35 Burst results for "Newton"

Dave Rubin: Red States Show a Willingness to Compromise

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | Last month

Dave Rubin: Red States Show a Willingness to Compromise

"Don't even want to get into it. The disagreements of like, what is a conservator or not? What really matters though is like we believe in consent of the governed separation of powers, the constitution, freedom of speech, we believe there's something worth conserving and protecting, and then let's go defeat these degenerate woke people. Yes, like that's the mission statement. Yes, we can set aside whatever the differences are. So Newton is so irrelevant. Charlie, some people on the more libertarian side are going to want no taxes. Some conservatives want a little bit of taxes, but they don't want a lot of federal taxes. We could put all of that aside to save the country. To save the republic. Let's just save the republic. And then we can hash out our differences after. Right? We can. And by the way, you know, I mentioned this on the show last night at the live event that, you know, when it comes to this roe V wade thing, look, the pro life thing to conservatives, this is like the top of the thing. It's about life, conserving life. So this is the type of thing. But two interesting things happen. One of them, I didn't know until the show last night. So in Florida where I now live, a few weeks ago, they passed a 15 week ban on abortion. Now, 50 weeks, that's three and a half months. That's more, even though I have some willingness for a few weeks. That's further than I would go. I would go maybe to 12, okay? Now, I get what I purely get the pro life position on this. I'm not denying that when the sperm meets the egg, it's a life, all of that stuff. Okay, fine. But think about this. Florida, which is thought of as this red, right wing, Ron DeSantis state. They did a three and a half month abortion law, and nobody cared. I don't mean nobody cared in such a good way. And what I mean is they passed it and it was thought of as a compromise, and it wasn't controversial. It wasn't on the front page of The New York Times or Washington Post. It was like, oh, here's a compromise. So that shows you that red states are willing to compromise, because if it was a purely red state position, they'd have no abortion or it would have the most minor exclusions, right? So that's what Florida did. Someone told me this and you can confirm it for me last night. I didn't know this till after the show that Arizona I think did the exact same thing. Very similar. 15 weeks. So think about that. You've got two states, Arizona, I consider a red state. And I think it will get redder. I think you're going to be okay here. We got to fix it. I know you got some things to do, but I think you're going to be okay. But the point is that the red states are showing a willingness to compromise. It's the other side that's not

Ron Desantis Florida Newton Charlie Washington Post The New York Times Arizona
41% of Kids Who Go to College Don't Graduate

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 3 months ago

41% of Kids Who Go to College Don't Graduate

"All, 41% of kids that go to college don't graduate. 41%. Every person in this room knows somebody or you are somebody that went to college and you dropped out. There is this belief that you must go to college to get a higher wage. It's just not true. Every one of those studies is faulty because it doesn't factor in what you're actually studying. It doesn't factor in your work ethic, your integrity, all these other different things, right? Not to mention the dropout rate as it is. But let's just look at an average college or university where the average student debt burden is anywhere between 35 to $40,000 and going up from there. So we have a generation of young people who are telling them to go borrow money. They don't have the study things that don't matter to go find jobs that don't exist. Into an increasing marketplace where they're not actually being filled with skills nor are they developing the full human being. So I would be fully on board for college. If every college like hillsdale college, where they're pursuing or they're going deep into the classics, Socrates Plato and Aristotle Aquinas and Augustine and bacon and Newton and they're really diving into the great books. It's the opposite. They're training activists. And instead, it's this community that's been created where they want you to believe there is no God. And if there is a God, it's you. It's like, wow. Okay. You're gone. Yeah, you're God. You can make the decisions you want to make. And I mean, I run a college organization, right? I have visited well over a 175 colleges, turning point USA is now on over 3000 high school and college campuses across the country, right? Grace God. And so I say this with a good amount of authority, which is college is damaging our country more than most people could ever realize. Every major bad idea that makes your head turn and you kind of think stems from a college campus. Every single one.

Socrates Plato Aristotle Aquinas Hillsdale College Augustine Newton Bacon USA
Maureen Steele: Support the 'People's Convoy' Online or in-Person

The Dan Bongino Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Maureen Steele: Support the 'People's Convoy' Online or in-Person

"Right How can they help you is there any way outside of just money are there other ways people can they join you If they want to join how do they get in touch with you If they want to support please put the information I'm going to put it out all week I'm going to talk about this all week So don't you worry But how else can they support you So you can go to our website and the map of our route is there Our first marshaling point is the kingman Arizona area And anyone can join us in the marshaling areas There's moms and Subaru's coming with their kids and the family dog So anyone can join cars are going to be behind all the trucks But this is the people's convoy This isn't the trucker's convoy The truckers are the tip of the spear but anyone can join And if you can only join for a hundred miles join for a hundred miles if you can only join and come and give us all a hug and a handshake at the marshaling areas just do that Also join in your own hometown If you live in Newton Iowa or wherever you live get a rally together hold a vigil make it known and call the local press I mean let them know America needs to unite and let people see that this isn't a fringe movement Anyone with two eyes in their head when Trudeau announced that knew it was no fringe movement It was the entire country rising up and I would daresay we have 80% of our great nation on our side Americans have had it They've had it with not just with COVID but with cancel culture with the PC police People are done with it We want normal American life back And it's time to take it back

Kingman Subaru Arizona Newton Iowa Trudeau America
CNN Unfairly Covers Canadian Truckers Protest

The Larry Elder Show

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

CNN Unfairly Covers Canadian Truckers Protest

"CNN just teed off on these truckers. Listen to this. In our healthy Canada is seeing it second week of protests against COVID restriction, protests that have crippled everyday life there. It started with a group of truckers, angry about vaccine mandates, blocking traffic on January 29th. Over the weekend, more demonstrations sprouted across the country in Vancouver, Toronto, Quebec City, streets are clogged, the honking is incessant and deafening. Many businesses and even some schools can not open. Now the mayor of Ottawa was declaring a state of emergency. Let's get right to CNN's Paula Newton who's live in Otto and Paula. Police have been reluctant to take any major steps to clear the protesters because of fears of escalating matters. Same network cheering on people trashing the streets, causing violence, including deaths during the four months after the death of George Floyd.

CNN Paula Newton Quebec City Canada Vancouver Toronto Ottawa Otto Paula George Floyd
Historian William Federer Takes a Look Back at Various Forms of Government

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Historian William Federer Takes a Look Back at Various Forms of Government

"I'm talking to our friend Bill Federer with American minute dot com. Bill, you just gave us the four stages that went to the French through the French Revolution and onward. So please maybe reprise that. So we can track. Right. So we have the pilgrim covenant form of government. Think of it as a triangle. You get rights and blessings from God and you voluntarily take care of your neighbor because you're accountable to God. In the century after the pilgrims, covenant turned into social contract with a distant God. This comes out of the scientific revolution where you have Isaac Newton discovering laws of gravity. Kepler discovering laws of planetary motion, Robert Boyle discovering laws of pressure. And so some theologians said, well, gee, maybe God made everything with laws, and like a guy winds up a clock and said that on the shelf, everything's following these rules, these gears. But if God's there, he's distant. He's far removed. The ultimate of this is spinoza's, you know, that God's an impersonal force in the universe and so forth. And so the century after this age of enlightenment, distant God, you have the French Revolution. And it's a social contract with no God. You get your rights from the group, you're accountable to the group. And then in this, one of the writers of the French Revolution was Jean Jacques Rousseau. And he said, if the state says to an individual, it's expedient for the state that you should die. That individual on a die, because it's like there's a gift made by the generosity of the state. It's like, okay, there's some serious consequences to getting rid of this God. You don't have any rights other than what the state grants you. And what the state give us, the state can take it the way. Well, the century after the French Revolution is where you have Hegel and Karl Marx and you have

Bill Federer Robert Boyle Isaac Newton Kepler Bill Spinoza Jean Jacques Rousseau Hegel Karl Marx
William Federer Shares the Story of Yale's 8th President Timothy Dwight

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:14 min | 5 months ago

William Federer Shares the Story of Yale's 8th President Timothy Dwight

"Tell us if you would the story of Timothy Dwight. Right. So the setting is we have a revolution and then France has a revolution. And our revolution was preceded by a great awakening revival. France's revolution was preceded by Voltaire, who mocked Christianity and had a very skeptical viewpoint and undermined morals. And so as a result, the French Revolution became very bloody. And so Timothy Dwight was the president of Yale during this time, and he wrote comments on the difference between our revolution and the French Revolution. In my post on Timothy, why did I go through a little history? Yale, it was founded in 1701. There were ten congregational ministers who sort of felt like Harvard was getting to religious and stodgy. They actually used a term called old lights versus the new lights. And the old life were the religiously strict orthodox, the guys that had their positions and they looked down upon emotional preachers like George whitfield and so forth. The university was originally called the Connecticut collegiate school at killingworth milford, but then they moved to 1716 to New Haven, Connecticut. So the college group, as a result of reverend Jeremiah drummer and he defended the colonial charters against overreaching British Parliament. So the Chargers were given, then you'd have different kings that would want to take away the old charter and consolidated and he would defend them. He secured 700 books for the college's library and solicited donations from many individuals, including the English playwright, Richard Steele, the scientist, Sir Isaac Newton, and he also got contributions from a merchant named elihu

Timothy Dwight Yale France Voltaire George Whitfield Connecticut Collegiate School Killingworth Milford Reverend Jeremiah Drummer Timothy Harvard New Haven British Parliament Connecticut Chargers Richard Steele Sir Isaac Newton
Heinicke, Washington spoil Newton's homecoming 27-21

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Heinicke, Washington spoil Newton's homecoming 27-21

"Cam Newton returned to bank of America stadium for the first time as Panthers quarterback but it was overshadowed by Washington's Taylor Heinicke who threw for two hundred and six yards and three touchdowns in a twenty seven twenty one win hi Nicky Mehta scrambling forcing to completion to tight end John Bates and a fourth down run on a bootleg to set up the go ahead field goal those plays coming back football you can just try to make something happen trying to find a little opening or little leverage on somebody and give a guy shot so night I remember doing that stuff and I was a kid on the backyard halftime Packer game so didn't did provide some big moments throwing two touchdowns and running for a twenty four yard score but he conceded he needs time to master the playbook I'm Ben Thomas

Taylor Heinicke Nicky Mehta Cam Newton Bank Of America John Bates Panthers Washington Football Packer Ben Thomas
Superman's sequel: Newton leads Panthers over Cards 34-10

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Superman's sequel: Newton leads Panthers over Cards 34-10

"Cam Newton provided an instant spark in leading the Panthers to a thirty four ten rather the cardinals Newton ran for short touchdowns on its first place since signing with Carolina last week he threw a two yard TD pass to Robby Anderson on the Panthers next year he's giving them a fourteen nothing lead six and a half minutes into the game I wouldn't even call it the new me but I'm big on energy and that feeling on the sideline collectively as a team started with PJ to the office going out there in in in in however the defense given the turnover dust dust a combination of a great team win on the road the majority of snaps went to PJ Walker who completed twenty two of twenty nine for one hundred sixty seven yards on the ferry

Panthers Robby Anderson Cam Newton Cardinals Newton Carolina Pj Walker
Keith Getty Describes New Album 'Confessio,' a Love Letter to His Irish Heritage

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 8 months ago

Keith Getty Describes New Album 'Confessio,' a Love Letter to His Irish Heritage

"Book. But we're here to talk about your album. Tell us my friend. Confessio, this goes back to Irish American route. So you're in Nashville now, but you're from Ireland, and your wife is from Ireland. And talk and talk about the album, confessio, brand new album. Will you kindly interview us before sing global last year? We started the family him saying and did sing global all last year through the pandemic. And then we were honestly our heads were just fried. And so we went home for a year. So 7 days after 7 days after sing global, we flew home, 9 11. It's an easy day to remember, getting in a plane. On 9 11, we flew back to Ireland, and we stayed in Ireland for the whole year. Like John Lennox and C. S. Lewis and Allison McGrath and many other people who you know, we come from that tiny little north coast of Ireland and we spent the year there. And this album really is a love letter to that. You know, we, you know, we come from this place that Christianity is 17th centuries old that until the 1980s gave more missionaries per capita than any country in the world. South Korea and I give the most. And but also, but also this connection as you brought our four daughters who are all American citizens. He brought them back. We're all born in America. As he brought them back to their heritage and explained to them, here's been kind of donegal or John Newton's boat came in and he wrote, begun to write amazing grace. Here's here's where beat on my vision was written. And here's our culture and we began to realize that even as musicians that everything from country music to bluegrass to gospel songs to ship note hem the day to American and Appalachian music are all outgrowths of our own scotch Irish tradition that we have. And so this album was just really, I think it's a love letter to our

Ireland John Lennox Allison Mcgrath Nashville C. S. Lewis North Coast South Korea John Newton Donegal America
Tiny house in wealthy Boston suburb sells for $315,000

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Tiny house in wealthy Boston suburb sells for $315,000

"Our unique tiny home in a Boston suburb have sold after about a month on the market in the Boston area is red hot real estate market it's hard to find a house that sold for less than the asking price in this case maybe it's because the home involved is only two hundred and fifty square feet the home in Newton Massachusetts is on three fifty eighths of an acre it went for three hundred fifteen thousand dollars after going on the market for almost four hundred and fifty thousand according to Coldwell banker the house built in nineteen seventy is described as a tiny studio home with a completely open living space lofted unfinished basement and a new bathroom several unusual homes in the Boston area have gone for high prices in the past several months including the famous ten foot wide skinny house sold in September for one and a quarter million dollars I'm Jennifer king

Boston Newton Massachusetts Coldwell Jennifer King
"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

Let's Start A Cult

01:40 min | 9 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

"Know who will also demand that you give them their money. is it the matthew the mafia well both both are probably true. Yeah we did it. I specifically meant the products and services that support this show. Oh no usually they will give you something for the money. But i cannot personally guarantee that In enjoy these.

"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

Let's Start A Cult

08:31 min | 9 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

"Goes good. I like that. This aggression was encouraged by both newton and harvey according to the. Yeah they were like this is great. Keep going his. Yeah get that. Collect theater collective. There's nothing dork. Year than theater nerds arguing over theater spaces stage. We can do improv better than you us. According to the sullivan. Paul sprecher foot. All the members were invited to come down and occupy the theater. The cops came in in the middle of the night and we had barricaded the doors. It was very exciting saul wanted to teach people how to stand up to the cops. He liked that kind of confrontation and quote. Which i mean. Fuck cops i guess you know like but this is an extreme where i think the cops might have been in the right to attack. Yeah i mean this was like This would have been like nineteen seventies new york too so yes edward great through pretty wild back then it was kind of a warriors style right. Yeah this is probably like before. There was any amount of oversight of policing exactly this disturbing nature of the sullivan. Stu would only escalate from there on march twenty eighth nineteen seventy-nine reactor at a nuclear generating station in dauphin county. Pennsylvania partially melted resulting in a radiation leak that many feared would affect the local population the three mile island accident as it was referred to afterwards is now known as the most significant nuclear power plant accident in american history garnering a five to seven rating on the international nuclear event scale. Pretty hot. it's at a seven. Seems like that could be at a five or ten you know. Yeah this was. This was a good nuclear event. Not a perfect one. Yeah it didn't kill enough people often try next don't you. I loved it. There's like a rotten tomatoes style service for nuclear disasters. Five out of seven from critics. But it's a seven seven as whereas the audience is concerned radiated tomatoes. Maybe there you. That's what it is besides causing widespread panic about the potential negative effects of nuclear power. The three mile island accident also drove the sullivans to relocate to orlando florida in a bid to avoid escape the imminent destruction of new york city. When this failed to happen they returned to the upper west side. Were those who had declined to make the move or ostracized by newton and the rest of the institutes appointed leaders. That's pretty interesting. Yeah it causes a divide between the haves and the have nots. It's like we've been to florida. We know what true freedom is you. You haven't lived until you've been orlando. It's like It's like covert when all the new yorkers moved to florida when to get three no mask. Mandates mandates yep much the same it all. It's all exactly the same. Even at the time. Florida in mandate anything. That's why the sullivans loved it. Yeah there were like a cult. Welcome in he'll fit right in with the other ones. We've got plenty of colts. We've got a spot on the by you for you. Have some oranges. The three mile island accident proved to be a turning point for the sullivan institute. It changed the dynamics among members with newton behaving more and more radically as the months passed for instance he believed that the cia cia was interfering with joanne harvey's work and so he had a room built was still played walls so that she could edit her films in peace. Well i never. I never considered that. That's actually a pretty good idea. You should think about that you know. Yeah if our creative pursuits. Don't do. Well just blame it on the government. Interfering with them at the output wasn't what we intended. I think i think with your line of work. They might already be watching. That might be. Well received their most of your listeners. Actually the shake. We'll take whatever it takes. Yeah please subscribe. And so he also began seeing enemies everywhere which led him to intimidate an abuse his followers in a misguided attempt to protect himself and this is the classic cult leader trope and they all go down this where they think. Everyone's after them and out to get them psychology guy. Why would that be. I don't know probably like a little bit of narcissism and they. They definitely think that like you know. They're like paranoid and anxious about anybody doing anything that is in them. Abc control of it. It's probably control thing to right like you know you spend so much time telling other people that you know best that eventually you start to believe it right and then you know you're you're still aware enough to understand that not. Everybody thinks that you do know best. And so i think that's very undercutting to a person with the ego that it takes to be a cult leader reid well hundred percent. You guys are good. Wow are you professional idiots. Josh charge me for the hour. No this is on the house. Allow perfect first ones freeze. How we do it for our own narcissism. Just like you say you guys are good but you're not with the cia. Are you moving. Leader amy siskind. Who had been a member of the sullivan in stew. For more than two decades recalled that quote even had this idea on how to deal with people who were against you and his idea was basically intimidation and violence in her many incidents throughout the history of the group of intimidation and quote. So how. I love this. He's like i got this great new idea joanne. I got this great idea intimidate and abused people. She's like that's an original one. I've never ever seen that before. I don't think another person's ever tried to intimidate or abuse. The people around them to get them to do what they want. Anyway i thought hitler tw- twenty years ago i learned i. I know a thing or two. Because i seen a thing or two. Yeah he's great guy. He also encourage this behavior among the sullivans to which resulted in the institutes therapist using fear tactics to manipulate their patients in order to get them to act as they wished according to test. Ko of penn state university desire to control. Who had kids. And how many and who with one account of when a member tried to leave to sullivan's track the man down to subway and dangled him over the tracks threatening to kill him if he left the movement. One of those men was newton son and quote. Wait a minute sold newton. Kids got to hang around. Yeah oh yeah. The rules don't apply to newton. Who can he makes their wives. And he gets to have old fam- he gets to have multiple families exactly and that's why isaac newton's also didn't abide by his own laws. Yeah i guess if his sons doing this i guess you could say the apple in full from the draw own ges. I'll give you that one all right. We'll start running counter on puns in the senate there. We go if you hit five. You're allowed back. We'll be no problem to add to that. Newton also acquired a fleet of school buses and motorcycles claiming that it was necessary in case of an emergency former sullivan. Dr michael bray was put in charge of this and he later recalled that quote. We'd have very planned out escape. Route that involved. Walking to george washington bridge in terms of the leadership's children it meant putting them in backpacks and then writing them out. In an who'd motorcycles which we had about six of an quote by the time the sullivan institute had managed to amass approximately twelve million dollars in property assets. Apart from the several apartment buildings in the upper west side they also owned a resort in the catskills and a house in vermont all of these refunded by members who had been voluntarily giving up the majority of their salaries for the purpose betterment of the group. Oh my god. And andy art. Do you.

newton sullivan Paul sprecher sullivan institute cia florida joanne harvey orlando dauphin county saul harvey Stu amy siskind edward Pennsylvania colts new york city new york penn state university
"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

Let's Start A Cult

07:11 min | 9 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

"Theories and paranormal phenomenon. From the death of john lennon to the men of new orleans they cover it all. Please welcome art. And andy. our you guys doing today. They josh josh. We're doing great. Thank you for having us. Thank you for having us and thank you to your listeners. For putting up with us our apologies and also our thanks. Oh no no you. You guys are great. My my listeners will love you. fred will become Bunkers what do you call your audience bunkers funk funk funk okay biscuit as book fuckers but it is bunkers. That's true all right. All right i. i appreciate that. So fred's will be thumb bunk fosters and and they will like it so yeah some some aggressive cross pollination going on conversion well guys in today's episode of let's start called. We will be talking about the story of the sullivan institute. An infamous sex cult based in new york city that existed from the late nineteen fifties to the early nineteen ninety s established by a psychotherapist who aimed to promote his mentors teaching it instead became a group that four members to give up their children in favor of sexually liberated lifestyle. The so what are your thoughts on promiscuous lifestyle with no kids. Wow i mean the bachelor life. Sounds like a dream come true. I mean every night down at the applebees hunting for strange. The apple beats. That's the life for me. Yeah that's right. Well where else would you rather be a friday night. No kids nobody to answer to nobody. But you and the bartender jeff even just little late all your problems to lay at his feet because he's here to serve you. Well that's the that is a very interesting take on on this cult but so you guys might fit right in by the sounds of it. Wow wow yeah we've never fit in anywhere that's a i. Yeah usually people tell us where to aspirin for colts. You guys are way too much. We have this too much personality. We used to know. This guy's name was charles manson. He was like i. Listen i gotta kick you guys out so it's not really working out. Your personalities are a little aggressive for me. The drugs are not working on you. And your harshened my buzz to so. Take a hike artery. Well let's hop into the early years of the leader saul newton. Not much is actually known about the early years of saul bernard cohen. Who would later go by the name. Saul newton what is known though is that he was born on june twenty-fifth nineteen o six in the city of saint john in new brunswick canada lewis canadian. We claim him. Oh vilo yeah another rotten canadian immigrant come into the united states. It's starting something weird. I him then drake than justin bieber. It doesn't ever end. I apologize after attending the university of wisconsin. He went on to study at the university of chicago. Where iran social circles that ultimately resulted in him becoming communist and antifascist these ideologies led him to serve in the spanish civil war which lasted from nineteen thirty six until nineteen thirty nine which is super weird that he was like. I can go fight in another country. Civil war does that. Does that not seem odd to you. This is already what a life story. Yeah even already. He immigrated from. Canada went to school in the united states and then fought in the spanish civil war. So taylor's all this time. What a life. He could wrap it up there and he could write so many. Yeah but wait. There's more so much more. Afterwards he was drafted into united states. Army to fight against the axis powers during world war two. The post war years saw newton studying to become a psychotherapist although he maintained a keen interest in politics and psychology around this time he married dr jane pierce a self taught marxist therapist whom he had met while working. At william allison's white institute in new york city co founded in nineteen forty. Three by the renowned psychiatrist harry stack sullivan. The william allison white institute promised to train students. In psychoanalysis and psychotherapy it was widely regarded as revolutionary since it's teaching steered clear of conservative mainstream ideas in favor ones that were newer less explored and perceived as more radical. You know radical like not lobotomize. Impede right it was about say radical far out radical like writing skateboard while deng. It's cool mom. All the other kids are doing it. Psychology is cool mom. Shortly after harry. Stack sullivan's death in january nineteen forty nine newton and pierced. Left the william allinson white institute to start their own. They called it the sullivan institute for research in psychoanalysis just quite a matt mouthful but you can see they named it after the man they mired the man who just passed away so they got they did. They did learn a lot from them but clearly not enough yet. They might have missed a couple chapters. Yeah they skipped a few classes. Newton pearson vision there institute to provide students with an unadulterated version of his namesake's teachings. But it didn't take long for this to be distorted and ruin. thanks in part to the couple's political ideologies. Kind of like how the idea of this podcast started off with great intentions but my fascist ideologies of ruined abbey and. Yeah i mean whatever. Our political ideologies are have also contributed to the decline of this episode. You guys you guys just believe in Alien pyramids right. Yes that's right that's very love. We love to see extraterrestrials arranging themselves in the shape of a pyramid and cheering for the home team. In the shape of orion's belt so b sullivan institute opened its doors in nineteen fifty seven attracting many artists and intellectuals all of whom were taught that mental illnesses and social anxiety were caused by the traditional nuclear family unit which consisted of parents and their children because of this they were prohibited from engaging exclusive committed relationships with newton and pierce encouraging everyone to have regular sex with each other. Yeah i just have sex with whoever. You want a winning me over with this philosophy. I'm through the door my nut. I have a pamphlet in hand. My hat is backwards. I'm ready to listen. I got my skateboard in the other. Yup let's.

Saul newton josh josh sullivan institute fred saul bernard cohen john lennon new york city united states charles manson dr jane pierce william allison's white instit new orleans harry stack sullivan william allison white institut andy colts canada saint john Stack sullivan new brunswick
Paul Anka Recalls His Time Working With the Rat Pack

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:24 min | 10 months ago

Paul Anka Recalls His Time Working With the Rat Pack

"Paul anka. It's so great to see you. I wanna ask you. You're sitting in front of a zillion gold records Where they happen to be your gold records for the most part of my keble michael jackson elvis presley other artists have been involved with most part a lot of those that are from nineteen fifty seven on. Now you worked with the folks. You you've mentioned. I mean i should mention this upfront. If i were better my job recently you've worked with drake the weekend Michael boob lay andrea bocelli. Olivia newton john. We were talking about your time with sinatra. How did it end up that you were working with what we today. Call the ratpac. No greater fan of dean martin than yours. Truly amazing that you knew these men. Well we have to go back to the beginnings you know the record business and the business that i was in was primarily run by the boys the boys mafia whatever and that was cool. There are great work for we knew what a position was but they ran everything they own the clubs the only record companies etcetera so when i started beginning success for young I realized who was working for. I realized you know how i was to be myself and i started working to copacabana. Which was the testing ground in new york city. I was successful. And i got the word that now that new york went very well. We're sending out to vegas to the boys and you're gonna work in vegas. So what year are we talking about. Big apartment what year we talking about. Fifty eight nine hundred fifty. Started sophie tucker. Which was i guess. My audition did well with her. And then it evolved into the sixties started working sands right from their youngest kid. Never worked there and here. I was with all these guys. Were my idols realizing that. Bobby darin frankie avalon still these kid idols. But we knew this at the end and we realized that we had to evolve survive into something else thus we had these guys that we looked up dean martin sammy and break so i like to sand started working and guys mentored me. They took me in. Because that's making money for them indirectly directly. The boys ran the place and we became very very

Michael Boob Paul Anka Olivia Newton John Andrea Bocelli Elvis Presley Michael Jackson Dean Martin Sinatra Drake Copacabana Vegas Sophie Tucker Bobby Darin Frankie Avalon New York City New York Dean Martin Sammy
Personal Brand: How Do People Experience You?

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:08 min | 10 months ago

Personal Brand: How Do People Experience You?

"In today's episode. We're talking about building your personal brand which connects to our business driver of you guessed it personal our guest. Today is tim newton. He's the senior creative officer here ramsey solutions. And he's an expert in the field of branding. I sat down with him to talk about. What a personal brand is. Why it's important and the steps you can take to build the personal brand. You want to have then after our interview. Tim is going to coach. Some small business owners as they call in with their personal brand questions. You don't wanna miss that at first. Let's jump into my conversation with tim. Tim thanks for being with us today. No problem happy to be here. This is going to be fun. I love talking about branding and marketing. And you are the king of branding and in my heart. At least evidence appreciate it. Never mu so a lot of people You know rightfully so. Maybe have concerns about their personal brand how they're perceived Obviously my personal brand is being really rugged handsome intellectually you can tell just if you're listening on the podcast you feel you feel that i experience you. Yeah well i want to just get the definition out there because people have a lot of feelings about what a personal brand is. So how do you define personal brand personal brand really is someone else's perception of you like is is basically what it is. It's important like the thing. I talk about personal brand all the time because the reality is we are always making decisions about everybody around us just based on how they walk. Talk dress all. They're all unconscious decisions. But we're always making decisions about each other and so that's why personal brands important. I've had Team members tell me man. We we talk about personal bran. Is it really that necessary to talk about personal brand like is it really that important. And i'm like what i see where you're coming from but if people are making decisions about us every day then there's something to personal brand and when it comes down to it if it's people's perception of you a good personal brand equals opportunities and is if you have a good personal brand you have more opportunities. You had bad personal brand new fewer opportunities so whether we like it or not. We have a personal brand. Every one of us has a personal

Tim Newton Ramsey Solutions TIM
"newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:28 min | 10 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Newton foot.

"newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson and i'm holly fry. We have done various episodes related to the environment on the show before so things like the smog and the cuyahoga river fires and the london smog of nineteen. Fifty-two we talked about extinctions in our twenty eighteen episode on endings and about invasive species and our episode on australia's rabbit proof fence and then in recent times in our episode on kudzu. That came out not too long ago while all of these topics are related to the environment and humans and industries impacts on the environment. None of it's really about climate. I don't know that we've ever talked about the climate in terms of like the current climate crisis. We've talked about things like the year without a summer which was a climactic phenomenon. The yeah we've talked about ways different. Scientists have measured various aspects of the climate. A little bit yes. Some of that has come up. In unearthed yeah not climate itself specifically yes and the warming of the climate in particular which is an ongoing emergency. Obviously so today. We are going to remedy that. We're gonna talk about eunice newton foot and in eighteen fifty six. She became the first person to make a connection between the earth's temperature and the concentration of carbon dioxide gas atmosphere. That credit though usually goes to john tyndall who made the same connection a few years later eunice. Newton was born in gauchan connecticut on july seventeenth. Eighteen nineteen and she was baptized on september. Twenty ninth of that year. Her father's name was isaac newton junior which is a delightful coincidence considering unis's path in life and her mother's name was thursday and eunice was the eleventh of their twelve children. Isaac not a scientist or philosopher but a farmer and although he seems to have been very successful at this he also liked to invest in various business ventures and these did not always work out and by the time he died in eighteen thirty five. He was deeply in debt. Sometime after eunice was born but well before her father's death the family moved to east bloomfield new york. And that's where unis's parents would live for the rest of their lives and really beyond that we just don't know much about her early life except that in eighteen thirty six. When she was about seventeen she enrolled at troy. Female seminary that later became known as the emma willard school after its founder. It's possible that eunice left journals correspondence or other personal accounts of her time in troy or other times in her life but if she did they have not been brought to light so we don't really know much more about her time at the seminary than we do about her earlier life but there are a couple of conclusions that we can draw. What is that her education. There would have had a really strong foundation in science. And that's something that wasn't really typical for a women's school at the time. Emma willard corresponded and collaborated with amazon. Eaten who was co founder of the rensselaer school. That's now rensselaer polytechnic institute. I was about seven miles or eleven. Kilometers away from troy. Eaten was a natural scientist and on educational reformer and his reforms included a focus on learning by doing rather than focusing on memorization so willard's curriculum for the women's seminary incorporated a lot of these ideas. So eunice would not only have attended lectures on the scientists. She also would have learned about designing and conducting experiments as part of scientific study. It's also possible that unis's time at the seminary influenced connection. That would happen leader in her life. Eunice was at the seminary from eighteen. Thirty six to eighteen thirty eight and later on she would live near and work with elizabeth. Katie stanton who graduated from troy female seminary in eighteen thirty two. So it is possible but not really documented anywhere that these two women felt a connection thanks to their having gone to the same school on august twelfth. Eighteen forty one when eunice was twenty two. She married elisha foote who was about ten years older than she was. After their marriage they moved to seneca falls new york also home to elizabeth katie stanton. At one point. Elisha actually bought the home. That's known today. Is elizabeth katie. Stanton house although it doesn't look like the foots ever lived in that house. Both of eunice and elisha children were born in seneca falls and those were mary who was born on july twenty first of eighteen. Forty two and augusta who was born october twenty fourth eighteen forty four in eighteen forty eight. While living in seneca falls both eunice and elisha were involved with the women's rights movement and the seneca falls convention. Eunice was one of the five women on the committee that was tasked with keeping the conference proceedings. She and elisha also both signed the declaration of sentiments that was crafted during the convention. On most reproductions of that document unisys signature is fifth after lucretia mont harriet katie. Eaten margaret prior and elizabeth katie. Stanton again we don't have a lot of personal remembrance of her. All of this suggests that she was an active and involved participant in this phase of the women's rights movement in the united states. While living in seneca falls eunice became a member of the american art union which works to promote the creation and sale of american art. Elisha became district attorney for seneca county and then a judge of the court of common pleas. Eventually the foots moved from seneca falls to saratoga springs new york and regardless of where they lived both elisha and unicef seem to have both been really interested in experiments and inventions. Their published work suggests that they set up laboratories in their homes where they did experimental work that they hoped would be worthy of publication. This includes the papers that were red at the american association for the advancement of science meeting in eighteen. Fifty six which is where we are at chronologically in this story. But we're going to have a lengthier discussion of unisys scientific work later so for now we will move on to the rest of what we know about her life. In addition to their published scientific work both elisha and eunice applied for and were granted. Multiple patents unisys patents included one for a filling for souls of boots and shoes. This kept the boots and the shoes from squeaking that patent was issued in eighteen sixty later developed a paper making machine according to a favorable writeup of this machine and the boston posts in eighteen sixty four one massachusetts papermaker that this invention into useless saving a hundred and fifty seven dollars a day and materials. Which would have been a significant amount in eighteen sixty four that same article suggested that wrapping and printing papers that were made using this method would cost two or three cents less per pound than other paper. Did one of elisha specialties. As an attorney was patent law and he represented himself in legal disputes involving his patents and since some of his patents were financially valuable. There were several of those for example one of his inventions was a device to regulate the draft of stoves and a dispute over this patent lead all the way to the us supreme court in silsbee versus foot. This was honestly too convoluted. A case to be summed up in an episode that is not about aleisha or potentially even just that case but a similar device already existed when foot patent was granted but this case also just includes a ton of back and forth about who had been allowed to into evidence. And how much money was owed. Whom is.

eunice Elisha troy female seminary tracy v wilson holly fry seneca falls unis eunice newton john tyndall troy gauchan elizabeth katie east bloomfield cuyahoga river Emma willard rensselaer school Katie stanton Eunice elisha foote elizabeth katie stanton
Review: 'La Nave De Los Monstruos' 1960 Mexican Sci-Fi Movie

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:52 min | 10 months ago

Review: 'La Nave De Los Monstruos' 1960 Mexican Sci-Fi Movie

"I am so thrilled to be talking about the movie that we've selected for today. Lanoviy las monstruous sort the ship of monsters and astoundingly shockingly devastatingly awesome mexican film from nineteen sixty in the exquisite genre of science fiction. Horror romantic comedy musical This is a movie about women from the planet. Venus who are roaming deep-space on a quest for the hunky aliens in the galaxy and skip from planet to planet collecting reptile cyclops. Hunks kissy face. Brain newton hunks fang head skeleton hunks until they finally meet the honky. Tonk of all a rascal writer of the chihuahua. Planes played by the incomparable lalo gonzalez aka porto more on him later. This movie is so much fun. Yeah this is a real pleasant surprise. When when you brought this this title to to our attention. I did like some preliminary research. I looked it up in the The cyclotron video guide like all right. It's listed there. Sounds like like like it. Might be good so i went into it expecting there to be something awesome about it. You know i'd find a monster. I liked her performance. I liked. I was also expecting a certain amount of dead space in. There is sometimes the case with films from this time period of this caliber but this one is just wall to wall excellence. Yes totally they're not a dull moment. I mean we've we've watched some sci fi horror movies from the fifties that they might have a really fun goofy looking monster or they might have elements that work really. Well not of this earth comes to mind but then there will be other moments that are kind of some dead space. Yeah we're gonna dull square logo dudes just standing around delivering dry dialogue. This movie has essentially none of that. It's all killer no filler

Lalo Gonzalez Aka Porto Chihuahua
Cam Newton Released, Mac Jones Wins Starting Job

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 10 months ago

Cam Newton Released, Mac Jones Wins Starting Job

"Newton out in New England. This was a surprise release after the Patriots tapped rookie Mac Jones as the starting quarterback. In fact, Ken Jones is the only quarterback currently on the Pats roster, so I would imagine there Else to cam going to happen in the cell and head down here. What do you think? I I would love that, Um, Ron Rivera said. That's not gonna happen. Like the three guys that he has, you know, barring injury, Maybe it happens. One can only wish Rob would

Mac Jones Ken Jones Newton New England Patriots Pats Ron Rivera ROB
Buccaneers Working to Restructure WR Mike Evans' Contract to Clear Cap Space

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Buccaneers Working to Restructure WR Mike Evans' Contract to Clear Cap Space

"The buccaneers were reportedly working to restructure. Why receiver mike evans contract due to cap space. Suits clear some. He is a sixteen point. Six three seven million dollar cap hit this season and the bucks currently only have to a little over two hundred and seventy thousand cap space. According to the nfl salary cap report so he has three years left on a five year. Eighty two point five million dollars extension so they every structured it. This is the this is. He's restructured the with them several times so this wouldn't be the first time he's restructured to deal with the team. But this is actually very smart. Mike evans is not a player. That you're going to move off of anytime soon so extending his money out giving you some calories. Capped salary cap room and flexibility. And giving him some more time is this is a situation that makes sense. How how great is that. Brady engines career and gets mike evans

Mike Evans Buccaneers NFL Brady
New England Patriots Cut Cam Newton; Mac Jones to Start

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

01:26 min | 10 months ago

New England Patriots Cut Cam Newton; Mac Jones to Start

"Speaking with our breaking news at foxborough. The patriots are releasing cam newton. And we'll move forward with as their quarterback pro football focus posted this week that the alabama rookie has the best preseason rookie passing rate since two thousand thirteen and now look to do with him. Couldn't do last year. Get new england back to the playoffs. Oh shannon what will be the patriots record with mac as a start of the season trying to look as you mentioned. I've tried to schedule and looking at it I say this is gonna make the playoffs. And so i believe it's gonna take ten wins for them to make the playoffs. So i'm gonna go ten ten and seven at the bare minimum possibly lebanon states. But i'll be conservative. I'll say ten and seven I think mayfield play well. I know they're not going to rely olmec as much as maybe some of the other quarterbacks but they're going to run the football i believe they're going to be a top five running team and everything they do is going to be predded gonna be set up the running game so they're gonna be heavy play action. They went to the to tidy. As they went and got a hindrance free agency got john newsouth upgraded the wide receiver position. I think decide nelson born. Yeah so they got some weapons. I man i still like jacoby. Myers i like here tomorrow. Watching the better he gets. I really liked jacoby. Myers in so with that being said skipped. I'm gonna say they go tunas seven and they make the playoffs.

Patriots Foxborough Cam Newton Football Alabama Shannon New England Mayfield Lebanon John Newsouth Jacoby Myers Nelson
How Cam Newton, Mac Jones Fared in Patriots-Giants Preseason Game

First Take

01:11 min | 10 months ago

How Cam Newton, Mac Jones Fared in Patriots-Giants Preseason Game

"Just a little bit even with the preseason. Officially the books last night's win over the giants was his yet to name. These starting quarterback for the patriots. Hippies miami we want now all signs point to cam. Newton started every preseason game pot. Mack jones overall really nice progress completing thirty six hundred fifty rose. Three hundred eighty nine yards and a touchdown in the preseason so bill what do you think ahead two regular season games. Have you made a decision on who will start at quarterback in the regular season. Yeah no we. We still have a lot of decisions. You think you've played well enough to be a starter of. I mean i've done a lot of opportunities to play in. I can improve on everything. I want to improve on. So i think. Just learning. From hoyer. Cam jared anybody. I can just listening to josh. And his coaching. There's a lot of work to do but I think i've made progress but honestly just the only thing that matters is today Tomorrow focus on tomorrow. But i think the past is the past and we're kind of moving onto the new new season here okay. He has the right mindset but check

Mack Jones Patriots Giants Newton Miami Cam Jared Hoyer Josh
"newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:41 min | 10 months ago

"newton" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Probably not thinking terribly deeply about it based on what he said along with others like the architect and mathematician. Christopher ran a hearken back to the notion that well maybe there is a kind of magnetic relationship between the moon and maybe the planets and the earth and gravity and so on vague but establishing a direct connection somehow. However it's happening forget about it. Newton wouldn't have cared about that if that's all they said but it was when hooked mentioned this different way of thinking about the motion away. He could certainly have thought of because it does not contradict anything. Newton is a brilliant mathematician. And he could see that you could suddenly start to do things with that that you otherwise. Wouldn't this lead eventually to another controversy with hook in which hook said well after newton published great print. I gave him how to do this. And then newton of course got ticked off about that and said well listen to this. I did everything. And because he had a pick a little idea he thinks he can take credit for it. Okay so his ability to play with his ideas mathematically what solidified initially tuition that you could have was the first time he was born the idea the action at a distance the you can have forces without contact which another revolutionary idea. I would say that in the sense of dealing with the mechanics of force like effect considered to act at some distance. It is novel With both hook and newton a at the time the notion that two things might interacted a distance with one. Another without direct contact that goes back to antiquity. Only there it would thought of. Morris is sympathetic reaction you know to a magnet and a piece of iron. They have a kind of mutual sympathy for one. Another like Like what love. What are we talking about. Actually they do sometimes talk like that. That his love the mets. I see now i talk like that all the time i think love is somehow in consciousness center forces a physics that yet to be discovered. Okay now there's the the other side of things which is calculus. The begin to to talk about the newton brought a lot of things to this world. One of them's calculus..

newton Newton Christopher Morris mets
QB Ryan Tannehill Among Nine From Tennessee Titans Positive for COVID-19

Zach Gelb Show

01:36 min | 10 months ago

QB Ryan Tannehill Among Nine From Tennessee Titans Positive for COVID-19

"That we need to realize is gonna take a not just now in the preseason. But this is going to be an issue when we actually get Into the regular season. And that's covid. Okay. We see what happens with Cam Newton wasn't eligible to return to practice until today because he was away from the facility and he's not vaccinated. You need Take a test and come back, not positive, and even in the case of the Tennessee Titans They already said a couple of days ago that they had seven players. That they've had to put On the Covid 19 reserve list. This week you got Mike Rabel, their head coach who tested positive for Covid on Sunday and Ryan Tannehill. He's now a part of that group. Ryan Tannehill tested positive for Covid 19. And if you recall, it was only a few weeks ago that Ryan Tannehill was one of the players who basically said Listen The NFL is basically forcing our hand here. And as a result, Ryan Tannehill he got vaccinated. Even though it sounds like he didn't want to. He did, and he still tested positive. Now, having said that, as a result, Ryan Tannehill, he's gonna miss 5 to 10 days and he needs to produce two negative tests. Two consecutive days. Okay, the Titans they get going September 12th. I think that is enough Time to hopefully get Ryan Tannehill back up and running, and their general

Ryan Tannehill Mike Rabel Covid Cam Newton Titans NFL
"newton" Discussed on Mobbed Up: The Fight for Las Vegas

Mobbed Up: The Fight for Las Vegas

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"newton" Discussed on Mobbed Up: The Fight for Las Vegas

"Managing your company's risk is a tough job. but you don't have to do it alone at pro group management. We are with you all the way. The leader and workers comp programs for self insured groups in nevada programs teams here to work for you from establishing safety standards to helping you find the best coverage for your company. We are with you every step of the way cutting red tape and monitoring regulatory changes so you can focus on your business. Group management has been helping nevada businesses for over twenty years. Let us help yours find out how to have pro group management work for you. Visit our website at pg envy dot com to receive a free cost savings analysis. Now that's pgn. V dot com or. Call our las vegas office at seven. Zero two seven four zero forty-three eighty pro group management workers. Comp that works for you. From las vegas review journal studio welcome to season two of mobbed up the fight for las vegas presented by progressive management additional sponsorship provided by l. cortes and a golden steer a heads up before we get started mobbed up contains explicit content such as obscene language and depictions of violence including murder. Please be advised that this podcast might not be suitable for all audiences. It's a moment of jubilation for wayne newton as he appears before the nevada gaming commission carson city on september. Six nineteen eighty. The midnight idol has just been approved as the new co owner of the aladdin. Hotel newton had drawn applause in the packed hearing room when he said he wanted to make the aladdin a quote shining star instead of a black cloud and gaming commission chairman. Harry reid told his colleagues. I don't see anything that we do today. That's going to tarnish the image of gaming in nevada. The commissioner kicked out the aladdin's previous owners. Some executives were convicted in federal court of allowing the detroit mad hidden management over the casino but as newton left the room with his longtime lawyer. Frank farren cough. The smiles on their faces were quickly. Erased were confronted by nbc star investigative. Reporter brian ross and his producer. Ira silverman mr newton. Mr newton news reports at the time described the approach as an ambush fan. Cough remembers it. Well we were watching out of the commission room walking down a hallway to go out to my car and brian. ross. And i r- silverman showed up sticking a microphone and wayne's face saying how 'bout pinocchio making these allegations that he was a front so the mob the mob money. I mean just yelling and screaming. We know penalty was a well-known reputed mafia figure who had made death threats against newton and his daughter go away earlier in the year. Fan com says newton was getting angrier and angrier as ross stuck a microphone in his face and peppered him with questions under the lights. So the camera about kalsi made to pelosi farren. Cough thought ross was trying to provoke newton into doing something dramatic for the camera even striking the reported and i sit weighing keep walking keep. Walking member wayne was black belt. Blackbelt was afraid. Who's gonna turn wagon. And they follow us all the way out to my car and i you know i got wayne in the car and i said don't do any. Don't.

nevada las vegas Hotel newton black cloud and gaming commiss nevada gaming commission wayne newton cortes Frank farren newton Ira silverman mr newton Mr newton Harry reid brian ross ross Cough detroit nbc silverman wayne kalsi
"newton" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"But the, the video does show him going back to his economy class stage social media event. Not with Cam Newton. I love that. That's what how Cam Newton travels in that outfit like look like it was wait a minute hosts game. How ridiculous is this theory of a means that Cam Newton want the attention about being turned like Cam Newton stage social media? Vent is where you go with. Why, like why? Why, why, why not wait for another flight? He's in a patient already missed ones Cam Newton, and he's impeached in Paris. What are you what, are, you know rush for now? And now he's, but I'm just saying, like, once they say, hey, man, you missed your direct flight. We can get you, but it's a connected to Dallas and you have to take the, the, the coach class from Dallas Charlotte. What did you say, what's the next direct flight from Paris to Charlotte clearly, he was man, that was in a hurry? Then if he was willing to go through if he was willing to jump through those hoops, wearing that outfit jump to what hoops hoops, fifteen hundred dollars to you guys, fifteen hundred dollars that doesn't tash offensive to for doesn't. I think the reason that's a good amount of money to offer in cash for anything. The reason this is something that we're all interested in is why what is the reason because he's willing to do that is the reason because he's flying coach is the reason because he turned it turned it was turned down because Cam Newton's flying coach wearing that outfit because he got rejected and. He had to just put his tail between his legs and go back to. So what's the number? Where do I have to put the number where you guys would be saying, man, how do you reject that? I was at possible that you reject that fifteen hundred dollars cash. I mean dude is obviously doing very well. This could not have been a flight from Dallas to Charlotte because it says that he was he was, it was a ten hour flay. That's not a ten hour play. Ten hours from Paris to Dallas another multiple reports out here. I wanna hear all of that. I want to hear all of us later scoop, I want you guys to give me all the reports from every corner of our gathering information kingdom, except the, the Knicks pressroom where some people are banned from the new York Daily News. We'll get to that with a mean in the second you think this was an affront to the man's whiteness? Do you. We have to ask somebody white. Where's to God's Chris, Chris? I'm just looking at this video more. It are we sure that the guy that he offered this to wasn't just more legroom coach seat. It was the extra legroom like he thought because the way you said it before is that he was asking a guy in first class for his ticket. I don't think that's the case. It's a guy in coach, just with more leg, the bulkheads seat, the one on the front, you know, I'm talking about additional legroom Lou now, the, it's an interesting time because, of course it does. Nobody in first class needs is fifteen hundred dollars at a guy Konami. Does let's assume this guy paid for four tickets though, so maybe he spent like 'cause, you know, he could be traveling with people offer. Let's pretend he's with a group of four he paid for all of them. So now he's spent. Maybe you know thirteen fourteen hundred bucks right on four tickets. So he's doing the math, do I want all the money back, but I have to go sit in some middle seat, I would have just negotiated to double it. Who's he? Who's he traveling with? Is he with a child? Is he gonna leave his? Child loan for an extended period of time. Was it a ten hour flight? Was it a two hour? Maybe he's got maybe he has his twenty four year old daughter with him who he doesn't wanna leave 'em new next to for ten hours..

Cam Newton Paris Charlotte Dallas Knicks Konami new York Daily News Chris Lou fifteen hundred dollars ten hour twenty four year Ten hours ten hours two hour
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Sort of global media ecosystem global politically co system, if people all of a sudden are able to do and undo messages that they send on Twitter able to change things on the fly that there's sort of you can't trust the words in front of you on the spot for that. That's at the, you know, at a at a very a macro scale. Let's just boil this down to something smaller. What about a death threat and a death threat? I I will bring up something that I had. Sorry. I had my finger in which was when Chuck C Johnson was banned Chuck's Johnson. As one of the most prolific trolls on Twitter up until he was banned for a death threat against a civil rights advocate in two thousand fifteen from Twitter in two thousand fifteen early two thousand fifteen the tweet that got him banned was I if somebody pays me enough. I can take out, you know, someone and and when he said, this it was very clear what that meant imagine. If he could go back and change one or two words, so that it isn't such a threat what he's still be on Twitter, and the threat is still real just because you change it doesn't make it less real. And so so I think that that is another consideration at a at a more micro level than than at a macro level. That's kind of terrifying. The idea that editing on Twitter opens us up to abusers. Manipulators taking advantage of the fact that no longer do we know for sure tweet is a tweet to be able to to really put out messages that they don't have to even be accountable for in a way to target abuse. In a way, that is probably more frightening than just a tweet that hangs out there or tweet that was deleted imagine, the people you, and I both know who have gotten terrible threats on Twitter that they only see it for five minutes. And then the person changes it to something more innocuous, and I mean, talk about gas lighting and triggering people. This is why like if you do this you need to bring people from so many different places into the room to walk through this. Because it it may not be a feature you want to do. That's there is an interesting question too. Because I think then ordinary users that want it they want to be able to just edit a typo ever completely reasonable request. They start to say the here these. Cernan's? And you know, what I see people say is then oh, well, then you show that it was edited you show the history say all this is the original version. This is what changed and then you can see like like Wikipedia lets you do this even if you go into Google docs, or Microsoft Word, you can see the past revisions track changes on your on your document doesn't that solve this problem? If if it was initially death threatening, you edit it, and now, it seems more harmless and innocuous can't you still go back to the history and see it does that solve the issue. It's hard to retract ally. Want something out there people will run with it. And we've seen this over and over again in the last two years where misinformation is purposefully put out there. And I do think it's on purpose. And then it's retracted or updated or changed, but the lie has already spread given what I know. And I've seen Twitter evolve. Particularly as an abusive platform or platform for some abusers, this frightens me even more. And when I say, it frightens me it really frightens me it really frightens me because people. All of a sudden don't have to be responsible for even less responsible for what they say today because I said, well, that's not what I meant perfect example was would it Trump say about when he was talking to Putin, and he'd has Putin a question, and they said, you know, in literally changed one word, and it changed the entire meaning..

Twitter Chuck C Johnson Putin Cernan Trump five minutes two years
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"So before we talk about the the weather it should be done. Let's talk about if a company like Twitter were to enable editing of tweets of the core messages that make up the platform. What would some of the considerations? Be. What are some of the questions you have to answer at a tech level? Sudden the first question I would ask is how do you fan out a tweet to fifty or sixty million followers? If someone can edit it every five minutes or every one minute the technical, and the just the the scale of something like that is crazy because if I were to tweak, let's not use me. Let's use somebody who I really. Like say, Barack Obama tweet something out, and he's got a hot one hundred million dollars or whatever it is. Right. A hundred million dollars. And he's he's just like everyone go out and vote and he spells vote wrong, which he wouldn't do right. But and then ten minutes later, he realizes that. He spelled vote wrong. So he wants to edit that tweet and change it. Well, that tweet is now been fanned out to maybe not one hundred million people, but a lot of people, and there have been notifications that are kicked off, and there are retweets the kicked off, and there's there's common tweets that get kicked off. And then all of a sudden each Hanes this like, so what do you do? Then how how do you handle that? And that's a product decision and someone needs to map that out and said, okay. So if that happens, how do we handle notifications? How do we handle alert? How do we handle emails? How do we handle everything? Right. And so that's just a small very small piece of it. And I think that that starts underlying a lot of the technical issues and the technical issues of of changing something. In a real time system and having it update in a reasonable amount of time across a network that spans the globe. It's not an easy thing to do. It's not impossible trying to update a tweet while it still fanning out. I just I can't even begin to think about you know, just how the technical challenges of doing that the latency that you'd have to start considering when you literally have a tweet that was sent ten minutes ago that still hasn't been found out everyone in all all of a sudden, it's been changed. So I mean, the the the amount of churn in the system would be would be pretty interesting. Okay. So you get you get into some very very complicated problems. And it's interesting because it seems to me, you know, from a lay person standpoint, sending a tweet kind of feels like sending an Email like here's my message in goes out there, and maybe it's going to one recipient or maybe it's going to a couple people. I've see seed, but it's out there, and they got it in their inbox. And we're all good, and that sort of how I, you know, kind of imagine at a naive level how Twitter works, but when all of a sudden, we're able to make changes in and keep you know, assuming we would just keep being able to edit that tweet forever to me the feels a little bit more like, you know, like dropbox or box one of these services where it's sinking. Files are like Google Drive where sinking my files between different places. So like, they have to be kept in sync all of a sudden, I like that analogy because if you really want to keep if you think about that. And you think about we'll go back to the Barack Obama example an account with a hundred million followers, try sinking with one hundred million followers, and then continue to do that. And then what happens with accounts that are managed by several people that you could tweet once from DC in wants from Chicago within five minutes of each other you, and I both have have watched this things with threat at tweets, and and and sub tweets and re tweets and how how and then you..

Barack Obama Twitter Chicago Google Hanes five minutes ten minutes one hundred million dollars hundred million dollars one minute
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Them. And even things as simple as how much do you let someone right in a text field for a report for tweet. Right. Because you don't want somebody to be able to put Warren piece in there. But you also don't want to limit it to one hundred forty characters. So so there was a lot of consideration that had to go into making. How do you do the report a tweet? Now how you know. How are we going to do? From a product perspective from Iowa's, Android and web, one of the other considerations. We had to to to make and I think it was the right consideration. At the time was to go from a native experience to for this particular feature to a web view because we realized that while it didn't wasn't one of the most highly trafficked areas on the Twitter app. It was something that we could do from in a web view that would allow us to make changes both on web, Android IRS all at the same time. And so explain to folks by not know, what that means what it would admit as you shifted from that app that runs right on your iphone right on your Android phone into basically a form that worked as it would in a web browser but lived within the app, and that lets you experiment a little bit more work a little bit more quickly and getting out like changes to to users. So that's that's a great glimpse into how it gets real complicated. Real quickly. When you've got hundreds of millions of people on a platform. No one is just a little bit into. How do you? You decide this is the button we're going to work on this is a feature. We're going to work on is that the sort of thing where a normal person on the team can say, you know, I'd like to build an edit button on Twitter, or is that a, you know, top down a CEO Jack Dorsey or CEO Dacosta low comes and says from on high. Now, it's time for all stall assemble around building an edit button, the somewhat simple answer that question is. Yes. It did actually happens in both ways. Okay. It's fascinating. Because in a lot of tech companies everyone from an engineer solo engineer to the CEO can suggest a feature, and in some cases, a lot of features. Come from both ends, right? They come from the engineer who just converted from their internship to the CEO who doesn't like something. And now, these are these are not normal cases. But it does happen generally comes from a product team that consist of product manager consist of you, experts and user experience person consist of Jamir maybe a technical program manager. And and we look at things like whether or not you're going to, you know, you're trying to move up a tick user number particular metric, are you trying to get more users. Are you trying to better understand how people are using something? Right. So you may want to to what we call instrument or add logging. So in something, you know, a lot about. At logging to a feature to understand how people are using it. So that you can you know, better modify the feature in the future. So it's it really is up to the product team to to set what we call. Okay. Ours. Our objectives and key result. And those should have metrics or numbers that we we we want to to move in one direction or another like more engagement on this particular feature or more users or less reports coming in or in something like the report a tweet button. We really wanted to make it simpler, and we were going to to measure that, you know, by how fast people could actually complete the process when in reality what we really should have been measuring strangely enough was the number of reports coming in. Okay. So let's wave our magic wand and pretend that we have the power the ability to 'cause somebody at Twitter or some product team at Twitter to think about doing an added button. And you know, one of the reasons I asked us, I think there's a lot of. People on Twitter to get frustrated. They have typo, and they say gosh, you know, you can make a like a live real video streaming service on top of Twitter that works globally and get you can't let me at at the texts on this thing that that seems outrageous, right?.

Twitter CEO CEO Jack Dorsey engineer Warren product manager Iowa Dacosta low program manager
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Leslie, welcome to function. The thank you for having me. So we'll get into the nitty gritty of the added button. I I wanna I wanna back up a little bit. You spent some time at Twitter when were you there? How did you end up at the company? It was a drunken night in San Francisco. No, no, it they reached out to me oddly enough. And while I had been a frequent user of the service. I never thought about working there. And when I met some of the folks dick Costello in particular. You know, he's he's really a dynamic leader. And and really just encouraged me to take a chance on on coming to Twitter. And and you know, seeing seeing what I could make their and it didn't come there to do product initially. I actually joined a do a function that could be best described as DevOps DevOps is development operations, which is providing the infrastructure for your code to run your software. Yes. However after about a year, I was approached to do. Kind of a revamp of the mute button. That Twitter had rolled out a few months before it had gone over really poorly. They had to essentially retract. Take take the feature back to its original point. And then we were going to try again, and it was really an interesting situation. Because no one wanted to do it. And I couldn't understand why. And when I started asking people around the company why they said because anyone who ever tries to touch safety security or abuse and harassment Twitter ends up getting fired or quitting. And it was just this black hole of product feature work that no one wanted to do. And and I thought it was a great opportunity because it was hitting upon a population groups that I cared about generally women and people of color who are abused more on Twitter than most people. So so I took that on..

Twitter dick Costello San Francisco Leslie harassment
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Welcome back to function I'm ill dash. Okay. So clearly, there's an argument to be made for Twitter introduce a feature that lets us edit tweets. In fact, it's one of the most requested features that people ask for. And Twitter's own CEO Jack Dorsey actually, talked about the idea of editing tweets when the idea came up at the power of eighteen conference in India people want at it because they make mistakes on Twitter, and they want to quickly fix them. That's a lot more achievable than allowing people to edit any tweet all the way back in time. Because what happens with that? If I say something like, I tweet something that you agree with and then you re tweet that. And then I edit my tweet to something that you disagree with you re tweeted now, something that you disagree with. And that's what we need to prevent. And there's a bunch of things that we could do to show a change. Log and show how tweet has been changed our looking at all this stuff. So we've we've been considering at it for for quite some time. So it sounds like letting people at it tweets could be complicated from a technical perspective, but extremely complicated from an ethical perspective. I talked to Leslie Miley about this now, Leslie is a former engineering manager at Twitter, and he's also led engineering teams for slack and for Google and these days, he's the chief technology officer of the Obama foundation, especially when you talk to Leslie because he's one of the entire tech industry's best thinkers about how to translate doing the right thing into the actual features we use and he did a lot of that Twitter working with their trust teams or safety teams are making sure people had a good experience and really pushed hard for people to get what they wanted out of the platform without a lot of the attacks in the stress and the harassment and the abuse that people often associate with Twitter..

Twitter Leslie Miley chief technology officer Jack Dorsey Obama foundation engineering manager Google CEO harassment India
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Knee-jerk reaction people, especially outside of meteoroid side attack is well, if you know, everybody's going to amplify this and re tweet it shouldn't we be able to just go in and edit the tweet an update. It and say this is the corrected information. What are your feelings on it? Oh, absolutely. I've been begging Twitter for years going back to at least two thousand and eight for some sort of mechanism to do this. I think in in an ideal world after I sent that tweet regarding congresswoman giffords, there would have been away for me to edit the tweet and the act of editing. It would be immediately replaced in every tweet that went out. It would either at reply or D M everyone who had shared it. And it would not only would it be corrected, but it would leave anyone who had helped amplify it. It wouldn't be just the ability to edit the tweet there would also have to be a mechanism that alerts directly the people who might have contributed to amplifying it. So since it is an interesting thing here because one of the big issues around media, manipulation and misinformation on social networks, not just Twitter, but Facebook, and and the others especially in. The sort of current political environment where we seen these things be targeted. Whether it's by groups within the US here domestically or international efforts is the stability to sort of throw doubt on what's shared on these networks. The undermining veracity undermining of credibility is a big tactic. And we see sites that regularly. Will you know post a headline that they know to be false wait for people to screen shot at and then amended and say, oh, you know, sorry are bad in the other tactics that if we look at that environment where there's a almost a, you know, the the war on whether something can be known to be true or not has a whole playbook around it. Do you think that idea of the editorial tweet or the the thing we still alert everybody who's retweeted something is going to be relevant. Do you think people amplify something because they want to share the correct information too? Because it it rea- FIS their view of the world, generally speaking, I wish it were more the former, but we just have to be honest. For a lot of people. They they amplify things because they want to look impressive around their friends that you know, there's something that they believe to be true. And they know their peers will feel the same. And so the they end up pushing things along, and so there is no technical mechanism that could ever be created. That's going to get a small percentage of the public to do what I consider their civic duty to correct, false information. They would have shared whether it's for personal reasons political reasons, cultural reasons, they have decided that they are so mistrustful or want to so that mistrust that it doesn't matter what the platforms do or or third parties creating apps to try to make this easier. I don't see there being a solution. That's going to get around these trolls. So the best we can do is have tools that will. Alert the people that would ideally alert everyone, but perhaps allow you to concentrate on the people in your network who, you know, have the most influence and even while that's going on. I it certainly doesn't hurt to send a D Amor get on the phone with people, you know, who have large followers and tell them what you've just corrected. So they go ahead and do the same thing. So I think the solution still involves whoever I a shared the misinformation accidentally, they they have the responsibility to contact as many people as possible who can help make that correction, but even with the best editing inversion ING, tools that a platform could come up with you will still have bad actors out there who were going to make a mess of things. So that's that's an interesting point. Because the other thing that happens, and especially these days, but might have even started back in twenty seven is the on Twitter, the Twitter thread, so somebody. Applies to tweet with additional information. Sometimes it's used for corrections. Now. Right. So few say, you, you know, the sun has risen in the west and somebody replies and says as soon as risen in the east of that's part of the same thread, it might carry through that that user interface or that that choice in the app wasn't there, you know, seven years ago..

Twitter meteoroid giffords US Facebook D Amor seven years
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"So almost fifteen minutes after the newscast and having felt I'd I'd done my part. I finished my my lunch. Put the kids in the car with got in with my wife and started driving twenty minutes to get back home in that twenty minute period. Chaos broke out because all sorts of people in the news industry started contacting folks at NPR saying wiry sang this we've confirmed she's in surgery right now, she has not passed away. And so NPR's news blogger at the time pretty quickly started posting updates on the blog saying that there were conflicting reports. But at this point, no one was running the Twitter feed. Because I'm in my car with my kids, and when I get home, I go back on Twitter and turn on the TV and look at all the out replies. Received from colleagues and peers in the industry saying that she's still alive. And so I sent out a tweet about twenty must have been twenty twenty five minutes after that original tweet saying that they're conflicting reports about her her status, and because NPR only does live newscasts at the top of the hour on weekends. Another twenty five minutes would pass before anyone went on air to say that she was still alive. They didn't issue a correction. They just said that she was in in surgery, but the impact there was no way of taking it back at this point Reuter CNN, FOX, the New York Times, so many news organizations apart from a small number such as the p ran with the story saying. That NPR had confirmed that she had died and had some of them used found additional sources claiming the same thing. But then they started retracting as they learn more about it. And because those news organizations were often doing minute by minute live coverage rolling coverage. They were able to correct it quickly. But because of the structure of NPR, the hourly newscast, and the fact that there weren't people in the newsroom to run a rolling live. Breaking news cast the change in in the reporting wasn't issued until an hour. After that first report, it was a mess. How many people in an organization like that have the log in for the, you know, public facing news account on their phone for for Twitter or social media account. Well, let's see this was early two thousand and eleven and we had a very small social media team. There were. Just three or four of us of the time and some a number of producers had access to it. But they tended to be weekday producers. There wasn't a protocol for managing breaking news through social platforms at that point in time at NPR when it came to weekends. If something like this had happened on a weekday. It would be a matter of managing editor running down to one of our desks and say get over here where we're starting to cover the story and afterwards it became clear. How NPR screwed this up? It turns out that the source that the local news director used that's person from the sheriff's office and the source. We used in Washington d in Washington DC from congress. They both got the information from the same person another who happened to be another law enforcement official locally. And so what NPR didn't know at the time is that there weren't actually two sources there were two people repeating the same thing they had heard from one. Source and if protocols have been followed, and if they had contacted the executive producer of the newscast who would have been home on weekend at that point. There's a very good chance. This would never have happened because there is normally a standard of three independent confirmations to report a death. So to say mistakes were made is a bit of an understatement. So this is interesting because I just I just I'm sort of stuck on this moment being a time. When a your major media organization is still very casual about social media. This is twenty eleven and it's it's interesting to think of how much this has changed since then right where where there would be much more of a mature process or formal process, even on the weekends. Probably. Oh, very much. So the social media at the time was not considered part of the news room. We weren't even on the same floor. As the newsroom, we were near a bunch of the tech, folks. And and the music team so along with the sort of process ice. Relation. There was the physical isolation of our team not being fully integrated..

NPR Twitter CNN New York Times managing editor Washington FOX congress executive producer director official twenty twenty five minutes twenty five minutes fifteen minutes twenty minutes twenty minute
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Can you give us a little bit of context about what it was like NPR covering the story? And what happened in the minutes after the news broke? Well, something a lot of people. Probably don't realize is that NPR. Unlike a lot of news networks isn't a twenty four seven operation. They're generally isn't a huge number of people working on the weekends apart from running the the shows that happen the weekends. So beyond that, it's it's it's a much smaller team than what you would expect on a typical week day, and that particular day Gabby giffords was having a a meet up, essentially. At a local supermarket. It started around noon, east coast time and very quickly. A gunman came shot her in a number of other people multiple people died, it was an absolute catastrophic situation. Quincy deadly of the wife of a local NPR news director was across the street at the time and was an called her husband. And he was able to get there to the scene while she was well, congressman giffords was still there injured in hadn't been taken away in the ambulance yet. And so word quickly spread through the public radio system that this had happened and they went on air locally pretty quickly. And we started reporting it somewhere around one pm local time or one PM east coast time and on that particular day I had a day off it was weekend. And so I was sitting at a restaurant with my. Wife and a four year old and a two year old just kind of relaxing and having no idea what was happening at that particular moment and behind the scenes as they were approaching the top of the hour for the next major news cast, news director in Arizona called and said that they talked to someone in the Pima county sheriff's office confirming that congressman giffords had passed away. So the newscast staff scrambled to confirm that and just before like literally minutes before they had to go on air. A congressional reporter on Capitol Hill confirmed through one of her congressional sources that she had died as well. And so with those two sources in mind, they went on air and announced that she had passed away. This then was sent around as an Email alert. It was the lead story on the NPR a website, and I wouldn't have known. It was even happening except for the fact that I got the Email alert and knowing that NPR. Didn't have a social media staff running weekends at that point in time. I looked at the the Twitter feed for at NPR news and nothing there weren't any recent updates as to what had happened. So I copied and pasted the latest headline which said that she had passed away and a link to it and send it out at proximate -ly to twelve to fifteen PM..

NPR congressman giffords director congressman Twitter Pima county Quincy Arizona reporter four year two year
"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

Converge with Casey Newton

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"newton" Discussed on Converge with Casey Newton

"Get reliable information out to the world, like a news organization that's reporting during a time of crisis, and they want to be able to report the news responsibly. We have breaking news for you. It's coming out of Tucson, Arizona. Several people have been shot. Shot the Tucson citizen newspaper is reporting that among those shooting victims is congresswoman Gabrielle Gifford snack in twenty eleven Arizona congresswoman Gabby giffords was shot during a mass shooting that left six people dead and several others injured and the scene was chaos as you'd expect this first responders, scrambling everywhere. Trying to help the wounded this reporters that are rushing to the scene to try and get more information. And we understand that congresswoman Gabrielle giffords is among twelve people shot at the grocery store just hours ago. And that is according to a democratic source. There are unconfirmed reports that there are fatalities. And I should tell you. It's disturbing news. That NPR is now reporting that the congresswoman congresswoman Gabrielle giffords has in fact died now as we now know giffords was wounded that day, but she did not die in the shooting. Andy Carvin was the social media editor for NPR at the time. An NPR had reported on air that Gifford to died. So Andy tweeted out the same information. And the thing is Andy's tweet was only up for twenty five minutes before he quickly issued a correction. Another follow up tweet that said they were conflicting reports on condition. But the thing is that twenty five minutes is all the time. It took for that. Inaccurate report to reverberate on Twitter and everywhere else across the internet other news organizations like CNN and Fox News ran with the report, and they all cited NPR's a source the NPR news Twitter account at that point in time. How to run two million followers by today's standards of some celebrity accounts, not particularly huge, but for them. It was one of the large news accounts on Twitter. And so I think it's safe to say that the tweet reverberated much more broadly than the actual newscast did because it was re tweet -able it landed on people's desktops, and they could click a button and ping pong it further NPR eventually issued a correction and apology for the mistake on air and on Twitter, but maybe an edit button. Stopped the tweet from reaching so many people with incorrect information the incident happened almost eight years ago now and Twitter's changed a lot since then. But one thing that hasn't changed is that there is still no edit button for tweets. Andy carbon is a visiting professor at the university of British Columbia school of journalism. We're talks to students about how to create a navigate digital news. And he joins us on function to take me back to that tweet and twenty eleven we talked about how an edit button for tweets could possibly be used to report, the news more responsibly in how he might want such a feature to work after my conversation with Andy will hear from Leslie Miley who was formerly an engineering manager at Twitter and also someone who thought deeply about the impact that Twitter has on the world. Eddie carbon. Thank you for joining us on function. Can you give people a little bit of background about what it is that you do and especially what you were doing a few years ago online. Currently I am a visiting professor at the university of British Columbia up in Vancouver where I'm teaching the journalism school, social media and visual storytelling. But I've spent the better part of the last ten fifteen years working at different news organizations, experimenting with ways to incorporate social platforms into the news gathering process, Iran this founded and ran the social media team at NPR for a number of years. Most recently, I was a senior editor at large. Now, this news up in New York. So been playing in the social space for a while and been been around with it for the the many highs and lows of of the whole thing. Right. So one of the things it's really interesting as you've been in the thick of how how do we? Port news on social media. And how do we tell people what's happening in the world? And I want to go back to a moment a few several years ago. Now when you were at NPR, and is in January of twenty eleven is almost everybody will recall there was a really horrific shooting of Gabby giffords. Who was then congresswoman an NPR was one of the first outlets that was covering the story..

NPR Twitter Gabrielle giffords Fox News Andy Tucson Arizona Andy Carvin Andy carbon visiting professor university of British Columbia Gifford university of British Columbia senior editor CNN editor Iran Vancouver