35 Burst results for "Next Week"

Prof. Nicholas Giordano on the Patriot Act and Your Loss of Freedom

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 6 hrs ago

Prof. Nicholas Giordano on the Patriot Act and Your Loss of Freedom

"As promised, Nick jordano, professor Nicholas jordano is my guest. He's a Professor of political science at Suffolk community college, a native New Yorker. I love it. I'm also a native New Yorker. But I had a sojourn in Connecticut where I lost the accent. So I apologize. You're a Professor of political science who has been talking about a lot of the stuff that I talk about on this program, which is to say the growth of government bureaucracy and the growth of government at the expense of freedom. So how did you, how did you get to that place? Were you raised in such a way that this was on your radar? Did this come to you as you did your studies? Well, I'm a student of history and the founding fathers made it clear that we want to limited government. We want a small government because governments continually grow expand abuse their power. And so we have to hold government accountable. And then what I saw with the Patriot Act, beginning to unfold, that's what concerned me because I was in Homeland Security. When you say the Patriot Act, talk about what year was the Patriot Act. Shortly after 9 11. So normally it takes about two years to get pieces of legislation through most pieces of legislation never see the light of day. But the Patriot Act passed within two weeks. And it was an encompassing bill that really changed the dynamics of the national security framework of the United States. And people said, well, if you don't support it, then you must be doing something wrong. And many conservatives. You're with that. You're with the terrorists. Correct.

Nick Jordano Nicholas Jordano Suffolk Community College New Yorker Connecticut United States
Senate approves $40 billion aid package for Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 9 hrs ago

Senate approves $40 billion aid package for Ukraine

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting the Senate ships of $40 billion Ukraine aid bill to President Biden for his signature The Senate gave final approval Thursday to a fresh $40 billion aid package for Ukraine sending the bill to president Joe Biden for his signature The legislation that includes military economic and food aid for Ukraine and U.S. allies passed on a vote of 86 to 11 Both party leaders Democrat Chuck Schumer and Republican Mitch McConnell urged passage It's a fight we should not and can not turn away from I encourage every senator on both sides to join this bipartisan super majority Every Democrat who voted approved the measure as did most Republicans but all the no votes came from Republicans which was also the case last week when the House approved the legislation 360 eight to 57 Mike Gracia Washington

Mike Gracia Ukraine President Biden President Joe Biden Senate Chuck Schumer Mitch Mcconnell U.S. House Mike Gracia Washington
Oklahoma lawmakers approve bill banning almost all abortions

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 10 hrs ago

Oklahoma lawmakers approve bill banning almost all abortions

"Lawmakers in Oklahoma approved a bill prohibiting all abortions with few exceptions Abortions would be banned in Oklahoma except to save the life of a pregnant woman or if the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest that has been reported to law enforcement Governor Kevin stitt had earlier signed a bill that bans abortion after 6 weeks of pregnancy Two of Oklahoma's four abortion clinics already stopped providing abortions and an attorney for the two other independent clinics said they will no longer offer services once this new bill is signed The Oklahoma bill comes following a leaked draft opinion from the U.S. Supreme Court suggesting

Oklahoma Kevin Stitt U.S. Supreme Court
Jan. 6 committee wants to talk to Loudermilk about Capitol tour given the day before attack

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 12 hrs ago

Jan. 6 committee wants to talk to Loudermilk about Capitol tour given the day before attack

"The house panel investigating the capitol riot wants to talk with another GOP congressman The committee wants to know about a tour of the capitol Georgia's very loudermilk led the day before the attack in a letter the panel says there are indications some people and groups try to gather information about the capital's layout The committee is now asked for cooperation from at least 8 lawmakers whom it believes have information key to the attacks planning and execution along with former president Trump's potential role in inciting it The request loudermilk comes a week after a dramatic move to subpoena top House Republican Kevin McCarthy and four other members Sagar Meghani Washington

Loudermilk GOP Georgia Donald Trump Kevin Mccarthy House Sagar Meghani Washington
 More Americans apply for jobless benefits last week

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 14 hrs ago

More Americans apply for jobless benefits last week

"The number of Americans collecting unemployment benefits has reached a 53 year low The Labor Department reports 1 million 317,000 people receive jobless benefits during the week ending May 7th That's the fewest since December 27th 1969 Applications for unemployment rose by 21,000 last week to 218,000 Weekly unemployment applications have been consistently below the pre-pandemic level of 225,000 for most of this year even as the overall economy contracted in the first quarter and

Labor Department
FDA head: Baby formula factory could reopen by next week

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 14 hrs ago

FDA head: Baby formula factory could reopen by next week

"The Food and Drug Administration's chief says the shuttered baby formula factory at the heart of a national shortage could reopen as soon as next week The abbot plant in Michigan has been closed since February due to contamination issues FDA commissioner Robert califf faced tough questions from a house panel about why it took months for the agency to investigate whistleblower warnings in the fall about safety violations Why did the FDA not spring into action Caleb told Connecticut's rosa de lauro and others he can't say much for now We have an ongoing investigation about the details Wisconsin's Mark pocan says that's unacceptable You can talk about it honestly You should talk about it Abbott says it could take about two months for a new formula to hit store shelves once production resumes

Food And Drug Administration Robert Califf Rosa De Lauro Michigan Mark Pocan Caleb Connecticut Wisconsin Abbott
Geo Tracking and the 'Gay Bathhouse' Argument

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | 15 hrs ago

Geo Tracking and the 'Gay Bathhouse' Argument

"I'm continuing a kind of highlight or analysis of my conversation with Philip bump in The Washington Post. And he disputes the validity or at least precision and the accuracy of geo tracking based upon an expert that he interviewed one guy who said, well, it's only accurate to about 30 feet. Well, that's not true. But let's say it is true. I don't think it changes our conclusions at all. For the simple reason that you've got a Dropbox. And you've got a mule within 30 feet, remember a human body is 5 or 6 feet. So 30 feet puts you basically within three or four human lengths of the Dropbox. You're in that vicinity. You're in that geofence or circle. Okay. And if it was only one Dropbox, you could make you could say, well, wait a minute. Maybe the guy was stopped to eat some popcorn. Or was reaching for his wallet? It happened to stop within that radius, but this is why true the votes high bar and by the high bar I mean, ten or more drop boxes. Totally settles the issue, because quite frankly, if you're within 30 feet of ten or more dropboxes, obviously you are going to those drop boxes to do what? Well, there's only one thing you can do. So you remember these aren't post boxes. You can't be writing a letter to your best friend from college. These drop boxes have one purpose. And that is to put in mail in ballots. They're ballot dropboxes. So the only reason to go to them is to dump ballots. So in fact, there's a guy who made a comment on social media. He goes, dinesh, you know, he goes, listen, he goes, what if I were to show that your phone was within 30 feet of a bunch of gay bath houses? Would you be okay with me saying that your regular frequenter of gay bathhouses dinesh and that I have proof that you that you that you did that? And I replied in a kind of a quote tweet and I say, hey, pal, listen. If you can find my phone within 30 feet of let's say ten or more gay bath houses in the period of let's say two weeks, yeah, you can reasonably conclude that I'm a regular customer. Why else would I be within the close vanity vicinity of not one not two? Not three, but ten or more bathhouses. So yes, use your own common sense and draw your own

Dropbox Philip Bump The Washington Post Dinesh
Peter Doocy Tangles With Karine Jean-Pierre Over Disinformation Board

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 15 hrs ago

Peter Doocy Tangles With Karine Jean-Pierre Over Disinformation Board

"Peter doocy. A national treasure tangling with Kareem, everybody's a racist, but me, Jean Pierre, in The White House press briefing. Last week you guys said that you needed this disinformation governance board at DHS to make sure that freedom of speech is protected across the country and that these platforms are not used for forms of disinformation. So what changed? Look, the Department of Homeland Security, they began their statement repeating that the board had been intentionally mischaracterized, which is a little bit of what you were asking me. And they were explicit about what it does and doesn't, it does not do. It was never about censorship, policing, speech, or removing content from anywhere. It's function was to keep Homeland Security officials aware of how bad actors, including human smugglers, transnational criminal organization and foreign adversaries could use disinformation to advance their goals as secretary Marco said, he has asked former DHS secretary Michael chernoff and former DAG Jamie to lead a thorough review. This is the pause that I was talking about and assessment as members of the bipartisan Homeland Security Council advisory council. The board will not convene during that period, but the department's work across several administrations to address this information that threatens the security for our country is critical and will continue. So that work is going to continue. So if it's pausing because you think the Borg was mischaracterized, then the disinformation board is being shut down because of disinformation. Is that what's happening here? Look, I mean, the board was put forth for a purpose, right? To make sure that we really did a really did address what was happening across the country when it came to disinformation. It's just, it's going to pause. There's been a mischaracterizations from outside outside forces. And so now where we're going to do is we're going to pause it, and we're going to do an

DHS Peter Doocy Jean Pierre Kareem Secretary Marco Michael Chernoff Dag Jamie Bipartisan Homeland Security C White House
'2000 Mules' Hits 400 Theatres This Weekend!

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:47 min | 15 hrs ago

'2000 Mules' Hits 400 Theatres This Weekend!

"The documentary 2000 meals goes into theaters, 400 theaters this weekend, starting, well, there are a few early shows. Even on Thursday, evening this evening. But it really begins four shows a day tomorrow, which is Friday. And then it continues, and it'll run pretty much as long as people are seeing it. In fact, if we do really well in the theater, we might even expand to more theaters the following week. So it's important for us to do well, and this is a great way to see the movie. In fact, I make these movies for the theater. It was heartbreaking to me. With the last one, Trump card, where I was all set to go and a thousand theaters. In fact, and then COVID, theater shut down, all these mask requirements. And so I kind of pull the movie, which was, as I say, very hard to do. But with this one, what's so cool is we had done a very limited theatrical release. We essentially rented the theaters out may 2nd, may 4th, and we did so well that the independent theater is a lot of them came to us and were like, hey, we'd love to have this movie in the theater in a normal release. So this is all kind of jumbled because it violates every kind of normal rule for releasing a movie, normally you go out in the theater. You try to hang in there for two, three, maybe four weeks, then there's a kind of mandatory gap, then you release the movie for digital download. And streaming, and then later you try to get some sort of a deal with an epic or Netflix. So that's the traditional formula. Well, that formula I kind of door up and throughout the window. For a variety of reasons. One of which is that this is the first film I've released in a real age of censorship, where we're blocked and all the normal things that we used

Donald Trump Netflix
Ukrainian medic taken captive after she recorded horrors of war

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 19 hrs ago

Ukrainian medic taken captive after she recorded horrors of war

"A Ukrainian medic has recorded her time in mariupol on a data card smuggled out to the world in a tampon Julia paya is now reported to be in Russian hands Managed to record two weeks in the life of a medic in the first few weeks of the war in a town which is experienced the brunt of the fighting The wounded little girl cries in pain and fear as she is led in on a stretcher the girl's brother is also taken into hospital starts to weep as she realizes the

Mariupol Julia Paya
 North Korea's suspected COVID-19 caseload nears 2 million

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 21 hrs ago

North Korea's suspected COVID-19 caseload nears 2 million

"North Korea has reported hundreds of thousands more COVID cases as its pandemic caseload near 2 million The latest report came only a week after the country acknowledged the outbreak and scrambled to slow infections in its unvaccinated population as the country lacks the infrastructure and resources to contain the virus It is possible that cases are being under reported so as to soften the political impact on authoritarian leader Kim Jong-un North Korea's antivirus headquarters have put the death toll at just over 60 which experts have said is abnormally small compared

North Korea Kim Jong UN
 Buffalo supermarket at center of deadly shooting a community lifeline

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 22 hrs ago

Buffalo supermarket at center of deadly shooting a community lifeline

"18 year old white man accused of fatally shooting ten black people at a buffalo supermarket is scheduled to appear in court Peyton gendron who live streamed his deadly supermarket shooting from a helmet camera before surrendering to police Will appear in an eerie county courtroom this morning before a buffalo city judge Last week his court appointed lawyer entered a not guilty plea on murder charges shortly before the attack last Saturday gendron posted writings to online discussion groups detailing his plans and his racist motivations authorities are investigating the possibility of hate crime or terrorism charges all but two of his 13 alleged victims were black The reverend Al sharpton is expected to speak at the funeral for deacon Hayward Patterson on Friday

Peyton Gendron Eerie County Gendron Buffalo City Buffalo Al Sharpton Deacon Hayward Patterson
The Left Is So Upset With Elon Musk

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | 1 d ago

The Left Is So Upset With Elon Musk

"The left is really upset with Elon Musk. Why are they upset with Elon Musk? Because he won't listen. He won't heal. He won't do what they need him to do. You know, when I have Briggs and I want to bring him right up to me, there's a German command called foos, which means get beside me and cut it out. You know, any dog owner Victor marks, you see with a dog. Get over here. Cut it out. It's actually another German word phooey. He's knock it off. It's very direct. That's how the left treats their own. And they've been saying to Elon Musk the last couple of weeks, foos, foos, get beside me, come to heal, and Elon's like, no. I'm not going to. Now the latest tabulations of where his net worth is, they kind of re tabulated every single day. It's about $221 billion today. He certainly has the net worth still to be able to purchase Twitter. We don't even know how valuable SpaceX is. SpaceX is probably way more valuable than anything they publicly disclose. Elon's going to be just fine. For those of you that are like, wow, Tesla stock is really down. I don't think he's going to have to take out a second mortgage anytime soon. However, it does dampen his potential purchasing power. But the left hates Elon because he will not be totally and completely blindly obedient to everything they tell him to do. You see, the way it's supposed to work. And by the way, Jeff Bezos is getting a little Elon Musk energy recently. I'm not a fan of Bezos, but Bezos is like angrily tweeting towards Biden too. He's like, hey, we as elites, we could think towards ourselves like, okay, Jeff Bezos, we'll see how long that lasts. We'll see if you keep on getting your Pentagon contracts. And Jeff Bezos will heal. Trust me. You want to talk about a guy who is all bark and no bite, that's Bezos. Elon Musk, he just might be wild and eccentric enough actually to challenge the regime. I think he

Foos Elon Musk Elon Victor Marks Spacex Briggs Jeff Bezos Tesla Twitter Bezos Biden Pentagon
Republican Leadership Never Took Madison Cawthorn Under Their Wing

Mark Levin

01:41 min | 1 d ago

Republican Leadership Never Took Madison Cawthorn Under Their Wing

"This young man Cawthorn who lost by really An eyelash And the Republican primary in the far west corner of North Carolina He may have had his faults It was a young man But the Republican leadership never took him under his wing You had former Republicans who were host on TV who were mouthpieces for their rhino brothers and sisters and just trashed the hell out of the guy Yet the drudge report trashing the hell out of the guy You had the Republican establishment in North Carolina trash in the hell out of the guy You had tell us the Republican senator who's a Mitch McConnell want to be trashed the hell out of the guy And just to show you what kind of a guy Donald Trump is he endorsed him in the final week or so of the campaign Even realizing it was going to be a tough race given all that had come He still endorsed him At a principle He's still endorsed him And he just conceded Unfortunately he lost So rather than take this young man who was in a terrible car accident so he lost the use of his legs from the hip down wheel wheelchair bound Rather than take him under the wing teach him the ropes and so forth and so on They went gunning for him Because that's what these bastards do

Cawthorn North Carolina Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump
Is This the End of the Ministry of Truth?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 1 d ago

Is This the End of the Ministry of Truth?

"That is rare that we're able to say that some of the mockery and backlash that we are able to create is actually successful. And we're so used to kind of being outraged about things and nothing actually improving. Well, the Department of Homeland Security, as you well know, DHS came out a couple of weeks ago with their new ministry of truth the orwellian surveillance board that was going to be chaired by the very sad individual Nina jankovic with a really bizarre singing routine. And kind of the perpetually sarcastic and ironic tone that she takes to all things politics. So Nina jankowitz was supposed to run this thing, 33 years old, author of how to lose the information war and how to be a woman online, of course the question is, what does a woman exactly Nina jenko? She was relentlessly mocked by this program included, not because she just a random person, we don't make a habit of doing that, but because she was going to have a badge, going to be able to investigate people because she didn't like their tweets. That was one of her things. She said, I want to be able to edit people's tweets online. Well, Nina jankowitz went very viral for some of her videos. Do we have some of those videos still? And it's just so incredible. What happened? Effective today, Nina jankowicz has resigned. From the disinformation board, can't handle it, Nina, I guess. You're not up to online chatter, it seems when your own words are held against you. And the Biden regime has now paused the disinformation government's board and they are considering it shutting it down all the way together.

Nina Jankowitz DHS Nina Jankovic Nina Jenko Nina Jankowicz Nina Biden
Biden to invoke Defense Production Act to address baby formula shortage

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Biden to invoke Defense Production Act to address baby formula shortage

"Hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Ross Ross Ross Ross you're you're you're you're reporting reporting reporting reporting president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden invokes invokes invokes invokes the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act for for for for the the the the baby baby baby baby formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage president president president president Joe Joe Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden Biden has has has has invoked invoked invoked invoked the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act to to to to help help help help tackle tackle tackle tackle the the the the infant infant infant infant formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage the the the the order order order order requires requires requires requires suppliers suppliers suppliers suppliers to to to to fulfill fulfill fulfill fulfill orders orders orders orders from from from from formula formula formula formula manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers before before before before other other other other customers customers customers customers the the the the president president president president is is is is also also also also authorizing authorizing authorizing authorizing the the the the defense defense defense defense department department department department to to to to use use use use commercial commercial commercial commercial aircraft aircraft aircraft aircraft to to to to fly fly fly fly formula formula formula formula supplies supplies supplies supplies that that that that meet meet meet meet federal federal federal federal standards standards standards standards from from from from overseas overseas overseas overseas to to to to the the the the US US US US the the the the White White White White House House House House is is is is calling calling calling calling it it it it operation operation operation operation fly fly fly fly formula formula formula formula a a a a February February February February shut shut shut shut down down down down of of of of the the the the Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott nutrition nutrition nutrition nutrition plant plant plant plant in in in in Sturgis Sturgis Sturgis Sturgis Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan due due due due to to to to contamination contamination contamination contamination issues issues issues issues severely severely severely severely cut cut cut cut into into into into supplies supplies supplies supplies of of of of baby baby baby baby formula formula formula formula the the the the FDA FDA FDA FDA okayed okayed okayed okayed the the the the re re re re opening opening opening opening of of of of the the the the plant plant plant plant this this this this week week week week but but but but Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott said said said said it it it it will will will will take take take take eight eight eight eight to to to to ten ten ten ten weeks weeks weeks weeks before before before before new new new new product product product product begins begins begins begins arriving arriving arriving arriving in in in in stores stores stores stores might might might might cross cross cross cross yep yep yep yep Washington Washington Washington Washington hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Ross Ross Ross Ross you're you're you're you're reporting reporting reporting reporting president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden invokes invokes invokes invokes the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act for for for for the the the the baby baby baby baby formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage president president president president Joe Joe Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden Biden has has has has invoked invoked invoked invoked the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act to to to to help help help help tackle tackle tackle tackle the the the the infant infant infant infant formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage the the the the order order order order requires requires requires requires suppliers suppliers suppliers suppliers to to to to fulfill fulfill fulfill fulfill orders orders orders orders from from from from formula formula formula formula manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers before before before before other other other other customers customers customers customers the the the the president president president president is is is is also also also also authorizing authorizing authorizing authorizing the the the the defense defense defense defense department department department department to to to to use use use use commercial commercial commercial commercial aircraft aircraft aircraft aircraft to to to to fly fly fly fly formula formula formula formula supplies supplies supplies supplies that that that that meet meet meet meet federal federal federal federal standards standards standards standards from from from from overseas overseas overseas overseas to to to to the the the the US US US US the the the the White White White White House House House House is is is is calling calling calling calling it it it it operation operation operation operation fly fly fly fly formula formula formula formula a a a a February February February February shut shut shut shut down down down down of of of of the the the the Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott nutrition nutrition nutrition nutrition plant plant plant plant in in in in Sturgis Sturgis Sturgis Sturgis Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan due due due due to to to to contamination contamination contamination contamination issues issues issues issues severely severely severely severely cut cut cut cut into into into into supplies supplies supplies supplies of of of of baby baby baby baby formula formula formula formula the the the the FDA FDA FDA FDA okayed okayed okayed okayed the the the the re re re re opening opening opening opening of of of of the the the the plant plant plant plant this this this this week week week week but but but but Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott said said said said it it it it will will will will take take take take eight eight eight eight to to to to ten ten ten ten weeks weeks weeks weeks before before before before new new new new product product product product begins begins begins begins arriving arriving arriving arriving in in in in stores stores stores stores might might might might cross cross cross cross yep yep yep yep Washington Washington Washington Washington hi hi hi hi Mike Mike Mike Mike Ross Ross Ross Ross you're you're you're you're reporting reporting reporting reporting president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden invokes invokes invokes invokes the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act for for for for the the the the baby baby baby baby formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage president president president president Joe Joe Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden Biden has has has has invoked invoked invoked invoked the the the the defense defense defense defense production production production production act act act act to to to to help help help help tackle tackle tackle tackle the the the the infant infant infant infant formula formula formula formula shortage shortage shortage shortage the the the the order order order order requires requires requires requires suppliers suppliers suppliers suppliers to to to to fulfill fulfill fulfill fulfill orders orders orders orders from from from from formula formula formula formula manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers manufacturers before before before before other other other other customers customers customers customers the the the the president president president president is is is is also also also also authorizing authorizing authorizing authorizing the the the the defense defense defense defense department department department department to to to to use use use use commercial commercial commercial commercial aircraft aircraft aircraft aircraft to to to to fly fly fly fly formula formula formula formula supplies supplies supplies supplies that that that that meet meet meet meet federal federal federal federal standards standards standards standards from from from from overseas overseas overseas overseas to to to to with with with the the the US US US the the the White White White House House House is is is calling calling calling it it it operation operation operation fly fly fly formula formula formula a a a February February February shut shut shut down down down of of of the the the Abbott Abbott Abbott nutrition nutrition nutrition plant plant plant in in in Sturgis Sturgis Sturgis Michigan Michigan Michigan due due due to to to contamination contamination contamination issues issues issues severely severely severely cut cut cut into into into supplies supplies supplies of of of baby baby baby formula formula formula the the the FDA FDA FDA okayed okayed okayed the the the re re re opening opening opening of of of the the the plant plant plant this this this week week week but but but Abbott Abbott Abbott said said said it it it will will will take take take eight eight eight to to to ten ten ten weeks weeks weeks before before before new new new product product product begins begins begins arriving arriving arriving in in in stores stores stores might might might

Sturgis Mike Mike Mike Mike Ross Ross Biden Biden Biden Biden President President President Michigan FDA Defense Defense Defense Defens White White White White House Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott Nu Washington Abbott Abbott Abbott Abbott United States White White White House House Abbott Abbott Abbott Nutrition Abbott Abbott Abbott
How the Heck Did Chris Stigall Lose 90 Pounds?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 1 d ago

How the Heck Did Chris Stigall Lose 90 Pounds?

"Let's reach out to the man that keeps Philadelphia seen every single morning. A.m. 9 90s, the answer we call him crystal, but I'm not sure he is because I see this svelte individual is fit individual. He doesn't have the COVID extra 30 pounds. Is that really Chris? Brother, it is. It's me 90 less these days. I've got it. I'm trying to show off. I'm trying to strutting around the world. I went to a awards ceremony last night and people said, you look good. Yeah, 26 pounds. That's how good I look. And then you say yes. A small man on you like I was. I mean, I was a husky fella, you know that. You had, you know, you got what, a couple of pounds to lose. And you look great. I was, I was getting into that sort of, I don't know. You could have had a guy wires attached to me and entered me in as afloat in the Macy's day parade. I was getting that size. All right, before we talk about disgusting things like politics, let's share our happiness at what we've both done. I'm the amateur, you're the pro. I did this with amazing woman doctor Ashley Lucas at PhD weight loss and nutrition. My wife and I, 5 weeks, 26 pounds for me, 18 for her with super happy guys if you're interested, I'll give you the details later. How the hell did you lose 90 pounds, dude? I mean, I could plug him if you want me to. Yes, he's also a waiter. That's true. All right. His next doctor Rick tagg, TA GUE, doctor Rick tag at a place called the center for nutrition. And my old stomping grounds and my kind of original hometown of the Kansas City metro area. Doctor tig is spectacular. He put me on a weight loss program and I dropped 90 pounds from January to October of last

Ashley Lucas Philadelphia Chris Macy Rick Tagg Rick Tag Center For Nutrition Kansas City
Remember, Populism Is Not Conservatism

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:34 min | 1 d ago

Remember, Populism Is Not Conservatism

"And I don't dispute that he made some mistakes. I started my day with a knock down drag out with my pal Mark Davis in Dallas because Mark said, wow, we dodged a bullet. Why? I still can't hit the high notes. That's called doing a musical nonstop for three weeks and screeching and blowing out your voice. Yeah, mark's very excited that Madison Cawthorn lost. And I sort of tried with love and respect to get Mac marked to back off. We Republicans never know how to act. Unified. And Mark claims that it was all about finding the most conservative representative. Possible. And I get it. I appreciate that. But there is this, there is a populism that the establishment types can't stand. That's why they hate Trump so much. It has to do with the populist streak of trumpism. Populism is not conservatism. And some of us are having a more difficult time than others in reconciling the two.

Madison Cawthorn Mark Davis Mark Dallas MAC Donald Trump
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:19 min | 9 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"You can just see that a judge could be some merrily removed on the basis. That he or she has reached her judicial oath and interpretation of that old lands with the central people's complement of course an implemented through people like the chief secretary and you can just see that the judges are not stupid. Of course they can see the writing on the wall. So if i have an important piece of a case that has won a few of those are very sensitive political leaders in the opposition on trial and the people stadium has already pronounced the verdict. If you're a judge you know. Of course you can see the writing on the wall. You'd go decide for yourself how you're gonna ruin that case. The consequences could be dire if you arrive at the golden input wrong decision because some summary removal of someone in official position on grounds that he her speech oath of office is marrying and could be easily applied to judiciary and the judges know that. That's number one number two the key person who controls judiciary senior promotion and also see neha Judicial appointments is actually the chief secretary and this point is sometimes overlooked because if you look at let's go proceedings under the basic law senior judicial appointments. I'm talking about court of appeal upwards all have to be approved by less show and given the go today. There's no balance. There's no check and balances all pro-beijing views pro-beijing appointees number one number two. The person who actually moves the motion to confirm judge for senior position is actually the chief secretary. The chief secretary is responsible to put that person's name forward in the lesko. A meeting to say. Can you please approved person and endorse him. Ask the next chief justice and if the chief secretary things you're not a patriot. He have all the power to say. I'm not moving this person forward. Because i have questions about his patriotism. The chief secretary controls that decision making process by being in his role asked. Who was the person responsible for putting forward at again as judges. We all know that as as people who are familiar judiciary in hong kong. We we know that that that that process well. So you again to think about whether judges who understand that would be affected by such a system so i think systematically and you're looking at the institution as a whole. Can you still say hand on hot at the hong kong judiciary is independent. I was very disappointed with the uk supreme court when they came out to Continue to say they will continue to send judges in hong kong because they believe that the hong judiciary is still largely independent. I'm disappointed because the statement doesn't provide any reason. It doesn't explain why they still believe that and i would like to see some reasons but i have my serious doubts about that assertion so those are the free points that i wanna make and Happy to any questions on any of you have thank you jerry. Can you share well. That was a powerful statement is lots of issues. I've got a few comments myself. But i'm eager to hear from sharon Jeez originally from hong kong she became a distinguished graduate of nyu law school. She's a active civil libertarian. For over thirty years she's taught in china. Ah sharon is the executive director of human rights. Watch run of our most active organizations that covers this field. So sharon if you could give selected comments and then we'll have a discussion but we're really glad to see you am. I think you were the one who first introduced me. Dennis and then i decided to invite him years ago to speak the council. Thank you very much. Thank you so much jerry for that kind introduction and and dennis thank you for Those really detailed opening remarks and thank you for all of the work that you have done. And i know. We'll continue to do abroad I want to offer a few comments but from centering. The perspective of an international human rights perspective. But if i could just. I add a quick comment to dentists remarks in particular these social engineering project that's underway and i completely agree that the social engineering project on the mainland is absolutely spreading an interrelated with what is happening in hong kong There are two things about that. Social engineering project one is that it is supported by a completely interrelated. Set of law propaganda disinformation censorship and then the whole panoply of police security Apparatus the second wanted to say there's an insidiousness about the way in which these various social control and clean up and crackdowns are being formulated and they are being formulated under the cover of what i would say arguably reasonable legitimate rationales that is addiction to gaming by teenagers who really will go till they drop. Monopolistic practices by these gated walled gardens by the large tech industries. Dd controls eighty. Two percent of the industry and the other large ones are indeed trying to tie in monopolistic practices so that is a legitimate goal. Terrorism is legitimate real threat and the fact that students are so stressed out. Why this endless tutoring and the need to address. That problem are real threats. So my point theories is that it is an insidious packaging that labels all of these practices at under a rubric. Where you could say. Those are real problems. The problem is how to deal with these problems. In the way in which The leadership is dealing with them is not within a rights brain framework or a in compliance with its international obligations The one i would say is is not only insidious but i would say is not reasonable is trying to create what they call the correct standard of beauty now. that is why no more sec- men no more men wearing makeup and it extending to. What can you sing in karaoke clubs. So i think that you know those are objectives that i would say. I don't agree with from the start so Let me let me Regarding the law itself let me focus on. The law has been clearly widespread local and international expert concerns regarding the vague and overbroad provisions in the nfl and the lack of transparency and accountability of the entities. Which have been created and also very specific legal analysis and concerns regarding the misuse of terrorism as rationale the misuse of the sedition legislation in hong kong that you are referred to dennis and widespread fear before the passage of the national security law about the risks of arbitrary arrests and the complete undermining of rights protections and the rule of law and therefore prior to the passage of the national security law..

hong kong beijing sharon Jeez nyu law school Ah sharon lesko jerry supreme court sharon dennis Dennis uk china sec nfl
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:04 min | 9 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"With an open acknowledgement that. This is a really tough time. Eight that we don't gloss over that or skipped past that that we do give them many many many many openings to be able to speak to somebody rather that's appeared peer right whether that speak to a professional whatever that is and that we continue to not just. It's it's important frankly that we don't just cheer lead and push people. I think as you might be alluding to towards you know. Just keep going just stay. Everything is fine but openly acknowledged that everybody right now is really slogging through it and that coping is incredibly difficult and i think that the other piece is that bind you. This starts with leadership. This really is not effective in cannot happen if the president doesn't embrace it because it really trickles down from there frankly And it has to be in multiple places so this should be reflected in a statement that's on every syllabus rate it should show up on the bernie management system. it should show up in correspondence. You know anything that the institution can do to remind students that they get it Cutting cutting red tape right now. Right removing bureaucracy Relieving and getting out of any requirements that are not necessarily all of those things are human centered things. I appreciate everything that sarah offered and doubled down on that in terms of thinking about the senior administrative approach to this certainly there exists. Concentrated means to to engage students. And i think we utilize those Having had the opportunity to work on different kinds of campuses. I do think it's mindful for for us to be attentive of the populations that don't easily have ready access to senior administration. Having had the opportunity to serve at a community college quite often. We know that there is a more Guided path to get directly to student input feedback But i think it's critical to you. the necessary means to get directly to students. I think the intention -ality that. Sarah points out in terms of having empathetic messages. Communicated in different mediums as critical whether we're using social media whether we're doing that on our syllabi whether we're doing that specifically as it relates to the messages that we put out to the campus community. I think there has to be consistency in the chorus. That speaks to the empathy of the now. And how we're working to navigate this together Toxic positively that you referenced. I think is prevalent at a number of institutions and for us to be mindful of what that means one of the ways that we were able to execute that here at the university of pittsburgh was a town hall series that we put in place for all stakeholders called. This is not normal to just identify collectively as a community that what we're experiencing experiencing is absolutely abnormal and talk about what that experience was into think about collectively how we could move as a community to respond to the needs and to have ongoing triage ian and collective concern and outreach by all constituents i think to do that and to be attentive to those populations that are most removed from hired from senior administration is something that we have to do so utilizing our colleagues at all levels specifically looking at peer mentoring models that that offer opportunity to have communication with students and think about starting those messages during the orientation process is a front and center consideration to move that agenda for next pro robinson so pro robinson i do amcham politics international relations At tufts university on this being the council on power relations. I want to bring up the issue of study abroad and certainly last year both undergraduate and graduate study abroad. International relations is very important university. Decided it had to bring home students from all of our study abroad programs except oxford which was deemed safe and we were told everybody was living with families and of course at the end they had to eventually bring those people home the game so now. We're talking about our study abroad programs. Will we have one in ghana. I have counseled to students who are going to be studying africa at either. So as or llc maybe we have to shutdown africa because it's too dangerous actually want to know are there that are thinking about. The implications of creating are not having a study abroad opportunities for students in non-european places and ways in which you might be able to do things like i participated in a couple of very exciting webinars. They're universities where. There's some kind of interaction so i just wanna know. Has anybody been thinking about that. And does the council may be have a had that on its agenda or have you been doing it secretly and i didn't know about it we can look at it for future Topic pearl you want to. I don't have any expertise in the space except to say that i spoke to folks. Aa yesterday and they're very concerned about students health and wellbeing. And in the same on my end. I wou i wouldn't have anything in terms of expertise to offer but but which say from an administrative standpoint. It's intentional for us to be mindful of the different opportunities that we engage with into us an equity lens with regard to how we're monitoring those experiences I know loud and clear as we think about race and ethnicity being affront consideration as part of this pandemic and our response to be mindful of the ramifications and the impact on different communities so leadership should put that front and center in consideration but in terms of specific things that i've seen directly nothing that i could offer but i do If should i find information. I'll definitely pass them along Torino and just to follow on a bit from a different angle what about the pandemic related inequities facing international students. What is the you know on your campus international students and have been able to come this year And maybe that would be an opportunity to create some International experiences on campus. Absolutely i think different institutions obviously are different places with regard to that. We've had a number of students who have been able to return to campus but to be mindful that there has been a significant impact particularly as they think about housing and What the experience is like in the community And as we think about particularly depending on where individuals come from how they self identify and the the rising tide of what i would classify as racism and xenophobia potentially impacting. Those students is a consideration that we have to put front and center. I would say that you know again. We had big problems before the pandemic which folks not being able to afford to be here the way that they had hoped to be able to really afford to be here. We had students international students at good pantries Well before the pandemic You know Certainly the number who can't be here at all right now is one issue but i also want to note that One good thing is that the federal government's Higher education relief funds the her three dollars in particular which came out this year which provided emergency aid to students does not require students to be united states citizens in order to get those spots. It doesn't even require them to fill out a fafsa either so institutions. All of them that receive title for have a substantial amount of emergency aid dollars right now which they could choose to leverage to.

council on power relations robinson university of pittsburgh sarah tufts university africa Sarah ian ghana oxford federal government united states
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

06:31 min | 10 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Know they also have to bring senator menendez conversation and an taking on what he wants so for what i understand. There's a lot of you know policy debate going on and meetings and under trying to get feedback but still they haven't figured it out You know how they're going to do for example Restoring remittances nuts. They'll still On on you know a debate issue. I think there's a difference between perhaps their political or policy preferences and the political constraints. You alluded to the paddle senator menendez and a fifty fifty senate for example At this time. I'd like to invite our members to join our conversation with their questions as a reminder. This meeting is on the record and the operator will remind you how to join the question. Queue. please cute operator every time we'd like to ask a question. We'll take our first question from tom. Mcdonald did more great program Tom mcdonald partner From washington also former us ambassador to zimbabwe. I'm actually proud to say. I was instrumental in saving the lives of two cuban doctors who sought asylum my embassy in two thousand. One is a md and the others a dennis. They're married with kids. You know in in miami dade and they were in zimbabwe in jail Which you never wanna be were in the crosshairs of rodolfo. Sarah gino at the time was the cuban ambassador i wanted to. I wanted to ask a question related to africa in in sort of sort of taking this discussion different way will. These demonstrations the close relationship between The cuban government in africa. And where do you see that south-south relationship going between The cubans and The african governments especially those that it came out of the liberation struggles. Thank you very interesting. Question I think how latin american governments have responded would also be an interesting angle since we tend to focus so exclusively on the us cuba relationship but the africa. One is super interesting I don't know if you follow at this at all or he would like to tackle that. I haven't seen honestly Be action a common front african governments It might be the case that we're not paying attention. We had saying you know how awesome allies in the region have reacted. They have said aid. They had supported The government. But i'm afraid that's a good question. That's something can take a look briefly. I think it will be interesting to see if these ideologically aligned governments. Come to the defense of the way they used to. I think you're in latin america for example seeing some of that in peru where you're seeing some little bit of shifting happening but that's what. Us leadership comes to play. I think if we were to become a little more proactive in this process We can help shift. That a lot has changed. You know we have a five presidents since the end of the cold war from bush all the way to a president trump that had one way to view this issue. This is post july eleventh. I think it's important to focus the discussion little bit. That way and i it's post july. I still believe cuba cuba. Nineteen thousand nine can still happen. In twenty twenty one years leadership will be essential and helping corral national forces the way trump administration did on the venezuela policy. Whether we agree it was good or not it should be. Marshall is part of us law by the way part of the libertad act was supposed to be bringing nations around the us policy on. Cuba never been done. I think it should be done. And it's an issue that i think with africa and latin america. We can make a lot of headway if we focused efforts on it I think that you know so far. We haven't heard anything negative really other than from some folks in holland and we haven't really heard something. That's you know significant in terms of re breaking radically or even slightly with Support for the cuban government's narratives. Now what really matters is whether africa against vaccines doesn't vaccines. I mean right now. The percentage of people who are vaccinated in africa is in single digits I do think that the cuban government had the expectation that they would create a much more powerful vaccine earlier on and that it wouldn't take three shots and they would have one of the five working if not to sufficiently that they could then export that and make money from it. Not just you know big muddy from i should say rather make a lot of sort of Hey as we would call it from kansas from it the notion that they would gain in prestige and they would gain in terms of of the marketability of their main source of income right now which is the exporting of doctors in the contract and doctors abroad of as well as other as well as other engineers so. I think that we need to think about that too. Because that isn't that is definitely on on the top of the escalating. Yeah i would also may decide that Many countries around the world view. Us policy towards cuba such a domestic issue There's a lack of support unfortunately End at least for the latin american left african left as well There's a lot of st geel nostalgia after the cuban revolution and it's easy to just focus on criticizing the embargo rather than government. Some really quick because they'll never comes up and it really matters in the state of florida and this speaks to not just the past nostalgia for the past but the reality that the cuban government is currently the cuba. Cuba is on the list of states for terrorism trump. put it back on the list And that from the perspective of people in nigeria is a little ridiculous..

senator menendez cuban government africa cuba Tom mcdonald miami dade Sarah gino zimbabwe Us rodolfo latin america Mcdonald senate dennis tom washington peru venezuela Marshall bush
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

06:34 min | 10 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"As you know renewable energy and distributor can like grades and Angela panels on bring electrification. She knew on developing countries. I think more the solutions will become even more viable. hey We have time for one more question. If anybody has a question please raise your hand. Okay mona i think I think that's it for questions if you want to wrap up today. Thank you so much. i think. Actually sorry about that. I think the last question. I have is You know that you successfully preparing for the future of mobility will require transformation In a number of factors so my question to the to both kilian. Jody is what do you think the most important criteria will be to accelerate the adoption of of this. You know what we were talking about today of of You know. E- mobility micro mobility artificial intelligence and transportation. What do you think is the most important and it could be more than one criteria for to to have mass adoption of of both of your respective companies. I definitely don't think there's one silver bullet I it's going to be a combination of a lot of things on including supportive. Healthy from government Senior researcher that you know we talked a lot about on we. We need We need companies to start thinking about well Super examples some companies are testing out on providing an amount of what message Chew people that don't you know ride that don't take private car. Don't get access to free Free parking at their workplace and that's been shown to incentivize the uptake or public transit and been biking now so i think it's a combination of a lot of things But we do know that. Electrification is really Keita's new jersey As well as know shared mobility which went lift is also very focused on on autonomous and connected. So i think dose were features are going to be the future of mobility and And we need public and private sector actors work together on to nibble that hugh hewitt jodi. We are very lucky in that. We don't have a huge adoption problem. At least in urban cores around our core product people want to use ridesharing for thomas biggest thing seeing people do it in the real world so the biggest thing we see in our our user research over and over is the single saying it makes someone most likely to want to try and self driving bride. That someone who's a real person has done it on real car on a railroad so lift is going to be a huge part of that adoption journey. Because we're helping people see what this is like In their real lives is a real transportation option. That's that's with my eighty hat on with my broader societal hat on i think the single biggest forgetting adoption of sort of alternative mobility options single biggest bang for for our collective faulk is getting government investment in abyan structure. I will like having looked at the economics of this a lot. This is a place where the the private market is going to have. Trouble funding is any individual player is the capital spend is just so high and to lift is committed to one hundred percent part e fleet or of our fleet being ev by twenty thirty and the single biggest walker that were seeing in that is not driver behavior. It's not vehicle availability it's not vehicle rage. It's access to easy charging. And i think that's that's probably it's nazi stopping adoption of this of alternative mobility but it stopping alternative mobility companies from moving to a more electric or solo a all electric option And that's really where. I wanna see the world going. So that's that's my boat. Yeah i would just say as someone that does That primarily focuses up clean energy electrification and trying to a sustainability practices those countries around the world that are more that provide more government incentives and support. We're seeing a lot more adoption. Not just in the mobility. We're seeing it with solar wind hydrogen etc just beyond that and So i completely agree with you. Jodi thank you. So i guess i'm going to send this back to see a far I believe we're out of time. And so i want to thank our audience. Of course. I want to thank my very Distinguished panelists huey and jodi thank you so much for your time and It was it was really delightful to to be here. And i hope that our audience members learned like i did some really interesting data points for more event. Audio subscribe on itunes or visit us at c. f. r. dot org..

hugh hewitt jodi kilian mona Jody Angela Keita abyan new jersey faulk thomas walker Jodi huey jodi
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

03:00 min | 10 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"This event is presented by the council on foreign relations ache you. We're we are delighted to be here. Today are to talk about Micro mobility my name is mona. Johnny and i am the global co head of the energy and infrastructure practice at pillsbury winthrop shop. Hitmen and i'm joined here today. By huey who is the director of sustainability for spin which is a micro mobility unit of ford motor. And i'm also joined by jody kelman. Who's the general manager of lists lift autonomous. So before we get into our questions. I would like to start with huey to just tell us a little bit about herself. And her role and Talk a little bit about spin and the What you're what you're doing there. And then i'll i'll ask the same question for jodi. Inks much and stain. As mentioned is a micro mobility company. We deploy easterners in e-bikes in cities across the us And see the end campuses across the us as well as on canada spain uk and germany. Our goal is to help build a more sustainable future in cities to providing service that offers riders more sustainable modes of transports for first and last mile trips and to connect to transit emissions in the transfer sector is approximately fifteen percent of global emissions. And it's growing and road. Transport is a contributor to approximately three quarters of that So we believe that it's important to provide solutions that can hope decarbonised cities. My role is to ensure that spin operates as sustainability possible through ensuring our operations or sustainable scooters that were deploying sustainable ensuring working with cities to help make the case for riders to shift modes on to more sustainable modes for short trips south. Just past their raid. Thank you jody. You want to tell us a little bit about your role at lift so Good morning everyone from san francisco where the sun is finally starting to come up seven. Am here so i am. I am downing my coffee As we speak by at my name is jody coming. I lead lists.

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:50 min | 10 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Org and on itunes podcast channel religion in foreign policy as always see if our takes no institutional institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have ambassador. Michelle gavin with us today to talk about the conflict in ethiopia's ethiopia's tigray region. Michelle gavin is currently senior fellow for africa studies at the council on foreign relations. She was formerly the managing director of the africa center. A multidisciplinary institution dedicated to increasing understanding of contemporary africa and prior to distinguished career in the government from two dozen eleven to two thousand fourteen ambassador. Gammon was the ambassador to botswana and served concurrently as a us representative to the southern african development community. She also served part that President obama and the senior director for africa at the national security council and before joining the obama administration ambassador gavin was an international affairs fellow and adjunct fellow for africa at the afar. So michelle. thank you for being with us today. it would be great if you could provide us with an overview of the conflict in tigray region of ethiopia. And talk about what's led up to it and policy recommendations as you see a what we can be doing here From the us vantage point or will thank you so much for inviting me to join you today and thanks to everyone is taking time to engage with this issue which is wine that genuinely does keep me up at night And i think is is keeping a lot of people so this is a conflict that broke out last november but had frankly been along time coming. The ethiopian state had for a decade been governed by a coalition a coalition of political parties. But there was one group that was kind of first among equals that was dominant in this ruling coalition and that was the tepe elf and the tigrayan people's liberation front at so the to which make up about six percent More or less of ethiopia's population there is a theo. Pia is a federation so there are states demarcated on maps with a different kind of local government and sometimes local defense forces as well. The tigrayans had been kind of dominated. Federally intel really at the rise of the current prime minister. Vip prime minister. Abby op-ed who is not great in he is a from is a romo ethnically although his background is is mixed which is true of many ethiopians and also a mixed religious background. Interestingly his father's slim his mother in ethiopia orthodox christian himself is pentecostal so as president. Excuse me prime minister. Abby a Power kind of reform agenda because indian all observers inside and outside ethiopia agreed at that time the ethiopian state wasn't really working. There was a great deal of popular dissatisfaction with the federal government with the center. A lot of political contestation and so he unveiled a reform agenda much of which was celebrated domestically and internationally designed open up political space in the country but part of the reform involved and eliminating some of the kind of preferences and the the sort of first among equals role of the left. So you have to gray in a senior to grains who had long enjoyed very influential roles in politics but also in the economy in the military Finding at some of that power being stripped away and it set up at a fairly antagonistic relationship now over time at the prime minister's reform agenda stalled in some areas. They're still a great deal of discontent in contestation. any theo. Pia aside from in tigray but things really came to a head with the grants around the question of elections so ethiopia in june just completed elections but those elections had been delayed so be original. Election date was postponed because of cova nineteen and the difficulty of of campaigning of organizing the midst of a pandemic. the grands chose to go ahead with elections in their region in defiance of federal authorities. And this really kind of set up a standoff and then the it was you know both sides were clearly mobilizing forces for actual conflict that the spark that lit the tinder was a preemptive attack on the part of two grey enforces on some federal forces in the area. And then what you had was a a devastatingly costly conflict where you ended up with four different armed groups. A in the mix in tigray and civilians suffering. You had the federal ethiopian forces you had the two grain forces pushing back but aligned with those federal forces and very much complicating the picture you had eritrean forces who crossed the border to to support prime minister abbey in this campaign against a teepee aleph and worryingly you had militia forces from 'em hara another very large ethnic group in the country who claim. Some of the land that on maps had been considered not so this devastating conflict which has been accompanied by clear mass atrocities Use of sexual violence as a weapon. Refugees have been attacked health. Care centers have been deliberately destroyed which is a war crime across have been deliberately destroyed and in fact hundreds of thousands of two grains are now living in fan conditions. people have begun to die Because of famine it's a man made famine in tigray. So you have the conflict you have atrocity crimes and you have this devastating lack of food and access to healthcare. We're almost there. Were almost up to the president but something very interesting happened last month. Where essentially the two grands who a more or less have been fighting as a guerrilla force You know they kind of those who weren't immediately killed or captured kind of melted away regrouped in the mountains at the trains ended up reclaiming a great deal of territory from the federal forces. Federal forces then withdrew from the two grain capital for most of tigray and prime minister. Abby announced a unilateral ceasefire. It didn't really meet it. Didn't look like what ceasefires usually look like right with arrangements for communitarian access etcetera but there was this kind of Inflection point in the conflict outwear appear the to grandparents had gained an upper hand. The ethiopian federal forces withdrew with rain did not accept at a ceasefire unconditionally. They wanted the or trans out. They wanted those emperor militia out. Essentially the ceasefire is gone now. A fighting has resumed and has in fact spilled out of teague right into a neighboring region..

ethiopia Michelle gavin tigray africa africa center obama administration Abby southern african development c council on foreign relations Gammon national security council botswana gavin Pia President obama romo michelle us
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:22 min | 10 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Other countries that we could cooperate with and and just carrying those standard messages of of traditional democratic values ban. That's something that we were kind of uniquely positioned to do because it was not if those were not the messages that were coming from the federal government so we have freedom in that sense. I think we should be thought of as kind of places where you can also experiment with things. So we we. I think it's more more on the practical sense of say. There is a Well globe guaranteed basic. Income is is an idea that is now percolating and it was. It was a finnish idea originally and now you have states and localities You know doing pilot programs to test it we're gonna Start a large Later this year. So that's more as a more domestic policy concept that came from abroad but that's a role that we can play on as foreign malinche. I'd say and then we we also We we sometimes can just don't have the the constraints of having in in a lot of our relationship even with allies. You know we. We have the positive messages in the positive cooperation in them. We also have to deliver the kind of slightly more difficult questions. But you know when we're talking to the germans for example we don't have to talk about the pipeline we can. We can talk about our cooperation. So in some ways that's nuance because there are times where we're talking to governments that. Have you know human rights violations. Where were we will absolutely talk about that. Even though the conversation. But i guess what i'm saying. Is that the the conversations can be different. They can be Single issue they can be more talking about the benefits than than the difficult issues Let's just another you know. That's more freedom that we have your average foreign service officer the let me ask you a follow up. Just thinking out loud here. I guess this would be relevant for for everyone Paul one of the things that seems to be a foot in foreign policy is some modest decoupling from china because we want pharmaceuticals we want. Semiconductors we want medical equipment like masks to be produced in the united states. Because we don't want to be dependent on china does that create opportunities to repatriate jobs or pre production and and create jobs. Are you seeing any tangible ways. In which this kind of sense that we need to pull back is creating opportunities for la to question I'm trying to think if i can think of any like particular example. I mean the mask issues interesting Spent the first few weeks like you know in a frenzy looking around for masks and competing with others. Us cities in states like getting undercut by and prices with deals that we had at the end of the day Our masks from china. For what for one reason or another did not work out and we ended up contracting with honeywell in arizona. I believe for millions of asks. And so i imagine the honeywell had to hire poor workers to get those masks. They're not la jobs but but they are Do have a very high manufacturing base in los angeles. And i'm i'm sure there are examples. I just can't. I don't know of any one example of someone saying you know this is like too volatile gonna move. I'm going to bring my stuff back ally But i bet there is about. There are examples of that great at charlie. Can you talk a little bit about on a domestic abuse of the us role in the world today to other times. Us history. I mean you you were going back a little bit further that before bam you think it would be good just to give sort of an overview of the contours of it. Yeah i mean is arena mentioned publish a book at the end of last year which is a history of of isolationism and i started writing at before. Trump was elected Actually quite a years before trump was elected. And i have to say that when when he came into office and he gives an inauguration speech where he says for this day forward. It's america i. It's only the america first. Bite my head kind of exploded. Because i had spent the previous day reading the america first committee founded in nineteen forty one to keep the united states out of world war two and even though trump for many was a kind of bolt from the blue. He really wasn't he was harkening back to earlier. Strains in american history and american identity in american strategy some in neo isolationism the unilateralism. The native the protection of they were all there from the beginning. Seventeen eighty nine when we began life as a federation right through until pearl harbor right. We generally wanted to stay out of international affairs. We didn't wanna stand our troops and expand blood and treasure of broad We had a very restrictive immigration policy. And i'm not just talking about non whites. I'm talking about catholics and jews. I mean most. Americans probably don't know this but in nineteen twenty. Four congress passed legislation that cut immigration by jews and catholics by ninety percent. This is from southern and eastern europe. And then we proceeded to deport a million americans of mexican heritage many of them were american citizens right so so a lot of stuff that we saw bubbling up. During the trump era was not out of out of the blue it really it did have roots and in american history and especially in the american heartland this kind of more traditional american identity has has remained reasonably alive and well which is why i think trump tried to tap into it. But this is all by way of saying that we are we are at a at a at an inflection point here where a lot of these bigger debates about who we are. What's america's role in the world. Where's our domestic a population head in terms of mississippi and religion. All of these things are very much part of a national conversation that we've been happening having for for for quite a long time. And i think it's important for us to keep that that history in zoo as we as we engage in debates and and i think it's partly because i i i was aware of how tenuous how fragile our engagement in the world has been across american history that i think it's so important for people like us to gather foreign policy cone heads as i called myself and local politicians a to have this kind of conversation. Thank you need. i'm let you have the final word..

united states china honeywell federal government la america first committee trump Paul arizona Trump charlie los angeles congress europe mississippi
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

06:25 min | 11 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"The heart of this book is the case studies and with a seven countries that you got so i wanna turn to those And megan tell us a little bit if you would just the breadth of the seven countries. Never gonna start with Nigeria and we're gonna turn to factoria for that. One gives a sense of the breadth of countries. You you covered. So i was really grateful to be able to rate and chronicle this work. In the victories of women activists leading locally in nigeria of also in tunisia and egypt just really compare and contrast what happens since the two thousand eleven uprisings. You know two very different stories in terms of what happened. Afterwards and the role of women in trying to form new constitutions new governments you know in one case in tunisia thriving building something new and being at the center of it serving in office and then egypt's suffering incredible persecution under the el-sisi regime after a lot of hope initially and i also wrote about pakistan a country that i've been really grateful to be able to do quite a bit of work regarding you know whether that was that malala fund or continuing until today and really just you honestly to tear down this idea that women from these countries are not a incredible and powerful and do not need saving in the least You know they are creative and courageous and to really chronicle their victories and how women are fighting in their own communities for what they believe needs to change. not what people from other countries or donors sink needs to change but what they know needs to change in a way that can only come from deep roots and commitment to your country to your community Rachel wrote about china brazil and she also wrote about sweden so i know she would love to share about the countries that she wrote about or you know. Brazil was fascinating because women. They're basically turned their campaign against sexual harassment into campaign for political power. Which is i think really instructive around the world. In china women managed to rise up. And in some instances actually defeat censorship. Because there were so many women were willing to come forward. That essentially the sensors couldn't keep up and sweden we selected in part because it is often seen as the most gender equal country in the world and yet they had an enormous. Need you movement there as well which really exposed a lot of persistent challenges and awakened men and women alike in that country to the work that still remains nuclear. Just lost factory at are not other. She is great. Will i want to dive in a little bit more into detail here. On some of the cases. I want to start with nigeria. So if you could talk about give us a little sense of how the metoo movement developed on the ground and really spread from from northern nigeria to bigger issues throughout the gives a sense of the trajectory over the last few years in what has happened there. Absolutely thank you so much shannon will i. I would like to really thank mega and rachel of documenting. All of the works of these amazing women all over the world It's very important that you know we're able to document whatever we're doing and the has sort of become the the stamp you hear a round. Whatever kind work. you're doing As you know very vital to empowering women just all across the world so thank you thank you so much Especially megan who has stayed in contact with me through the entire journey and to this point Well as you know as you know if you read the book. I guess you'll get that sense that the meat you've meant in northern nigeria will nigeria specifically. Nigeria was very much organic on. It was sparked twitter actually so We had a period where this young women Just got the courage to start talking about some of their experiences of sexual violence and northern nigeria is known to be one of the most ultra conservative societies in africa. As a whole on. So you know you. The courage it took is very immense for you know young women to come out and say that someone that they hadn't been married to had sexually violated them because obviously that stigma is very much still strong within our cultures so after that happened the hashtag really took off and For the first few days we saw a lot of men to being supportive and all of that until that kind of sparked a series of opening up by a lot of young women on there were point thing is as a finger is at a lot of young men so then it became sort of a threat right It became a threat to a lot of men. So it was that okay. A human that haven't violated or harassed women in in in that sense of things so everyone became afraid and then we became wrapped up in partisan politics here Because you know that's the that's the first way you can de-legitimize a movement say that they worked for one political party or the other All the second as you know where very much Unwelcoming lgbtq community so anything that you ascribe to that community then you know it's de-legitimize automatically so that happened to us but then we figured that a majority of women that suffered this kind of sexual violence of flying so we needed a campaign that would sort of go get to the grassroots so we launched a campaign and we focused on legislative bills that you know the the state assemblies Had refused to pass because of the subject of age age of consent which is also the age of marriage..

nigeria tunisia malala egypt megan Nigeria sweden china pakistan Rachel brazil Brazil shannon rachel twitter africa
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

08:54 min | 11 months ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Great well thank you very much and welcome everyone to see bars fellows book launch. I'm we are here to talk about to celebrate this book. Awakening metoo in the global fight for women's rights. I am shannon. O'neill ended deputy director of studies here. So far as well as the nelson and david senior fellow for latin american studies and it is my privilege to preside over this meeting. I will be joined I am joined right now by two newly minted authors and we will be joined by a third illustrious panelist when she gets out of traffic in nigeria. So we'll see her in just a couple of minutes. Let me use this first. Couple of minutes to introduce our panelists You have their full byles which you bad with imitation. But let me just give you the highlights of each. And then we'll begin the discussion. So rachel little known to many of you. Rachel is the douglas dillon. Senior fellow in the director of the women in foreign policy here at c. afar as she's also a professor of gender. Us foreign policy at georgetown law previously before she joins the afar she was a senior advisor to secretary of state. Hillary rodham clinton on global women's issues And she followed the former secretary of state to the clinton foundation where she was a director of women and girls programs. She is an attorney by training and has long been focused on these issues of gender equality next alternative. Megan stone megan to is part of the family. She's an adjunct fellow here in the women in foreign policy program And she joined us after serving as an entrepreneurship fellow. At harvard's kennedy school at the shorenstein center from two thousand fourteen to two thousand seventeen. She was the president of the malala fund. says she worked with the founder and the nobel prize winner on empower girls globally as part of that organization and in our final panelists who is on her way We will turn to you when she joined us is factory has seen. She is a fellow at the peace security development fellowship program for early career africa women at the africa leadership center and she has worked with ngos. She's worked with development agency. She's worked with the nigerian government on a number of social issues and programs and she is actually a protagonist in this book. And we'll talk a lot about her history in nigeria and one of the people that really pioneered the me. Too movement in nigeria. Which will hear more about So welcome to view in soon. Welcome to our to our third panelists at and let me start off talking to you too as as the authors. Let's talk a little bit about the origins of this. What is it that inspired you to focus on. This really led you to this topic. And so rachel. Lemme let me start with you first. Let me into thank you shannon for hosting us. And i'm so pleased to be joined by my wonderful co author as the inspiring for korea has sheen we're grateful to be talking to all of you about a weakening i worked on the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign and was hoping to fulfill Goal of electing first woman. President here in the united states and was crashed in the aftermath of but what i really was struck by as i slumped back to washington. Dc was this incredible rise in women's voices. And i think that. Us media really covered that here in the united states but at the council on foreign relations we started tracking this rise. Globally starting from that seventeen women's march that was truly global on every continent and remarkably was organized in only ten weeks. Thanks to digital technology to then that be too movement which goes viral in october twenty seventeen and spreads to over one hundred countries to the rise in female political participation. We start to see in country after country around the world. And i was really struck as were my colleagues limited foreign policy program by this rise and the stories of courageous. They've been that really weren't getting told. And i'm so fortunate in grateful that i got to help tell these stories together with megan in this region. Talk a little bit if you would about your path and then also if you would. How did you decide where to focus. How did how did you decide to focus the spoken. And where did you Thank you so much for. I wanna give credit. Credit is due in. Say that the idea from the book came from rachel. She approached me. Initially as another fellow at sea. Afar and i was really interested in the idea. I said this is a great idea to talk about this. Is it okay if i bring to the book. A perspective of women human rights defenders and also technology because of his big parts of my activists work in the pass and when it comes to women human rights defenders. What what. I found over many years. Doing this work is that many of them will tell you that they themselves privately in conversation after you really get to know them that they themselves have suffered from sexual assault sexual harassment. Sometimes it's been at the hands of men in their communities other times. It's been a specific act of political retribution for them daring to raise their voice. It's not something that women always speak out about. I think this is why nadia murad leadership another nobel peace prize laureate because she really came out and spoke just break. She broke the silence about what women experience and conflict in terms of sexual assault. And how it's used as a weapon of war but this is something that most human rights defenders don't talk about like they're much more comfortable talking about if they were jailed Unjustly or we you know. The people can be physically attacked but being sexually assaulted is something that just wasn't spoken about. And so i was grateful for the opportunity to write with rachel about this and really shine a bright light on it and also technology no for anyone that's worked on any modern political campaign or on any social issue you know the use of digital organizing is central and we're really is magical is when you combine the online organizing offline organizing together so when we looked at the countries you wanted to write about really wanted to capture the depth and breadth of this movement. We wanted to make sure that we were bringing to bear country examples in women who are incredible leaders from very different contexts to try to see what we could pull out. Were universal lessons and linkages and the connective tissue between the movement. But also show that. This work can succeed in very different situations. You know different. Faith communities different socioeconomic realities different colonial histories different systems of government. You know so. We really wanted to show that women. Everywhere including in the united states continued to face these challenges and bring that humility and a listening ear. Let me ask you about that because obviously these issues issues. A discrimination of sexual violence are nothing new in in any of these countries around the world but this last two thousand seventeen on last four or five years have been really defining moment and the differences of weather linguistic differences geographic differences educational differences legal differences religious differences. We really saw movement around the world. So what is it in this moment. Is it the technology. What is it in this moment. That made a different. That really you saw to spread globally. Well we credit the women who were willing to raise their voices but we also recognize that twenty-first-century tools have really helped facilitate that and have transformed the methods and the speed of global women's movement during earlier. Eras victories were won. Only after a lifetime of organizing it took more than a century or women globally to win the right to vote in two decades to enshrine the principle that women's rights are human rights into international law. And today thanks to advances in technology the movement can mobilize millions across country lines in a matter of weeks or even days. We also recognize that. Twenty-first-century will have diversified a global events in granting purchase to anyone with access to an internet connection and helping women find strength in numbers. The internet in many respects has become a twenty-first-century public square for women especially in places where there's redone is circumscribed. And they can't gather safely in public but they can post anonymously online. The result is a global women's movement. That is more diverse. more powerful and more far-reaching. At any point in history one thing is. I read your book really. The heart of this book is the case studies and with a seven countries that you got so i wanna turn to those And megan tell us.

nigeria rachel byles douglas dillon Megan stone harvard's kennedy school shorenstein center malala fund peace security development fel africa leadership center shannon united states megan clinton foundation neill Hillary rodham clinton nigerian government afar nadia murad georgetown
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Thank you i'm mark hadfield. I'm president of highest. Which is the american jewish communities refugee agency. I wanted to quickly thank you for your leadership and ask a question. Thank you for your leadership. Because in february twenty twenty. My daughter joanie made the wise decision to spend a semester abroad in dunedin and one month later when the pandemic triggered the termination of all. Us study abroad programs. We my wife. And i told her not to come home. She'd be safe for a new zealand a year and a half later. She still very happy and safe to be there. So thank you and my question on october. Twenty seventh twenty nineteen. A mass murderer killed eleven people praying at a synagogue in pittsburgh immediately after posting on social media that my agency highest was bringing invaders to kill his people as you've discussed five months later on march in march two thousand nine hundred fifty one people praying in the mosque in christ church experienced the same horrible fate as those in the tree of life synagogue. This coming weekend is world. Refugee day in new zealand has long been a very generous refugee resettlement country. Many of the people who killed at the mosque and many of the survivors in that mosque were in fact rebelled. Refugees that need that new zealand had welcomed. Were impacted the massacre. If any have on new zealand's refugee program and howard reassures refugees that they will find safety. Welcome in new zealand. Thank you thank you matt fiercely. Can i just Say that. I hope your daughter as well and enjoying life into needed and i hope you've seen him mittens. It can be very cold part of the country on your christian One of the many many things about march fifteen dead would just added additional layers of diva station to that. The about one of the things said i know new zealand is felt very deeply was affected so many of those who were impacted from amazon community came here to be safe and and in a wire think we felt a sense of family because that come from such devastating circumstances i hit made new zealand harm and we hadn't been able to keep them safe refugees from syria for instance and so that was a against site just not a layer of devastation at one of the one of the things that i will repeat it very often was. You should have been safe here. Tubes of impact on how refugee quite in resettlement the thing. That's much more devastating impact on it has been because actually in the aftermath of mattress thing. It hits changed. It hadn't changed at all out commitment to recedo menton and sit a has been reported to me that it changed people's spectacle willingness to be resumed here convent. How because of the impact. Its head on the next asks but also our ability to bring through. Large numbers of people into a cartoon facilitates did us down briefly but we have recently been able to give a cap. We have dedicated spice and quarantine facilities for our our refugees at coming to new zealand to recedo and so we are now a banking banking to a regular rotation of recycling. every fiji's as i mash of his depicted for the point of view of your society. What have you done to persuade new zealanders to essentially welcome refugees. People asking for silent people from abroad because here. It's obviously one of the most controversial policy questions we have. What have you done to to win over your population when one of the things that we and that is well established in new zealand is the is the proceeds oversee to when it actually. It's been recognized spain. it's it's been a very successful process. We have a receive mitzi to win. Our refugees spruce derive of the nuggets. The going through quarantaine. They go into a resume mitsui. They spent time being supported and preparing for resettlement and visited out as seem to at and meet with the children and some of the community members of volunteers who come into the program. At severe we try and create a very welcoming fu stage at the one of the things that we have continued to. Debt is a percy said can niks our refugee families with the communities that receive a win so we have really take full responsibility for supporting families wants to move to the town or region that they'll be received in and stone dead support network around every is incredibly important. I mean i don't need to tell you. The experiences that many will be coming from and the mesa culture change so that support ongoing support crucial when it comes to the museum and community. Look the riott challenges. We have housing crisis in new zealand. We need to constantly talk about the responsibility. We hid and our ability to continue to fill out international obligations while we do with some of our destruction challenges but the message that are continually trying and she is dead. We're wrong to assume that it is. Acid is doing our fiji community if i it is even that brings something to us when i look at the contribution of our refugees to new zealand. Society had significant and We have for instance members of parliament with ricky background. Said it speaks of open lead to this. So i really wish for new zealand to be in a position. We amplified highlight the contribution of of often people with extensive backgrounds and waking lives that really benefit us so that we change the nature of the conversation from big asses. The it's the somehow doing a favor to ultimately be been affected krista. Our next question comes from ted polling with core management. Please on me accepted richard. Thank you for moderating credible session prime minister. Thank you very much for giving us your time. Everything i've seen in herds new tonight or this morning confirms all the great things i've heard about you from my new zealand. Friends my question pertains to the south pacific region which is often discussed the strategically. It's quite important. And it's very rich natural resources. How do you think museum's role in the south pacific is going to evolve. Especially has china plays a larger there with felton road initiatives. Thank you an excellent question and wanted being top of mind for the entire time that we've been in office. I'm the fishing. I should probably say i. Actually we see ourselves as family of beaded within the pacific. We see ourselves as a nation and slightly in a obviously in a different position than at because pacific golden four princeton switched by the south australia. Immune dissolve but sounds of the pacific. It has caused us to reflect on the role that we play with us and on reflection Having taken a good look at it. Our relationships in the pacific alathea was that we needed a receipt when we first came into office. That peps for too long. We had our relationships head reflected almost a dog darnay relationship which was not a fear of of sydney how people to people exchanges in the way that we saw ourselves within the region. So we've being moving al relationships and buried deliberately. Sorry onto onto a footing where we are alongside and embedded within the region as partners in trying very much to change the dynamic. Now the army wants. He'll be able to judge whether or not we doing that. Successfully rubio pacific neighbors saw. Leave them to to judge. But it was a very deliberate decision. Now chimps have the geostrategic impact of that. New zealand will leave that out speed and some of the other nations in tunes of how aid and economic relationships however we are not the only one stood us supporting the region. Of course there is the presence of china in the region. But there's also the presence of australia. Very strongly the european union japan and others what we would be seeking as given the interest of the united states in the region normally at a strategically but entombs all those long standing relationships is to to look beyond just throws regional relationships beyond just independence. Speak to but she looked in the united states to beat it south more our regional economic architecture and outside it not just for the pacific but actually the pacific generally at this in china administration..

joanie eleven people mark hadfield february twenty twenty october dunedin amazon syria richard pittsburgh a year and a half later one month later sydney south australia matt south pacific new zealand five months later march fifteen krista
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Thanks michelle. okay. We're gonna now turn to you in a which just a reminder will be on the recold erica. I think you're gonna just give us the briefing on how to Aas questions most of pretty familiar these days but Erica thanking as a reminder to ask a question please click on the race hand icon on your resume window when you are called on. Please accept the anew. Now prompts then proceed with your name and affiliation followed by your question. Okay um so. I think i stop is Hannifin honey Please ask a question thank you very much. This has been a very good discussion for a long time. We've been hearing about that. Africa policy focus in africa and i think speakers Properly articulated that the opera shifted from nine ideological elliptical geopolitical issues into more economic and colleges and the two things that are of concern to me years on that one is economic total trade between the united states and the entire african continent peaked around thirty billion dollars in Thousand and twenty and perelman who data Actually dropped to about twenty billion dollars. By contrast the one china china's total trade with africa is about six seven times as big as as As the second is the issue of Demographics at misgovern spoke of africa's populations about one point four billion people The rate of growth in africa is among the highest in the world. It's over two percent and by regardless it's set to exceed four billion people by End of the century. That's the question really is what the priorities are for for the us dealing with africa and how it should execute its priorities. In a way that addresses the needs the infrastructure investment healthcare delivery drops and obviously technology and to the best of my knowledge. We don't have a focus and consistent policy of than Pretty pretty Wide ranging questions there on. He maybe zoo if you could go first and maybe talk little bit about The trade issues and and Places where the us may be offense game and trade to africa. Yes i think. Undertake france we should also remember that to him. The patterns of trade between the us between china and and the african continent I largely and rain for stated competitive advantage. The african continent they naturally meteorologist ron processing rows commodities And and they don't have african economies to take diversification Desiccation where most of the jobs are so. The volumes are high but in terms of the content. The structure of trade is still weighted in favour of of china. Africa has had china to stimulated industrialisation. You know through the exploit of raw materials for submit for symantec for construction am etc. It has kept a finishes chrome federal chrome finish faces spending in china so we've had the chinese to absorb many unemployed from the countryside's so the trade between the us and africa africa it's largely diversified because a goal is flexible Many african countries have been able to you'd Capacities in textiles and clothing at this afghan to sector benefit hugely from From from a goal. I am and also other aspects paul fair michigan. The value added products side cetera. I mean the the fortunes by these are not too stringent. I think is an opportunity for the us to grind. Roddy nuts to remove ago together. I tweeted twenty-five but to ways to greg. Friday loosen as it negotiates by trump free trade agreement with with some can contract and products finally under trade issues if you look at the fta the free trade agreements. Templates that you ask us. This is extremely rigid. It it's very very very very rich. Eat and and i think this needs to be adopted to african conditions. I mean if you if you ask shades. Fta with japan. It would be the same template that he used for economies. That have not reached a certain level of competitiveness but by and large upping the u. as trade strategy in the african continent is better than china's at from the point of view of promoting economic diversification. Some african countries have taken advantage of eat. Some have not by day. Okay michelle and the second part of honeys from the question of our ties. Asian you know. Do we lean you know. This is a pretty comprehensive agenda. We've been talking about that. But all their areas that we should focus on on on going to not only have a if you will out a quick likelihood of of success at are going to yield the benefits. will will maybe make make then the or should make 'em the priority area. Well of course. You always have to prioritize. But i think you know i do want to return to kinda where i started. Which is one really important takeaway. I hope is that the. Us can't keep thinking of africa as a continent. Were you have one big policy initiative per administration. It's just nuts. It's not the way we think about the rest of the world right. It has to be integrated into the totality of us foreign policy and so as as importers prioritization is. I don't think it's the case that you can kind of pick wine and just That that's going to be what you do with africa. It won't work. And i also disagree a little bit with. The premise of the question is as hard as we might try to get away from. Some of our security related concerns really have dominated a lot of the washington. Based conversation about africa agra win sort of combating global terrorist threats was the highest order priority. There's still some really worrisome security trends on the continent. I don't i don't think there's any ignoring that. An imagining that somehow were going to develop really robust economic relationships and global governance relationships. You know while you have this level of instability in the suhel you have the threat of massive state collapse in the horn. You have these very worrying trends in in mozambique and continued instability in central africa. So again you have to if you wanna act like a global power and i think the. Us is not in any way ready to see that. It's an all hands on deck sort of approach. But i do. I do think that what can't ever be bumped down on the priority list is this continued work. Honest not preachy. Work on governance and governing capacity. While while is it going to be important to engage civil society and that's actually part of a governance agenda right ultimately to have fruitful partnerships with african states. You need to be partnering with governments that have capacity and and so hard government strength is is in transparency and legitimacy part of it too is in service delivery and this has been something that was not invoked for a very long time right. It was a pretty easy throwaway lines about bloated civil services and but when you take a hard look actually at the size of kind of a public service in some of these states is incredibly small relatives to our own or or to other states. And i do think that you know some rethinking about what does it mean when we say good governance. What do we mean by that. Do we just we just me kind of some of the lying principles or do we mean capacity to deliver for people because that's a huge part of pushing back on an authoritarian about.

Erica michelle mozambique paul fair erica four billion people Hannifin washington End of the century suhel about twenty billion dollars second trump africa Friday central africa african two things around thirty billion dollars over two percent
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The World Next Week

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Sweeping and complex engagement strategy that is most manifest in economic engagement but includes very clear political increasingly military dimensions but the notion that a major power rivalry is is really how we should understand what. What's the us doing in africa. Is i think hugely problematic. Not just because of the kind of echoes of the cold war that it conjures up for anyone familiar with us history on the continent right where we ended up supporting regimes. That were incredibly abusive. Often deeply corrupt that fundamentally led to easy simply because they were on our side in in some imagined. Great game right. It's not just the aversion to a cold war nostalgia. It really is fundamentally a concern about a tremendous lost opportunity of building meaningful and effective partnerships with african states where there is some significant overlap in a van diagram of shared interests and values. And if were seeing everything through the lens of these other actors what were missing entirely is the agenda of african states themselves which are which are in this is incredibly dynamic time on the continent right. Africa continues to be the youngest region of the world. i think we're going to continue to see More assertive afrikaner international stage and some interesting political transitions. Where a there's going to be an opportunity right to work with africans on a set of global problems on on envisioning and actually building the global governance infrastructure of the future and goes opportunities. I think will be lost. And if we become kind of obsessed with this notion of competition china so before. I tend to mizzou for for his take on this. I just wanna be cleo while it seems unlikely that we would revert to something close to what we saw. During the cold war proxy conflicts and so on chinese motives on on the continent often portrayed as having some of malign intent all that some zero-some consequences for the us. Can you. can you just walk us through in what. What are we worried about with. Chinese influence and presence in africa is that other is no strategic access. Is it undermining democracy alerting development. Work right yeah. All of the above. I think you know. I think one way to think about it is sort of is is putting it into some some baskets around these tensions right And the the biggest rain is what are we worried about worried about the global competition right around norms around the model of the state whereas the us you know and the biden administration in particular continue to express concern about democratic backsliding about resurgent authoritarianism and at constantly beat this drum of of of trying to shore up a rules-based international order. You have on the other hand. Very explicitly a a model of the state that's really authoritarian development model. Where were china harnesses. It's incredibly impressive. Record in in bringing its own people out of poverty to suggest that a a different a different politics is the way forward to try and achieve Development games and indeed that kind of global norms should allow for more leeway for states to decide which which rights actually matter within their own borders. Right sort of less less of this idea of of universal norms around human rights civil and political rights. So there's this big debate but then there's also some more nitty gritty stuff around a competition regarding a global technology standards right and the access and influence the the winner of this competition may have there's competition around two minerals Particularly the the nature of the energy economy changes. It's a shift away from the kind of old debates about access to big oil producers but still a number of incredibly important strategic minerals that are essential for the future of green economy right are found in africa. and there's a very clear effort to sort So up exclusive access to this so there are there are different levels right of of this competition a big political piece and then some more discreet at economic at pieces. There's no support for herford candidates at international institutions. It really plays out almost every level policy. Got it okay. Give us a sense of if to the extent you can sort of capture. How this emerging rivalry is is portrayed discuss them africa to the extent that it is is the on a contending viewpoints from people. Do some see it as an opportunity for africa. A great risk for africa again if you could just sort of give us a sense of of how. This is viewed from africa extent. You say skill. What must be quite diverse views from many quarters. Well thanks thanks opponent. And thanks sam. Shire for ted for They suddenly few views are changing the african continent at least from my observation in how african see at both china and the us having an initiate. You you're forty. I in the early two. Thousands about china's for eight in into the african continent building infrastructure roads ports. And also you know the exchange between soft loans and access to me neurons these way the deficiencies at china's deficiency was backs at these deals way. Be tech to the elites. So china doesn't have a historic normative framework recognizes as civil society and also That that is comfortable with all penn liberal democratic norms and i think the us has not been able to fully exploit at china's on a baby on some of these talk issues. I think over time. They s been disquiet about some of the practices by china in the african continent and in someone's deceased infrastructure collapsing or not not being a fully rehabilitate tax. The the use of china's rank house in some of these these projects by buying notch. If you put up china and the u s i think many africans would would would would kind of align themselves to add to china because the us and in many western countries have a a checkout history of he got called the team fabric organism in the case of the us supporting regimes that have been a liberal side. Adding the us has to be a lot more carefully and how it's It's diplomacy are to to the african continent more sensitive understanding that tam. They you know they they. It's viewed it comes from a it's viewed in very critical lights are combined to china because china daas only say that. Tam they've never called macadamia african country all or failed all align themselves with that european countries. That ray where former former quarterlies fathom all. There is a growing realization of africa's own agency at the idea about tim. It doesn't matter whether they to use a deng xiaoping's formulation doesn't matter. The cat is black. Allied as long as it catches mice could catch so it doesn't really matter whether you america china but if if these countries i able to africa africa's interests They go to work with a pragmatic position. And we've seen this with kenya. Kenya is a intensity negotiating. Bilateral free trade agreements with With with the us It's cultivated very close relationships with china which has invested in significant item structure projects in in the country. It's talking to many players on wants to retain on a post brexit's at trade arrangements so many africans. It's about Realization of africa's own agency. And any this periods is. I'm touching some on my son off. These means so i want to pick up on this point about african agency. I can appreciate. How many african leaders don't want to be if you will in the crossfire of between china and the us. And and i'm is there any kind of high level discussion among senior African leaders about how this rivalry may Evolve and and and how africa should you know not lose agency to try to shake things to their advantage is is happening or is it. It's still really in a very early stage. I've.

sam africa forty america Africa cold war both kenya Thousands Kenya european two minerals mizzou eight one way Shire African zero china early two
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Providing them with financial resources and staff needed to fulfill their mandates. Thank you we'll. We'll end our remarks there and look forward to answering questions from the members of the group. Thank you very much. That's great presentation. Go to all of you now for your questions you either raise your hand and ask the question or you can type up your question right your questions in the qa box already see that we have three or so And if you're on an ipad you can click on the button and you can raise your hand in that That window so i mean. Take the first question from Let's see dr to jit. Batali of religions for peace I continued to be concerned about the rise of right wing religious nationalism in south asia particularly in the largest democracy of the world india. Could you kindly address why. India was moved into the category of cpc sure Thank you thank you for that question. india was actually moved into the category of cbc recommendation. Last year in new serves twenty twenty report report and then we reiterated This the cbc recommendation again in in In in the twenty twenty one annual report A key factor was the citizenship amendment acted discriminatory law that was that was enacted in In in twenty nineteen Making a making up providing preference to certain are religious groups for citizenship We we also have long been concerned in in india with issues of Mob violence where mobs act with impunity and target religious minorities and legal legal structures that prohibit that prohibit conversions or restrict conversions and Now worrying new development there were several laws enacted during the during twenty twenty to restrict Interfaith marriage which resulted in numerous arrests during during the year Another concern expressed in the in the twenty twenty one chapter is the increasing repression of dissent Including those who spoke out against the citizenship amendment. Act in its discrimination against muslims and those who otherwise advocated for minority rights or religious or religious freedom there also. How has been a tightening of the space for civil society. Organizations ngos in india including restrictions on on foreign contributions contributions from abroad on and the the the closing of human rights and religious humanitarian ngos. Great on okay. So the next question comes from victor people should raise their hand to victor. Golly beg on who is an author philanthropist and community leader My question is about respect for the holy spaces in jerusalem on city that holds a special place in my abrahama religions Especially in light of the recent on axa. What's the position of state department. Such actions add to stomach antisemitism and islamaphobia. Thank you for that question i can. I can address that for such as specify that you serve the us commission on international Freedom is separate from the state department so to speak for the state department. But i can reference to the release of their report last month. as well There was a question on this issue. And of course Ineffective there was such that You know pieces is vital because of an ongoing conflict is stone pieces vital to Getting to respect for broader human rights and religious freedom. You know this is an issue. We've tracked for many years You know the situation there. Things flare up at different times. We've seen a flare up recently reprehensible to see people being denied but at the same time. It's extremely complicated as security Measures and concerns that fact iran But we certainly You know. I would like to see a movement here on the on the broader conflict. Is that indeed. A lot of the data that we followed over the years demonstrates when there's broader conflict broader instability extremism that diminishes a human rights protections as a including religious freedom. So i if the if we can address these broader pressing crises Then unfortunately it's going to be the human rights that that are affected and are impacted severely. Thank you don free. Who has written a question but he's also raised. Its hands so don mono you just Yourself at say who you are and ask your question hi. I'm don free with the united religions initiative but also with the covenant of the goddess so. I'm curious practitioners neo-pagan witchcraft fall under the witchcraft category. That's currently illegal. In many african and south asian countries or it's often punishable by death and i know from personal experience that the communities in such countries are very underground does usurp looking against accused witches in assessing a country or non governmental entity as that included under religious rights. Thanks thanks for that question I can i can start. And then if if i want to time but the short answer is is yes under a freedom of religion or belief as protected under international standards It's an individual right to believe or not to believe as one's conscience dictates And very clearly under the international texan interpretations It applies to all beliefs There's not sort of distinctions. Made between quote unquote traditional Beliefs versus nontraditional beliefs et cetera. Some countries do legally make those distinctions. But they're problematic under the international standards. So we we have Reported on Ac accusations of witchcraft or sorcery in in different countries in our reporting And i believe the state department has as well and there are reports over over the years in in in different places so so absolutely as long as people are You know peacefully practicing Their their own beliefs and exercising of their conscience. It is protected. Thank you let's go to karenna gore. Who.

ipad south asia Last year last month jerusalem three twenty twenty cbc first question india twenty nineteen twenty twenty one chapter african twenty twenty report twenty twenty one jit. Batali south asian muslims united India
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Excellence take our next question from joel mentor on eight. Thank you for your time and insight this evening So my question. Can you tell me something that you were taught or at least once believed was important for success in life that now based on your experience you no longer believe in whether that be. You don't believe that at all or it's not as important as you once thought thank you. That's such a hard question. Jaw really interesting. One to you know it's Giving some thought because there's not a lot of things that we all grew up with that were cliche or that. We all thought that that would be good so one of them. I have to say was that the more hours you put in and the you know if you really by working hard i mean long hours you will actually do better and that you're being more conscientious cetera. And you know. I don't think it's as part of you. You know as you get more experienced what i have realized and you know. David mentioned my husband. He writes for you know as a historian. And you know going back to my father who also wrote but also academic life. I think just putting our does not do it and i really was. I was called the nerd when i was at school. I was a hard worker. Lots of long hours. And i think being smarter and and being more strategic is much better and then last but not least on that front by the way is i got to be enough to know. Well somebody called. Peter caught son which i think big also used to run their gic which is the singapore investment authority. And he so happens when i met him. I didn't know this see was older ahead of me. But he had spent on the first part of his career at the world bank briefly and work with somebody called. Jean burke was a legendary Treasurer of the world bank and he kind of went back to singapore built basically g. I see out of scratch and you started doing meditation. And he was teaching meditation to the leader of his country and then to many others he was in washington and he said on speaking at georgetown. Will you come. And i said i always learn from. You had left to come and see what's going on. In singapore whatever you went to share economy investments in business. And all that said no. I'm there to talk about meditation and anti took me with him. And and you know. We went to georgetown to this. Meditation and georgetown university was was is still using meditation as one of the practices put their mba students and others but also has a christian meditation center. But it's really not particularly necessarily religious affiliation but it's really about meditation for the students brothers and he was very involved in that and he's been very involved in bringing that to really business communities and i just learned how much more affected you get a by following. Peter and i tried to do that and he's still involves Some of his events and some of his You know work that. But i've come to become a big believer. I think david one of your good friends mandy works with you and with many of us also is a big practitioner in this area. But certainly it's not just hours but it's how you think how you put everything you're learning together. Excellent our next question is from cassiano sek. How am thank you so much for your time. Today my name is casio. Janacek a partner at mckinsey and i lead our strategy work in the energy sector and as you know We're facing some really unprecedented change going. On as we face the energy transition and a lot of built up issues ranging from in flattening supply and demand certainly investor pressure etc and. I'm just interested in your perspective. On how you think about making investments in the energy sector You know if you've got your own criteria how you think about ese metrics today and and You know what you think holds The future holds for the industry. Thank you for that question by the way by with displeasure. My son the they mentioned was in. Medical school is at barton this year. And is doing an internship at mckinsey as we speak so if you hear any background noise is in another room working on his internships in terms of what you put your finger on. I think energy is going through a huge transition. Since i started working on energy i remember. I worked with somebody for robert maverick oxford and he was early. Created the occidental institute and he said to me. You're a woman. Go learn about something else or the boys know about oil. Learn about gas. Nobody knows about it. So and it's a cleaner fuels. That's how i started. Learning about. Natural gas. And i fought fast forward. I go to the world bank. And then i run into somebody who's very famous in. The david may not sure nothing. You'll see buyer was sort of the father venture in israel and you'll see worked as it turned out with me when i ran the banks energy business and he had been banished from his earlier job and he said when he was working with the world bank we asked him to look among other things at at deng as a source of energy but he said that was life changing. That's him to go back and become. The father of venturing is well. So so i think yes she has been with us for a long time and and While i was at the bank we were not just investing but we were doing shadow pricing. We we're doing will coming up with ways of innovative ways of doing carbon pricing early early today when we do investments really in my firm but also many others that i talked to be are including that carbon costs in implicitly. Even if there's not an explicit market cost now whether you know we get to a situation where countries do with an explicit cost of carbon on goods remains to be seen not impossible. But i think i'm as we are looking at energy we're going to say huge transitions going through You so what happened with exxon right in the last few weeks now. Even a few weeks ago you would not have had a few years ago. You would not have had that happened right you. Energy companies were basically saying one thing but continuing with their continuing with the same carbon footprint as they were before as of today. I don't think that's possible anymore whether you're shell whether you are exxon. Whether you are really any multinational or small company you have to look at the future of energy..

David Jean burke washington joel Janacek Peter israel exxon mckinsey Today cassiano sek robert maverick casio eight this year georgetown university today mandy one few weeks ago
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Now. Were there many women in senior positions of the world bank when you were there. I was very fortunate While they were not senior women of my first bosses at the world bank was a woman. Apple deanne. Julius was not day julius on the advisory board of rock creek work but also on the chart chatham house. She was on the board of domestic on the board of bp ab chief economist at shell etcetera etcetera so. I was very fortunate to have her as one of the first by work with and she's sort of basically allowed me to think that being a woman should not be a shortcoming and you can do pretty much anything and then similarly just kind horned who was treasurer. Before i was pressured was also another woman. I work with so very fortunate on some of the women. Mentors i have gotten jessica was very involved with the council of force and is continued to be involved with the council. Now the firm. Your start is called. Rock creek Where'd you get that name. So the name comes from the park in washington. Dc and you know a lot of financial firms. You are have creeks and rocks stones and things like that. So brock break was sort of in the backyard. When i started the firm show rock creek is a firm that kind of money you manage to do. Do private equity do public equities fixed income. What is it that you specialize in so at drug weekly. Due to businesses one is where we create customize for years of venture private equity and stocks and bonds for an endowment or foundation and we basically became become their outsource. It's sort of more for what we did when we started to more Multi asset class. So that's one part of the business. The other part of the business is we have our own funds. We have our own funds investing. Let's say in quantitative type model driven investments. We also invest in climate in In energy clean energy in education health and interestingly through kobe some of the most interesting areas on the investment side and the highest return have been more impactful areas. That i've been very excited. About how much. Money do you have under management. Now while i'm david given but you have built it's very small it's Close to seventeen in. Eighteen billion is very very large How many women own money management or industrial management firms are there that are bigger than seventeen billion dollars. I'm not sure if there are others I hope that there might be ones that. I'm not aware of We might be right up there. I think you are about the biggest but are not suppose. I say i watching this interview right now and i say she's a very smart person. She's got a lot of experience. I want to give her some money. Can somebody just call you up and become a client or if you have to be like the world bank to be one of your clients so drug week. Our clients have been institutional again. Universities foundations pension plan sovereign funds. And that's sort of been the model and And it's been a kind of a two as learning. It's sort of a little bit like when we were at the world bank where we provided what we used to technical assistance and also i manage money for some of these central banks or sovereign funds or others and we sort of continue to learn and to do as we can. We also have done a lot of investments in technology through time. And and what. I'm really excited about is also on the impact side starting to share what we started to great which is The objective data collective with sort of the world that is interested in investing more in sort of more sustainable and impact ideas. Let's say like investment advice on. Should i worry that because we have a big debt in the united states that may be at some point and we have. Were barring a lot of money eventually. We're going to have high inflation. Should i worry about that right now or should i not worry about that. Well you know again At least Might be is that right now no question. Inflation is creeping up I think it's going to be more short-term than very long term so no questions this short-term inflation that we have part of the supply demand imbalance that we're experiencing because of transport problems coming out of covid. is creating a lot of imbalances in semiconductors or other areas. So you have those kinds of things going on the one hand but but might use the You going to get rid of that and this sort of Inflation that is creeping up is going to lead us. So i'm particularly excited about where we are in the economy because as you have more equity in the economy you're going to have higher breath as people shared the goods that are coming out of the economy. You're going to have higher ross. Higher growth economy is going to be healthier to invest in then s laura croft economy. Both i say to you. I like your firm an institution. I want you to manage money. But i'd say look. I want the highest rate of return. You can legally get with for me forget. Es gee i don't care about diversity inclusion environment you can destroy the environment. I don't care. I just want the highest rate of return. What do you say to those clients. I think even if you don't have those goals it so happens again. Let's let's take the last twelve months right Maybe in the last month or two has gone up a little bit but really renewable energy has been one of the best areas if you were invested. They did in some of the companies. Were there were emerging markets or in denmark or in the us particularly companies providing services to solar and wind. You could have made twenty thirty forty percent education. unhealth don't care about it. S g or impactful investment..

Eighteen billion jessica Julius twenty thirty forty percent washington julius Both Apple show rock creek united states Rock creek denmark seventeen billion dollars one part david world bank two last one
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"To two thousand eighteen were the hottest on record. Now we've been keeping records since the late eighteen hundreds, but we know eighteen eighties. We know that the temperatures have changed. There's no dispute about that may was the hottest may on record in the Arctic this week north of the Arctic. Circle. We had a town that experienced one hundred degrees Fahrenheit in heat s unprecedented. So this heat that we're experiencing as a result of cumulation of carbon emissions since the industrial revolution, but they takes a lot of heat up and we're now really experiencing that he. That he brings very dramatic. Events with attribution science we can tell we can do the forensic to know that these events either were largely caused by climate, change or certainly climate change contributed to them, so we're seeing bigger wildfires. We're seeing more intense. Storm Storm's intensifying very quickly over warmer waters greater heat extremes, so even though it you have average global temperature increases about one point six to one point seven degrees. Celsius so far. We know that we see these spikes of extreme heat. Extreme heat is one of the biggest killers that we have. To humans. We also see greater streams in precipitation. Those are those rain bonds that you may have heard of think of Hurricane Harvey dropping sixty inches of rain on pancake-flat Huston in just four days, and of course he level rise. So. These events are dispersed around the globe, but they're some sections of the globe. It's a kind of a global lottery in some sections of the global will be effected much more severely than others..

Arctic Storm Storm Huston Hurricane Harvey
"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

12:36 min | 2 years ago

"next week" Discussed on The World Next Week

"In the coming week the impeachment of president trump moves to the Senate China tries to suppress a mysterious illness ahead of the lunar new New Year and the World Economic Forum. Annual meeting is held. Dabo Switzerland is January sixteenth. Two Thousand Twenty in time for the world next week. I'm Bob McNair Jeans and Jim the. US House of Representatives has voted but to send the impeachment case to the Senate which will decide if president trump is to be acquitted or convicted on two counts. But Jim can you give us a sense of what will be looking for during the week ahead on this. And what is most notable certainly bobbing. Let's note that the trial process is actually going to begin today. And by the time this podcast airs. Three things have happened. Okay one chief justice John Roberts will sworn in all one hundred senators who will have pledged. Make coat the oath. We're here to do impartial. Justice according to the Constitution and laws to the Senate will have adopted by simple majority. Vote the rules that will actually govern covering the trial. And the third thing is that the Senate will ev- issued what's called the rid of summons we'll go to the White House inviting him to participate in the trial and again. There are two accounts that the house has brought against President Trump and impeaching him. One involves the issue of abuse of office the other one involves obstruction of Congress. And and already you scoped out. What looks like a very different process than what we just witnessed in the house over? The last several weeks writes a very different process because one the Senate has a different role. Here it's its role is simply decide whether the facts of the case merit the President's removal from office a keep in mind. The president can be removed if either of the. The articles of impeachment garnered the support of two thirds of the senators. Okay so does it require conviction on both counts. Just one count. The the other reason is going to be different of course that the House representatives is controlled by the Democrats in this case in the Senate it's controlled by the Republicans and so the Republicans. We'll be responding to leadership of Senator Mitch McConnell but obviously to president trump. Who is the leader of their party? Now the actual mechanics of the impeachment trial which probably kick off on. Tuesday are a lot different than we're used to and a couple of things one is. That senators are expected to attend the trial. It's is going to run from Monday through Saturday. Once it gets underway senators. Don't have to worry about getting up early in the morning because the trial won't actually convene each day into one a PM. But here's the key thing. All senators must attend. They have to sit at their desks. They can't talk or even ask questions. Let me quote here on pain of imprisonment imprisonment. They could only read impeachment related materials and this may be the killer for a modern politician. They are prohibited from using their electronics. So no no IPADS no iphones. No Sim some notes or anything. Quite like the sounds like a different world than we're used to a different world and again the senators are supposed to sit there air and act as jurors not being engaged in other business now support not the case can be dismissed it any time by a majority vote but the Republicans skins currently don't have support to do that in the way to work as the house. Managers will present their essentially indictment of the president. That's expected to take several several days. It will then be followed by the president's defense also expected to take several days. Senators will then have an opportunity to ask questions but again there questions must be submitted in writing and the managers and defense lawyers can respond verbally now. One of the big open questions here is whether or not we are going to see. See witnesses come before the Senate last one of the big questions is you know. It's been a lot of talk. On Demands by Democrats at the Senate should bring in witnesses. For example join Bolton former national security adviser Republicans have been very reluctant to agree to bringing in witnesses. But at some point there's an expectation that the Senate and it will vote on whether to bring in additional witnesses to testify and again in this thing if Democrats maintain solidarity to be able to call witnesses. This is they're going to have to get at least four. Republicans to switch sides in vote for bringing in witnesses and so. There's a lot of attention being placed on senators like Mitt Romney of Utah. Susan Collins of Maine Cory Gardner of Nevada the more Alexandra of Tennessee and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska as a Republican to be the most likely likely to vote to bring in witnesses but were probably a couple of weeks away from seeing that happen once that portioned. The trial concludes assuming we do bring in witnesses. And I should note. That won't be like a moment from Perry Mason in which witnesses appear before the full Senate most likely they will give depositions on the sidelines guidelines to small groups selected. Senators that which we videotaped in those portions relevant could be used in the trial. But it's not going to be certified big Hollywood moment so this wouldn't be like what what we saw in the house hearings which involved these in many cases these lifelong civil servants who were coming in to testify about what they knew or heard about this case which is which at its core involves Ukrainian officials who who may have been asked to find dirt on presidential candidate Joe Biden and what the president's role was in that it. It will be different than that if you go back to the impeachment trial of Bill Clinton didn't have live testimony by witnesses. And I will note and this is one of the hard things to sort of gauge is. We'll public pressure build on Republicans to call witnesses now. One of the things that's happened in nearly month since the House voted on the two articles articles of impeachment is that more information has come out about what happened. The dealings between the trump administration and Ukraine most notably in the last couple of days lead partner. Who's WHO's under indictment apparently turned over a variety of documents to the House that had been released which tend to buttress the argument being made by the House? Impeachment managers injures also gave an interview last night to Rachel Maddow. MSNBC which didn't help the president's case in also just as we were sitting under the podcast news broke that the General General Accountability Office says the GAO which is a non-partisan operation of Congress has concluded that the administration violated the law in holding up aid into Ukraine. So how that's going to play out whether that moves the needle publicly remains to be seen yawn and on the Ukrainian side also coming out today. There's been a flurry of news. And I suspect we'll see see. More Ukrainians themselves have announced their mounting an investigation into whether or not the US ambassador at the time was being improperly surveilled by Ukrainians. So there's there's a great deal of concern about improper behavior happening across the board and it's adding to as you said Jim the pressure that is going to mount on the senators about about the extent to which they they dig further into this case or not one thing I just know that people are watching the proceedings on television and one of the interesting questions to fall the will be. What percentage senator of American? TV's tuned into the impeachment. Trial the cameras in the Senate chamber are operated by Senate employees none of the networks or or cable news channels. Have a say about where those cameras are pointed and indeed the president is. CNN has been arguing that CNN should be allowed to have cameras in the Senate so he can make its independent editorial decisions about where to focus cameras just before we wrap the session up. I think they're really sort of two other issues. To think about. One is the question of what what impact is the trial going. Have on President Trump in the conduct of American foreign policy. And I think that's very hard question to answer. We're not really sure but what I do know. Is that every move. The president makes informed policies is going to be subjected to intense amount of media scrutiny and speculation nation about his motives. Well we've already seen the attack that killed custom Sola money. Some people were using the phrase wag the dog in terms of generating News in such a way to divert attention in and support the president's case and so forth. Yeah we're GONNA see a lot more of that because again. I think once it goes to trial with the attention being focused on it everything goes up to to eleven on the one to ten scale. You're going to point out one other thing Jim. I would just one quick question though. Is that a chance. This trial goes up to and beyond the scheduled state of the Union address on February fourth. Because I would be quite interesting drama as well. I think right now nobody knows. How long does trials going last? Sort of the betty money going in is two weeks however. I just think that there's a lot of moving parts here and could end up in a situation where it runs longer than that I think. In that case there may be a move to postpone or delay the the the state of the Union address. We'll sort of see how that plays out and again we don't know what other information may come up in the next several weeks again flipside. Is this trial. How could be over in less than two weeks? I mean the range of possibilities here is quite large the other thing. I just wanted to point out about thinking of how the trial is going to play out in its consequences. Consequences is the effect is going have on the Democratic presidential race. You mentioned February. Four th scheduled time of the state of the Union while the day before February third. That's Camila Caucasus. Correct and you basically have of the six leading Democratic candidates freelancer United States senators. You're thinking senator. The club Char Senator Sanders and senator. Warren they're all going to have to be in Washington. DC while Joe Biden. People to judge and Tom Star crisscrossing is crossing. Iowa were dropping in on New Hampshire visiting South Carolina. And so you know. There's going to be a lot of question of how does that affect dynamics in are we going to see Z.. Disputes breakout in. The Democratic Party will believe the trials being used or delayed to hurt the candidacies of more progressive candidates. You you can see a variety of ways in which this could become very controversial and I will note that Senator Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee Republican yesterday. She called on Club Shar Sanders in Warren to recuse themselves from the trial citing let me quote her here unparalleled political interest and quote in removing trump from office. Now I don't expect Senator Klobuchar Sanders in Warren to remove themselves from the trial but I can also magic on twitter cable news where people feed on controversy discount becoming bigger and bigger issue. Wow high drama indeed okay. We'll hold on here. We go Bob. Let's move away from the impeachment process and talk about China issue. This year. The Chinese Lunar New Year falls on Saturday. That's the twenty fifth and this will mark the transition from the year of the pig to the year of the rat now amid the preparations nations for the Multi Week celebration. There is a concerning mysterious pneumonia-like outbreak in the city of Wuhan in the WHO Bay province of China. This virus is captured tension because it's similar in many ways to the virus known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. SARS people boomer member over a decade ago. Saw can you give us a sense of how the outbreak might affect China and surrounding neighbors as literally millions of people travel travel throughout the region. During what is a big time for celebration. Absolutely jemma is very much a time of of movement and usually a very festive atmosphere atmosphere. Both in people travelling to see relatives to go to other places in the country but also that the types of foods they eat so there several issues that are raising concern. Here one as you say. This illness bears very sort of uncomfortable similarity to stars however big difference being the human to human transmission is not been born out in any fashion that we've seen yet it has been cases that have been reported outside of China now at latest report both Vietnam and in Japan people who were afflicted seemed to have recovered covered fully and not spread it to anyone else nor do they seem to have gotten it from another person That is being watched extremely closely. But it's happening also at a time in our colleague John. John Song is written about this for. Our website is happening time when there's also been a really devastating outbreak of swine fever in the country. It's are the two related or there's entirely separate issues that the moment it looked to be separate issues and again this is something that involves pork and involves the spread of illness via the consumption of pork or the proximity to pigs. Pork stocks have plummeted because of the culling of herds to to try to cut down on the incidence of this and we should note..

Senate President senator President Trump US Senator Klobuchar Sanders Jim the Congress Joe Biden Ukraine House of Representatives Senator Mitch McConnell Bob McNair China John Roberts Dabo Switzerland Union Senator Marsha Blackburn