a whole in having citizens they're suffering Issue is the russian people right right in with africa but it gets to putin's decision making not just make the russian people's lives more miserable and to go back to what general jason saying it's all about deterrence to. He hasn't been to target at this point. I want to end before. We open it up to audience. Participation ripped general the trains and ask about iran. I know this isn't sort of a two minute. Answer but your perspective that you have president ruhani saying the ball is in biden's or president biden's or To return to that the nuclear agreement and lift sanctions. The biden administration has ended that they are very eager to return to the new. The deal. my question to you is How likely is a return. And do you think as many detractors had said with the initial bill that a vitamin straightened actually work a better deal. But clearly that's again what was hinted at When you have the confirmation hearing for tony blinken who also did didn't employ that this is going to happen tomorrow or next week There's going to take some time. The ideal world obviously would be that there could be an effort that is pursued in conjunction with our partners in the region with gulf states in israel So that we're not doing secret negotiations and they're not kept abreast. We'd want to ideally. Get a bipartisan support. On capitol hill so to could actually be a treaty rather than another executive order. Because of course those are not make those can be a bit fragile. If there's a change in the white house the the issues are well known That the agreement of course that was reached and signs. Some five years ago is now..

europe ladimir puccini biden last year Michelle next week jason navan tomorrow israel al-shabaab five years ago syria iraq vladimir putin one africa tony blinken two minute one hundred cities
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"In record time and i am on the board of operation warp. Speed the thing that you know from the time. The sequence was in january tenth Within a year we actually have two vaccines that are going to be deployed It's really remarkable in terms of the impact of the innovation. They came to bear and to see that then somehow sit on the shelf or a percentage of our population and eventually the world Initially in our country because of hesitancy many parts of the world because as we ramp up availability to see hesitancy and become a major reason. Why individuals don't get vaccinated. I think is continues to be one of the really serious challenges that we have in in the remaining time that i'm cdc director Through the middle of january to keep pushing for vaccine back to nation with confidence. I'm we've been working with every state in our country to develop their own. What we call micro distribution plans vaccine will be probably being delivered this weekend or next early next week to sixty four different jurisdictions and they have worked since July with the cdc developing their own individual micro distribution plans for the populations that they believe should be prioritized or axiom. It will take us probably till the end of the second quarter or the beginning of the third quarter before. There's enough vaccine that all american public will have access to it and i know our country will be committed to working to do what it can to them provide vaccine availability to the broader world. Probably close with just Saying that we are turning the corner. But i wanna come back to reality that is going to be. I think okay a brutal time for us. As i said i think it will be the most challenging time in history of our nation from public health perspective And i want the public to really understand that. Despite what i said. That's not written in stone if people really would embrace the strategies that we've asked problem with this virus is it's really infections. I'm overall adjust by training interesting that we're seeing record lows of flu. So the mitigation that we're doing the level were doing is having an enormous impact on the respiratory pathogen influenza but that same degree of mitigations not having any impact of any degree as i mentioned that our nation now is at the highest threshold of the pandemic and unfortunately we're continuing to see cases rise as a consequence of the thanksgiving a surge combined with the surge that we're having in general We do know that if you do in fact wear masks It really works. We did a an dot w. in kansas where the governor issued a voluntary mandate counties. Could either do it or not. Do you know Say half a little less than half Did it in lower have didn't do it. The follow up period turns out if the county had a mask mandate in do any investigation of how well was Exercise but this is the county issued a mandate those cownie said a six percent decline hundred thousand cases over the observation period and the counties did decided to nor the mass mandate they had over one hundred percent increase so there was over one hundred six percent difference in the amount of in cases that were spread. Just simple decision whether to send a leadership perspective in in recognizing the mass were important So i'll leave dan. I'm happy to answer questions and see what other people Questions that the the audiences thank you so much. Dr redfield and I'm i'm really glad that you started with that question. Of what can we do to protect ourselves because There are over. Six hundred fifty members on this call on many are leaders in their communities. And i think you know that we're going to get into lots of questions that there's probably nothing more important that We could address today than Than this question of how to how we can protect ourselves how we can protect our communities So i hope that everybody's taking those words to heart You did talk about today. Being momentus day yesterday we as a nation had a reported over three thousand deaths. it's a record Many news outlets have pointed out that puts the coronavirus toll for one day higher than the nine eleven toll for the first time. That's number eleven attacks There are some other statistics that are just that really bring this home. We've had nearly three hundred thousand deaths now in total That is half the expected cancer deaths in a year..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"The point where we're doing it and you think about how far along China is in currency less. Commerce. We can't just rest on our laurels that these technologies are going to be here that we're gonNA lead in them. Or that somehow. It's just going to happen magically and I. I think that it's GonNa take on some intervention, and we could go in the opposite direction. We could just be in tone gridlock. You know everybody's afraid to take a train. Everybody's afraid of public transportation were afraid of the newburgh driver, and so everybody's in a personal automobile, and then we're nowhere. On and someone was reminding me today that when you go to. They were telling me how they were visiting Ethiopia and working on a project there and everybody's in vehicles that like from nineteen fifty to the United States and so it does take a lot to turn over infrastructure and and it takes intervention. Will thank you, amy. We've for this peak into the future of energy, and and what digital brings us. We've reached the end of our time. Here all of you. WHO JOINS US today? Thank you very much next week. WE'RE GONNA turn back to a little bit more. Traditional international relations renowned Steve's bitch chapters about retrenchment and US foreign policies, so please join us next week and please join me in thanking Amy for today's class. Thank you all..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Russia should dynamic. We have the complication up. China modernizing its forces India and Pakistan having forces development of new technologies. That may I put a existing nuclear technologies at risk talking about things like hypersonic missiles so I think technology is creating a whole series of problems in our culture to the nuclear clear area that we have not begun to grapple with and they may rise up and surprises in some particularly alarming ways. Put One nod into tackling inequality pretty because it has everything to do with what you're talking about. There was a times piece about a study done by thirty different universities. And the idea is the more inequality. There isn't a country the more it is likely that the populace wants a military government. Happens here too so if it is I think so. How many people know how important this is that there are people who are looking into how to address it in a ten year span is a is a good span to look at because if we don't if we don't figure that one out we will all be be marching about in uniforms? I am William from rutgers a research Internet think tanks and civil societies program. My question is about China Sir. Recurring to theme team of multi-lateralism on what the panel think of mainland China's Belt Road Initiative due the panel think of the initiative as more of a philanthropist atlanticist infrastructure project or a neo-colonial model of debt chap diplomacy. Well it certainly starting to seem like the ladder. According to the reports emerging from countries that have been heavily involved in this. You're starting to see a belt and road. It's also takes a little bit of an amorphous quality because China's is active in so many places mentioned Hawaii signs in Europe. I saw them in Georgia that the country this summer as well but also in Africa as well and it's both an essential and in some places but also a increasingly onerous partnership that these countries find themselves involved in especially feeling leveraged aged feeling a bit invaded by Chinese workers and entrepreneurs and so forth. I think the Belton road the verdict still out on it. I think a lost opportunity for the US of course was was countering it with the trans-pacific partnership which was one of the first moves. The trump administration made leaving it. And so I think it's getting getting to feel like it's coming got a bit of a burdensome move by by China and I think you're gonNA start maybe seeing this ratcheting up a little bit more as China's economy slows terms of their their need to to create markets and export markets and so forth. I think there's a there's a great deal more pressure that countries involved in the initial feeling. I my name. Is Mary avoid where he. I'm a second year graduate student. At Arcadia University. Like Democracy Multi lateral ISM is also declined. What are some factors that can bring back? multi-lateralism latter lessen the one factor. That's most likely to revive. multi-lateralism is the willingness of the United States to lead the effort. If you look at sort of the world that was created by the United States after the end of World War Two we call it the rules based order the liberal international order. You call it. The American lead order Pax Maricana what stood out about it. was you had one country. The United States basically service like an organizing force to build up these institutions that did did not exist before for a whole variety reasons. The United States has sort of lost its enthusiasm for multi-lateralism clearly president trump when he campaign payne ran on a platform not of isolationism. As it's often discussed but if unilateralism we'll do what we want. We don't WanNa be fettered by these institutions and I think one of the consequences as a result of that is where there have been opportunities to reinvigorate multilateral them they follow them by the wayside. Just give you one example sample on this issue of trade. We talk about problems. They really should have three stages recognizing of a problem figuring out why you have the problem generating a solution for the problem. I should say four than implementing your proposed solution. I think the president is right and that there's a lot of problems in the international trading system. He falls down on steps to three reinforced and clearly one of the ways to deal with what he's concerned about in the international trading system would be an invigorating known that's the World Trade Organization instead at the United States essentially as decided it does not like the World Trade Organization and in Oh about two months from now the organization effectively is going to be a unable to continue working because at the appellate level the final stage in how the World Trade Organization works requires on having members of that Appellate Body Body and the United States is blocking the appointment of new members of that body and come December. They will not have enough people to actually proceed and what that does is again as you break. Institutions people go elsewhere institutions. Become very hard to fix and it becomes very hard to create new institutions nations. So I think that would be the big change now. Something that you think you will. Maybe China could lead us in a new multilateral direction. The Chinese to this point have not not shown any interest in doing so maybe someday they will but I would not the vision. China has of how the world will be organized is not one that has a lot of appeal will particularly to countries that are in its neighborhood. They actually fear the rise of China. That's why for the United States. There is a lot of support for we might call sensible. US diplomacy in the region. That's why you had so many countries in Southeast Asia in East Asia signing up to the trans-pacific partnership because they saw this as a multilateral example of how you could knit countries together create a counterweight to China that would put pressure on China and have to adapt to to what members of TPP redoing rather than China's seeing their essentially as a gigantic economic black hole certain terms of its gravity. It's economical Michael Gravitational pull sort of drawing everybody toward it. I mean I would say it's also were looking in the multilateral sphere on foreign aid which is not a favorite topic of this although there is still quite a bit foreign aid dispersed by the US Congressional area congressional interest but presidential administrations can have an incredible edible effect. And I would just point to just by way of example was the pep far program under President George W Bush in Africa the US brought extraordinary. Resources is to bear and worked with a number of countries geos and so forth to basically help diminish and and stamp out in many places HIV AIDS in sub Zahren Africa and while there are a number of critics of some aspects of that approach and other aspects of George W Bush's foreign policy he gets wide credit for that initiative which pep forward was a success. It was US run and the US really was. I was uniquely situated to be able to bring that sort of firepower to bear the. US Do this in many other places especially the global health front but there's other areas well. Hello I'm Safia Southie. I may junior at Columbia University. I just want to ask how you envision. The role of the United States in the pursuit the continuing pursuit of human rights especially in regards to enya whose recent threats to extensively expand illegal settlements within Palestinian Austrian territory. Oh dear you know. I thought the answer to the question of how do you go back to. multi-lateralism is is an election American. And I think it's the same answer. I think that this administration will be quite supportive of that in the same way that the president president spoke about the Kurds are no angels and it didn't really bother him that we're having some real serious civilian deaths and so I can. Only they say that but I think the answer is an election on that note. Bob I think wrap up wrapped up where we begin with with voting people boating and taking part in democracies. This wraps up the first ever live podcast edition of the world next week. Thanks to DEB for joining us. Please don't wait ten years..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

11:43 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"I can't find them unless I'm on all those apps so I know them. I think there is an effort. Certainly I I spent two and a half months in Europe this summer and they are much more aware not aware but they are trying to use legislation to change and to protect but what you end up is every time I wanna read an article. I got a big screen. That says please give me your choices and I look what those choices are and they are we will. We'll send you personal ads or we won't it's it's not it's not working. It is too cumbersome and there's moments where I just click and say whatever you WanNa do I wanna read that but I don't have this much time so I don't think we're even close to a solution to what we are going to have to do to make it safe that we still have encryption and that that raises a problem because obviously being encryption is good. If you're a good person you don't want your stuff being looked at but if you're a bad person trying to do bad things. Encryption is a powerful tool to let you accomplish your bad ends. How do you how do you balance that out? Good policing I mean look you. You know it of the criminals us. I think it's a minor thing honestly. Encryption and policing is how crimes are solved if they are but. I don't think that all of us have to give up privacy for that reason and I think certainly the legislation that's beginning doesn't take that as a bottom line either so w talked about previously where you were ten years ago in. Damascus obviously plays this gigantic role in the past decade decade. But could you talk a little bit about the sweep of the Middle East. I don't know Syria these story that you want to focus on or would you. Are there other lessons. We should take in the past ten years. The Middle East well at the moment is because we are at a pivot moment. I mean this is Humpty dumpty the. US President pushed him right over the ledge. And I don't think we know yet how that one will come out. Everybody's racing from Isis to Moscow. What does this mean to me? It may mean at the end of the day that Turkey does have a safe zone on the border. That's what it looks like that Russia's on the other side I mean this week we've had these amazing scenes that you see the Syrian army going up the highway one way and the Americans coming down the highway. The other way the Russians moving in from the right isis moving in from the left I think that is a huge story. I think the second big story is Saudi Arabia and the question is is can the head of that government. Get Away with murder on. That's also a story that hasn't completely played out so those in my mind. Those are the two big ones wants to watch and Iran and US has sent forces to Saudi Arabia because of Iran and seen as a threat to the Saudi energy installations. So it's the Saudi Iran. mm-hmm story is Saudi Iran. Proxies story it's all of those things and throw in Syria as well because Syria raises questions. About how reliable are we. The Saudis ladies were discomforted to say the least about what happened in northern Syria and said so publicly. The Iranians have been cheering. What happened and So are because they're involved in in Syria and so have the Russians so that's a new element to add into. What is what appeared? Heard for a while to be a pretty simple confrontation between the United States and Iran. And now everybody's back in kind dry you on because there's obviously been a lot of commentary. Commentary Law Discussion certainly on the cable news channels about which countries have benefited from the president's decision to withdraw troops. But what I have seen last last discussion of is how American interests are hurt because the president would argue that American interests have been advanced by his taking the troops out. How do you size that discussion up? Well as the Israelis. I can't imagine that they are very happy about this. Because it gives Iran a stronger foothold in Syria. I have seen the argument that says if shark can take over his country again he has no need for the Iranians and the Russians but Iran has been in Syria since nineteen seventy nine. It is unlikely unlikely that they will walk out the door just because things are calmer and that's not going to happen. Let's put to the torture living in Decor Iowa War San Antonio Texas basis. What does that matter? How does that translate into American security because an unstable Middle East eventually reverberates? Nine eleven one is about the Middle East ultimately Isis on the ground is about our security and those things are not written in this black black and white tableau but there there and I think that people in the region that they are there. So let me ask you. We've been in heavily in Middle East from longer than a decade to viscount right sixteen years since the invasion of Iraq. How does that net out for you? What is the united gained from that? What is it lost? Well the Middle East never works in Nice. That's NEAT decades. The Middle East is a very long story and it has been for us for the United States for a long time. I mean it used to be very simple equation oil Israeli security and now it has gotten a little bit more complicated because of the Iranians but I agree with you. It is a very hard argument to make for the middle of the country. Because most most people don't I don't know about Kurds and don't care either. But instability people do understand and precipitous foreign policy. Decisions made on twitter is not a good model. I should be careful before I get lots of love letters from Decor Iowa in San Antonio Texas I say Americans generally. It's not just the heartland sort. They should have a lot of people. Don't know but I think president trump what he did tap into was something as he's done in many other fronts was what he was encountering on his his campaign trail. which was this fatigue with? The Middle East agrees absolute exhaustion. And when you look at the numbers in Iraq for example socal blood and treasure just to the US. I let alone what happened into rockies and others in the region it's just staggering. And so I think he still has and he was doubling down on this last night at a rally. You still have these these hearings who just say a enough for Americans over there trying to fix things in a place where they're just going to be at each other's throats but you see the Middle East is the Anti Las Vegas what happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas. That is is not true in the Middle East and we have seen this again and again and again. And so. That's the drawback to walking away walking away in the way that the walk was done yes. There is a good argument to be made that we were doing ourselves. No good by staying in Syria. We were essentially a trip wire and you could see what happened as soon as the plug pulled all hell broke loose and they had to come in again and say to Mr Air. Don Don't be a fool in that letter that the president sent onto him so seem to have had much of an impact on president wants decision because he received it before he decided to actually send troops in. He has been making that decision for the. I think that decision in his head was made letter or no letter he was going in. And you see what the pressure is on him. He's got two problems he's got in it Lib eventually there are millions of people there and they're going to have to go somewhere and there's not any place for them to go except for North into Turkey or is what two million you. Three three million Syrian refugee exactly. And here's the second problem he's had he's just lost. His party lost the election for the mayor of Istanbul and speaking of Democracy speaking of democracy and this guy was after a do over exactly. He tried to see if perhaps he could get a better result than like the first results. But this guy is pretty criti- strong against Syrian refugees and so his idea is all right. I will just shove them into this space. I WANNA take in northern Syria so it that's his solution to a ferry acute political problem for him one final thing to wrap up your mid East segment which is just Iran. So two thousand nine. If we're beginning our KENYIR concede here. Iran had come through a pretty pretty tough people power revolt and it ends. This decade should weathering US sanctions but also as you say taking a little bit of a victory lap on Syria. How do you look at the way? Iran's domestic dynamics were playing out so I think they are in a holding pattern and I so an Iranian official recently and I said are you guys waiting for to see what the two thousand twenty election's GonNa look like. And he said absolutely they will wait that one out because they don't have to make a decision until they know. Are we talking for years. We talk in eight years then we see but for the moment maximum pressure is not working it just just makes the region. Why are there American troops in Saudi Arabia because maximum pressure is not working? I want to move over to gym now and see if Jim can take take us back ten years and take us through what he sees as a significant development. Maybe that was not foreseen or there may be. There was some Harverson. Jim Happy to do it. I would say looking back. The big change over the last decade has been the end of the. US China love affair was it it was it was a love affair. Let's go back okay. Let's go back twice. Yeah let's let's go back a decade ago. We were first recording it. It was a lot of talk in the air about how we were seeing the rise of Chai Merica or if you prefer it was this Chai -fornia there was an awful lot of talk about how American Economic Engagement was going to inject American political values into the Chinese system. Maybe see China become more open. We would see China eventually evolved into a responsible stakeholder in the international national global order so much so that a lot of capitals around the world was a great fear of the rise of the so-called G to these two governments Beijing in in Washington would essentially dominate. What's happened in the world and set the rules everybody else? Let's flash forward to today. The United States is formerly named Aim China as a strategic competitor we have launched a trade war against China. One of the aims of that trade war is to disentangle or de decouple the US and Chinese economies. Meanwhile China has made it clear that it has no desire or intention simply to take directives from Washington eighteen. DC and not only. Does Beijing want to set the rules of the game. It wants to determine what games are going to be played. and WHO's playgrounds. And they're going to be played on and as you saw just last week with the controversy over a single tweet sent by the general manager of the Houston Rockets against the Chinese intend have used their economic leverage to try to censor what people in other countries you're saying for talks about things. These are issues that they don't like and I think that's a really big development. The question going forward is. How is this relationship going to evolve now again? It's probably a big dose of humility. We go back about your area deb. When the Arab spring I broke out everybody was talking about democracy had finally arrived in the Middle East? It didn't quite turn out that way except maybe for Tunisia likewise a decade ago people were sort of upbeat about where you as China relations are going to go so humility. Always but I do think we're likely to see a lot more conflict in that relationship you've just seen the president announce trade deal though a lot of the parts of the trade deal haven't been worked out and by the time they sit down and try to put the fine print in the deal may fall apart but the bigger issue is. It is at best a truce in much longer broader confrontation between the two capitals. And it won't simply be limited to issues about what the tariff or taxes on imports coming into the country..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"That's the logic the question we have right now. It's a big question remark. Will it actually play out that way because one way it could play out as you point out is that the government simply just cracks down severely on public protests and is able to contain contain that protest in doesn't lead to the next step which is a change in policy but again big question. Mark got predictions on both sides of that debate. And we'll see how it unfolds. It's thanks again to our twitter. Followers hoping generate that discussion. Jim Who or what is your frigging Bob. I'm going to go with a number of my numbers. Forty one and that refers to the length of time between nineteen seventy-eight State Department decision on the status of Israel's settlements in the West Bank and the decision this week by the trump administration back in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight Jimmy Carter was president. The State Department issued a decision saying that Israel real settlements in the West Bank were legal violated international law the Carter Administration was the only US administration to take that particular position. I should subsequent administrations basically said they found the settlements unhelpful or bar the phrase that President Obama would use illegitimate this past week. The trump opened ministration secretary of state. Mike pompeo announce it as far as the trump administration's concern Israel's West Bank settlements. Do not violate international law. This is significant ruling. I will note that a number of international bodies disagree wholeheartedly and so this is sort of touched off yet again. This question of America's his broader commitment to international law multi-lateralism in also the specific thing of is the two state solution in the Middle East coming coming to an end in the end up there. I think something on the order of one hundred and thirty government-approved settlements in the West Bank. Maybe another one hundred and thirty or so that are informal. Molded aren't necessarily with the approval of the Israeli government. And the argument is that the settlement policy is essentially making it impossible to have have a Palestinian state at any point in time. Because it simply won't have the natural should've boundaries and spread to be able to succeed. I will tell you on the on. The merits of the issue can get lawyers to argue back and forth over whether or not the traditional rulings from variety of international bodies are are dispositive. That is and the question or not and I will spare listeners. The multitude of arguments pro and con on all of that but it does sort of raising this fundamental fundamental question of. Where is the Middle East peace process going to go? Is there one even begin to speak about. Yeah it's occurring a curious time as all sorts speculation about why. This decision came out. Israel's in the process of trying to an failing so far to put together a government looks they're going to have a third set of elect against failed failed to exactly what the government who along with bb. Netanyahu both greeted decision by the United States. Actually on the West Bank settlements still was unable to put together a critical mass of parties to to be able to govern the country. So it could be going right back to the polls. And there's no sign that that's going to lead to any further breakthrough unless this is a country where one or two seats seats could spell the difference. So maybe some furious horse trading going on before this next round we will see what is going to happen sort of internally with Israeli domestic politics. But you're quite right. This decision and was applauded by people across the political spectrum in Israel. So it's not necessarily divisive there. Ain't this the bigger question. Should going forward is happy effectively. You come to the end of the two state solution. Here actually just flagged the most recent issue of foreign affairs which has any three really good pieces on this topic. They take different points of view you want is for Martin. Indyk is a fellow here at C. Afar and was twice you as embassador to Israel talking about how the trump administration's policy is endangering prospects re piece another piece by Mike. Duran is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute who argues that the two state solution has been dead for quite some time. And it's about Tommy sort of recognize that another piece by a gentleman whose name is now escaped me arguing that you would never gonNa make two-state solution work and that we really need to think about how you can have a one. State solution. Consort of equal equal status provided for us for democratic rights at both Jewish Israelis in Arabs as well so this is a very complicated question. It's been coming up fair amount out on the campaign trail certainly on the Democratic primaries in so I think it's really interesting issue to watch and see how it develops. Yeah and and it's very thought provoking you're right it's a IT'S A. It's a great issue on those articles. Also brought her Middle East coverage in that issue is food for thought on on. Not only. What's happening there? But what the. US role can and should be and whether other in matters. Even you know like you mentioned forty one years since that State Department ruling and in that time probably hundreds of thousands of Israelis of basically taken up seven hundred thousands river all seven hundred. Yeah so and and and again I I want to do a podcast. We talk about issues in three or four five six minutes. This is a very complicated issue with lots of arguments and kind of arguments long history but I think we may be at a turning point. We're going to have to rethink sort of what it is that. US policy is seeking to accomplish can accomplish what about you. Bob Who are. What is your figure here? The week Tim. I'm GONNA take liberties as I sometimes do and chooses my figure a panda a panda And the pandas name is baby spelled B. I. Hyphen B. Y.. And Bay. Hey baby was born at the National Zoo in Washington remember the Smithsonian and his part of China's panda diplomacy but going back. Actually he has gone back this week to China to Chengdu where China China runs this facility to help reintegrate pandas back into a bag back willingly or did he miss behave. Clear exile unclear unclear. He seemed to be fine. He was well stocked with bamboo shoots and so forth in his a fedex jet that he took back by Fedex Fedex and I mentioned engine him not only because I like pandas because I do really remarkable and they are. We should note the symbol of world. Wildlife Federation among other things pens are actually one of the world's so far success stories always in terms of reviving endangered species. They are no longer technically endangered. They are listed as vulnerable. So they're not out of the woods yet. Pardon the Pun there not out of the bamboo Jim but their numbers amorous have come back to such a degree in part because of this the called panda diplomacy of China that in some ways are triggered by the US China normalization relations in the early seventies. which is when I believe was when that first occurred Pat Nixon was enamored of Pana's story goes and China responded by actually sending to pan is to live in the US not on loan but since then they have started this process of these loaner pandas and in some cases to try to breed in foreign zoos? And there's been mixed record but it has happened they became a darling of Washingtonians in particular because they nationals who created special cameras. You can watch base growing up from a little peanut to what we live in tiny which just part of the challenge. It's tough to breed pandas. And then once they are born to get them to survive in captivity they may did thrived we all sorts of incredible photos and videos of baby frolicking looking in the snow and so forth so it really touched a chord for all Washingtonians in these partisan times. Jim Penn is I think broke down those walls. And there've been other such initiatives in US zoos. WHO's US across the world in? So I mentioned is just to say that you know in the midst of all the tough things going on and on the trade front and other and other ways between countries there whereas soft diplomacy occurring and it sometimes has an impact and so the story of babies should be one to give a little bit of hope so is a replacement debate on the Fedex plane back to the actually. There's an excellent question and I have not been able to confirm that or not have been looking around On someone reports to see whether that is going to happen. I don't have any reason. Believe not that won't happen if any of our your listeners can confirm that look happy here but it has been a successful relationship. And it's one by the way that at the end of the day the Smithsonian according to the reports I've read it's not cashing cashing in on this and in fact it has spent several million dollars to support this program of its own and but for the greater good of of prolonging the panda species basically and so one imagine imagine. It's going to continue but I'd like to see confirmation of that but baby is back in Chengdu and that's our look at the world next week. Here's some other stories to keep an eye on a second. Round of presidential elections actions are being held in Afghanistan and Bulgaria's Prime Minister Boyko Borisov visits the White.

United States Israel West Bank Middle East State Department China Bob Who Chengdu Mike pompeo twitter Jim Who Fedex Fedex Fedex Jimmy Carter Mark Israeli government President Obama Jim Penn America
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Alot. Yeah I got to do is brand if this piqued your interest. If you want to learn more please visit us at. Cfr Dot Org where you can find a page for this episode. That includes show notes resources and transcript. Please subscribe on Apple podcasts. spotify or wherever you get your audio leave us a review give us stars. Tell your friends we want to hear from you directly to so write us Our email is why it matters at sea afar dot org why it matters is a production of the council on Foreign Relations. The show is created and produced used by Jeremy Sherlock Asher Ross and meet Gabrielle. Sierra are sound designer is Marcus Zacharia. Robert McMahon is our managing editor and Doug Halsey is our chief digital officer. Christian woolen is our product manager. Are Researcher is many. Christopher original music was composed by Kerry to Houston special. Thanks to Richard. Haass Jeff Frankie Roma Kendall Lisa Ortiz and Rafael siewert especial note for very first episode. Thank thank you to everyone at Sea Afar for helping us get this off the ground for why it matters this is Gabrielle. Sierra signing off. See you next time And that was why it matters. You can find why it matters alongside the world next week and the presence inbox on C. Afar dot org or wherever you get your Rhodia. Thanks for listening..

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Is Bob McMahon Co host of the world next week for years we've been previewing major events happening around the world in the coming week but for for those who want to know more about the issue shaping world we've launched a new podcast. It's far it's called Wyatt matters in the show takes an engaging approach to explain global issues that affect us back back at home it delves into topics climate change space junk and lethal autonomous weapons. Were so excited about the show that we're bringing you. Its first episode on the world next week's feet. The episode is called the Big Red Button and it examines the President Sole Authority to launch nuclear weapons and implications on national and global security. If you like what you hear here please search your favorite podcast APP. White matters and subscribe. We hope you enjoy Mr President. I have struck wants to Mr President. I strongly advise major attack. Option want concur anything less than the most devastating counterstrike at the second wave. Running there has to be a better off just responding in kind all around. It certainly bring on nuclear winter. There's only one way. Fill your contract. Anyone disagree with that assessment. We've seen this go down in movies. Dozens of times a president in a room with generals and serious-looking advisors discussing whether or not to launch a nuclear weapon for most of us. This is how we think it works in real life but it turns out there is no law that says the president must run his decision by an advisor. That meeting with experts in the situation room doesn't have to happen the. US President has sole authority to launch a nuclear clear weapon. And he can technically do so at any time I'm Gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today a look inside the rules for nuclear launch in the United States and the risks of giving one person so much power. Hey.

Mr President US Bob McMahon Wyatt Sierra
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

12:28 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"In the coming week Turkey's president visits the White House. Spain holds its fourth election Shen in four years and the US faces a deadline on trade with your this November seventh two thousand nineteen in time for the world next week. I'm Bob McMahon. Jim Linzie. Well Jim the coming week. Shows President trump meeting Turkish president aero on their schedule to sit down together at the White House. And the timing really couldn't be more dramatic It was a phone call recall last month between trump the one that paved the way for Turkish forces to move into northern Syria where the situation is still in flux the US Congress is showing growing alarm at Turkey's actions it said to be preparing sanctions and it took a vote last week with a huge. Bipartisan support that recognize formerly recognized. Turkey is committing genocide against ethnic Armenians in Nineteen fifteen. So so Jim I guess the first question is are they really GonNa hold this meeting in this kind of atmosphere. All signs are Bob that the meeting is on. Its set for next Wednesday at the White House. And you're quite right president air to Wong unbecoming to Washington. DC A city. That right now is not very happy with Turkish policy both in the region and toward the United States we we have the initial oddity of the relationship between president trump and prison air to want everyone recalls that Last month the president of the United United States president trump sent present aired won- a letter that President Wan took as being insulting one of the more scrutinized presidential letters in recent memory. Certainly will generally when you have the head of one country urged another head not to be a devil or a fool. One can't be surprised when the recipient of the letter in this case Mr Aired Awan objects is that diplomatic and political courtesy. I'm Gordon Amir has been broken now. It's interesting this that aired one told reporters at the time in Turkey that let me quote him here. We will not forget this. Lack of respect and last Friday aired one was asked by reporters in Turkey about the trip in about the ladder and he said and again let me quote him here. Of course we will take that letter with us. We will return it. We have things to say to trump's face now that could be a lot of political posturing obviously for the president of Turkey getting this letter Turkish. Nationalism lot of trucks don't like US criticism of Turkish policy so perhaps that's mostly for domestic consumption in. They'll have a smooth their personal conversation. Certainly both leaders have expressed affection for one another. I think the bigger tissue is that the broader view in Washington is quite hostile toward president aired Juan in Turkish foreign policy not just because of invasion of north eastern Syria. Not just because of the turn toward a more liberal set of politics in Turkey but because Turkey in view of many in the United States is not acting like a good member of NATO. We still have this issue of the Turkish purchase of Russian anti-aircraft missiles which has been a fly in the oil or flying the relationship between these two countries just last week. Not only did the House vote on the Armenian genocide resolution. Something that upsets sets Turks. Quite deeply but the house has voted for sanctions to be imposed on Turkey for its behavior that's invasion in northeastern Syria. And I will note that the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has put on hold consideration that legislation out of respect for indifference to the upcoming visit. Is it but it's quite clear that on Capitol Hill. There's a lot of criticism for president so other than the carrying the famous letter with them. Do we know of any so-called deliverables the Turks would like from this visit or the. US would like miss visit. I suspect that the issue we'll talk to list is the current state of play of things in northeastern Syria. The the Turks have been quite critical of the United States arguing that the US is not fulfilling. Its ended agreements to limit the activities of Syrian Kurds in the area of territory that the Turks have taken but I would imagine all the other issues that we have spoken but will come up as well. I would imagine we'll be talking about the Turkish purchase. The Russian missiles would surprise me if president didn't make mention of Turkey's displeasure at the vote on the Armenian genocide. So I would expect aspect those issues that are going to be booted about at the White House next Wednesday and part of this is crucial because Turkey is still in the process of What it says is is going to be the creation of this buffer area this so called quote unquote safe zone? That would be a buffer between them and Syrian Kurd positions. But also a place ace. Were they fully intend to by all accounts move Syrian refugees back into so. That's still on denture. They'll talk about that. I would assume sell my sense is is that the as you pointed out the Turks view this buffer zone as a place to push refugees from Turkish soil. Back onto Syrian soil. And what that signifies is that that this is not a problem that is going to be solved in one meeting at the White House because assuming you have that return. Repatriation of Syrians back to to Syria. That's a substantial process. There's going to be the issue of the security people in that region. Three and a half million. I believe yes in Turkey over so this this this is a this is not going to be ironed out at the White House and I will note that air to want also having meetings and conversations with Russian President Vladimir Putin because the Russians and have a big stake in the shoe quite clearly where president trump is looking to do lesson Syria. The Russian president has been more than willing to do more in Syria. Dan what the sort of see how that plays out one of the side plots to all this of course is how the Turkish delegation is going to be treated and also how the Turkish delegation United United States behaves. People may recall the last time president ear to one visited Washington. DC BACK in May of two thousand seventeen. His bodyguards regards attacked protesters and that led to I think some significant survey tech protesters outside the Turkish embassy in Washington. DC The Turks. Turks declined to apologize for the clash and they blame the protesters. US authorities indicted or charge fifteen Turkish nationals with crimes crimes related to the tax on the protests and a lot of it was captured on film. It's it's pretty Granted it was clear. I think from what we saw that the bodyguards initiated a the confrontation now. Those charges were dropped in in some sense. They're not terribly effective because those Turkish party going back to Turkey but again I would intimidate tate. You're going to have protests of president aired lawns. visit not just at the White House but also at the Turkish or near the Turkish embassy. And we'll see what happens on that score but Bob. Let's switch gears in move to Spain where elections seem to be popular this Sunday November. The Tenth Spaniards will head to the polls holes to vote in their second general election in the last six months in their fourth general election in the past four years. Acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called alter the vote back in September after he and his Socialist Party failed to secure enough parliamentary. Support to form a government. So Bob tell us what the issues are. You are in this election in Spain. Well it's hard to mention these elections without mentioning the issue of Catalan separatism Jim and especially because since selections recalled there was a sentencing of nine. I believe it was nine separatist leaders to jail for their role in holding in fomenting this movement I believe in helping to also put put together what was deemed illegal. Vote couple of years ago to To secede and so forth is a an issue that has seemed to have really lit a fire under parts of the country contributed to. What's seen as a very divisive election that could you could see a further splintering of support for different groups? You have a far right party something. We hadn't heard of until recently in Spain a National Party box moving to the four they for the first time ever in the spring and in April gained seats in parliament there polls are showing them looking looking to add to the seats. They had I believe twenty four seats Polls show them gaining as many as forty seats so you have a country yet again. Another European country with tradition of center left center right leadership alternating now having to deal with fracturing on both their left and right and needing by most signs needing to form some sort of coalition to govern now the Socialists. looked to gain the most seats in the three hundred and fifty seat parliament but not anywhere near enough to rule outright. They're looking like might get a maybe a third of that of that many seats at this point meaning they could try to make common. I'm in caused with further leftist parties including the Demos Party which we've heard about a lot or try to maybe strike some sort of a grand coalition with a rightist parties. They do stand this this campaign that has you know again comparing it to the US. I it's quite brief campaign. However it has been notable for the violence of the abuse by especially the right and right of centre inter-parties against the socialist for their position seen as too conciliatory towards the separatists and Cutler? Basically saying you know you're talking with their leadership you're you're not sort of cracking down hard enough. It should be clear. That cut alone is no questions asked part of Spain. Let's stop negotiating with them and sort of showing gestures of of sort of accommodating their wishes in anyway anyway partly that is because there was demonstrations after the the sentencing of the separatist leaders grew quite violent molotov cocktails being earl and so forth and you had the way who is who is throwing the cock. So it's it's the separatists Catalonia and you then had a number of these right-of-centre parties saying look. You know this is getting out of hand. It's time to really crack down on and be tough but it is a question of the country's identity of a country that has seen itself as a sort of multicultural country of of regions the Basque region being another region agent with very distinct identity language and so forth cut the loan of the same way on but now there seems to be a real split in the country among parties at want to treat them more harshly sleep the separatists and others that want to be more conciliatory and I should say there five leading parties. You had a debate earlier this week with five leading candidates from the five leading parties or overall thirteen parties which For Spain in modern Spanish history sort of unheard of so well that gets back to a broader trend we see throughout Europe enrich where we used to have two dominant parties one center owner left one center right and they tend to alternate back and forth in power. We've seen sort of the center collapse in the growth of multiple parties and that becomes. I'm too real challenge in any parliamentary. Since then Italy you get to these coalition governments. That can be hard to see other. That's right you know. In France you had basically the creation of Whole cloth of a new party by Michigan? McCall but Italy. You've had this happen. Germany's had this unheard of rise of a far right party the off day and Yeah and it's the in some. In cases the co-opting of some of the views of the fringe parties into the mainstream parties. That is driven possible is at the center. Right party gets pulled further to the right center left party for for the Tillis issues such as immigration. Say or issues that deal with the nationalistic sense. So it'd be closely watching. The narrative is Spain moving in the populist direction. I'm struck Bob Bobbins conversation. You've focused on the issue of identity and the fate of Catalonia or we haven't talked about our haven't heard anything about is the economy and typically we talk about elections WanNa know his economy doing well. We're doing poorly because presumably is doing. Well it helps the incumbent. Party's doing poorly. It hurts the incumbent Party so Oh is economics off the table in this election. No it's not and that's going to be an interesting to see whether that ends up becoming in a way a stealth issue given all the attention that the only issue is given. It's a country that has a lot of economic challenges some of the reports. I've seen leftist parties. Pajamas have gained because of their appeal to spending more on health and education attention and it sort of basic core services. But it's got a high unemployment rate. I mean it's in the high thirteen percent or so thirteen point seven or eight something like that as high unemployment put in perspective. US unemployment rate is under. Four percents. Growth is is in the positive which is actually good for European country at this point projected about one point five one point nine percent on the next year but but there are concerns about high debt. Spain is a country that you know the previous government that was the popular the Popular Party the P.. They sort of ran on on a tough reform economic reform platform..

United States Turkey Spain White House Syria Turks Washington Bob trump Bob McMahon Jim Linzie US Congress DC Party President Wan
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"I saw them in Georgia that the country this summer as well but also in Africa as well and it's both an essential essential and in some places but also increasingly onerous partnership that these countries find themselves involved in especially feeling like they're leveraged and feeling a bit in made by Chinese workers and entrepreneurs and so forth. I think the Belton road verdict still out on it. I think a lost opportunity for the US of course was countering it with through the trans-pacific partnership which one of the first moves the trump administration made in leaving it. And so I think it's getting getting to feel like it's coming up a bit of a burdensome move by by China and I think you're going to start maybe seeing this ratcheting up a little bit more as China's economy slows terms of their their need to create markets in and export markets and so forth. I think there's a great deal. More pressure that countries involved in the built roads this year. We're going to be feeling I. My name is Mary. Oh boy and I'm a second year graduate student at Arcadia University like the Moxie multi-lateralism is also declined. What are some factors that can bring back? multi-lateralism the one factor that's most likely to revive multi-lateralism is the willingness of the United States to lead the effort if you look at sort of the world that was created by the United on states after the end of war to call it the rules based order liberal international order you call it the American lead order Pax Americana what stood put out about it. was that you get one country. The United States that basically service like an organizing force to build up these institutions that did not exist before for a whole variety of reasons. The United States has sort of lost its enthusiasm for multi-lateralism clearly president trump when he campaign ran on a platform not of isolationism as often discussed but if unilateralism we'll do what we want. We don't want to be fettered by these institutions and I think one of the consequences that is as a result of that is where there have been opportunities to reinvigorate multi-lateralism. They've fallen by the wayside. Just give you one example on this issue of trade trade and we talk about problems really should have three stages recognizing of a problem figuring out why you have the problem generating a solution for the problem. I should say four than implementing your proposed solution. I think the president is right in that. There's a lot of problems in the international trading system. He falls down on steps to three and four and clearly one of the ways to deal with what he's concerned about in the International Trading System would be invigorating. What's known as the World Trade Organization? Instead the United States essentially society it does not like the World Trade Organization and in about two months from now the organization effectively is going to be unable to continue working working because at the appellate level the final stage in how the World Trade Organization works requires on having members of that Appellate Body and the United States is blocking taking the appointment of new members of that body and come December. They will not have enough people to actually proceed and what that does is again Dan. You break institutions people go elsewhere institutions become very hard to fix and it becomes very hard to create new institutions. So I think that would be the the big change now. Some of you think you will. Maybe China could lead us in a new multilateral direction. The Chinese to this point have not shown any interest in doing wing so maybe someday they will but I would not serve the vision. China has of how the world would be organized is not one that has a lot of appeal particularly to countries. Is that in its neighborhood. They actually fear the rise of China. That's why for the United States. There is a lot of support for we might call sensible. US Diplomacy Law missy in the region. That's why you had so many countries in Southeast Asia in East Asia signing up to the trans-pacific partnership because they saw saw this as a multilateral example of how you could knit countries together create a counterweight to China that would put pressure on China have to adapt to what members of TPP appear doing rather than China Sea essentially as a gigantic economic black hole in terms of its gravity. It's economical gravitational pull should've drawing toward it. You would say it's also worth looking in the multilateral sphere on foreign aid which is not a favorite topic of this president although there is still quite a bit of foreign aid disbursed by the US Congressional area of congressional break congressional interest but presidential administrations can have an incredible effect in one one point two just by way of example was the pep far program under president. George W Bush in Africa the US brought extraordinary resources to bear and worked with a number of countries NGOs and so forth to basically help diminish and stamp out in many places IDs in sub Saharan Africa and while there are a number of critics of some aspects of that approach and other aspects of George W Bush's foreign policy. He gets wide credit for that initiative which pep far was a success it was us run and the US really was was uniquely situated to be able to bring that sort of firepower to bear you see the US do this in many other places especially on the global health front but there's other areas will. Hello I'm Safia Southie. I'm a junior at Columbia University. I just wanted to ask how you envision. The role of the United States in the pursuit the continuing doing pursuit of human rights especially in regards to any a WHO's recent threats to extensively expand legal settlements within Palestinian territory. Oh Oh dear you know. I thought the answer to the last question of how do you go back to. Multi-lateralism is an election American. Reckon and I think it's the same answer. I think that this administration will be quite supportive of that in the same way that the president spoke about out. You know the Kurds are no angels. And it didn't really bother him that we were having some real serious civilian deaths and so I can only say that that I think I think the answer is an election on that note Bob. I.

United States China World Trade Organization Africa International Trading System Georgia Arcadia University Bob George W Bush Pax Americana trump China Sea Columbia University Dan Southeast Asia Safia Southie Saharan Africa
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

11:18 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Yes in the congressional record so this is just way businesses operate on the hill and I think that journalism also is having trouble adjusting to this this new landscape for us. There's certain conventions that we have to abide by and that is the equivalency the we have to have two sides rides and sometimes we're stuck with a false equivalency. This used to happen in all the climate change arguments where your editor would say. But what's the other side but it's a bunch of climate deniers that are paid by the oil companies. As I don't care you must have one and you had to have one and there was no way to sort of let your readers know your listeners that the balance was not equal it was a false equivalency. But that's how journalism works. And that's what we do three there's far too much opinion on the journalistic silo far too much in my view. Because that's all we have. That's our coin in this realm it is objectivity and good reporting and we are wasting it. Yes Jeb too much opinion in the pieces people who reporting or too many reporters reporter's going on nighttime cable news shows absolutely tweeting. I mean you know. My company polices tweets. We have a polit bureau and they've really watch us because we're dot org so they must but I am appalled by what I see my colleagues tweeting in other other other news organization and and so the question about the facts and truth. I mean this does get down to journalism responsibility and credibility and I think there are movements afoot whether it's the self policing of the big social social media platforms but also there are private organizations or our nonprofit organizations setting themselves up in mobilising and try to do more to sort of rate the more more credible sources serve this coming a gatekeeper function. I worked for a number of years for us. Funded Broadcast Radio for your brain liberty and join them in the early nineties broadcasting to these countries just coming out of the communist era their fact checking was far more rigorous than where I had been previously in the private sector media partly because they were very very sensitive to being seen as you propaganda and distorting the truth and everything else and their credibility mattered for them. It actually made them one of the go-to sources of news in some of the markets. They were in so it does matter. It's it's I think we're seeing kind of a cyclical thing going on with media right now. It'd be interesting to see how this shakes up alone My name is now that I'm a junior student at Adelphi University versity so I just wanted to ask regarding attitudes towards democracy in the Middle East We recently see a rise once again in protests in Sudan in Egypt in Lebanon in in Iraq. So I wanted to ask. Do you see any regime. Change is happening in Egypt or any of the other countries. I don't think Soon because everybody's just been through that but I think what is interesting. Is that spirit of the Arab. Spring is still alive. What's happening in? Lebanon is just astonishing Dhanush. Today I was watching it on social media so this is a generation that still is willing to go to the street and take those risks. I you know I worry that. That was all snuffed out because so many of those activists paid such a heavy price in Egypt certainly in Syria but this week has shown me that the Arab spring is still alive and kicking closest person. You with their hand up stand up. That's a general rule. If you think you're called on act like you're called on I'm Elliot suppressor and I'm a Master's student at Fordham University. And my question is does anyone see a disconnect between this administration's ends early focus on the Muslim ban and the current stance on the warriors and is this simply a ploy in the trade war or something different going on. I already voted. I said it was simply something used to gain leverage in the trade war I mean I think there's certainly an argument to be a compelling one in that direction it's partly because of the inconsistency on the administration's ministrations approach on on human rights questions across the board. I mean this positions they taken on Venezuela for example go against you know positions. They've taken in other parts of the world facing similar circumstances MHM stances and so it's hard not to be cynical in that respect. It's also note that the administration's are mandated by Congress to issue human rights reports and to weigh in on issues. She's like this and in some cases they will find common cause with with Congress to to act in ways that seem seem consistent. So it's a bit complicated again again. It's hard not to be cynical. I think on face value though I think there was a great deal of concern about the appalling state of affairs involving the Leaguers. I think the other fact is that there's not a lot of workers here's your making their way to the US to seek asylum and so that is a consideration. We are seeing a direct line to to those who are coming to the US. The asylum policy in the immigration policy in this country is is quite quite different transactional transaction. Hi My name is Veronica. I go to Suny Buffalo Stadium Police. I major in relation a to climate change like you said earlier. He said it was up to us to make a change. What should we be doing to combat this issue political organization Find whoever is is working on this in your town mayor Bloomberg after Paris after the trump administration got out of the power disagreement he. Ed went on a tear and started doing some really interesting organizing. You know it's interesting that you ask because I've been talking about this in my own town every once in a while. I'll I'll nudge my my sandwich maker to please. Could you get bamboo spoons. And then you think who cares. These issues are so big that this is about how airplanes fly this is about how Air Conditioning works. It is bigger than any one of us but I think that if political leaders know that there is an angry mob organized it is better than afternoon. My name is Christopher bag. Donuts I'm going to Manhattan College in my question for you guys is. What do you think the most important development is going to be in the next ten years looking and forward? Wow curveball what does it Yogi. Berra said predictions are hard to make especially about the future. I do the news So I'm out. Bomb turned the tables on us. Because that's usually our our focus is looking ahead. Well on the one hand I'll just I'll take the topic topic I started with I think could be consequential because at the end of the day democracy is involving leadership and changing policies from from climate to the Middle East policy to. What have you? There are a number of interesting things going on sort of rip off of gyms positive take on democratic developments. It's not all gloom and doom and I think partly because of this the radical populism in some places it has stirred up publics that were dormant complacent cynical. And what have you and there are many many examples of how listening to deb talk about the environmental activism. Made me think of the new president of Slovakia Woman Who's WHO's environmental lawyer who was content to be going about our business until things in our country started to outrage you're including yourself killing of a journalist and investigative journalist and she's now president came out of nowhere to become president of Slovakians lucky was in this belt of countries that were seemingly illiberal and moving band direction. You saw a backlash in some cases in this country in the midterms you so a lot. Just look at the voting levels compared to two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen. It's a lot more and more people running. It was interesting. We Jimmy had our year end. PODCAST last year We did it with a German scholar. WHO's at Brookings Right now? And she's stuck with me. which was that when she was thinking about what happened democracy and what what now could be changing because of it? She said you know in Germany. They were In her country people were very very happy to just take this wonderful stability and prosperity that they inherited did she called them consumers of stability but she said people started realize it's not just about consuming. It's about actually actively sustaining democracy and doing something about it being citizens and and she was hopeful that she that she was seeing changes in Germany. You're seeing things in Europe as well. The the pendulum may be shifting and other places last weekend elections in Poland. Were not not as concerning as some people close watchers thought because the the main party has been acting deliberately did not win the Senate and is not going to be able to force through a number Bro. Constitutional Changes Hungary's dominant party lost a number of municipal elections including in Budapest. UC MODERATE OR UC center right party emerging a leader from the centre-right in Greece and Greece slowly possibly moving out of its morass Italy. A center left Party entered into a coalition government in place of neo-fascist fascist. And so there are changes happening. I think democracy is a place I would start what to look for ten years down the road and see whether this was the period of time that people were shaken out of lethargy and maybe started moving on things like climate among those to me the obvious answer. The question is climate change. That's going to deliver some things we don't like and have unexpected but since that's an easy and obvious answer let me give you a different one. Which is the continuation of nuclear proliferation? And I think looking forward you know it has been since August nine nine thousand nine hundred forty five. Nuclear weapons have not been used in the course of the one thousand nine hundred seventy s into the nineteen eighteen eighty S. We created this arms control regime as it's called that sort of limited the main nuclear competition between the United States and the Soviet a union that system of arms control is falling apart Bush administration left the APM treaty trump administration's left the IMF treaty. The new start treaty may or may not be renewed the one of the main last remain variety of other treaties sort of fallen by the wayside and sort of governors the US Russia dynamic. We have the complication. Nation of China. Modernizing its forces India and Pakistan having forces development of new technologies that may put existing a nuclear technologies at risk talking hypersonic missiles. So I think technology is creating a whole series of problems in our caller to the nuclear area that we have not begun to grapple with and they may rise up and surprise us in some particularly alarming ways can I put one not into tackling inequality because it has everything to do with what you're talking about. There was a times did a piece about a study done by thirty different universities. And the idea is that the more inequality there isn't isn't a country the more it is likely that the populace wants a military government. Happens here too so if it is I think so many people know how important this is is that there are people who are looking into how to address it in ten year span is a is a good Spanish. Look at because if we don't if we don't figure that out we will all be marching about in uniforms. uh-huh I I'm William from rutgers. A research Internet the think tanks and civil societies program on my question is about China Sir recurring to the theme of multi-lateralism. On what does the panel think of Maine. China's belt wrote initiative due the panel think of the initiative as more of a philanthropist infrastructure project project or a neo-colonial model of debt chap diplomacy. Well it certainly starting to seem like the ladder. According to reports emerging from countries that that have been heavily involved in this. You're starting to see to belt road. It's also takes on a little bit of an amorphous quality because China's is active in so many places mentioned the Hawaii signs in in Europe..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"To being food producing regions can no longer produce crops. You're already seeing. Climate Change Change induced migration for those who follow for example. What's happening in the so-called Northern Triangle in Central America El Salvador Guatemala on doors part of that adage driven by climate induce changes failure of the coffee crop? People leaving their homes in their farms. And we look at these numbers sort of the bright news news on that chart of the production to people who are in extreme poverty. The real question is can you continue to lift people out of poverty. If food production is disrupted disrupted. Now I will note. This is no surprised anybody that the global response to climate change has been too little too slowly done I again also. I remember that the fanfare that surround the nineteen ninety-two Kyoto accord. That accord died on the floor of the United States. Senate and I'm told by people who track track these things that more than half of the heat trapping gases. Currently in the Earth's atmosphere were generated after the he oto accord was signed the two thousand and fifteen Paris climate agreement has been hailed. People patted themselves back over that great achievement. I just went on something. Called the climate country tracker and essentially none of the major emitters of heat trapping gases are anywhere close to hitting their Paris climate targets. And it's obvious that the United States has walked away from the Paris climate numbers and our emissions are growing again. So the talk about how we want to keep the the globe from not heating more than two degrees centigrade. The prognosis that I think is growing. Dimmer we're going to see a lot more talk about adapting that's easy to say perhaps perhaps perhaps Wealthy countries will be able to adapt at least to some kinds of climate change. It's going to be a lot harder for poor countries who simply won't be able to build old in the kinds of resilience that we're talking about and for many low-lying island countries but I will also say the low lying parts of continents are going to cease to exist because they'll be under water. I think we had a particularly low point this summer with actually occurring during the g seven summit. I believe when you had these reports of these raging fires in the Brazilian Amazon and some of the g seven leaders scrambling to do something about it and and miss you macron getting into a bit of a tiff with Bolzano of Brazil over the response response and for the severity of the fires in the concerns in the alarm they kind of subsided as a news story. I shudder to think what's actually still happening in the in the Amazon. And not just Brazil's Amazon and actually Bolivia's than facing its own problems but it was an example of the world not covering itself in glory in the way it was responding to something that's a broader crisis but you I'm not surprised by that number. All you have to do is look out and see. WHO's in this room and we're the guilty parties and you all know it? Our generations didn't do its job and so so it's up to you now. I mean I had three four heatwaves in Berlin where we were at Baghdad. Temperatures in a country that doesn't have air conditioning. And you can't put it in now because it is a carbon emitter and you can't retrofit. Those buildings now schools closed businesses closed. Production goes down I sought in the forests are disappearing in Germany. I mean Europe was in a leather this summer. So it's up to you. I will note that this raises some tough tough challenges not simply that dealing with climate change reducing the emission of heat trapping gases requires changing the way cities. Your build the way economies. Janis are run. It also requires a change in the way that countries operate. And you hit on it Bob with talk about what happened. This summer we started saw it close up and personal which which is that to solve this problem. All countries have to do something and the problem is is an incentive for many countries to free ride all it you pay to fix it or they they say. Why should I pay to fix it? I didn't really produce that much. You're the ones that produce. That's a problem. And you know our our boss. Richard Haass President the consulate formulations As a book called world in disarray and he talks about this notion of sovereign obligation. That normally you think a sovereignty it's is it's my territory. I can do what I blonde in. The idea of sovereign obligation is that that may be true but you also have obligations to others and that's what the Brazilians add in response. We saw a surgeon nationalism. The Brazilian saying you're not the boss of us. You know unless you want to pay us a lot of money. Take a hike. And that's part of the problem of trying to find a resolution resolution at the UN General Assembly subsequently you do not see a lot of rhetoric from a number of important countries like the US about sovereign obligations is more about the sovereignty compassion failure. Starving T. is I used to teach introduction of world politics while we have a live podcast. We've been new element for this one as well which is audience against participation. So I think we want to move to the next segment of this which is open question time. So if you've been thinking of questions get them ready. We have several people deployed around the room. Ready to come in and and pass the mic to you been will answer the best we can. We can stand up and wait for the microphone. Professor Ira Weinstock Political Science and sociology. Taurel college why questions very simple after. What trump just did to the Kurds? Why would Kim of North Korea trust any agreement or or anything that trump says? I think you answered your own question but Bob or DEB. You want to Chime in here. I'm sure he's watching this very a carefully. Kim has a special relationship with the president. Obviously he's He's played it actually very skillfully by all appearances but when it comes down to brass tacks in terms of what the US wants from him denuclearization. I think it's looking more and more remote prospect and in terms of what the US leverage might be. It's kind of it's also seeming the remote prospect. It's not just what he did with the Kurds for the Saudis. They couldn't figure out you didn't do anything about that. Drone that was really expensive. And so what you saw two days. If you're on that they're on the unshod town so what you see. Today's ago is Putin comes and it is you know all flowers is and everything the Saudis can do to welcome Ladimir Putin to Saudi Arabia. which you know if you've been following this for long enough you know this is really something? The Saudis we're always always always anti-soviet union and it was a religion question for them and now Putin is welcomed in the same way that trump was in the beginning of the administration. It was fascinating to watch once again. Stand up for yourself. Hi My name is Julius. Kahn senior at Barnard College. And something that you deb had said about about this new big data versus open phones arms race raised a question for me which is in this arms race. Who are the players and what does it mean that? It's not just necessarily states. Well it is mostly states. I mean what we saw one. Example is Jamal Kashogi. The Saudi journalist a group in Canada called the citizens is lab. Did some information and in this question. I suggest that you all look them up. They're doing some really interesting work. And they discovered that the Saudi government had bought technology edgy from the Israelis to put malware on his phone to track everything he said. And I think that that is the biggest issue about big data versus is freedom on our phones because there is technology available. You can buy it and you can see. That ideology has nothing to do with it. You will by from WHO can deliver. And now we all have APPs in our phones that are supposedly encrypted but for how long I don't know hello my name. Is Max bought. I'm a freshman. NYU Stern like question. Is With the rising differences and ideologies between the United States and China and the growing power. These two countries countries are we headed for a new Cold War. It's a great question. It's going to be in the cover of magazines in a few already. I think it's tough to for civil define when a new cold war is in some ways having grown up under the Soviet Cold War. There's certain things that just don't apply anymore. One of which is just the economic integration of the two countries vast and as Jim and saying that you know the whole chime Erica idea that was out there ten years ago and the interactions between the two countries just are far different than they were in the Soviet as however however certainly in terms of the military buildup going on the rivalries competition playing out in south China. Sea disagreements and potential frictions growing over human rights. And then you add to that a trade war and potentially a changing of the trade relationship in a certain way that leads certainly a chill and it's maybe Cold War is not the right term but there is a some sort of a major chill going on tectonic move. Perhaps that is taking this into a difficult place. And a worrisome recent place again given the size and the firepower of the two countries My Name is oh. Go Salaam aggressive in that borough college and as asking that. Isn't it the time to tackle the climate change issue to reframing as an inherently capitalistic issue and then with what we know today and being being knee deep into to wit. Doesn't that offer the best of political opportunity windows to actually start frank and that the system. deb Your the savvy media person so you think about a lot about framing issues simply framing issue. I don't think it's a simply of. I wish it was that. Would that would make it easier. It is a speeding-up issue. I think that we can all all agree on that. We thought we had more time than we do. Look you have. I've seen them political leaders. Say I I WANNA deal with with climate change but I don't want it to hurt the business community not too much so we'll go a little slow and I think I'm sorry but it's going to hurt a whole lot more if you don't tackle it now so I i. In in my view in this country country Europe is different but in this country I still feel that. That's the argument that If we move too fast it will be bad for business you get the sense that the businesses themselves selves are kind of keen for more guidance. More structure I mean. Look at what's happening in California. The car industry the car industry but also energy industry. I it seems like there's there's some readiness anecdotally there's some readiness on the part of big business to do more on this front. There's a great deal of concern and they're not getting any sort of structure except from local Oakland political people who are saying well you know we have to go I. I'm for this but not so fast. And it's not it's not happening on. The Democratic presidential candidate debates not seen climate journal. Aw Great I would actually flip the gentleman's question around. I think actually the way you can solve. It is through capitalism. It's often framed. Exactly this is going to cost you. Jobs offs the fact is there's a tremendous amount of money that you can make by inventing new technologies and I will know that coal producing plants don't really care whether or not the government is elected or through monarchy or run by a Communist Party. It is about industrialization Zeh Shen not about who owns the means of production. I would also note. Small little note of potential hope in terms of how other environmental issues have been dealt with in the past. Take a look at the Montreal Ontario Protocol how it formed what it was supposed to be addressing when I was coming at aged determine. Acid rain was the big concern. Climate change was still a little bit more remote. Acid rain was the abiding concern a lot of similar arguments coming out. About how expensive would be you ended up. Having among other things a Republican administration stepping forward and taking leadership on it and banning innings certain elements that were causing that were contributing to the acid rain and that was afflicting especially in North America. So there are. There are ways to address. These things in political is a big thing but the private sector can can also take note of these things as well. Hi I'm GonNa tell ya I go to the new school. I'm a Grad student there. I'm actually taking a course called post with politics. Picks so my question is regarding facts on the death of truth. Do you think this is experiencing now like Fox are no longer relevant in today's age oil back actual reporters and you got that whole objectively. Just the facts man. Yes look I think that in one way it is a political strategy. That if the truth doesn't matter anymore then it's easier to convince people one way or the other we see this every day. We we see mick. Mulvaney is on tape saying one thing and then an hour later comes out and says he didn't say it but there's a tape but I didn't say but there's a tape. He's a member of Congress grice or wasn't member of Congress and they used to being able to revise and extend their remarks..

United States Paris trump Bob Europe Senate Ladimir Putin Central America El Salvador Gu climate journal Amazon Kyoto Saudi government Germany Brazil Berlin
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Number and we'll put four up there for you to vote from so is your finger of the decade. The fact that the world population reached seven point seven billion or number two global warming increased one point five degrees above pre industrial levels or three international migrant count hits two hundred and seventy two million I believe that's a record or four percentage of people worldwide. Living in extreme poverty dropped from eighteen point one percent eight point six percent so a positive development amongst the four Choices so please go ahead make choices and give you same amount of time as last time to think it over and go ahead. Just Click on the number. We'll take stock in about ten fifteen seconds and this is called dead air and my business all right with that then we will call it a a stop. And let's let's see how the Poland so global warming to to I that second one wapping forty seven point. Five percent of you chose global warming as the most significant figure numeric figure in the past ten years number two was international migrants surging. Twenty seven point six percent of you chose that extreme poverty see the improvement in poverty levels. Sixteen point six percent noted that and we'll population eight point three percent. Jim What would you say about the global warming figure. Well I have confess that I'm old and I can remember when we talked about climate change as something that might happen and is now something that is happening whether you you look at rainfall patterns beginning and end of season storm activity the global climate is changing and I think that actually has massive consequences consequences for the other three items on our list. How do you feed a planet of seven point? Five billion people in growing if rainfall patterns change if places that are used to being food producing regions can no longer produce crops. You're already seeing. Climate Change Change induced migration for those who follow for example. What's happening.

Jim What Poland
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

13:33 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"In a lot of capitals around the world. It was a great fear of the rise of the so-called g two at these two governments Beijing in Washington with essentially dominic. What's happened in the world and set the rules for everybody else? Let's flash forward to today. The United States is formerly named China as a strategic competitor we have launched a trade war against China one of the aims of that trade war is to disentangle or decouple the US the Chinese economy's meanwhile China has made it clear that it has no desire or intention simply to take directives from Washington DC and not not only. Does Beijing want to set the rules of the game. It wants to determine what games are going to be played and who's playgrounds. They're going to be played on and as you saw just last week with the controversy over a single tweet sent by the general manager of the Houston Rockets. The Chinese intend intend and have used their economic leverage to try to censor what people in other countries. You're saying for talks about things issues that they you don't like and I think that's a really big development. The question going forward is how is this relationship going to evolve now again. It's probably a big dose of humility. Go back thinking about your area deb. When the Arab spring I broke out everybody was talking about Democracy Fund? The arrived in the Middle East. Didn't quite turn out that way except maybe for Tunisia likewise a decade ago people were sort of upbeat about where U S China relations are going to go so humility. Always but I do think we're likely to see a lot more conflict in that relationship. We've just seen the president announcing trade deal. Though a lot of the parts of the trade deal haven't been worked out and by the time they sit down and try to put the fine print in the deal may fall apart but the bigger issue is best a truce in a much longer broader confrontation between the two capitals. And it won't simply be limited to issues about what the tariff or taxes on imports coming into the country there was a great deal of interest in it hasn't totally dissipated stated in the trump administration's approach to China different from its approaches and a lot of other areas because for a number of China hands so to speak it was like finally the US is going to knuckle down down and confront China with some of these things that have been mothers and it wasn't just in the US by the way it was other countries that were bothered by China's trade practices and intellectual property theft and so forth and yet as we've discussed on our podcast and many fellas have noted the. US has been loath to kind of build any sort of a coalition in fact as it was declaring trade war with China. It was it was skirmishing garmisch on the trade front with allies. who normally would have joined? Can I say after spending a summer in Europe. They feel squeezed. So while way. Signs are as big is as you can imagine. All over Germany. Trade in Europe with China is quite large. And you find the split between people on okay when the conflict comes what side are we going to be on and they would love to build a an alternative to the swift system so that if trump says I'm sorry but you can't trade with China they WANNA be able to say I'm sorry but we have. The Swift system allows payments to flow around the world in the United States. Given it's financial powering hiring clout can basically say you can't go through. US banks and the system seizes up so they've already created one. They said it was for the Iranians. It's called insects. But it's also for the Chinese if they ever have to stand up but there's another sort of argument in Europe that says look the transatlantic alliance is. It's what we've got and we we don't like the guy in the White House but we can't go this alone and we certainly can't be on China's side so we're stuck but I think as you look at it. The problem is says that while the Europeans would prefer to find some way to work with the White House. The White House has not just on this issue in a whole range of issues Sidney Lynne. It's not interested in their help. That's one of the great ironies of the trump presidency courses. The president campaign back in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen on how America's friends and allies allies weren't doing enough and he wanted them to do more and what we've seen over the past. Two and a half years is laudable. Foreign capitals got. That message wanted to do more in the answer from the white douses. No thanks we don't need your help as notion that their strength in numbers. And that's not something that is really I think taken hold in the Oval Office and the President President has sort of conceivably alienated pretty much. Everybody even sort of looking at the issue of Turkey were in the one. I think the president was hoping to take an impediment Edmund out of US Turkish relations. But he's touched off a conflict that is leading members of Congress come out and talk about sanctions and the president and his secretary of the Treasury talking sense issue about turning off the Turkish economy which doesn't sound quite like the way you would want to go about building a strong partnership and apparently Mr Avon is coming to Washington. That is still on when I was one. That is still read it this morning. It is still on. That will be really interesting to see what happens when the Turkish leader comes to Washington at a time when Congress wants to sanction the Turkish economy. You know we talked a lot about the trade for obvious reasons but Jim I was wondering what you think about the human rights front with China. Okay the the administration recently actually just announced some sanctions on Chinese officials linked to the repression of human rights it transcends many US administration the human rights challenged with China by. Do you see it as a as an area area where there could be some traction or is it is this going to be an area potentially also for building an international coalition because international whether it's UN or European bodies ladies that are also concerned about weavers and other issues which number one I don't see any international coalition building because this is not an administration that is interested in building coalitions relations and I was saving beyond that. This is an administration that has de prioritize if I can use that horrific word. Human Rights in American foreign policy on on the president was quite clear very blunt about it on the campaign trail. He didn't think it was our business. We know better than anybody else wasn't our business to go around and do that. I think that what you see happening. Now vis-a-vis China is simply trying to create leverage for trade talks. Not because there's anything in great concern about the week now the challenge orange. Of course you have is in dealing with China is that it is very powerful in. There's not anything obvious. The United States can do to compel Beijing to change its policy toward the weaker and indeed one of the problems you can run into. Is that the more public you make your opposition. You can actually reinforce the desire in China to continue that crackdown. You can actually serve to reinforce the outcome you don't want to have so there's something to be said for quiet diplomacy but there's also something to be said for taking an issue head on talking about. It are good burning colleague. Elliot Abrams than a lot of work in human rights area and he talks about dritan button number irvy's writings and books about during the Cold War when Ronald Reagan was talking about the Soviet Union as the evil empire and talking about the importance so people having freedom and liberty that those that the mere fact he said that didn't change what the Kremlin did but it gave hope and inspiration to the people who many times felt they had been forgotten left behind. That's a big deal so those of you who might be habitual listeners to the world next week podcast know. This is the point where Jim and I run out of steam and turn over to our audience figure the week for a change of pace and so we're going to continue that spirit of that by turning over our figure of the week segment the podcast. You all actually. It's figure decade though you all have she mobile device. It won't change the screen behind us or anything by it will allow you to vote for figures years of the decade. Both a person in one vote and a number in the second vote so you should see okay. Now you're seeing the first question significant significant figure the last decade. This is something to think about it in terms of popularity necessarily but significance. Think think about that before you cast your vote and we will run down the list list of four names. They're they are Little surprise I would imagine Donald J trump number one Xi Jinping number two Vladimir Putin number three ongoing markle Michael Number Four. So just press the number on your on your mobile device for which one you think was the most significant figure. I'll give you a few seconds. Let's say will he be about fifteen fifteen more seconds. There's a lot of votes coming right now. Fast and furious. Democracy in Action Participatory Democracy. So how do they vote on these titans of the world oral stage. So that's lock. Let's let's see what we came up with Ha That's our jeopardy contestant here at his final jeopardy choice. The number one vote-getter Xi Jinping with thirty three point three Exactly a third interesting thirty three point three percent for Xi Jinping number one number two Donald Donald J trump twenty six point four percent of you voted for trump as the most significant figure third place not far behind Vladimir Putin twenty four point one percent and last was anglo-america anglo-america with sixteen point one percent. So what we'll do after each of these votes are the ways. We'll talk a little bit about who you chose Maybe in the human as you can say why you chose that way as well she should ping obviously for Jim sort of teed up a little bit the China question but huge figure huge transformative figure not certain yet how the transformation is going to end up since since it's still very much in progress but he is the most I would say authoritative and powerful Chinese leaders since and has set about consolidating his power consolidating the power of the Communist Party in ways that were I think surprising to a lot of people thought. Maybe they see a little bit more pragmatism in him interesting to watch. Though as Chinese growth starts to slow we just had new figures published. I think Lowest Chinese growth in thirty years or something like six percent six percent many countries would kill for but for China. It's quite a drop. And and so his ability to deal with slowing growth to deal with this trade war to deal with restive minority populations a very feisty democracy movement in Hong Kong a unresolved situation with Taiwan. which has its own feisty minute by the way? Taiwan has elections next year. So it's a great choice. Actually Jim I don't think Jim was donated coaching. I think he'd personally was was also thinking along the same lines. I don't know Jimmy any thoughts to add what I would notice as Bob said Xi Jinping the most powerful the Chinese leader since Mao Zedong and he intends to exercise that power and he has risen to the top in part by making the case is that China is time for China shine in the world that China needs to be more assertive. He is the one you use the metaphor but China's going to decide the playgrounds in which games teams get played but he does also have a big risk when you consolidate power and you hold it all you also become the person who clearly is responsible for all things things that happened good or bad and you mentioned the issue of the potential weakening of the economy but also the fact is there are lots of people in China listen to people outside of have China. That were surprised at how successfully was in consolidating power. He has rivals and challenges within the Chinese Communist Party. And so I think the interesting to watch in the years to come. Tom Is really what's going to be happening. Internally in China because I think that particularly upper echelons of Chinese Communist Party is going to determine where China goes I s both of view. I'm surprised at how low the angle a miracle number is is it because she had a lot of challenges and she actually did them pretty well. I think that's he's probably something to be said for that. I think here's someone who's actually in the midst of this sort of Democratic Maelstrom has seemed to have navigated a pretty smooth so far at least smooth transfer of power power in Germany in terms of her own party terms of appealing to the moderate base in Germany. You know. And so she's She's not in the news every day. She doesn't that's not her style now and so she gets punished for boating Boston. I think she's consequential but she also has failed to really sort of rejuvenate reading keep the momentum. I'm going for the European Union and the broader European project. I mean if there is another sort of fourth trend over the last decade I would point to as the I guess is the I wouldn't call it a failure of the European dream but maybe the failure of the European dream to reach its achievements need a lot of backsliding divisions within the EU ahead Brexit But you also just have this notion that many countries trickle in the southern rim of the European Union really unhappy with Brussels. And you know obviously. The president of France is a bunch of ideas rejuvenating the European project. But we don't see them going anywhere so I think the question. Angela Merkel is what is she left left after her. That's going to be better and I don't see that significant teamed up with macaroni and like she did with Sarkozy. The MAKOZI was called at one point. I haven't really had it has and I think Obviously and you've talked to many people some sure you have in Germany. She still gets a lot of criticism for her. I think morally correct decision to. You're welcome a million refugees in Germany. But for many parts of Germany it was too many people too quickly. Although the thing that we haven't talked about at all and you feel it acutely lately in Europe and certainly in Germany is climate change and in fact that has become the primary concern rather than the refugees and the Greens may do better. There may be finally a coalition with the Greens for the first time. Ever well speaking of that topic Bob..

China United States Germany Europe Washington Jim I Chinese Communist Party Beijing European Union U S China trump Congress Democracy Fund Houston Rockets Middle East
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"A huge issue. We've had some controversy this. We could facebook's Mark Zuckerberg comments about this but will these organizations which have put a lot of resources into trying to tamp down the hate speech and the the actual events that are causing violence or that are contributing to it. But I'm not sure that they were yet feeling the pressure to do more. I would love to go and have a talk fuller about social media but I will probably reveal my great ignorance of many of these APPs and how they work. I actually want to pivot and see maybe would for deb as you look back over the last decade. What do you see sort of the big trend the big development? Can we go back to social media. I mean it's been such a huge part of my life mid part of the reason that I know about what's APP telegram and all the other ways that we communicate now is because I've got to keep up with young Arab revolutionaries. I can't find them unless I'm on all those APP so I know them. I think that there is an effort. Certainly I spent two and a half months in Europe this summer and they are much more aware not aware but they are trying to use legislation to change and to protect but what you you end up is every time I want to read an article. I got a big screen that says. Please give me your choices and I look and what those choices are and they are. We will send you personal ads or we you won't. It's it's not it's not working. It is too cumbersome and there's moments y just click and say whatever you WanNa do to find I wanna read that. I don't have this much time so so I don't think we're even close to a solution to what we are going to have to do to make it safe that we still have encryption and that raises a problem because because obviously being encryption is good if you're a good person and you don't want your stuff being looked at but if you're a bad person trying to do bad things. Encryption crypt is a powerful tool to let you accomplish your bad ends. How do you how do you balance that out? Good policing I mean look you know of the things things that criminals us. I think it's a minor thing. Honestly encryption and policing is how most crimes are solved if they are but. I don't think that all of us have to give up a privacy for that reason this and I think certainly the legislation. That's beginning doesn't take that as a bottom line either so w talked about previously where you were ten years ago In in Damascus obviously Syria plays gigantic role in the past decade. But could you talk a little. What about the sweep of the of the Middle East? I don't know Syria these story that you want to focus on or would you. Are there other lessons. We should take in the past ten years in the Middle East. Well at at the moment it is because we are at a pivot moment I mean this is Humpty dumpty the. US President pushed him right over. The Ledge. And I don't think we know yet how that one and we'll come out everybody's racing from Isis to Moscow. What does this mean to me it maiming? At the end of the day that Turkey does have a safe zone on the border. That's what would it looks like that Russia's on the other side I mean this week we've had these amazing scenes that you see the Syrian army. Going up the highway one way and the Americans coming down the highway the other way the Russians moving in from the right isis moving in from the left. I think that is a huge story. I think the second big story is Saudi Arabia and the question is can the ahead of that government. Get Away with murder. That's also a story that hasn't completely played out so those in my mind. Those are the two big ones to watch and Iran and the US has sent forces to Saudi Arabia because of Iran and seen as a threat to the Saudi energy installations so it's an a Saudi Iran story Saudi Iran proxies. The story is. It's all of those things and throw in Syria as well because Syria raises questions. About how reliable are we. The Saudis were discomforted comforted to say the least about what happened in northern Syria and said so publicly. The Iranians have been cheering. What happened and so are because they're involved in in Syria and so have the Russians? So that's a new element to add into. What is what appeared for a while to be a a pretty simple confrontation between the United States in Iran? And now everybody's back and dry you out in there because there's obviously been a lot of commentary law discussion and certainly on the cable news channels about which countries have benefited from the president's decision to withdraw troops. But what I have seen less discussion of is how American interests are hurt because the president would argue that American interests have been advanced spy his taking the troops out. Do you size that discussion up. Well as the Israelis please. I can't imagine that they are very happy about this. Because it gives Iran a stronger foothold in Syria. I have seen the argument. That says if if a shark can take over his country again he has no need for the Iranians and the Russians but Iran has been in serious nineteen seventy-nine. It is unlikely that they will walk out the adore just because things are calmer. And that's not going to happen for. Let's living in Dakota Iowa for San Antonio Texas. What does that matter? How does that translate into American security because an unstable Middle East eventually reverberates? Nine eleven is about the Middle East timidly isis on the ground is about our security and those things are not written in this black and white tableau but there and I think that people in the region that they are there. So let me ask you. We've been in heavily in Middle East from long decade to viscount right sixteen years since the invasion of Iraq. How does that net out for you? What is the United States gain from that? What is it lost? Well the Middle East never works in Nice neat decades the Middle East says of ferry long story and it has been for us for the United States for a long time. I mean it used to be a very simple equation oil Israeli security and now it. It's gotten a little bit more complicated because of the Iranians but I agree with you. It is very hard argument to make for the middle of the country. Because most most people don't know about Kurds and and don't care either but instability people do understand and precipitous foreign policy. Decisions made on twitter is not a good model. Should careful before I get lots of love letters from Decor Iowa in San Antonio Texas I say about Americans generally. It's not just the heartland sort of issue. I think that's fair. I think a lot of people don't know but I think president trump what he did tap into was something as he's done and many other fronts was what he was encountering on his campaign trail. which was this this fatigue with the Middle East absolute exhaustion? And when you look at the numbers in Iraq for example so-called blood and treasure just the US side and let alone what happened to rockies and others in the region it's just staggering. And so I think he still has and he was doubling down on this last night at a rally. You still have these these adherence who just say enough for Americans. We're trying to fix things in a place where they're just going to be each other's throats but you see the Middle East is the Anti Las Vegas what happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas. That is not true in the Middle East and and we have seen this again and again and again. And so. That's the drawback to walking away walking away in the way that the walk was done yes there. There is a good argument to be made that we were doing ourselves. No good by staying in Syria. We were essentially a trip wire and you could see what happened. As soon as they plug out pulled all hell broke loose and I had to come in again and say to Mr Ertan. Don't be a fool in that letter that the president sent to him so seem to have much of an impact on president wants decision because he received it before he decided to actually send troops in he has been making that decision from the. I think AH decision in his head was made letter or no letter he was going in and you see what the pressure is on him. He's got two problems he's got in it Lib eventually. Eventually there are millions of people there and they're going to have to go somewhere and there's not any place for them to go except for North into Turkey or is what two million three three million Syrian refugee exactly. And here's the second problem he's had he's just lost. His party lost the election for the mayor of stumbled and Democracy speaking speaking of democracy and this guy was after do over exactly. He tried to see if perhaps he could get a better result but this guy is pretty strong against Syrian refugees. And so his idea is all right. I will just shove them into this space. I want to take in northern Syria. So that's his solution to a ferry acute political problem for him. One final thing to wrap up your mid-east segment which is just Iran. So two thousand nine. If we're getting our KENYIR concede here. Iran had come through a pretty pretty tough people power revolt and ends this decade weathering US sanctions but also as you say taken a little bit of a victory lap on Syria. How do you look at the way? Iran's domestic dynamics playing out so I think they are in a holding pattern and I just saw an Iranian official until recently and I said are you guys waiting for to see what the twenty twenty election's GonNa look like and he said absolutely they will wait that one out because they don't have to make a decision until they know. Are we talking for years. We talk in eight years then we see but for the moment maximum pressure is not working it just makes the region. Why are there American troops in Saudi Arabia because maximum pressure is not working? I want to move over to gym now and see if Jim can sort of take. Take us back ten years and take us through what he sees as a significant development. Maybe that was not foreseen or there. Maybe there was some harbingers. Then Jim happy to do it. I would say looking back to me. The big change over the last decade has been the end of the US China love affair. Was it a little. It was it was a love affair. Let let's go back. Let's go back twice. Let's let's go back ACA decade ago. We were first recording it. A lot of talk in the air about how we were seeing the rise of China Merica or if you prefer. It was Chai -fornia. Ah there was an awful lot of talk about how American Economic Engagement was going to inject American political values into the Chinese system them. Maybe it see China become more open we would see China eventually. Evolve into a responsible stakeholder in the international global order so much so that in a lot of capitals around the world. It was a great fear of the rise of the so-called g two at these two governments Beijing in Washington with essentially dominic..

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"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Well welcome everyone and welcome to this special special live tenth anniversary edition of the world next week. I'm Bob McMahon and I'm Jim Lindsey. We have a special guest here. deb Amos is the international correspondent in for NPR. We are delighted. She could spend this anniversary special with us and and walk back over the past decade and maybe take a little bit peek ahead as well and I say one thing there's more than one international correspondent for National Public Radio. I'm Steve Thank you very much for that too busy. Okay good today. I'm the okay. Well Debbie joined. Bob Thank you for being here against big day for us and before we dive into it. I I want to say Happy Anniversary Bob Thank you. This is our tenth can't anniversary that means tin or aluminum so after the show is over I will buy you a bud light and it can to mark the occasion. We thought we would do given that we've been doing this for ten years. Is that rather than we normally do. which is to look ahead at? What's going to be happening in the week to calm? We'd take some time to look back talk about what's happened over the lifetime of the show and so we're taking a look back at the most significant developments your trends over the last ten years. Bob's going to kick it off for us Bob. What do you see as sort of the big news coming out of the last decade? I'm struck by one of the issues that we've talked about. Maybe the most of any over or among the most of any word for the past ten years. GM and it's what's generally known. These days is democracy in decline. And I I guess I started my first wanting to sort of deal with the assumption about democracy so so what democracy is in decline Winston Churchill's credited with saying at one point that democracy is the worst form of government except for all the other ones that have been attempted. And it. Certainly you can point pointed many flaws in democratic governance in many problems and a great deal of of problems involving democracies today but there is a an assumption a widely widely shared assumption and a great deal backing evidence that democratic system of governance is a global. Good is something especially if you look at you. Trace the post war era in the world that representative democracy allows for human aspiration of freedom it allows more and more than other other systems of government. It has had the most success in that regard that it it protects civil liberties and minority rights that it contributes to economic stability democracies tend to go to war with each other except for trade wars. I guess but they do not and so starting with the assumption that democracies are good and they are in trouble and they are in as close democracy watchers say they are are in crisis ten years ago the main benchmark Organization for tracking these types of things. It's Freedom House. It has its world survey that it puts out in about ten years ago so when we were doing this podcast it had already logged three years in a row of decline in its freedom next and by the way it's been losing streak ever since ends thirteen years in a row now the last freedom index they did but ten years ago you had there already troubling signs and the seeds had been planted in a number of ways the world is just coming coming out of the global economic crisis and among many things that that crisis did was. I think it it. It angered a lot of people it isolated needed or or it it created a great deal of enmity towards so-called global elites who seemed to come out of the crisis better than others for example. There were other other issues news at play as well the world was starting. There was a greater movement of people around the world for all sorts of reasons that has continued unabated over the past ten years as well those are I would say the economic the economic inequality question was a main cause. Were enabler is a very big enabler pointed to again and again is social media the era that changed the radical change in media landscape. We Jimmy and DEB grew up in a world where you had sort of this oligarchy of of Network television in the United States dates. You know three main networks. You had newspapers where your go to place for. You know the the news of the day wire services through the newspapers and radio. CEO But it was all very controlled. World it was nowhere near that kind of environment we have now but there was a there was a gatekeeper function. There was a moderating function of media that just got blown own up and it was starting to get blown up ten years ago that the business model these of these organizations was under huge risks and social media stepped into the void. And then you had people people in the sort of people who are getting more and more angry about the situation that we're finding themselves in you know self selecting where they could get their information from And so the enabler of social media. Yeah I think played into this as well and so then what you had. You had the extraordinary string of events over the past ten years that has also already created reams of of analysis. But you had the in countries from the Philippines to more recently Brazil Turning Illiberal shall we say you've had the standard bearers of democracy European countries trees the UK. What we've been witnessing in the UK and the whole brexit process which is still playing out has been among many people have said sort of the great downturn of of a of a of a great nation in Democracy standard-bearer the European Union has been dealing with its with its struggles especially in the Eastern European Union? And then you have the United States not necessarily surly out there on the forefront of democracy promotion anymore and in fact facing a looming constitutional crisis in its own government and so There's no there's no single story to tell but I wanted to lay those out there as the conditions that were that. were at play ten years ago as Jim and I sat down with our Mary Band to start at this podcast and then have started to watch what this decline unfold Bob. A sort of a an optimistic note onto their into the conversation given that that that was a pretty bleak list of of developments and everything you said is exactly true but I think we also need to keep in mind that the idea of democracy Christie is not necessarily dead in one way. You can tell the story here in the United States is that because the president has made changes in American policy. It's actually AH energized. The public conversation I will note in two thousand eighteen. We had near record turnout in a congressional midterm election. So there's that but you look around the world think mm for example. What's transpiring right now? In Hong Kong where you have protesters millions of protesters turning out to make demands among them to have greater say a in how they are governed we also see democracy protests in Russia. So I I agree. There are lots of storm clouds out there in the real reason to be concerned. What about them? But I think there are also some raised sunshine. Shall I say well I was thinking about. Where was I in two thousand nine and I was in Damascus? There was no hint of an Arab spring in two thousand nine and the Assad model appeared to be as good as you got people call it. A NEO liberal autocracy that had changed from what Hafiza las had had on offer which was a terrible socialist drab. This was you know two young dynamic a couple at the head of the government from NPR Lozad and his wife who was a banker she had given up getting her NBA Harvard. To come and marry him. There was an upper house. I remember number watching a hamlet production. Assad came and there was a line in the play about how people had voted ninety nine percent for the leader and he slapped his knee. He he was laughing so hard fast forward to where we are now and let me say just one thing about this idea about democracy and where the shoot SAR boy. The Middle East looks really bleak really terribly bleak but the eight hundred thousand Syrians who went to Germany are politically active in a place that they can be they are. We are organizing for war crimes trials in Germany. There are lawyers. We're looking for witnesses to be in these cases Saudi Arabia another other terrible example. Feels to us that it's backwards for the first time ever. There is an activist network outside the country. That has never happened before. And this network. Does things just like help. Young women who have gotten themselves to Thailand or Hong Kong. They want to escape oppressive families. They help them figure out how to do it. How to shape their media campaign you know who to ask for asylum There are human rights groups now that have formed in London this this is very new for the Saudis. And so I think you have to be careful about where you look and recognize what you see so the idea is not dead that it just takes different forms. We'll but you also raise the interesting question. Of How will democracy activists be able to fair in a world of greater or tighter hater surveillance. Bob mentioned that part of the corrosion of democracy is in some sense by openness by having lots of voices many of those invoices authentic. Obviously some of those voices not authentic about obviously governments have a greater ability to track people and they can track them for good reasons. They contract track them for nefarious reasons. And so you have disgraced concern that as these networks develop intern governments will target them and crackdown down them. That way. Some ways. Many of the science fiction dystopia movies that Hollywood turns out periodically may contain more than element of truth in terms of how governments governments can control their people. What's happening in Hong Kong is fascinating in that regard because you have this incredible test of wills between the public demonstrators? I mean we're toyin lots of demonstrators. Who have adopted what they call it like water effect where they just sort of melt into or or or amorphous? Mass allow certain things to take place but block other the other things but they are you know there were attempts to sort of spray them with Colored water to tag them on all sorts of other things. You know the D. masking laws and other things but they've kept ahead of the move counter move. Yeah we are in an arms race and it's big data against you know open phones. I don't know anybody anymore anymore. That's not talking to me on what's up. I don't even buy a chip when I travel abroad anymore because that is my international line. Everybody understands that you want encryption encryption on either end you can livestream a demonstration. Let the police know where you are and where you were and so. That's where the arms race is. This and I don't think we have a winner yet. Think you know who the winner will be. I'd like to hope that it's the good guys. But there's no guarantee none. Well I would. I'd say also among the many fronts to watch as the US twenty two thousand presidential election process with how information is disseminated. Everybody obviously is very mindful twenty sixteen and the story line there and and you need look no further than the Miller report to sort of see how the US system was compromised. And what does this mean for. Social media companies responsibility sponsored. -bility will they in fact be required to sort of govern themselves as broadcast networks. have been in the past and the United States in terms of policing content on their platforms. It's a huge issue. We've had some controversy this. We could facebook's Mark Zuckerberg comments about this but will these organizations which have put a lot of resources into trying to tamp down.

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