35 Burst results for "Next Five Hundred Years"

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

"An ancient tablets acquired by hobby lobby is going back to Iraq it was looted from an Iraqi museum thirty years ago now thirty five hundred year old clay tablet discovered in the ruins of a library of an ancient middle eastern king is headed back to Iraq the relic is known as the Gilgamesh dream tablet officials believe it was illegally imported into the United States in two thousand three then sold to hobby lobby and eventually put on display in its museum of the Bible in Washington federal agents with homeland security investigations sees the tablet from the museum in twenty nineteen the artifact will be repatriated at a ceremony at the Smithsonian's national museum of the American Indian I Walter Ratliff

Iraq United States Washington Smithsonian's National Museum Walter Ratliff
Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
The Importance of a Fundamental Grounding in Western Philosophy

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:09 min | 4 months ago

The Importance of a Fundamental Grounding in Western Philosophy

"Let's talk about. It's what you teach the importance of least at least a fundamental grounding in western philosophy for all members of our civilization. How important is that professor williams. You know you're preaching to the choir. On this i would make it obligatory and i would start is early high school. I think when when high school students are have to confront the big questions and would philosophy gives you is not not so much a life plan as the ability to ask yourself big questions to realize that the what are the most important questions and ways that you go about reasoning to the answers and thinking about them and especially studying the history of lousy. It's very interesting as you know that. That science and technology grow so every year. We know a little bit more ever. You can do a little bit more. Philosophy doesn't grow that way aristotle. Today it's like reading aristotle. Two thousand or twenty five hundred years ago says still has meaning. It still has value because these deeper questions about the meaning of existence the meaning of of human life these bigger questions and so there's a frustration in the fact that you don't get that kind of growth is building on it like like technology does but on the other hand. There's something very very exciting to be able to still wrestle with these intellectual giants from hundreds and thousands of years ago and that is why as far as i'm concerned that is why those who believe in progress delusional that they have no sense of history the essence of man. The things man struggles with haven't changed since we left the caves. I mean truly the search for meaning the sense of Quantifying worth all of these things are the same. They were two three four thousand years ago. And that's why everybody you're absolutely right. Professors should be required to study. The you know. The the ancient greeks and some of the key modern philosophers Because it just helps helps man on his journey and that journey is a universal journey for all of

Professor Williams
"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:25 min | 4 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Discussed the effects of space on the human body how it may be possible to genetically engineered human other life forms to thrive in environments less hospitable than earth's through the use of new genetic tools and the ethical consideration around these issues. Chris thanks for joining us. Thanks so much pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about your book. The next five hundred years and what it'll take to engineer life to reach beyond earth and allow manta outlived the planet. There's a lot in this book that i think readers might find ethically challenging but the whole framework for the work that discusses begins with an ethical imperative. This has to do with the unavoidable fate of the earth and the responsibility that comes with the awareness of the extinction of life. Up will go with that. Can you explain happy to so yes it. Is you know it starts with a very simple premise. That has i think clear ethical need and then gets into. Well that's true. What does that lead to a lot of interesting questions are but in a nut show we are the only species with awareness of extinction as you just said and you know we are the only ones that can actually prevent extinction for other species. Obviously sometimes we have caused it which is not great perfect track record on this but with the only ones that can service is really know stewards and you know basically shepherds of life not just our own life because at some point the sun will boy the oceans and if we want to survive we'd have to go elsewhere so mars in elsewhere is not plan b. It's just plan a in the long run. All questions are very clear in the lens of a billion years at and then if it's true that means that we if we want to survive ourselves or other creatures as far as the only ones that know that so it's incumbent upon us to serve as the protectors next week protect current species or even to revive extinct species. I talked about in the book because we are the only ones who have this passage unique role universe in a unique responsibility quite literally a duty for our species to all other species. One of the biggest surprises me in reading the book is that it's not an abstract thought exercise but that as we're developing the ability to alter human and other life forms we've become skilled in genomics and synthetic biology. They're actually efforts underway to figure out how to apply this to moving life beyond earth but before we get into some of the issues of what's happening to the human body and space and how we might be able to address that at a biological level. Can you give us some sense of the work. Nasa and other researchers like yourself are doing to prepare human life and other life forms for life beyond earth absolutely. So what we've been doing some people might have heard on. Your show is the twin study for example we looked at identical twins. Mark and scott kelly. I served as the lead geneticist for the study. We were one of ten teams those a large effort to look at every facet of biology. And what happens is the body in space for a year and we could see that you know. We was kind of a first pioneering mission. But now we're replicating a lotta those measurements looking at dna. Aren a pro teams what happens in the muscles. The veins and arteries in the cognitive state behavior..

Chris scott kelly Nasa Mark
Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds

The Bio Report

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds

"Chris thanks for joining us. Thanks so much pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about your book. The next five hundred years and what it'll take to engineer life to reach beyond earth and allow manta outlived the planet. There's a lot in this book that i think readers might find ethically challenging but the whole framework for the work that discusses begins with an ethical imperative. This has to do with the unavoidable fate of the earth and the responsibility that comes with the awareness of the extinction of life. Up will go with that. Can you explain happy to so yes it. Is you know it starts with a very simple premise. That has i think clear ethical need and then gets into. Well that's true. What does that lead to a lot of interesting questions are but in a nut show we are the only species with awareness of extinction as you just said and you know we are the only ones that can actually prevent extinction for other species. Obviously sometimes we have caused it which is not great perfect track record on this but with the only ones that can service is really know stewards and you know basically shepherds of life not just our own life because at some point the sun will boy the oceans and if we want to survive we'd have to go elsewhere so mars in elsewhere is not plan b. It's just plan a in the long run. All questions are very clear in the lens of a billion years at and then if it's true that means that we if we want to survive ourselves or other creatures as far as the only ones that know that so it's incumbent upon us to serve as the protectors next week protect current species or even to revive extinct species. I talked about in the book because we are the only ones who have this passage unique role universe in a unique responsibility quite literally a duty for our species to all other species.

Chris
"next five hundred years" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"You learn when you get some of the grey hairs that you and i have is some things are just incredibly universally human and other things are incredibly. Not but you know a lot of times people fight me on this and i say you ever think k pop like have you watched k pop bands perform in alabama and like. Watch the girls go crazy. You could have never sold me on that twenty years ago. It's very clear where we are in the world and it's a beautiful thing. I think it becomes more team human globally and has nuances of optimism over next five hundred years absolutely does. And i think that's the thing that transcends nationality transcends language it's about entertainment and engagement. And i also think you know go onto the dies where you need to sit for an hour an hour and a half to watch content. Let's look let's look at five seconds when you know what's funny about that bomb interject. I couldn't agree with you more comma. I also believe in the reverse like maybe the most wonderful experience for me from content. Last two years was all eight. Straight hours of queen's gambit incredible to me. I've i've even this. I think there's too much fascination on length. I think that i will stop watching shitty six second vine two seconds in and i will sit through eight hours binging on. Ott and everything in between they both work. I think what people people definitely recognized that we now consume more short-form what i don't think people have completely wrapped their head around yet. Is we are consuming long-form at levels we've never thought. Before as a kid intuitively creatively as a storyteller. I always wondered why four hour movies didn't exist. Because there was many after two and a half and i was like they should have made that three and a half because i could see they truncated. The story may fuck that up because they decided we won't sit here. I'll center fucking ten hours in a theatre watching a new star wars and i think..

alabama
"next five hundred years" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

08:36 min | 5 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on Dictators

"From podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from park cast for free on spotify this season we're following the despot monarch who rain just before or during world war one. We've talked about. King leopold the second of belgium. Emperor franz josef of austria hungary. And now we're looking at the three pasha's of the ottoman empire. This week we begin our look at memet talaat pasha who sought to return the declining ottoman empire to its former glory will explore to what's political indoctrination as a disgruntled young man and how he and the young turks overthrew the sultan mixed week. We'll explore how to lot used world war one to secure his grip on power and how he used the raging violence as a pretext to murder approximately one point five million innocent citizens coming up we head to the ottoman empire high listeners just a quick reminder that starting in august dictators is moving exclusively to spotify. Being part of the spotify family means that we're able to bring you more indepth than exciting content than ever before and we can't wait for you to join us. Power read murder. Don't miss any of it. All you have to do is download the spotify app for free and search dictators. Give it a follow and start enjoying. That's it we can't thank you enough for listening to dictators and we look forward to seeing you exclusively on spotify in august. This episode is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customers can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today. At progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customer survey in two thousand twenty. Potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations episode is brought to you by. Cvs health if someone you love is at risk of a fall. The symphony medical alert system by cvs. Health can help support their safety at home. With twenty four seven emergency response monitoring. It helps keep an eye on their wellbeing when you can't be there. Terms and conditions apply learn more about symphony at cvs dot com slash sympathy or. Find it at your nearest cvs. Health hub truly understand the ottoman empire of the early twentieth century and the milieu of top pasha's rise. To power is essential to understand the history of the empire and what it used to represent. When rome fell in the fifth century the eastern portion of the empire survived and became known as the byzantine empire encompassing land in greece asia minor north africa and the middle east the byzantine saw themselves as the heirs of mighty rome and in the middle ages. They were the most powerful nation in the world that is until the rise of islam in the seventh century and the birth of the caliphate. For the next five hundred years various arab caliphates in groups throughout north africa. And the middle east began seizing lands from the byzantine by the late thirteenth century. The byzantine also lost control of asia minor. Soon the region became dominated by a patchwork of towns and cities most of whom were adherents of sunni islam until the reign of us man the first around the late twelve eighties. The territories in asia minor began to coalesce into one empire with one true religion under one leader the sultan the sultan existed as the principal religious and political authority and it was under sultan ahmed direction. That the ottomans began conquering significant portions of the decaying byzantine empire. While osman the i was essentially the founding father of the ottoman empire the empire expanded its holdings even more rapidly under his successors murad the first for example conquered huge portions of eastern europe and the balkans. These conquests continued in earnest until what was arguably the crowning achievement of the ottomans. The fall of constantinople orchestrated by sultan mehmud. The second constantinople had been the capital of the eastern section of the roman empire since three thirty see but after a series of corrupt and incompetent emperors as as the devastation of the black death constantinople was on its last legs for fifty three days. Mad the second and the ottomans lay siege to the once. Great city finally on may twenty nine. Th fourteen fifty three. The city fell. It became the capital of the ottoman domain and eventually would be renamed. Istanbul with that the byzantine empire was gone. And the ottomans were indisputably the most fearsome powerful and respected in existence. The next hundred years perhaps the most distinguished in the history of the empire especially under the rule of sultan suleiman the magnificent from fifteen twenty to fifteen sixty six. By the end of sulaiman's reign the ottomans controlled large swathes of land which spanned three continents. Shoe lehman also turned the ottomans into an economic powerhouse. Not only did the empire forge alliances with a number of european kingdoms it also controlled a myriad of trade routes including the silk road which connected asia with europe. It was a true golden age but every ascendant civilization must experience a decline after suleiman's passing the momentum of the empire reversed by the early seventeenth century. The once booming ottoman economy was stagnating. Much of this was due to the fact that european traders discovered new routes and could now circumvent the ottomans and avoid their taxes and fees at the same time wildly expensive naval wars against the spanish and venetians decimated the ottoman treasury. And although there were some victories the cost was much greater in terms of money and blood. There was however a brief moment when it looked as if the decline might be turned around from sixteen twenty three to sixteen fifty six during this period. A unique phenomenon occurred in the empire. The sultanate of women for three decades several of the sultans wives essentially lead the country. This occurred primarily because they were two successive adults sultans who died after only a short time in power and were succeeded by their sons. Who are too young to rule on their own. Their mother's then helped rule on their behalf and once the trend started some of these women also became de facto leaders at home when the grown sultans were engaged in battle the most notable accomplishments from this period besides enormous empire being run by women was the investment in infrastructure and public work projects throughout the realm. The empires defenses were also strengthened with fortress fortifications but the sultanate of women and it's productive rain came to an end in the late seventeenth century after one. Ill fated endeavor. The empire's decline started accelerating rapidly once again in the summer of sixteen eighty. Three ottoman troops attempted to seize vienna from the habsburgs and didn't go particularly well. In fact the siege led to a series of protracted battles that came to be known as the great turkish war. but for the ottomans. There was nothing great about it. The great turkish.

richard fifty three days early seventeenth century Three early twentieth century fifth century world war one late thirteenth century eastern europe today two thousand europe seventh century islam kate progressive dot com Istanbul This week six discounts late seventeenth century
A Tour of Turkish Markets

Travel with Rick Steves

01:56 min | 5 months ago

A Tour of Turkish Markets

"Joined by turkish tour. Guide lally sermon iran. Bali thank you for inviting gets a pleasure now first of all when we're in the town of konia i know from my experience taking groups around people get a little bit like an anxious. It seems a little more conservative. Women are more covered up into town like this described the atmosphere in cornea compared to a place like izmir or ankara. Well as you just put into words. It's little bit more conservative. But what's attract people's attention is not the conservatives off the town being a conservative is not a bad thing. It's just the personal understanding of how you want to practice your life and your religion. The reason i'm saying is that muslim women prefer if they are developed. They prefer to cover up but in different religions. People don't or may or may not need to show their face with what they wear because there's a visual aspect to it. It attracts attention. Otherwise cornea is not any different than any more conservative city anywhere in the world. Okay so different Groups in different religions will have their women wearing hats and their men wearing beers visual indicator. Then you to said if there was not you would not notice. A life is not different in konya than anywhere else in turkey. It's just men have more beards and women have more scarfs. That's okay we're going to go to the market now when you step into a market like anywhere. It's sort of a cultural scavenger hunt and you have a chance to learn about the culture from the market if you were going to take one of our listeners into the marketing konia. What are some of the things you would see. That would give you a better understanding own loved the marketing. First of all. What i love is that it's was a market two thousand years ago. One thousand five hundred years ago one thousand years ago five hundred years ago and today it's still at the same place in the same layout and more or less. Probably the items carried in the market are the same.

Lally Sermon Konia Izmir Ankara Bali Iran Konya Turkey
Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:02 min | 6 months ago

Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

"But this evening's talk. I'm going to be talking about a subject. i hope i never thought about before. That's unlikely sings. I've been speaking here for over twenty years and it's come up in the newspapers recently and Few people have been discussing this on the email because apparently just before easter time there was an atheist conference over in sydney and that really upsets some people in the churches in sydney and because they were talking about eighty s and it affects them. Bickers is put this an atheist religion. Does it believe in god. If it doesn't why does support his position about this and so the first part of this talk no maybe just a bit of information about the stand on a garden some interesting things which many of you may not know for the most important part of this talk is That actually as far as buddhism is concerned is better reform does not believe in a supernatural being because there some very very grave consequences such a belief in your ordinary lives. I'm going to put this view and pointed point out that actually that you can become a wiser more compassionate person without such beliefs which sometimes obstruct no one's feeling of what's right and what's compassionate. Bullets go from the very beginning. Sometimes people ask is put some an atheist religion. What is a buddhist. Take on a guard but i vote is to go to the ancient scriptures twenty five hundred years ago when the border was around and of course you mentioned just the idea of god was very common at that time as far as the buddha was concerned. It wasn't just a theory but because of these great house which you can get through meditation you understand how the universe works.

Bickers Sydney
"next five hundred years" Discussed on This is Today

This is Today

08:22 min | 7 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on This is Today

"Twentieth. Twenty twenty one. I'm russ and here's what you need to know about today. it's Yeah national be a millionaire day. And i think we can get there if we try We'll figure out some ways. We'll actually the website the balance Tells us a few ways to get there to to be a millionaire. I don't know if you can do it exactly today. But here are some ways you can get there over time According to the balance. As i mentioned here it is Develop your career and your expertise create a side. Hustle save diligently and invest for growth make smart investments invest in real estate Create a financial plan. Those are the ways that the balance told us. And i did come up with some some other ways here that perhaps i you could try and you know. There's the whole game stopped stocks thing that that a lot of people are doing over on a read it. Maybe that's one way What you could possibly do for the next five hundred years. Pick up and keep every penny that you see i. It might be longer because of inflation but that that's one way of doing it and it would only take you the next five hundred or so years You could also do this when you talk to. Your friends charge them by the word that might help is well and then also here's the big one the reminder bill gates a single so you know i mean come on. I'm sure he's on the apps already. So just Do a little. Swipe swipe there. And maybe you can be the next. Mr mrs gates. I don't know anyway. It's also international red sneakers day while this is an awkward segue because this is a serious one. Yeah this one is actually. This is about food allergy awareness. You can go to red sneakers dot org and according to the website. Red sneakers was for oakley It was established by robert and merrill deb's the death of their eleven year old son oakley due to a fatal allergic reaction to nuts. So if you have some reds sneakers today maybe throw those on or you can tweet out and share red sneakers dot org today also national rescue dog today and i've got a story for this one. It's national pick strawberries day. We planted some strawberries in the backyard. But if you're a regular listener you know that. I've got some chickens in the backyard is well and apparently they really love strawberry plants because they celebrated national pick strawberries day. I'm gonna take some photos. Things like that or the strawberries but no it's just little green sticks coming out of the ground at this point. They've eaten everything. So there's your lesson out there if you have chickens don't plant strawberries They love them. So there you go all right. Let's take a look at our events for today on this date in nineteen twenty seven big day aviation actually too big days today to several years here. I nine hundred twenty seven. Charles lindbergh left new york for paris aboard his plane. The spirit of st. louis. The flight took thirty three hours. And that was the first solo nonstop flight over the atlantic and nineteen thirty two on this day. Amelia earhart did the same thing from different locations. But he was the first woman to fly solo across the atlantic. All right. we're going to get to a little bit more modern times here and one of my favorite. Tv shows you know. It's like. I get excited to talk about the tv shows in september. Because i get to mention all the premier's well this time of year. I get to mention all of this series finales and on this night in nineteen ninety. Three cheers aired. Its last episode. It was two hundred seventy four episodes so if ever seen this and you're looking for something to stream well you can watch this and you won't be looking for quite some time. There's a lot of episode there and in fact this final episode was actually in a way three episodes it was about it was a little over ninety minutes long. And what they did was now you know in syndication and on streaming and all of that. They divided up into three episodes. So hey there you go you can watch even longer The cool thing about the finale was the diane who played I'm sorry who was played by shelley. Long came back to the bar and her and sansa. Who've you know reunited a little bit and the cool thing about this episode was kind of like just another episode of cheers. Which i thought was actually kind of cool and why did it end well. It actually ended because ted danson chose to leave in nineteen ninety-three The writers actually did wanna keep the show going and the producers wanted to keep the show going so they said well you know what. Let's give the main role to woody harrelson Who was also on the show but he decided. I don't want to do it. I don't wanna continue without ted. So let's kill off the show. So cheers had. It's last episode. This series actually didn't start out too hot it actually when it started. It was literally the last place show of the week that it started there. Were seventy seven shows on that week and it was number seventy seven the final episode however. Well it was the second most watch series finale of all time in as i mentioned you know it was it was good. I liked it It was much better than many of these season. Finales like you know. For instance Dexter yeah and of course i know texters potentially coming back here and we're going to get some more episodes of that but this got me to thinking you know because i liked this series finale. What were some of the other ones. That i maybe wasn't a fan of Well got to bring up the sopranos right like this. The fade to black really like what happened on that. I would love to know but maybe that makes that a good episode. I don't know The really bad. When i feel like was roseanne. The last season turned out to be a book by the way spoiler alert In turn out to a book that roseanne was writing and see. Dan had a heart attack and died the season before. And they just come back this season. It was really a weird trip on this show that last season anyway it turns out in the last episode of this comedy. The dad dan is still dead and y- the whole premise of the last year was that they won the lottery. well they didn't so talk about a downer. It's a comedy i would say. Another bad one was the ending to the cosby show and that one was weird because bill just gave everyone drinks. I'm sorry i couldn't resist one. I had to get that one out there all right. Oh boy all right on this day. Nine nineteen ninety-five connie chung was fired from. Cbs fired or resigned. It's weird in in broadcast. How they do these things. It was a series of questionable interviews. Or perhaps it was sexism. Nobody's really sure what ended her career exactly. Cbs but there was one interview Just after the oklahoma city bombings where connie asked a member of the oklahoma city fire department. Can the oklahoma city fire department handle this and many people thought that was a sarcastic in kind of a bad question. So that was something that led to the demise of connie chung on cbs She did bounce around afterwards from network to network and every once in a while you see your pop up on various networks now into twenty fifteen david letterman. Here is another ending. He ended his. We'll say.

Charles lindbergh Amelia earhart robert ted danson september atlantic new york nineteen ninety-three last year paris Dan thirty three hours today seventy seven shows three episodes first woman first solo second one eleven year old
James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

You Can Heal Your Life

02:15 min | 7 months ago

James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

"Why. Don't you tell everyone kind of how you came up. And discovered the moses code like how did you come up with this. How did you discover it. And what is the moses. Go okay. I it's a funny story That has a very funny ending I remember a year or so before that There was a movie that came out I don't think very many people saw it was a movie called the secret and of course almost everyone has seen it and this was right at the beginning and i remember watching thinking two things number one. This is a very good movie and a lot of people are going to see it. And i really felt like the movie stopped short and fac in from my perspective. It chronicled what. I call the egos law of attraction which is based on. How do i use spiritual law to get what i don't have in somehow field feel fulfilled and i knew that what was really needed was to take it one more step. It was a wonderful first step but the next step was. How do we manifest from the level of soul not from the level of ego which is based not on what i can get but what i can give is not so much focused on riches but richness and less upon goods and more upon goodness because of course when we have richness in our lives and goodness in our lives will then everything else follows and we find ourselves fulfilled on levels. That we can't even imagine. I know i live in mexico in a small town called heat mexico and i'm surrounded by some of the richest people ever known even though they have next to nothing. These beautiful mexican families that surround us. And i know many people who have extreme abundance and they're poor and so the moses code is meant to take us to the level of soul so that we can become the source of that goodness and it goes back historically thirty five hundred years and what i always like to say is that this was a code. That was lost thirty five hundred years ago and it is the most powerful manifestation tool in the history of the

Mexico
Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

Untangle

02:01 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

"What to do when you get up and go has got up and gone. Which honestly is how a lot of us have been feeling these days so in the upcoming conversation were thrilled to be talking to dr country. And we're gonna learn about what you can do from a nutritional perspective to increase your energy and your mood and it does not what you think. Welcome dr country. Thanks areola happy to be here. Cut your band actually sitting by beds so there you go. It's a joy a pleasure to have you because for a lot of us are get up and go truly has got up and gone these days. It sure has who would have guessed. I know so. What's one of the first things that you recommend to somebody who is feeling like they could use a little bit more zip in their lives. There's many factors that go into. Why most of us are tired and fatigue and just don't have the energy that we thought we ought to have many of us think we are modern lifestyle or code. This is normal to feel like this but in fact my research in that of many others shown that this tiredness is not normal. When it's actually a sign that something is really wrong deep inside. There's two things that i think are really important for people to understand. One is that apocryphal. He's the father of medicine. Twenty five hundred years ago. Said all disease begins in the gut and how that guy could be so smart that long ago without are sophisticated tests. He knew that for instance are mood game in our gut. Our illnesses came from our gut. And we now know that he was absolutely right that most of our issues including being tired and including having depression anxiety actually stems from gut despite basis. Which is a fancy way of saying that the microbiome within our god is all screwed up

Depression Anxiety
"next five hundred years" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Thing anymore so in half generation. We've actually made a lot of headway now. people realise. Yeah the north. Were definitely here to me. I always say people. We know for a fact the north of here in the earliest parts of the eleventh century. Leif eriksson all those icelandic sagas nor saad as we know they were here. We know they came down least as far as northern new finland. Now most experts say that lonzo meadow site which is to stop over point. They came down probably as far as mame runs. Look were sure of at least new brunswick. So they're right. The doorstep of new england already to me it would be more surprising over the next five hundred years after the north. Where here that. Nobody came back. That's way more surprising than the idea that people did like to meet five hundred years as great reasons to come over here. Trading mining cop whatever it was economic advantage that lots of all the land the land of of of ah plenty. There's plenty of great reasons for coming over here. And part of the human condition to to seek out new life. A new civilization as star trek says and so again the idea that the atlantic ocean was a barrier during times. and before. that's that's a fiction that the church wanted people to be afraid of falling off the edge of the earth that they crossed the atlantic but that was because they wanted to maintain control they wanted. They didn't want people exploring of being scientific. But most educated people understood that there were the earth was round and there were other lands across the atlantic and this goes back to ancient atlantis and whatever goes way back but again to me the takeaway. The surprising thing would have been if nobody came back between the norse and fourteen ninety two. That's almost five hundred years. That would be surprising to me will will. I think is kind of really interesting where you went there. A couple of ways. Day this one. You're pushing it way back. At least it seems to us. You're pushing way back and we'll dive into that in minute because you're pushing it back to the second century and you're pushing a role but let me just throw a couple of things that i picked up from a another interview that i heard you do because you have a kind of broad knowledge of all this stuff that i want to kind of tap into and that's that we've kind of moved from one kind of wacky paradigm that we shouldn't look before columbus and we've moved off of that and now we moved to the. Oh okay we can look to kind of the medieval period like you're saying and nor did it and you know what we want to stop there when really we have no reason to stop there like you point out the phoenicians who are the people in lebanon right and they were great seafarers and they kinda sailed all around in boats bigger than columbus. You could also point out that the whole easter island thing. I mean that's a harder ocean across and you got all that and then you've got all connections in south america. You also got all this other archaeological evidence in formula club instance it's popped up with you.

Leif eriksson south america atlantic ocean lebanon atlantic new england earth eleventh century easter island five hundred years new brunswick northern new finland lonzo meadow columbus fourteen ninety two next five hundred years saad one kind second century ah plenty
What Is the World's Oldest Book?

BrainStuff

01:51 min | 9 months ago

What Is the World's Oldest Book?

"What's the oldest book in the world. That's bulgaria's national museum of history. Their lives one top runner a book comprising six pages of beaten. Twenty four karat gold covered with a trashcans script which is one of the few writing systems that modern scholars have yet to fully comprehend mostly because there are so few lengthy examples of surviving the book also features illustrations of a horse rider. A mermaid a harp and soldiers according to reports the book exhibited in two thousand three was estimated at about two thousand five hundred years old was found in southwestern bulgaria in an old tomb and was donated to the museum by the finder. Who remained anonymous. It's a and authenticity were confirmed by two independent scientists whose names also remain unknown in. This book is often cited as the world's oldest book. It is the oldest book containing several pages that we know about there are older pages around but not bound together in any books but the case is closed. The question of what is the oldest book in the world will likely never be answered a first. There's the question of what exactly is a book. Books are slippery artifacts. Think of your most read paperback novel. It has a physical presence. A specific shape and form that fits on a shelf and requires dusting. It also has a non physical form the story itself and what it means to you in the memories and emotions at conjures and so is the book moreover physical presence or is the content more important in the shape or do they both play an equal role. Take it a step further and ask. What if your favorite book wasn't printed handwritten and that's still a book. What about if you read it on an electronic device or it was narrated to you

National Museum Of History Bulgaria
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 9 months ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Portugal's Art and Architecture

Travel with Rick Steves

04:53 min | 9 months ago

Portugal's Art and Architecture

"Let's start today's travel with rick. Steves in portugal. The architecture and the art of portugal to tell the story of that small country squeezed between spain and the atlantic ocean. You can wander through museums classical and romantic paintings to styles with the largest impact on portuguese painters or you can take in the beautiful. Blue azoulay zhou tiles. That ornament many of portugal's buildings to learn more about portugal's art and architecture. We're joined in our studio by two portuguese guides. Christina duarte and refco christina and raphael. Thanks for joining us. Average abuse here. Rick christina so often to understand the art of a country you need to understand its economy. There's money behind the art. How does money shape the art in the architecture of patrols. When you have money you want be surrounded by beautiful. Things actually is universal. Everybody wants to be surrounded by beautiful things. The thing is that you don't afford it many times and when you afford them you have them in portugal much money then because they have great art from five hundred years ago yes well. It is a combination of two major. Factors the fifteen hundreds with the discovery. Spirit that allowed us to have for the first time money enough for our trade with many places in the world so automatically the royalty had many the nobility had money and the church have many and the coincidence is that your have money and you have also religion behind it so which. She's being major catholic. Contrary in thinking that you want to give your best and you'll beauty to your your glorify gone exactly to glorify god so They were two kinds of ways of spending that money in art. Which was the private and that will be for palaces that nobody will see and to god in churches and i consider that public art so review. All you have this money coming in from the trade in fact the churches were actually nicknamed spice churches. How how does the space tie into the building of churches. Well when portugal arrived to places like india and china and we started to bring all of these new products. Back to portugal. They revolutionized portugal they revolutionized our economy and from there on the society started to change and that is one of the interesting aspect of art is that it reflects the other dimensions of society. So the spices. There were They were a major factor. For example the jeronimos monastery that began to be built precisely with the money that came from the spices. Which bases were these that were so valuable. So you had Pepper you had cinema And many others in christina. Why would people spend so much money for pepper and cinnamon app to preserve no sleaze to preserve refrigeration also to Pigments of any kind for linen. Or tying dying yes. it was something exotic. It was different. People never seen it before. So imagine the first time you are smelling coffee or you're tasting pepper or you're smelling cinema. Imagine the impact that you had imagined how it sparked your imagination so the wealthy people would want this. It would be titillating for them now. You mentioned the monastery at toronto's same just outside of lisbon b. l. e. m. I believe that was men. Welland style architecture. What is men whalen. What we're does that word come from so The men willing style is named after our kingman. Well actually the name was given only in the nineteenth century during the romantic period but kingman while he was one of the most important kings during our age of exploration so he ruled from the time of columbus until fifteen twenty began to rule in fourteen ninety five until the fifteen twenty s in the nineteenth century. They figured out that. We had a several monuments throughout portugal. That shared the same characteristics. So what are the characteristics. If you look at the front of a church what will you see and you go. Oh that's men welland from fifteen twenty so the manor line is late gothic style so you have the basic structure of the gothic and then over that basic structure of the gothic. You have a very specific declaration. You have for example. Maritime mothes you have the strong. Heraldic of manuel specially to miller rece- fear so that the coat of arms of the royal family and then themes from the sea because the money came from the see exactly like the rope the rope a rope with an art. He's a very very important symbol of maryland.

Portugal Christina Duarte Refco Christina Rick Christina Steves Atlantic Ocean Jeronimos Monastery Raphael Rick Spain Christina India China Welland Whalen Kingman Lisbon Toronto Columbus
"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

The Mindless Morning Show

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

"And knees that we can just kind of like around as our own words right strap onto crawler and it sucks so so whatever. You're making this crazy so you so basically you'd have to construct these large dome styles to to house communities like us to live in that. The thing that i worked on would be what. You'd call the habitat macho which is the thing that just gets like a trailer. It's like you went to a trailer park and step your trailer in there. That's not long term long term after get under the at least for the next five hundred years even if they started aggressively changing the atmosphere for five hundred years you can. the best bet is living lava tubes. Which are you know when i went there. The mass of Volcanoes on mars. And because it's a third of the size of earth travis. Last ours is still your volcano. The reason that mount everest is five. Mile says the specific gravity of the earth. If can't get any higher right right. Well because the gravity's one-third of of You know on marris's it is here the what's to olympic mont says. The name of the volcano is fifteen miles high. It set a five but you can be standing on the edge of it and you can't even tell that it's a walk tried to fuck it big and Yeah it's so there. Yeah there's a lot of so they had these massive off of volcanic eruptions and when lava goes it's like Psych old sides hardened and it's created this tube that's gone through when lava gets done gone through. They're all over the place so the best way to get out of the radiation and the cold is the bill. Just these things are airtight. Because there or research feet on the ground so you just block off need shannon and you've got a place to live long term. I can't imagine like trying to make something like that airtight. That's gotta be fucking insane dude. Yeah that's that's amazing. You don't think of a separate where you have Pressure of fourteen fifteen thousand to psi. pressure prescriptions pounds per square inch. Whereas you know in amar to you only have to deal with a vacuum pressure from you likes to fifteen inches vacuum. I mean it's not it's it's much less. You could do it with fucking gerwig loose hair. I mean we heard of some impressive things superglued.

fifteen inches five hundred years fourteen fifteen thousand fifteen miles five mars one-third earth gerwig pounds per square inch third next five hundred years olympic mont shannon
Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

Judaism Unbound

09:22 min | 10 months ago

Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

"And kinda interested in talking about the person joshua. He's the title character of this book and he himself from my understanding of scholarly work on biblical criticism or otherwise. He himself has a story like an origin story. That some people think is kind of a retrospection where like after the fact. He's put into the torah in a way that he may not have always been there. And what i'm referring to is specifically. His glory story is that he's one of the two folks in the twelve spies story that goes into the promised land and says This is great all the other ten folks. All land is terrible. Joshua caleb are on the good side that god likes and because it's the land that they're supposed to go to am. I right in my understanding of that. How scholars look at that person joshua and to what extent to we learn more about him in talking about the book that's named after him. Joshua indeed has a book named after him but is one of the flatter hand more hollow biblical characters. I mean for readers. Go in sequence so you know redo romney in which moses in vary tragic psychological terms wrestles with his impending death. And you know even with the existential reality of death itself. so we're going through it moses psyche and when we can turn out of the penza out of the five books of moses when we opened the book of joshua we have an entirely flat character. You know joshua is really characterized by his obedience and interestingly enough has no title right once called the servant of god is not labeled a profit is not labeled a judge is not labeled a king. I mean we get the news of general because he leads these battles but he doesn't even have a title biblical literature does have great literature and just have complex characters. Josh was not one of them. And you can't really do. A lot of psychological depth with an icon in joshua right becomes an icon of this army of this ancient near right to really kind of like a strobe of what i would call. Ancient national is now. I believe that the book of joshua is ultimately synthesized by a group of editors that we call the or novelists they are the ones that are also very smart editors so joshua ends up becoming a kind of a tool that the nommik editors really use to kinda. We've eras together and also to contain a kind of perfect model right. They wanna leader in their language. Who neither the left nor the right right who keeps torah. You know kind of the cuff at all times. And so they give joshua authority by putting him back the times of most read someone who experienced the whole exodus and even while being a member of this desert generation right the generation of the liberated slaves joshua and his spy buddy caleb right are portrayed is the only two who believe in going to war in this land. So i think that's right. I think the shooter anonymous create joshua to be an icon of the kind of unity to which they aspire and one more piece that all add to your question about joshua and caleb who again are depicted is these faithful spies who go against the will of their generation. I love it kinda that the liberated slaves don't want to go to war. I feel like we haven't done enough to really like reclaim that biblical antiwar position expressed by that generation. But you know. John lewis show like i said he's a. He's a tutoring nommik creation. But there's a lot of northern stuff going on with joshua and caleb is a southern figure just as these editors could really say we've always been at war with canaanites. Their system could also absorb later alliances. So kayla who. This southern figure is a canoe. He's a kennedy and the candidates are ultimately a group that gets absorbed under the tribe of judah the twelve tribes structure is very good at pointing to those people who are on the outside who jumped. Don't join the alliance and saying those e mites those canaanites those jebusites there are enemies. But it's also good at absorbing groups that might join the alliance at their own pace and saying. Oh well that's caleb. He's the head of the kennedy clan and that's a sub family of judah so so both things are possible for trying to account for political alliances. Can we situated some of what you're talking about in some sense of historical time to understand sort of when the actual events that are being responded to her happening versus the time where the story is set. What's going on geopolitically. And the time of the israelites when they are making all these alliances. And then if i understand the approximate timeframe here they're basically writing and rewriting these stories that are functionally taking place around five hundred years earlier. Right i mean the so. It almost becomes like their writing and rewriting and massaging this almost like mythic prehistory. It's not just like they're telling a story from fifty years ago differently. They're telling a story from five hundred years ago differently. I'm just curious if you could give us some sense of what was actually going on in in their world at that time that was motivating them to do all this so yes. Speaking about time wine this is the kind of thing. Bible scholars go to conferences to fight of out. So let me kind of breakdown this picture together with a time line let me start somewhere with is a very important piece of poetry and it's important because because of how it serves as a historical in and that's song of deborah and the song of jabra with we believe based on its grammar and syntax is one of the oldest texts in the bible and some people even speak about the year twelve hundred bc. Jabra sings about a war and she sings that some tribes came and fought in the war in some sat home so she disparages the tribes who sat home and she sings the praises of the tribes who k. That's very important to me because it shows that the success or failure of a given tribe in war depended upon their allies. Were so we see major major motivation for these processes of consolidation. Many scholars have shown how end the nine eight century. B c e you've got these policies of consolidating clans in schreiber's into something that looks like a pro donation. This is happening in the region. And it's about war you know. Because if you're national formation right if or if you're a bunch of tribes and you've got a consolidated federation of people's you're gonna lose but then we get you know eighth century b. c. e. the rise of empires in particular syria and the threat of assyria marching. You know or the egyptian empire has its second wind around this time. It's that process. That i think gets people thinking we've got come up. You know with a larger scale organization in army. And so josh. Shaw gives this army which is kind of being configured in real time it gives this army kind of heroic prehistory behind which people can march. And so it means you know that it works and doesn't work because the syrian army takes out the northern kingdom the kingdom of israel in seven twenty two but ends up sparing the kingdom of

Joshua Joshua Caleb Caleb Joshua Authority Romney Kennedy Josh John Lewis Kayla Jabra Deborah Schreiber Syria Army Shaw Syrian Army Israel
Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:39 min | 10 months ago

Back to the Himalayas with Jeff Rasley

"About jeff. Welcome to the show. Thank you camping. Glad to be here happy. Have you tell us a little bit more about yourself well. I grew up in a small town in northern indiana gauchan. Indiana and i was all set to go off to college when it was time and i ended up dropping out after two days and just didn't feel like that was what i really wanted to do. After having spent my whole long life of eighteen years in school so i went to work in a factory saved up some money and then mom reluctantly drove me to the edge of town. I stuck out my son and he tried to cross country. But i did end up going back to college after my parents told me if i didn't they were going to kill me and i thought okay choices college death. I'll take college and ended up. Really loving academics. At a serious level went to the university of chicago than went to law. School eventually went to seminary so ended up spending a lot of time in the classroom. I'd even taught a few college classes practiced law for thirty years retired. And i suppose what's really brought us together is that i written ten books. Several of which are about what. I call philanthropy trekking in nepal himalayas grew so but is that exactly. What is philanthropy attracting. Yeah it it. Means a combination of fee lows. Which is greek for love and anthropologists philanthropy. Means love of humanity in. So i combine that with tracking. And so i've been to nepal fourteen times in started a foundation over there so i combined tracking with philanthropy led an organiz many groups of truckers and many of which have been involved with the mission of the foundation started which is called the possibility foundation. What exactly does the bassett village foundation do well. It's concentrated in a remote area of eastern nepal. Which is not on any of the popular trekking trails. A set of the first time. I was there which was in two thousand eight. My little group of truckers were only the second group of people from the outside world that had ever visited abilities which was an amazing experience because they were living basically the same way they had for the last five hundred years but anyway the foundation does is. I developed this relationship. Was that village. And we have helped to build a school hydroelectric system water system. Our most recent effort was little health clinic and we also help to rebuild the village which was partially destroyed from two major earthquakes. Back in twenty fifteen the same earthquakes that sarah safari was in when she was tracking mount everest in the last episode so our mission goal is to work with the local people to finance the projects that they would like to bring up their standard of living in terms of education sanitation healthcare those sorts of efforts but all of those projects have been requested by the village not suggested by us the outsiders the funders donors to the foundation members. And the reason for that is. I think it's very important for this. Kind of development work really to be primarily in controlled by the people at supposed to benefit so that we don't develop a kind of dependency mentality so the school the water system the electrical system the villagers build it themselves with their own hands and they own they run it and we just provide financial assistance and expertise. When it's ask for school cool. i was talking to somebody else as well. Today that happened to be working with foundations that affected the same area. About empowering nepali women roller. You should connect us. Sarah safari yeah. She's really cool. Where did you grow up. Like i said in the small town of gauchan. Indiana doesn't seem like there'd be much there in indiana as far as mountains. There are not. I had never climbed a mountain or done. Any sort of high-altitude tracking. Before the first time i went to nepal back in nineteen ninety five and my first experience there was directing the mount everest base camp trail.

Nepal Bassett Village Foundation University Of Chicago Indiana Sarah Safari Himalayas Jeff Gauchan Mount Everest Base Camp Trail
Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

Baselayer

08:51 min | 11 months ago

Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

"Back in the day when amazon i one public it shot up roughly after some fits and spurts. It went up to about ninety dollars. You it was like i'm too late. Missed it gone. And then it capitulated down at shot all the way down to two and i was like it's gone amazon's finished not even gonna look at it and then it went back up to ninety. I missed it. I missed it again then. Went up to three hundred to four hundred. It's this constant m. I too late emmett too. Early internal struggle that we have in our brain. What do you think about that. Yeah i think this is exactly so what you're really describing is Things being relative and this is actually think the fundamentally challenging concept with something like bitcoin which is a paradigm shift so people think about bitcoin relative to other assets. If you call a lot of conversations i had in two thousand nineteen twenty twenty where around bitcoins volatility right but bitcoins volatility relative to what because volatility is a relative measure price when we talk about price it's a relative measure because what am i Pricing bitcoin and typically people are pricing in dollars so relatively speaking yes. Bitcoin is volatile compared to holding dollars. But if we compare bitcoin to say equities if you quainton bonds if we compare bitcoin to precious metals the volatility doesn't look so extreme. What really happened at the start of this year. In march of twenty twenty the world shifted the world changed completely and forty years of capital markets. Beliefs were shattered like smashed with a hammer completely shattered. Now changes really hard for people and one of the things. That's really interesting For me personally. I want things to go fast right. Because i've in crypto and things fast and like wait why has it taken a six years to get to this point but in reality as you know the arc of time is very long and it takes a lot of time for the world to change for people to internalize that change and adjust their mental models right and a big part of this in a big part of ice than so much time talking and writing and trying to teach and communicate is. It's really about giving people new frameworks mental models to help them. Integrate this new way of thinking these mental models into how they view the world trade. That's really important. I think there's so many. Brilliant people in crypto. Who do this in different ways. So we have this really broad cross section of people communicating a lot of ways talking to a lot of different audiences which is amazing. The we had this fundamental shift happened. Everything got everything else got crazy. It's not that bitcoin got crazy. That everything else got way freaking crazier and what i love is when i talk to people about. Bitcoin bitcoin to extensive. I'm like let me ask you a question. Did you did you. By tesla five hundred and yeah. Of course i did. Like tesla's going to and i'm like okay. So tesla has appreciated more this year than bill. Clinton has tesla appreciated close to seven hundred percent in two thousand twenty yet you bought at the high and they clean appreciated two hundred and fifty percent and twenty twenty yet. You refuse to buy so help me understand right even if we're using the same of dollars even if we're looking at the same volatility measure somehow bitcoin Why and then he will start thinking. They're like wait a minute because math is hard this we know the people just. They're not thinking logically for some reasons for some people when they think about bitcoin their brain goes into like a tailspin and logic goes out the window. But this is again why i think the collectibles narrative is in so interesting to me because when i say to people like do you know what a honus wagner card is. They're like yeah. Of course. I know i'm like i don't know like okay. One honus wagner card is two point five million dollars. Do you think bitcoin at twenty five thousand thirty five thousand forty thousand is expensive in there. Like probably not right. So let's dig into that tesla coin thing. What part of the fact that. Bitcoin is effectively. Founded by an an-and sushi. Who we do not know if it's a he she it what vs on. Musk pop very public. Are we in agreement. That's the toshi was the aliens. Are we doing alias. I'm kidding shocking. Oh every time. I hear that especially in clubhouse. Everyone's like oh yeah. It was created by the alien somebody yeah. Let's not do that you know. I'm already speculating. That twenty two thousand one. The aliens are finally come here and just completely take over. But i don't want to hear that. The ashley also created the nsa taverners been around for a while and then there's a holiday larue like there. What what part in in psychology because you talked to a lot of institutional investors to you talked to a lot of big money. What part of that psychology. That one you have a very public figure with ilan and then too you have associate whom no one really knows who it is what it is. What part of that you place until list. Yeah so i actually think. Bitcoin and tesla are very similar in one regard both are aspirational and let me explain what i mean by that. Bitcoin invites you to conceptualize the world in a different way. Tesla what eon has done with business. Ilan has memed a new reality into existence. The way he talks about tesla right is completely detached from the economic realities of that business. Completely detached from the economic realities of that business but it doesn't matter because the vision that ilan describes the persona that he has the cult of personality he's created around himself is aspirational grit song by the way cult of personality. That's a great song. it's also great like psychological phenomenon. And what. I think eli done so effectively is. He's the zeitgeist okay. Markets are just sentiment machines. And it's it's been really interesting. Because every value investor. I talked to like twenty twenty. Made their brains explode. It literally made their slowed. They're looking at these stocks trading at fourteen hundred two thousand three thousand acts he for pe ratio rate and their brains are exploiting. That's our valued. And i'm like you forgot that nothing acid matters anymore. We don't live in the world that you lived in two years ago. this is not about value. We live in a world where there is a lot of uncertainty uncertainty about the future uncertainty about the stability institutions uncertainty about our role in this world. That's unfolding and in times of uncertainty. What people look for is vision. Right and what elon. Musk articulates when you talks about going to mars when you talks about. Putting for tesla on mars. That's vision right. I think satory she in so many ways and what we're doing with. Bitcoin is very similar. And i caught this. I've been really obsessed with the idea of building cathedrals lately. It's like five hundred years ago. Right if i was a visionary and had suggested for the future and i wanted to express that the only way for me to create something that withstood the test of time right to create quote unquote immutable. Truth was to build a cathedral and cathedrals took hundreds of years to build and people who built them dedicated tremendous amounts of resources to building these amazing like technology a technologically very advanced like gravity defying beautiful structures and. Whenever people saw them they would feel inspired. Right like cathedrals were how we painted a vision for the reality we wanted to live in. Okay tesla is a cathedral. Bitcoin is a cathedral. The stocks that are soaring the assets that are doing well their assets that are aspirational right and their people. Whether it's a non community of people an individual it's groups of people who believe in a vision for the future that is radically different from the future. We live today but it creates a motion. Right people look at it and they're like that is beautiful. And i wanna live in not future

Tesla Bitcoin Honus Wagner Amazon Emmett Ilan Larue Clinton NSA EON Ashley ELI Elon Musk
Late Triassic extinctions linked to climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Late Triassic extinctions linked to climate change

"Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can have a dramatic impact on life on earth. It has before about two hundred million years ago at the end of the triassic period about three quarters of all species died out the mass extinction was likely triggered by widespread volcanic eruptions the amended enormous amounts of carbon dioxide causing global warming. These medieval county conveyance side in time with the mass extinction events. Manfred capriolo is a phd student at the university of padua in italy. He says the eruptions occurred in bursts over hundreds of thousands of years. Each burst lasted about five hundred years by studying bubbles of gas trapped in ancient volcanic rock. He determined how much carfax each burst released. The amount was similar to the human caused emissions expected. This century campriello says his research shows that a single pulse of volcanic activity could have contributed to dramatic changes to the climate at the end of the triassic. Our world is different than it was two hundred million years ago but he says it's a warning that rapidly adding co two to the atmosphere now could have major consequences of this. Finding is absolutely alarming

Manfred Capriolo University Of Padua Campriello Carfax Italy
Like Water in the Desert

Gastropod

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Like Water in the Desert

"Philip start by introducing you all ramona. Button of ramona's american indian foods. I am Pima living on the pima reservation here on a hill river. I am also have donal them from south of here. They used to be known as the papagos. But now they're called the on them and the p. r. on them that's my other half mesa river people. And i'm gary ramona's husband terry button ramona. Interior farmers their farms about an hour. Southeast of phoenix on the way to tucson and the whole region is a desert. The sonoran desert includes phoenix and tucson and parts of california and it stretches all the way over. The border into mexico. Ramona's ancestors have been farming in the region for thousands of years and her dad kept the traditional live on the reservation where she grew up. My father did the wheat. He did the tempered. Beanstalk brown swam bob and the white tip rabin which is the start about and he did. Squash the gabon. Ceos watermelon and sugarcane and the black eyed peas just us above and chilies mostly. I don't for his chili. And those tilles are part of what brought ramona and terry together. Ramona had left the reservation to work as a nurse. In south dakota terry was there studying lakota songs and culture friends introduce them and they told ramona. That terry had picked up a few words of pima as well. That's the language of ramona's people in the south west. So terry tried out his rudimentary pima on her. And i said well you're saying it correctly but you're Die like accent is different and so it was a little bit hard to decipher. But i could understand him. So i said well Maybe we're a good match and so it happens. And then when i came when i met ramona the first experience i had with southwest cuisine was her dad's long green chilis and they were so hot they blistered my lips. They turned white. She would send him to me in the mail when i went back to school. Share with some of my buddies. Nobody could eat them and her dad. Pretty famous actually in the local community as well known for he's used to sell small brown paper lunch sacks with chilis and he'd have mild and medium hot he regulate a chilly temperature by the way he irrigated his chile's he wouldn't let anybody else water his plots not just because he was manipulating the firing of his tilles. It was because the water itself was so rare and so precious. There was never enough. A shirt is a place full of things other than water. They get a bad rap because they have low rainfall and It's as if they're empty spaces. Gay napkin is a desert agricultural ecologist. And he's written more than a dozen books about agriculture and the desert and its foods. He lives an hour south of tucson also in the sonoran desert within a mile and a half of where i am sitting right. Now we have evidence of forty five hundred years of agriculture in the form of corn remains from an archaeological site. So i am in the valley in the united states with the oldest history of agriculture. Yeah well as far back and farther back than written history can go. The people were farming. Here when padre eusebio kino who was the first non indian person to come into this country came here and visited the payments in sixteen seventy five. They were irrigating their fields with diversions from the hilo river at that time

Ramona Terry Hill River Mesa River Gary Ramona Terry Button Ramona Pima Tucson Beanstalk Brown Tilles Phoenix Sonoran Desert Donal Rabin Philip Gabon South Dakota Mexico
On Student Debt, Biden Must Decide Whose Loans to Cancel

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:32 min | 1 year ago

On Student Debt, Biden Must Decide Whose Loans to Cancel

"This hour. We are exploring the ideas and the debate over forgiving student. Loan debt in the united states. A little earlier you heard the voices from some on point listeners. Telling us the impact that carrying student loan debt has had on their lives. We also heard from some listeners. Who did not support the idea of widespread. Loan forgiveness. I will lose my mind if they do that. Student loan forgiveness. When i went to college. I chose a college. That was a state school. Because that was what i could afford. I worked four jobs while i was in college so that i didn't have any debt when you take out you know what you're signing for and it's a choice. Life's all about choices. I'm not for it you know i. I guess i was lucky in that. I had a family who raised me to be wary of that Ultimately ended up joining the military. So i can pay for college. I just don't see where the equity is there so those are some on point listeners from west virginia and from new york professors. Odi the when we say equity right. I mean Nathan the caller. There used that that that very word it's being used in different contexts right like just in the previous segment. We talked about how the disproportionate impact of student loans on black students. For example. there's a. There's a kind of itchy trying to achieve equity there as well but i want to just get street to what does fairness mean here because i think you probably remember from the presidential primaries last year gotta might as well be five hundred years ago but it was last year. There was a moment where think it was in iowa. Where an iowa voter confronted senator elizabeth warren about this idea of student loan debt forgiveness and the voter was saying like hey. His daughter's getting out of school. He saved all his money and even worked multiple jobs so that she didn't have to have any student loans. So would he get that money. Back and senator. Warren said no and he just infuriated him because he he made the decisions to not give his daughter a legacy of debt And there would be no payoff for that or no. Other people who chose the debt path would have forgiven. So what do you think about that. Fairness question yeah. I think it's an interesting question i mean. What does fairness in this instance. Let's say we don't cancel any of the debt. He's still not going to get that money back. But it might prevent you know the next generation of people from having to work multiple jobs and do all of this Extra work to get their children educated so failing to cancel anyone's debt doesn't really solve problems here. You now Would also we does doesn't solve problems in terms of like the underlying cost of higher ed correct and also then. The same thing will just continue to happen. Is it fair to that guy that everyone else must suffer the same way. Okay well so. But i mean failing to cancel. That doesn't solve that problem. But how does cancelling the debt solve the problem of very expensive higher education in this country. I think that it has to go hand in hand with policies that address. That exact problem the fact that the college tuition year over here has increased far beyond inflation. And they're just like structural issues at universities. I think that a lot of these universities. They've had to invest so heavily in responding to the corona virus and they are out of resources and local and state governments are also low on resources. So it's likely the federal government is going to have to invest in these institutions of higher education. So it seems like a good opportunity to deal with that underlying problem at the same time as as as addressing what we've been doing for the past several decades the fact that that yeah no no no. I didn't mean it up you there but I'm agreeing like this. This to me is the core issue. Cancellation are no cancellation's short-term decision with an with impact on yeah forty-three potentially forty three million americans right now but does it you. You were talking about next. Generations do really anything to via the problem for them. There's one more question to ask about fairness and feel free to tell me that. This is a terrible comparison. But you know every single day mean especially after the financial crisis americans or the housing crisis. I should say from eight americans have been told. Don't buy a house outside your means but by the house that you can afford. Shouldn't we have the same encouragement for education. Yeah so that's interesting. I mean it might be a good opportunity. To contrast with what's happening in europe for example in denmark you get six years of free tuition room and board and a stipend to attend higher education. What they're going to have is an educated people an educated workforce and etiquette educated citizenry. If what we're going to say instead is if your parents are not wealthy don't go to a good school. don't go to an expensive school. I mean that's one way of building a society. I'm not sure that it's the best. One we know is going to be then financially. Racially socio economically exclusive. And that's not the idea that we have about america right. You're supposed to be able to go to school and move up in life. Higher education as a tool for social mobility and also and very often not even mobility but just hanging onto. Where wherever it is that you were able to achieve in the last generation just stasis just like being really part of a society. Most jobs require a college degree these days so we we want to tell people. You can't afford to go to school. So don't

Senator Elizabeth Warren Iowa West Virginia Nathan United States Warren New York Federal Government Denmark Europe
"next five hundred years" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

"My hope my hope. And that's all i think if you you did some research you saw. I've got foundation. Were working on. We want to improve how we live under for all species every day. I wake up and work on that so. I'm hoping that we can take this this planet and and change it in a way that may be the next. Five hundred years will be improved for individuals Well you know. We talked a lot about covid them in his lots of other issues that the planet spicing and what. I'm interested in exploring a little bit in the time we have left. Is you know in the book paid to sink. And we've talked a lot about perspectives. And can you be more globally aware and putting things in perspective of sequential. Two billion people in the world set a to sink in terms of what's happening in my little family or my little community is a data point that might not be actually globally relevant Had to had to papal kinda move between those things i mean. Obviously within my little community is where i can have a direct impact can do something. Here knocking mike. An impact on that community Necessarily make an impact to the seven point. Five billion people. Unless you know. Unless i'm in a different position than i am right now. But how can we develop s thinking. Heck we move thinking up and down the like in the trenches where we are right now but then up into. What's the bigger picture. Look like and locations. Does that have And you know clearly. That's that's sort of thinking. We need to develop to stop to think. Bad will welcome a due to create that better future. Let me start with a question. How many people and this is not going to be anything research. How many people. Listen to your podcasts. It's probably between a sales and to fifteen hundred for h. Episode in the have you gotten feedback from different countries around the world from your popular all ages. Yeah yeah. I.

mike
Pirates of the Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Pirates of the Carolinas

"Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina. No,

Terrence Zip United States White Barents Carolina Carolinas Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Rick Steves Caribbean
"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Laugh Track With Gerry Strauss

The Laugh Track With Gerry Strauss

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Laugh Track With Gerry Strauss

"Like that. When it comes up on social media, are you encouraging? Right, now they're you know because of Kobe and all of that very production work is very minimal right now. So I haven't really worked since November I've done a few things from home if you like small fun guest appearances on like Celebrity Watch Party and celebrity call center which was fine and a couple of things like that. Just silly things that I could choose from home. but as far as real work, you know we're I've been doing a lot of meetings at home and doing all that kind of stuff but it's it's hard right now it's it's hard everybody you and so just trying to figure out what's next I have you been meeting with with the rectors and excuse me Different studios about what I WANNA do next with the resting in a sense. You know our business is going to change dramatically as far as how we operate and how I mean like everyone's and so you know because I haven't. Maybe necessarily gotten My heels dug into much into having a certain way that I do things they're really I feel like maybe that might I'm GonNa. Tell myself that that's an advantage because they don't have a lot of. Things unlearn I've just got to navigate some new territory and. You know instead of being like, Oh, I can't do that anymore. It's like, okay. No, let's okay we this is what we work with and this is figure it out. So you know looking at all that and you know I've been super active politically and on social media right now. So that's kind of been like focus. but I definitely, you know I definitely want to get back to work. and I'm sure that my family would like that too because. Everyone knows a little crazy afternoon working. So. Absolutely. Well, it sounds like at least mentally the wheels are turning and you're working very hard and yeah sooner or later that button that pause button will be hit and I've been doing my podcast from home. So that has been able to to at least keep he me going and that's fun. My podcast is never thought I'd say this with my friends who you are and it's an inappropriate crazy look at a parenting and it's pretty unfiltered and decidedly not Danny Tanner approved Bob second but maybe not Danny Tanner. Very brave if you're recording it from home because you're doing it from the belly of the beast. So yes. On on during a time when my kids are here so that they don't hear me talking about them but my older one listens to my podcast now. So this is becoming a problem. You need to create a special separate feed just the special edited version. Yeah exactly. Well listen. Everyone needs to check out jody's podcast for now and pay attention to what's going on in hopefully in the near future because I think you're going to be seeing hearing and just watching a lot more of what you do and in the meantime. Just watch fuller and Fuller House for the next five hundred years because that's never going to. Enjoy it I. Think we all need a little bit of some television distraction and full right now to bring us some comfort and yes, check out never never thought I'd say. and that's our podcast with me and my friends Celia Bihar, and then follow me at duty on on twitter and instagram at official Joey Keaton on. Awesome. Awesome. Will do thank you so much. He's been great having you on the show. Absolutely my pleasure. Thanks so much. All right. Thank you guys for joining us for another episode of the laugh track. We hope you enjoyed that conversation as much as I did. And we WANNA to let you know that the laugh track it's produced by myself and the real workhorse of the team producer.

Danny Tanner Joey Keaton Kobe jody Celia Bihar Fuller House fuller twitter producer official
"next five hundred years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Percent or more on your car insurance now we've been talking about Tom Brady in his future and there's a certain thing lurking in the background we're gonna get to that just a second the first let's talk to rich use in myrtle beach right here on CBS sports radio what's up man Hey branch at least you have a good spot hello thank you I appreciate it listen to thanks Brady and gone stay there he's already sold his house up there it's done he was in a big organization he's out of that so he's fallen real quick did you sell this house yet does up for sale but I don't know if I ever heard that was sold now is a couple days ago I heard that the house is already sold and he was in some organization up there forget what it was where use main contributor any pulled out of that okay so you think he's gone so I bought this isn't the right move for him to go and where would you put him one or two places I thank you sandy o'dell four I thank with waiters outlaws Vegas with group okay one of the and my last seven years I like Baltimore next week but and yeah both Baltimore's just that there's such a well built machine I I think in terms of value waiting all the teams in the NFL and it left in the playoffs who's got a shot to win this thing it's it's really Baltimore on their own two year and then everybody else and Richie I appreciate a man it here's the best thing about Richie's call to I don't know if you noticed this but I I did Richie he started off by saying the talking about the Chargers he said San Diego to the charge of a move for like two or three years now he still said San Diego but he did mention the raiders is being Las Vegas very good for him very impressed now is also factually incorrect okay so the house yet seen hours ago Los Angeles Times reported that a Tom Brady has still not sold his master's tone in fact Vince it may be in your price range now he just free he dropped its by six million dollars now the house is selling for we'll have a Giselle or asking for thirty three point nine million dollars man well if I just keep it on the dollar menu diet for the next five hundred years maybe I'll be able to afford it keep working the straw man you never know dream big man I'm dreaming I'm I'm ready to go Hey I love a nice me double who am I to say no to a McDonald's delicious to Buck the greatest thing ever let's get wait no I I have something I want to say here's here's what I want to get to all right here's the thing in the background with the patriots this fascinating because and and this is the world that we live in right because people going to say all these millennials are goldfish brains it it's all our fault though yeah I don't know they don't remember cell phone numbers anymore and like we used to they're just the world's traded in the worst way Dan these kids well here's the thing we all get flooded with so much news and so much random stuff every single day right like think about this imagine you open your cell phone and you go on Instagram and what is Instagram if you don't have an Instagram is just people like people back in the day there was always this joke of well guides uncle Lani in and sue went on vacation and and now they're going to see shows the slide show we're going to sit here for forty minutes watching his stupid slide show it's gonna be so boring Instagram is that slide show but it's cool now we've all changed we like seeing pictures of people doing other stuff or the very least we like posting pictures of people we like posting pictures of us doing other stuff so on Instagram given one scroll just get your finger and like run it up the screen and you'll have twenty different things go by really fast of people you know doing different stuff this person got a dog this person got a baby this person is on vacation the the those who broke up a little you know like you just look at the reverie thing and so you're getting that personal information from all these people that you know you're getting all these different stories from different outlets you get so much advertising you watch and stuff that you just wanna watch anyway TV shows and YouTube clips and all this different stuff people showing stuff on the phone so you've got so many things coming at you all the time did you can forget stories that happened three weeks ago and when they happen it's like all my god yeah I remember that like it was when you were in grade school you just like on earth this thing that's been buried for twenty years right it's three weeks ago but this is how it works now he if you're you're facing so much information all the time do you remember Spygate to just have a couple weeks ago there is still under investigation through the NFL for Spygate to the patriots are so the punishment has not been handed down yet and I don't know when the league doesn't they might wait till after the Superbowl I would figure at this point I don't know what it does them to do it during the playoffs they probably don't want that attention during the plaza Lester trying to news dump it either way I'm not I'm not a P. our special some radio guys win here but you look at this when you think about where Tom Brady's gonna go and whether he should stay New England whether you go somewhere else what if New England gets punished all hell what if it's not just fines which Brady won't care about who cares about money for Tom Brady but what if they lose a first round draft pick and a second round pick and a third round pick what if they really bring the hammer down because this is the second time it's happened right maybe that's the case we've seen tape of what they did it's out there that wasn't the case in the first bike a is the punishment could be severe enough the bridge he realizes for the next year to they're not going to have the capital to trade add pieces to draft pieces big give me the team that I need to win it maybe he leaves New England because of spike a two I don't know how likely that is some tells me we get those gonna go soft on which day I just it just feels that way but maybe he surprises but if there's a hard enough punishment maybe does go somewhere else but until I see the hard punishment I don't think that's happening and I think Brady's going to stay I think he's going to be a patriot but where do you think he ends up eight five five two one two four two two seven for all the people today Tom Brady and there's a lot of people that boy do they hate Tom Brady right your bottom is a free agent alike yeah I'll take down Brady what do you think Tom Brady you want somebody out with Tom Brady good order Tom Brady Jersey right now there's some sad sack walking around the Chargers Tom Brady Jersey I guarantee it so eight five five two one two four two two seven and and give us a little bit of insight on the patriots Alex Barth has been covering the pads in New England we're gonna bring him on next get a vibe of what it feels like up there now and what the future is for Tom Brady from his perspective that's all coming up next on Vince could with you on CBS sports radio but first let's.

Tom Brady myrtle beach CBS
"next five hundred years" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"But they did cut down the fires no yeah it does not end there and an intense fire season him going from fire season to flood season just write that yeah I really like in a week or so yeah I mean it just it just seem to to do that home yes so in in but did the other thing is too I I noticed on on your website over and over and over again you you talk about about the lack of faith well when you're encouraging everybody to get out and see all of these thing you're right you talking awful lot about the inability or the lack of maintenance problems and and staff to take care of all of the people who keep coming and coming and as we know more and more are coming and that more and more are encouraged to come that's right I think many of us who've been around a little while remember at the crisis with state parks the budget crisis that required that a lot of nonprofit organizations step forward to raise money to keep parks open and that budget crisis came and went we haven't heard about that so much recently actually it's an ongoing budget crisis the people of California are not pressuring their politicians enough to spend more money on our parks that we find so important to our quality of life just think about who we vote for and whether or not they had a platform for increasing the funding for parks either in city parks county parks for state parks minutes even talk about our federal lands these issues don't seem to be on our radar but I think here in Santa Cruz County those open spaces are so key to our quality of life and the and those areas are degrading I think it's degrading so slowly that many people don't appreciate it but when you go to north coast beaches and you see graffiti on the rocks it'll be there for the next five hundred years that's really really bad and now the other trails on the north coaster incising the cutting down there delivering soil to streams that have frogs in fisherman and it's becoming increasingly difficult to walk those trails it's even dangerous sometimes if you're not really attentive or if you're older or infirm and you're trying to go on a trail he might he might hurt yourself on some of those trails they're not safe and so there is that issue now at the same time you have volunteers building and maintaining trails sure Elton bikers in particular that are arguing for more and more trails for that that particular segment of recreation now this brings to mind a social equity issue so who can afford mountain bikes who can afford the transportation to get to the top of the trail or the time off to enjoy a really long mountain bike rides a very small segment of our park users are that kind of user group what we find in surveys around the bay area and if we really want to change the environment so that people really appreciate open space and parks we have to convert new people to that so we're talking about disadvantaged communities all of the various minority communities around the bay area also want access to open space they want that access to be closer to their neighborhoods where they can get to it with public transportation they want to walk to the parks and then when they get to the parks they want people to explain in their languages in ways that they can understand the beauty and things around them so when parks state parks and others divert resources to try and help minority user groups like mountain bikers rich people then they're taking away those resources from communities that really need to be converted to open space advocates and that's how we're going to protect the environment many many more people in many many different cultures really want to get outside and we're removing the resources by trying to maintain a things in remote areas where people don't have the where with all to get here sure why not it is that what you refer to again on your website as visitation plan yeah in its own but we don't so who who would you point the finger and or the sledge hammer or whatever the walking stick at it who would be responsible for putting this visitation plan together right so each agency that manages land so California state parks is a big landowner in our area now there are people who get trained at universities to write visitation plans to to write use plans home and and they don't have a single person on staff that has that training wait wait wait to a visitation plan is and I can give is a skeletal form or what I mean is somewhat out so let's take this example yeah and so they're mountain lions in our area are critical to our ecology they keep the deer population and check the deer mow down the understorey and in the hills the road in Phelan our reservoirs in order to keep mountain lions around we're going to have to have a plan to do so that means that we can't have trails all over every inch of state parks may not maximize access to state parks by humans and still have mountain lions so just so just take that so what do we need we need mountain lion reserves we need areas with less visitation and so it and then at the same time you have these communities that I mentioned that want access they and so they want signs and benches or they want want to be able to get to the parks so where is the best place to put them what is the carrying capacity of our parks in terms of numbers of people and where they go and so when consideration of the mountain lions but around here in the center for biological diversity that we're in about fifty such considerations in natural resources so it's a complex algorithm to figure out where to put people so that we can still conserve our natural resources and then also interviewing various users to say do you want your small children to be going out along side highly technical mountain bike trails a not right but then there's also people who want to DO wildlife feeling where maybe don't want to be around small children and and so we have to juggle these user groups interview them talk to them about what kind is a experiences they want and then search the parks conserve the maximum number of people possible in an equitable situation so that's visitor use planning there's a science behind it and and yet we have not seen that implemented in the Santa Cruz mountains yes that's state the day started state parks **** would have the most resources to do that but think about the other land management agencies we've got we've got city parks that we've got county parks we've done it land trust lands sure right all of the and federal lands the bureau of land management is now in Santa Cruz County managing that to Tony because dairies property right and so all of these agencies what would benefit from this expertise as with the public that is hoping to use these parks your you mention mountain lions a couple of times I mean I know how how many people have been Las Vegas eight killed and or mall over by mountain lions in our county in the last year or two or three I mean I don't recall anybody well I was wanting to keep bringing up mountain line right and I was thinking well I horse riding horse riding in program more dangerous to people who walking break and and bicycles and and only okay interactions and mountain lion me my lines that go the other way they they they really fear him and so they do run away and that's part of the problem is that when there's too many people the mountain lions really don't have as much habitat to use to hunt they don't like being around him right right right right right and I was going to talk a little bit about these big animals you know mountain lions are the last thing we've got of that ancient amazing serin Getty so if people know the terms there and get the they know it from Africa but California was like the searing Getty even more so not that long ago just about fifteen thousand years ago right when humans came we lost a lot of big animals and in particular we lost mammoths mastodons these are elephants there were elephants roaming this landscape and and I want to just think this is the holiday season and many people are wondering how to give gifts and food to give gifts to I want to raise the cry for the African elephants though the elephant is on its way to extinction and in our few generations it could disappear in the wild it did here in California think about what an amazing state it would be if we still had elephants it wasn't that long ago that we did and so Africa is our last hold out for elephants hi I urge people to try and give to organizations that that will rescue the elephants from extinction but here we had elephants and it comes down to land management what we see right now is the loss of grasslands grass lands are being invaded by trees around here native Americans for tens of thousands of years pulled up those trees they burn those trees they kept the trees out of our meadows and that's why we have these beautiful grasslands in Santa Cruz County native Americans maintain those grasslands after the elephants disappeared and then and then after we obliterated the native Americans then we started grazing them with cattle and that's and we're not doing that that many places so now is the time to appreciate the elephant and the need to steward undress lands in order to keep them those beautiful vistas that's another reason to support our parks organizations they can't just be chasing around recreational users all the time they have to have a budget to say maintain our grasslands of those beautiful wildflower fields around Santa Cruz County Eminem taken just a break here tell everybody you're listening universal grapevine numbers button on my guest right now it's crazy hates and we'll be back with green a minute first have to tell you that transformation highway is an interview.

"next five hundred years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"To you by a Howard Air. he T. A. R.. this just into the key to your news center presidential hopeful senator Bernie Sanders has been hospitalized. is a special report from ABC news I'm Erin caters ski Vermont senator and democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is hospitalized in Las Vegas he had been in town for a gun control forum timed to coincide with the second anniversary of the massacre at the Mandalay bay his campaign said in a statement that following a medical evaluation and testing Bernie Sanders was found to have a blockage in one artery and two stents were successfully inserted Sanders he's off the campaign trail at the moment but said to be conversing and in good spirits his aides are trying to determine what this means not only for his health but whether he can continue with his presidential aspirations at seventy eight Sanders is the oldest leading candidate in the field repeating presidential candidate Vermont senator Bernie Sanders hospitalized in Las Vegas I'm Erin could her ski this has been a special report from ABC news has a lot more on this breaking news coming up at eight o'clock on P. T. A. R. for breaking news sent straight to your phone text news the four one one ninety two three. vice president is in town today he has here is on it where he'll start his trip but by attending a fundraiser for senator Martha make Sally this evening and to trust me she'll need the money because the twenty twenty U. S. Senate race against her presumed opponent mark Kelly might end up being the hottest race in the whole country and the most expensive political race in Arizona history valley political expert Stan Barnes with copper state consulting joins us now to talk about the vice president's visit but before we get to that stand I wanted to mention Bernie Sanders in the hospital this morning this will this affect voters if he's just five years of being even just fine and they released him today that affect voters minds on on Bernie Sanders yes it does a bag bloggers voters minds is because politics and electropop takes a special presidential is a cold and ruthless world and there is no doubt that the age issue which is already an issue for Bernie Sanders will be offered for many voters if he's having held trouble so this is aside from his personal difficulties which I wish him well this is really bad for his campaign all right let let's get to what's going to happen in Arizona today vice president coming here it when you take a look at the turmoil and surrounding president trump right now even if he ends up not being guilty of anything is is just a good time for Martha make Sally to have the vice president coming to help her into the present I think you're reading too much into it but I can give you credit for trying to see around the corner on the left the president is the most valuable person when it comes to fundraising and profile raising there's there's no doubt about it and I think you'll probably come there is our from ours we sell it I think you welcome that I think you should walk but the good life hence is a really nice second place when it comes to all those things after all is the base of the Republican Party is the party before trial and he does. raise a lot of money and he does bring profile in so I I think it's just a way and all the way around for the center of your Sally that that the vice president would come to town but we did seem XLE embrace president trouble last year and she lost and there was a campaign call that she was on it got recorded and basically were she saying look I I don't wanna have to defend everything he says it's not my words it is she in some way shape or form going to distance herself at least a little bit from trump I think she should she ought to have girls you not the same person and she I've no doubt will have by policy differences with them but he is the president and he is a Republican and she's a Republican US senator and so motors will will put them together in some degree and and she should go with that I don't blame Donald Trump for her loss two years ago I am I I'm I'm not sure she does either and and in this case my own assessment is and don't jump on the ballot in Arizona actually helps Mar the makes alley in her own race in the general election after all what the hell is going to have to defend Elizabeth Warren Miller her as you name it I mean whoever that person is far left on the edge of the scale mark Kelly will be carrying that person and sell them balances things out it real quickly we started with presidential politics talking with valley political expert Stan Barnes. reports leaking out Hillary Clinton might hop into the race for the White House do you think president trump's praying for that to happen I think that not only is Donald Trump train for people like me our price for it I'm going to add that to my prayer list public. at and I am the observer and lover of the political system and if you Hillary Clinton actually gets back into the race this thing is going to be the first chapter in every school books for the next five hundred years yeah email I can't wait for that to happen all right Hey thanks is always stand Barnes there of copper state consulting and by the way yes Bernie Sanders hospitalize we'll have more.

Howard Air. senator Bernie Sanders T. A. R.. five hundred years five years two years
"next five hundred years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Is free. Talk live eight five five four five zero. Three seven seven three three are humans rampaging murdering animal slaughtering eating other animals or can we go feast in the fills like the cattle with you tonight. It's aria and johnson and ian and let's get right back into this discussion with vegan vegan. Are you still with us. I am yet perfect. <hes> <hes> you were making a point there before we went out. I would like you to recapture late the points that you were attempting to convey generally. I think he's trying to convince folks folks that. No one will be eating meat in. What did you say five ten years anywhere from three to ten years. I'm thinking that's really optimistic. I would say possibly within the next five hundred years. We'll see that certainly within the next thousand but i think breath. I don't see it happening in this lifetime. I think there are probably still be <unk> outliers. There's always going to be the pro meet group. I mean even take you underground living in the sewers burgers. So how did you come to this time. What do you see changing changing in the world today. That makes you think in three to ten years. No one will be eating meat or dairy products. So the biggest thing thing is is gonna be nutrition and and i know when she was saying that <hes> there are <hes> unhealthy begins there and yes there are there's definitely junk food vegan <hes> they eat garbage. The cookies accused donuts and fries <hes> but really <hes> the healthy vegan diet is no oil poultry plant based diet and it's scaring people their disease during a heart disease. It's cancer. It's carrying <hes> it's not gonna create regardless. It's curing during diseases and we have a disease epidemic in this country and it's starting to go around the world as well and <hes> and it's also so beneficial for the environment..

johnson ian ten years five hundred years five ten years
"next five hundred years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Now I can't imagine. They found that one day of work week, cut mental health problems by thirty percent. The study also revealed that there was no evidence that working more than eight hours provided to your well being not at all. Wait mental wellbeing. Yeah. Yeah. Because the rest of your existence, of course, it provides better, a wellbeing for you, because you can pay your bills and not starve to death. Lying out in the field. Some wrecked. The study was done as a result of automation becoming a big part of business models across the country. Like, I think sooner rather than later, but I don't think it's anywhere close to being to where we only work once a week. But that was the idea back a hundred years ago if you read things when we're the turn of the century from eighteen ninety nine to nine thousand nine hundred ninety no one the thought was, what will life be a hundred years from now in all of the predictions had to do with electric city and that will be working three hours a day, two days a week in that life will have nothing but love? And we'll all have our feet up and will be just enjoying ourselves. That's the way it will be a hundred years from now. Nobody took into account the possibility that you have companies and businesses. And now you have worldwide competition and that you can't take the time off that leisure time is a thing of the past because the guy over in China's working as a slave labor. Also, as long as there are things that you want. There will be things you have to do to get that. That's correct. Yeah, it's very naive. The. Yeah, I love reading about what they think the future will be. And so, I read with a grain of salt, the predictions of what it'll be a hundred years from now. I believe anybody has any idea. I can't imagine a world where. In the next five hundred years, where we're not working. Yeah. I can't either. Yeah. That's the nature of the you really have to explain to me. How we how we get there. You have to have food and until we have the Jetsons pill just taken that your whole meal. Well, somebody's gotta make it provide. It's almost like that. There's no free lunch and economics. Same same idea. Yeah, somebody's providing somebody is having to do something somebody has to work. That's why socialism and communism have never worked because they produce nothing. They can't it just those Connie's. They simply don't work. But you can't tell people that because they don't want to hear it guy. One time it really stuck with me, because you wanna you wanna you wanna own a business where you can make money while you sleep. He's talking about e commerce like that. And I was like, yes, everybody, everybody. Yeah. Everybody wants they want the passive income. I understand L. I have I have a friend who has five or six rental houses that he, he is paid off over the years and all that rent money that comes to me said, it's all mine, so he makes about seven or eight thousand dollars a month in rent, so he can live comfortably until one of the house is air conditioner breaks, and he's got to go in and replace it. That's ten grand. And now he's out he gets no income this. So no matter what you do even with passive income somewhere along the line, you paying for it. Hey, it's dividends. Of course. It stocks. Those are good. Yes. Yeah. Number one that we talked about it all show really the Trump rally last night was impressive. But it may not have been as impressive as how much money he raised in a single day. So just to give you a perspective before I announce how much he made Sanders, Bernie Sanders and his first forty one days raised eighteen point two million. Nice little hall from crazy highest, yeah. Okay. Trump in one day race twenty four point eight million dollars. Did they break it down because apparently, it's a badge of honor if it's given to you by by elderly people in their last cent, and there's thousands of them that do this for some reason, that's better than somebody who owns a business actually contributes because he's afraid of idiots coming in and say he has to give away all of his profit to someone else because profits dirty word. I would also I would also be the type where I would say, you know, if you are a mom of pop save your money. Spend it for you. I appreciate the gesture. But I don't want, I would feel guilty taking your money whereas a candidate, are you kidding? Yeah. What candidates say I get that. But I Democrats get up there and say, you know, like you said this badge of honor. Get it from these mom and pops. Yes, I taken in million dollars from Forty-six thousand different people. The average donation was twenty two. I don't care and they're all homeless, it tells me that you can't get anybody who's accomplished anything in life and support you. That's my thing, I'd say. Give me the guy going to give you a million dollars. If he thinks you're good thing. I'm gonna go by his stock. I would also feel as guilty wasting his money, then your your money. This guy. He's got money to blow clearly, give me a million dollars. There's a there's a logic to what I'm saying. When I hear people say, you know, Bernie Sanders, the average average was eighteen dollars, I thought this is not something you should be proud of. So you got a lot of people every voter gives you eighteen dollars. Big deal. I wanna talk about what the people who are looking at you and say, you're a good bet for business because business provide jobs and jobs are what keep you in your home. Not an eighteen dollar donation to a guy who's a sixties burnout socialist. Bego raised in the first quarter only nine million Pistol Pete seven million, and then Kamala Harris raised twelve million. How about that? That's pretty good money, there, scratch going into that. Eight twenty five million. No, it's, it's I imagine that you're gonna see this'll be a two billion dollar campaign. Did you hear they selected the CNN debates? I heard this the other day. And I didn't know this. Those were drawn from a hat. What, what are you talking about this CNN debates on what stay doesn't candidate? Yeah, yes. Well, there's CNN debates there's the debate. Sorry, I for some reason it was hosted by seeing it is. Anyway, there's EBay, the debate I did not know that talk about chance such a stack to lineup. Yes. And you believe that good for you. You're such a naive young man. Yeah. I'm sure I'm sure that somehow some way, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders just happened to be drawn. This was done by the DNC. Yeah. Exactly. And CNN. Okay. Okay. Alex Jones, this is not an Alex Jones. Wasting my time telling me that this was random. It was every other news media outlet is okay. Yeah. Absolutely. If they're saying this was random, I wouldn't believe the DNC after what they did to Bernie back in the last election. Okay. Then there's nothing to debate we clearly disagree on this. You're just naive. I didn't spend enough time in Washington clearly. Yeah. All right. Coming up. Target is very, very sorry for what you had to experience this weekend. Bill jackson. He's taking a look at traffic..

Bernie Sanders CNN DNC China Alex Jones Connie EBay Washington Kamala Harris Bill jackson Joe Biden Bego hundred years million dollars eighteen dollars one day
"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Adam Schefter Podcast

The Adam Schefter Podcast

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on The Adam Schefter Podcast

"Dear prudence about me Pharaoh's sister, prudence when they were in India together. I just think you know, he just had this great texture of rock, and roll music, that, last the last for the next five hundred years. My greatest baseball moment without a doubt was Father's Day. I can't remember the year where Jim Bunning threw a perfect game against the Mets at Shaef stadium with my dad at the game. I was at the game with my father. Yes, we were sitting five at five or six rows behind the visiting dugout at Shea Stadium. You father still alive today. My father Vito passed away, three years ago. And he was a great Joe. Dimaggio fan used to say if you're number four hundred or only us three hundred and fifty six strikeouts. You're gonna win a lot of penance. When there Jim Bunning game was nineteen sixty four I'll tell you something, Sal, every single baseball game that I go to I don't go to very many these days, but every single basically end that I ever go to and every single basically my ever went to I've always wanted more than anything to see a no hitter in person and everyone's came. I went to oh my God. That's incredible. I was eight years old was eight years old. And I can't wait to take my oldest granddaughter Kira. Who's five to affiliates game when she comes down to Philadelphia and visit being next month. That's what I want. That's what I want for my book, and she and she's never been to affiliate game before. Nope. She hasn't she lives in Albany, New York. And she hasn't been to a professional game and face time there when I was at a Phillies game a couple of like last week, I think it was I FaceTime there, and I showed her the cotton candy that was for sale. And she's like I want to go to game. That's how I get my daughter to go to a baseball. Game. It's all about hot dogs and ice cream and all the things that she can get an eat. Well we're at the baseball game. They love that Sal. Yes, that's well sell. Thank you very much for your service to the country. Thank you very much for your time today on the podcast. Congratulations on your pending Tinkerbell statue and watch luck with the upcoming. Philadelphia Eagles and NFL season. Thank you so much. Adam, we'll be back in a moment with your ask Adam questions, but I.

Mets baseball Jim Bunning Sal Shea Stadium Shaef stadium Vito Philadelphia Eagles India Philadelphia Adam Phillies Dimaggio Kira Albany New York NFL eight years five hundred years three years
"next five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

14:31 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Right wing machine. Gary McNamara and Eric. And these are going back eight six ninety redeye will Muller testify. Let's go to David in Wisconsin. David, welcome. You're on Red Eye Radio. Welcome to the show. Hi, david. Gary and Eric. You were report is eight finding. Doc you. So if he were to go up and testify at said anything edited anything or practice anything that report that would be. Panama perjury, and what did you specialize virtually rate? Brilliant point that we've got the smartest listeners on the planet. Now now think about that too. Because if you if you scoff at that and say, well, he could rephrase it, and no no you can't because there is your problem. If you do that under sworn testimony, you have a great risk of perjuring yourself and your entire report. So it's I think a very good case as to why molar would not want to accept if part of the negotiations and wait for the statement part of the negotiations is. Community prosecution. And why did he gets full immunity for Strock and for? And for me and for Brennan and all the whole on. And. Don't forget all these kids for the next three Kennedy, right, right? The next five hundred years, but you do make it right point. Because because imagine that because they would love them would love to say, you know, you wrote this letter. Now, we have actually the text of the letter that they wrote to the Justice department of actually smaller team, according to bar he believes the mall team that crafted not necessarily Robert Muller himself. You don't want to you don't want to stray from any of that. Even the letter that went to the attorney general is now binding if Moler claims responsibility for that letter or they issued concern and then varies from that letter at all. Well, now, you're still walking into that possible perjury territory. You don't wanna do that? You don't want to put yourself on record sworn testimony because you're going to essentially. Have to recall relive rehash almost not verbatim. But certainly to the letter nearly everything you just did that took you to the better part of two years to complete but a great point there. David and thanks. I think that's a great legal argument as to why. Or or certainly reason as to why Muller wouldn't testify. We'll see if it does happen or not so. Thanks so much pre sheet it eight six six ninety of Red Eye in from the political stories out there. This may be my favorite one of the weekend. You're ready. No, former Representative Barney Frank. Who was one of the first openly gay members of congress set on Friday that Robert Francis Beto aerobic may be regretting that he is straight. Now regret usually comes from something. You choose to do a bad choice that is Barney frame rate lying that being gazed a choice. Barney. Regret is it a lifestyle choice. A rock star has dimmed this from Breitbart while while has dimmed while south bend, Indiana mayor Pete, but a judge judges has risen said Frank. And he said that put a judge's sexual orientation is helping and otherwise milk toast candidate stand out in the crowded presidential field. Are you ready for this? No, it is time here because burnt Barney Frank. I'm Bernie Frank combination of Bernie in Barney. This. This is the first I believe in quoted recorded history in the United States of the discussion of gay privilege. Quote from Barney Frank his being gay is an advantage. And if he wore straight, I don't think he would be doing as well that's a quote to the Boston Globe. The quote continues attracts attention to him any gets points for being open, and honest and gives people a chance to infer affirm their lack of prejudice. Then he added, quote, I think Beto aerobic may be regretting that he is straight end of quote. Regret. Well, you're saying it's a choice. Apparently. So. Does he can't have regret for something that he had no choice? Right wrecked. If he was liberal, you can okay. Whole thing if you're liberal you can cause remember your victim. No matter what. So a rock can say on the victim because see victim because victim is that the same as regret. I I was victim. Because I wasn't born gay for gret victim looked definitions change. Now, he could as liberal resent his parents. A great deal resentment. There we all know that. Now. And let's get to win is that next. We'll get to some presidential polling here in a moment. But I want to get to this fall, the democratic senatorial campaign committee deleted a Twitter poll that it had posted Friday asking users. If they preferred supreme court justices to be like, Ruth, baiter Ginsburg or Brad Kavanagh. Why did they delete it? Now get into non line poll. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Right. If because the wrong Justice was winning. I see okay. The democratic Senator campaign committees account finally cried uncle when users overwhelmingly chose Brett Cava whom President Trump nominated last year over Ginsburg, the eighty six year old progressive icon, who's been on the court since nineteen Ninety-three. It wasn't clear when exactly the poll was taken down Sunday afternoon. Get this now one screen shot showed cavenaugh leading seventy one percent to twenty nine percent with more than two hundred and thirty thousand votes cast in the decidedly unscientific poll. Of course. It's an unsigned bowl. Right. That that's why this shows you I'm telling you that people don't the whoever works for the democratic senatorial campaign committee who put that Poland clearly doesn't understand rolling. He doesn't understand that the last thing that you do when you take one side when you look your prejudice. You're the democratic senatorial campaign committee. You're putting that poll out there to get it to fit your result. You don't think somebody's gonna find this and instantaneously contact other people that are going to take that poll, and you're going to be destroyed? Again. It goes back to what you said years ago. Do politicians and people in power actually understand that the internet exists. You know, I think that there's that question is still valid. But I think what they do understand clearly is that whole three branches of government thing that if the people look what look at what the Democrats what we have actually heard them say in recent years stupid American voter. And that's what we've been saying for many years. They believe you're stupid. They do. They're probably knowing them. If you look at the how they crafted the Affordable Care Act, and they put it together with the whole stupid American voter in mind, if you look at how they put that together, they're probably at every turn laughing going. Hey, these people can't even figure out the three branches of government. How are they going figure this up? They have the internet, and they still don't know. I mean, when you when you I mean, how stupid you have to be? Yeah. Because you you know, that the other side's going to see that and say, wow. Yeah. Let's just let's let let's just absolutely destroy them on on this one because they're idiots. Yeah. Right. And you see the latest Harris poll out there. Biden forty four percent of the vote. On the democrat side and. Bernie with just fourteen and what happened there? Leading terrorists vote. I wonder if they pulled any terrorists. That's the problem. I they didn't pull terrorists. See they should have pulled some terrorists. I he would he would pull much higher. It's not anything that Bernie a sane because as has been known been covered already even by liberal publications out. There Bernie isn't taking any positions on anything. You see though, he did come up with the name for Trump. Clown, clown. Trump. Man. That's pure genius. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. All right. Yeah. So so what leaves then is that the name calling is working otherwise he wouldn't do a payer yet. That's okay. Burnings? I read that headline weekend Bernie Bernie comes up with name for Trump clown. I didn't even read the rest of the article. I I. But the latest the latest polling here and have okay. Here's having trouble. Getting to it. The latest is at a national the national average polls of real clear politics. Wow. I'll get back then just a moment here, but the twenty twenty democratic presidential nomination. Harvard Harris poll, Biden, forty four percent Sanders. Fourteen next highest Harris would nine warn with five but a judge with two or work with three Booker with three. Well. Biden is up by thirty points in the poll. The only thing he's done so far. Smiled. There's only one reason. And I truly believe that this is I truly believe, and when we were covering the campaign, they Missouri campaign and Claire mccaskill came out with that ad that said crazy Democrats that was that was focused right on those that were involved in the cavenaugh hearings, which were which are as we all know Sanders. Warren, Harris Booker, they were all there, right? And I do believe that you have Democrats the rank and file looking insane. Who isn't a crazy democrat and the one that comes to the forefront? They look at it. And they say Biden he's been in forever. Right. And he's not viewed as nuts. Everybody else is crazy democrat. I really think that that is part of what's going on right now that proves Claire mccaskill point of using that it well, and it would be on the left. It would be their version of the silent majority. But in this case a plurality. But I mean, the people that don't want the AO sees to lead the party in the future. That they're not gonna vote for Trump. They're definitely gonna vote blue. But it's not going to be somebody on the far left. It's not going to be the activist. And that's what we talked about. Gosh last year year before on the left going forward to run for president. You're going to get the far left. You're going to have to be an activist eight six six ninety redeye when scheduling your spring cleaning, don't let your after treatment system VN afterthought with so much confusion still surrounding after treatment systems today. It's important to understand how they work in order to properly maintain them, passive and active regeneration or regions help clean and suit trapped in the diesel particular filter or DP f- passive regions occur naturally during steady driving. When the engine has reached the required operating temperature in order to do. So this means that the engine is producing enough exhaust heat to turn the particular.

Bernie Bernie President Trump Barney Frank Robert Muller Biden Harris Booker David perjury Robert Francis Beto Gary McNamara baiter Ginsburg Claire mccaskill Red Eye Radio Bernie Frank Panama Wisconsin Sanders Eric Red Eye congress
"next five hundred years" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"K S T E farm hour is brought to you in part by Dave Wilson nursery. Now, let's get back to the farm. Our? You may have heard about it. But what is it? We're talking about carbon farming one of the participants in the program here in California is Bruce Rominger, Bruce and his brother Rick of Romans your brothers farms outside winters are currently conducting experiments on sequestering carbon in the soil. What are the pros and cons? What are the benefits? Bruce, Roman juror explains. Well, carbon farming is basically trying to get carbon out of the atmosphere CO two as carbon one carbon molecule or atom with two oxygen. And you get that underground and people how do you do that? Well, that's what plans do plants take in CO two the emit the oxygen. Well, what happens to the carbon atom? It goes into the plant itself. The structure of plant would plants is mostly carbon. Well, humans are mostly carbon to it's the building block of organic matter of living matter on this planet, but carbon when it's taken into a plant. Quite a bit of as gone goes down into the soil as the roots. Also, and when that plants dies or harvested or something there's carbon that stays in the ground that has been moved out of the air into the ground by that living plant, so theoretically, if you manage your soil right to preserve that carbon. You can build up the amount of carbon in your soil. And that's basically the organic matter that percentage of soil has is organic is the carbon for the most part in your soil as a huge amount of benefit to that. For one thing. You're pulling carbon dioxide out, and you're putting it in the soil, which is called sequestering carbon because it's more stable and more permanent in the soil. Anything you can do to build up your Ganic matter, and your soil is helping the entire planet by pulling carbon out of the air lower in percentage of co two an atmosphere. It sounds great sounds like it's a win win for all. Because higher organic matter. Soils are fertile. They're easier. Farm better water infiltration, a whole bunch of pluses. It's kinda hard. To do in most situations to do it economically. It's not quite as simple astray for is of just described it when you're trying to grow a crop and make money, we would all love to be able to build up your Ganic matter our soil. We're trying to do that. It's a long slow process and in our climate with these dry dry summers that are really good for growing crops. It's hard to build up organic matter in soils with these long hot dry summers. We're working on it. We're trying to do it there sought down the road that you will be able to get paid for that in. There is a few protocols out there that are accepted where you can get paid a little bit in in managing rice in a certain way, you can get a carbon payment there's some forestry practices in the timber industry. Where you can't it's it's an ongoing process where we're learning how to do it. It's it's something that agriculture worldwide. Can't eventually play a big role. I think in pulling carbon out of the atmosphere and lowering CO two, but it's not. A real easy quick process. We all have to fear out our own system to make it work in in our crop rotation in our location with our soil's a lot of variables you mentioned you have an almond orchard, and what are the differences in employing conservation practices between a permanent crop and an annual crop. I think a permanent crop is easier. It's much easier. The system is much much simpler with one crop the same crop every year for decades as opposed to rotating different crop every single year. And it's not even like my rotation is always consistent. I don't always go tomatoes. Sunflowers wheat, corn tomatoes, sunflowers wheat corn. It varies depending on contract availability commodity prices. So to come up with a system where you can start doing sustainable practices in a rotating row. Crop operation is is much more difficult in our amens works doing cover crops were planning hedgerows were doing things, and I see that as a much simpler system in vineyards. Also, you know, cover crops are much easier thing that deal with it's very common talk a little bit about the need for synthetic fertilizers. When the trend is towards organic farming are are synthetic fertilizers necessary to feed the world, I believe. They are and I've grown I've been involved in organic farming for a long long time. And I'm I think it's fine. It's it's it's a different method. It's in a lot of ways, it's more sustainable in some ways. It's not there other inputs they use inorganic that that are need also be improved. But I think what I've read and not, you know, there's obviously difference of opinions on this is if you just start doing the math on a worldwide basis, and you look at the calories that every human being aids and you look at the food production, and you know, that nitrogen is a limiting factor on crop production worldwide to get enough nitrogen into the crops worldwide could feed the people, you know, I think we need synthetic fertilizers at this time. We don't have the technology to do without now people say well with legume cover crops and manures and things in organic you can get away with it while you can. But if every acre was organic, we don't have enough manure kaput on all those and if you're going to grow cover. Crops on every acre legume cover crops that legumes for the people that don't know our family of plants that can actually pull their own nitrogen out of the atmosphere. Also and then helped build up the nitrogen in the soil for the next crop. Then can use that nitrogen, so they're wonderful, except now think about the tens of millions of acres of leggings, you're gonna have to grow. And so there's going to be ground goes out of production for food crops because it's growing cover crops or it's producing the seed for like him cover crops and just from what I've heard from people in the eye at UC Davis. You start doing the math, and you just can't feed the planet with with out some synthetic fertilizers. How is that sustainable for the next five hundred years? Maybe not. So we we need to start trying to figure out how. But right now, we don't have the technology to do without and in my opinion, more and more farms are diversifying and sort of spreading their wings a little bit. And you're doing the same out there a Romans your brothers farms and that is to. Have an agritourism concept to your acreage. Yeah. We do that. We we recognize a long time ago that it's really good to open our farm up to people from outside of agriculture. Not just the tourism. But we do a lot of tours with university with other foreign groups, whatever just to bring people out in our the USDA brings out trainees for their in our offices to talk to us. We want people to understand about our culture that aren't involved in it directly, but agritourism is similar slightly different. You know, all we do is we have some range land, and we allow people to bring their horses out and for a small fee, they get to ride through the range land. What what concerns me, and I'm all for agritourism. But I I believe in agritourism, if it's, you know, real farmers doing something that supplements their income on their farm, but doesn't take away from the real business of the farming, which is growing food crops and people locally here know this. There's a controversy in your county right now about some of these wedding events centers that are calling themselves agritourism, but have no agricultural aspect to their business. They're basically non-farm people that have just. Bought a property and started throwing parties, and I understand a lot of people love to get married in beautiful places, and that's perfectly understandable. But it's difficult to farm around these it's basically like farming next to a school or next to an urban center. There's all these more restrictions now put on the farmers around these places. So I think we need to be careful with agritourism make sure it's agriculture made. Sure, it make sure it's educational, you know, for the public that's being out there and to make sure it's not harming the actual production in that area. We don't want to become an egg Disneyland kind of places where it looks like egg. But there's really no food being growing, you know. And all you have is, you know, pumpkin patches and corn mazes, and and you know, and Christmas tree farms or something like that. Which some people think is agriculture, but it's really not, you know, we're not feeding people and those kinds of things. So we have to be careful on on. We don't overdo it with something, and we need to keep the correct definition of Agra of agritourism, which is, you know, actual farmers and ranchers supplementing their income with some sort of tourism activity, Bruce Roman juror and his brother. Trek run Roman your brothers farms outside winters in yolo county, recently honored with the national Hugh Hammond Bennett award for conservation excellence for what they're doing on their sixty five hundred acres outside winters. Bruce good talking with you and best of luck. Well, thank you. Fred. I appreciate the conversation. We've got more of the T farm our right after.

Bruce Dave Wilson California Bruce Rominger yolo county USDA Bruce Roman Hugh Hammond Bennett Agra Fred Rick UC Davis sixty five hundred acres five hundred years
"next five hundred years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"next five hundred years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"But imagine if you could put a no Thomas car on the ride that would run now for the next five hundred years, and you couldn't take it off that history. History. Had history has do you wanna know the reason that atomic energy was able to be regulated by the US government was because when they developed the bomb it was during wartime, and so the president had special wartime powers. So the whole fact that the entire like atomic energy is an entire industry, but it's entirely regulated and controlled by the US government because it was during wartime in the president had wartime powers to make that happen. Had it been developed by private industry to be a completely different issue. Yeah. Non actually, I agree with you, the I think, you're right. But if it wasn't at that point in time, all of the governments the world United to agree that nuclear power had to be controlled because of the risk. So they only needs to where the here's the difference industry. Here's the difference. It's still very hard as as Kim Jong UN will tell you to create an atomic bomb. It takes a lot of skill a lot of expertise and a lot of tests. It turns out crisper is something you could pretty much do in your basement. Yeah. It's not that hard. And that's the real problem here is that this technology, whether it was developed by government or private labs, or whatever it will get out and unlike an atomic bomb, lots of people. Yeah, there's a lot of technology like that isn't there? We got the same Kane and heroin people doing that at time and look at the damage that that's look how easy it is to make meth. We'll be thing. I'm confident Christopher. We'll be at the inaugural. Yeah. Oh, yes. It one hundred percent. And ultimately, it has great potential to make things better. It's just, you know, human humans and humidity is Mitch. No, not ready to hit actually deal is with this in time. But the time is certainly not there yet. We'll such early days, you know, one of the of mentioned this several times, I'm reading I love you've all Noah Harari, the philosopher from the from Israel who wrote sans and homo dis his newest is Twenty-one lessons for the twenty first century, and one of the things he's pointing out is as we're doing this kind of regression to nationalism, and it's happening in many countries worldwide, this kind of nostalgic desire to close in it's happening in Britain, as you know, Greg, and it's happening in the United States, the problem that is many of the problems that we have to deal with in the future are not national but global you clan. I can't deal with climate change nationally, you can't deal with Christopher nationally. It's going to take a global effort, and in many cases countries are moving in the wrong direction. You know? A country can't ban crisper, and then expect it not to be used everywhere else right effect nuclear nuclear weapons as a global issue not a national issue, and they attempt to deal with it nationally is is fraught with peril as we will know if they've got so we have to have them. It's a global world. And you can't turn back the clock on it in the things that are happening. You know, they're ultimately going to be blips on the radar. We know that this is the way history moves right is often Tuesday for one step back. And you know, it's funny because one of the greatest examples of this is China and US and their trade relations in all of that. We are so intertwined and interdependent. On each other commercially that it's ridiculous. A lot of this thing is so much posturing and so much. You know, really negotiation tactics in many ways from from both sides because it would be catastrophic to both the US and China to not have a really strong trade relationship. That's just what ample right. It's just that promotes peace. I mean, that's. As one of the reasons we haven't had a nuclear war is because it would be catastrophic for both sides and everybody knows that right?.

United States president Christopher Kim Jong UN Thomas Noah Harari heroin China Kane Israel Greg Britain one hundred percent five hundred years