40 Burst results for "Newport"

Fresh update on "newport" discussed on Innovation Hub

Innovation Hub

00:49 sec | 23 min ago

Fresh update on "newport" discussed on Innovation Hub

"Participants in our contest agreed to these rules and we are not liable due to any participation in the contest. Any announced specific terms supersede any general terms if they conflict. Welcome back to innovation Hub and Cara Miller. So just to be clear town Newport does not hate email, so email is a tool is fine. If I want to send information or a file to someone I would rather use emailed in a fax machine, right? It's a fine tool. But there's a problem, according to Newport, who is by Day, a computer science professor at Georgetown, but who spent the last few years becoming increasingly well known as a productivity guru, someone who tells you how to get rid of all that junkie, sugary, shiny digital stuff that's eating up your time. Stuff that, by the way.

DAY Cara Miller Georgetown Innovation Hub Newport Last Few Years
Fresh update on "newport" discussed on Z104 Programming

Z104 Programming

02:13 min | 24 min ago

Fresh update on "newport" discussed on Z104 Programming

"Moshe Note, Papa. These like wounded soul. Maybe I'm too emotional. Oh, maybe you never Katie? No, maybe onto National apathy is like wounded saw. Maybe I'm too much. No, Maybe you never get happy. Help me, Not me. You can't Good for you. Don't Well do without me, baby like a damn sundial path. Acting really? Oh, For you. I guess you might don't really easily. Hey, it's peanut from Newport News and all the hits plans E 104. Is like your console for a minute since. Oh, you come. Uh, that's one. It's one. It My guy said to me. You know me better than I do. Dancing's okay? Nothing from touch myself from the outside my ego am I probably I want to love Boy that's long. I'm up in my ugly cool. I love to see me from your one of you. I want to try me. All that you're traveling. Oh, does nobody ever I like you, too. I love to save me from your point of view. I'm getting used the receiving. Don't get in. Good, if not leave,.

Katie Moshe Note E 104 Newport News
Fresh update on "newport" discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:22 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "newport" discussed on ESPN FC

"Back to your from south america and saying the opening game today sweden take vaca. How would you describe the opening power of this mind. It's my stole fifteen minutes to go in a game. That never really looked like they would go penalty. Definitely one hundred percent comes his line. Not a wise. Got your dossier. You're trying to argue with referee. Plus a definite they didn't mean it. We gotta go food steps up. It's a score to make it one nil penalty records in this competition as father. No problem there. Meanwhile into the ninety fifth minutes Handball in notes for me. Not for me. not much you can do. The steve ain't no though Moving on i'd say sweden. I'm overthrew unbeaten Victory some on four points next year as well by the way in newport to force the highest of the high. Something isn't it yes off. Big big goals say sweden looking good spain. taking on poland. Is the late game on saturday. Josue with us.

Fifteen Minutes Next Year Saturday One Hundred Percent South America Ninety Fifth Minutes Newport Today Sweden Four Points Steve Josue One Nil Poland Vaca
Fresh update on "newport" discussed on The John Phillips Show

The John Phillips Show

01:00 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "newport" discussed on The John Phillips Show

"Up to 74 is an author who has written a book on underdog candidates and political elections. So maybe he's just trying to write another book and speaking of people running for governor that are doing it just for publicity. Caitlyn Jenner, in her infinite wisdom is running for the governor of California, went on a syndicated radio show. That's not syndicated in California. Mhm. The BBC dependable traffic. Costa Mesa is stopped on the 55 southbound between Victoria Street in Newport Boulevard. Everybody's trying to get to the beach Monterey Park, the 10 eastbound before New Avenue crashing the car point left lanes. Traffic stop from Garfield, Marino Valley, the 2 15 north beyond after East Ridge reckon the two right lanes traffic stop from cactus. John Phillips. Traffic alert. It's 114 in Palm Springs, and everybody's trying to get out. Now you got stopped traffic in Whitewater that's on the 10 westbound in between the 1 11 and Fields Road. That's dependable traffic. I'm.

Caitlyn Jenner Whitewater Palm Springs Victoria Street Garfield Monterey Park New Avenue BBC 1 11 Fields Road Up To 74 East Ridge Newport Boulevard Costa Mesa Two Right Lanes California Marino Valley John Phillips 55 2 15
Fresh "Newport" from The John Phillips Show

The John Phillips Show

00:45 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh "Newport" from The John Phillips Show

"To do an interview on a syndicated radio show. That is not syndicated in California. BC DEPENDABLE TRAFFIC East L. A. The 60 westbound Before the 7 10 crash in the three right lanes, Traffic has stopped from Paramount Boulevard. Torrent. Sigalert the four or five northbound before Normandy stall in the two right lanes. It's stop and go from Main Street. Artie's a sig alert. The 91 eastbound at pioneer off ramp is closed for police activity. Anaheim on the 91 eastbound before Euclid accident. Left Lane blocked stopped traffic from the five Costa Mesa is completely stopped on the 55 southbound between Victoria Street and Newport Boulevard. People are going to the beach. That's dependable traffic. I'm.

California Victoria Street Paramount Boulevard Newport Boulevard Normandy Two Right Lanes Three Right Lanes BC Anaheim Torrent Sigalert Euclid Accident Four Five 55 Artie 91 Eastbound Costa Mesa East L. A. Crash
Deconstructing Dr. Grant Robicheaux

O.C. Swingers

01:59 min | Last month

Deconstructing Dr. Grant Robicheaux

"After the show began to air. I started to hear from all kinds of people who knew dr grant robichaud or had interacted with him. In some way over the years. I heard from high school classmates former party powell's business associates and a woman who says she used to sell grant his vintage festival coats before the burning man festival each year. He introduced himself as the doctor. She told me he was handsome. But as most burners who think they're being sexually free he just off his greasy and sleazy to me. I was told about grants tendency to excise people who disagreed with him if he was going to burn a bridge one former colleague told me he'd burnt down with gas he loved it. He thrived off of that. Another former colleague admitted that he saw grant be very route. Two girls treat them very poorly. I started to piece together a portrait of manipulative man. Who is different things to different people. He definitely had a dueling personality. Said the first colleague a. type personality very charismatic definitely very social knows how to entertain and communicate and make people laugh at times and then when he doesn't get what he wants he's like a toddler kicking and screaming and pounding his feet in the middle of target. I talked to one woman who said grant road show sexually intimidated her during a routine consultation. In two thousand seventeen. She says he placed his hand on either side of her body while she was wearing nothing but a flimsy robe and pushed his hips between her legs and that a year later on the very day of his arrest grant made another uncomfortable pass at her in the office. She says that members of the newport care staff noticed something was off. Sent me materials to corroborate her story. I was terrified of running into him and having him hurt me or something because as small as he is he's still quite intimidating shed. He has a presence about him. He's very intimidating he doesn't smile he's got this look. He's very scary.

Dr Grant Robichaud Powell Newport
"newport" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"newport" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Show is hosted by michaela rear. Let's talk about email. Maybe you can't remember life before it. Perhaps you're part of the policy that remembers the thrill of the. You've got nailed. Take whatever your first memory is most would say. It's a vital tool for day to day communication. But can you imagine your life without it. Our guest today definitely cat. I'm talking with cal newport. He's a computer science professor a new york times bestselling author and a podcast hosts. The title of his newest bestseller is synonymous with his mission. The world without now. If you've ever taken a vacation and you felt the dread of returning to a full in box you might be on board with ditching. Our current law. But cal says it's not really the tool that is to blame but rather the way we approach it and a mindset. He calls be hyperactive hive. Mind here's couch to explain. Email is a tool as great. If you need to a synchronous lee send information over a digital medium. The thing that really caused all of the trouble is that once email spread as a tool throughout the the sort of standard knowledge work workplace. It brought with this new way of working. You just mentioned it was called the hyperactive high. Find s my name for it. Then i think that's the real villain in my story. The hyperactive hive mind is an approach to work. Where you say look. We all have an inbox. We all have a email address tied to our name. Let's just figure things out on the fly ad hawk back and forth messaging. If we need to do something let's just go back and forth. If you need something for me just let me know if i need something from you. I'll grab you. We'll just take this natural way that small groups of people have always coordinated and we'll make it digital and scale it up for everyone in our organization in all of our clients and all of our vendors etc and is this hyperactive hive. Mind way of working. That i think has been a real disaster and one of the visual pitchers that you illustrated that it's sticking with even now is getting these little things and these messages in these emails and it feels as though you have a tribe that you have to respond to right away. Why is it that we've been taught we have to respond and it has to happen now and has hyper-active hive mind contributed to this. There's two related effect happening. So there's the human psychology at play here and then there's the workplace culture play here in both of them are causing negativity right now. Let's start with the ancient stuff. So when i used to wear tripe here i actually mean it in the literal sense. I'm looking back one hundred thousand years. We're talking about nomadic. Hunter gatherer tribes the the history in which we actually evolved most of the social networks within our brain and so we have been evolved in that history to take one on one communication with our tribe members very seriously and for good reason. This type of social cooperation was at the key to our survival. If i am not good in maintaining social connection with you then when there's a famine you know five years from now you might not share food. I might die. My jeans might not get pass on. Okay we take this seriously. The inbox by happenstance really conflicts a terrible way with this instinct. Because even though our prefrontal cortex says look the six hundred emails that are in our in box. These are not tribe members who need us. There's complete expectations in our company. That we're not going have fast response times a lot of these. Emails are not even that urgent. Our frontal cortex might be telling us that but there's deeper parts of our brain says these seem to me like tribe members tapping me on the shoulder and i'm ignoring them and that means to famine is going to be a problem and so an inbox is like a a social torture machine. That's meant to keep a low level but consistent home of anxiety because of the way it conflicts with our brain then we look at the culture of companies and the actual culture that you need to check these boxes all the time and here i think is really important that people think that this is just a malformed culture that we could fix by changing expectations but once we recognize that the hive mind is how most organizations operate. When you have that workflow in place you do have to check it all the time. Because that is the only way you have for people in your organization to make progress to collaborate the coordinate to move information to make things going at hawk back and forth unstructured messages. If that is the only thing you have then when people step away from it it actually causes problems. Which is why my big point is if you're going to solve the miseries of the hyperactive hide. You're not going to solve it in the inbox. You're not going to solve it with your habits. You're not going to solve it with your hacks you're not going to solve it with new norms. You have to actually go underneath the inbox rip out the hyperactive hive. Mind and replace it with other ways of having people work together and collaborate. That's going to be the only way to actually solve this problem. I think that's what we've been missing over the last twenty years when we've really been trying to grapple with this issue of email overload and this is such a novel idea that i want to just sit in it for a minute because i believe you would've been writing this book before the pandemic hit now in the pandemic whereas zoom meetings are norm. Emails are flying by. We don't have those one on one conversations that maybe would help us kind of deviate from the hive. Mind so i'm wondering how the pandemic has had you thinking about your own work. The pandemic has been a really interesting twist to the story soon into the pandemic. i took a commission from the new yorker to write a big piece on remote work and the pandemic's on what we should expect from the future of remote work so it gave me an excuse to actually continue to scrutinize these issues for months into the pandemic and see what's going on. The conclusion i came away with is the pandemic as making the hyperactive pipeline. More hyper so if you're in an organization that already relied more or less on the hyperactive height mind. Things have become notably worse. Now that you're fully remote to the point where i think a lot of people are are feeling the strain in a way that they could kind of get along with it when they are still in the office and it can still grab people and you could still see people and you could still have a quick conversation to sort things out and you had commutes on either end of your workday. Kind of split off work from non work people. Who could you could kinda keep a handle on it. It's spiraling more out of control during during the pandemic. Here's my optimistic. Take if that pain gets so acute. This pandemic might actually be the forcing function that gets a lot of companies to say all right. All right. we're gonna do the hard work of replacing a high with better ways of doing it because this is not sustainable. And so that's my optimism. Is that this bad event. Shakes things up enough makes the problem worse but also puts people into a mindset of like. We're ready to experiment. Shut down our offices like we're in the mode of trying different things. I'm hoping this will shake people out of this. Hyperactive hive mind. Wrought that we fallen into and we'll start to see some innovation in alternative ways to collaborate or coordinate. Do you think we're going to have to get Corporate america and americans in general have to get to the point where we're so burned out before all of this will happen or should we just start fixing it now before we get.

six hundred emails cal newport michaela cal new york both today new yorker one hundred thousand years first memory one america five years two related effect last twenty years americans
Family and friends concerned Noah Green was unraveling before Capitol attack

Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Family and friends concerned Noah Green was unraveling before Capitol attack

"People around the world today for spending their condolences after Officer William Evans was killed and another officer injured after a man drove his car into them yesterday. Following that attack, Capitol police chief yoga nom de Pittman said. This has been an extremely difficult time for U. S Capitol police. I just asked that the public continued to keep U S Capitol police and their families and in your prayers, the man who carried out the attack, Noah Green was shot dead after getting out of the car and lunging at police with a knife. Green's family and friends tell the Washington Post He became paranoid and have hallucinations. He was convinced his former teammates on the Christopher Newport University football team drugged him. A new

Officer William Evans Capitol Police Yoga Nom De Pittman U. S Capitol Police Noah Green The Washington Post Green Christopher Newport University Football
1,000-Gallon Sewage Spill Closes Stretch Of Newport Beach Near Los Angeles

All Things Considered

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

1,000-Gallon Sewage Spill Closes Stretch Of Newport Beach Near Los Angeles

"Ah, one mile stretch of new of Beach and Newport has been closed because of a sewage spill. That's foul. The water there in the Orange County health care agency says operator error caused the approximately 1000 gallon spill. Happened during work on him Sewer main line. This affects the area between Bayside, Dr Beach and China Co. It's not clear when the beach will re open depends on when testing shows that the water Is clean

Orange County Health Care Agen Newport Dr Beach China Co. Bayside
Is Multitasking Killing Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

04:59 min | 4 months ago

Is Multitasking Killing Your Business?

"A few years ago in my software company. Women are ninja. I started to realize that many of our team members were really scattered. They were getting things done efficiently. Have the meeting after meeting. And every time we met their to do list would get longer and longer and the things. They said they would get done by. The next meeting was not done yet. We're moving at a snail's pace in every department. And i started to realize that i'm just giving my team very unstructured work. I'm just giving all a bunch of tasks a bunch of goals to hit. And i'm saying go at it and what's happening. Is that when you do this with your team. They can't help but feel the urge to work on multiple things at a time. Now you might be seeing what's wrong with that. What's wrong with working on many things at one time. I do this all the time. Well it's not the most efficient way to work and this has been proven time and time again. You can do a ton of research on this online. But i've done my own research. You can check it out. you cal. Newport's work his book deep work as a masterpiece. His ted talk is also worth watching. But let's take an example. Let's say you give your marketing department or your marketing person. Three things to do on to run facebook ads. A want you to also run an affiliate contests and i want you to redo all our email automations for email marketing when you tell somebody to do all three things and give them no structure. What happens is that they do something from each task every single day because they feel overwhelmed they want to do everything and they want to show you progress in each of those tasks now on its surface you might be like. Oh what's wrong with that. Well the problem is that you're wasting a lot of time when you're switching from one task to the next this is called context switching and it's very very costly if you're wearing on one thing and then you switch over to another it takes you some time to readjust your brain to get into the groove of this new task to get into the zone. Being in the zone and working on a project is high high value time. You don't wanna take that away from somebody in fact you want to keep them in the zone for as long as possible but when people are working on multiple things at one time they get in the zone they get disrupted. They have to get into the zone of the next task. That's a little bit of time. And then they could disrupt it again and they have to get into the phone again and not only is this taking a lotta time. But it's very draining. Drains your energy. So what happens is that they come to the next meeting. And they're like this is my progress and is actually very little progress for each of the three tasks they feel like they worked so hard but they really didn't make much progress. The problem with this is that they never get any momentum. Now compare this to if you do focus work. And you don't multitask instead of telling your marketing person. I want you to do three things. You say listen. There are three things we want accomplish. The first thing we're going to accomplish this is the only thing you're going to focus on and you're going to get it done by the end of the week and that's running a facebook ads campaign. This is all you gotta focus on. This is the goal. This is the criteria. This is the outcome. We're looking for what happens. Is that they just stay in the zone that task day in and day out until they complete it. They come back the next week. Say hey finish that task. It's done here the results already. They're working on a different different level. They have momentum. They have a win. They completed something and then they can shut the brain off from that task and work on the next task. You're going to give them. This needs to be done in every department with every kind of work you do in your business. This is up to you as a leader to build this into your culture. And i realized this of years ago and it really allowed me to be a lot more efficient with my team. Sometimes you're gonna have to remind team not to jump around even when you give them you know prescribed instructions. I do this with our engineers. I have a daily stand up with engineers every single day. We we meet for fifteen minutes. We talk about what they're going to work on today. Actually i talk about where they worked on yesterday and then whether going to work on today and then we really get laser focused. This is all you need to worry about today. This is the focus for today. This is the goal. This is the win why that way when they come to the meeting tomorrow when they come to the standup they feel proud. This is what i worked on yesterday at. Got it done. We gotta win. we can mark it off. I love showing numbers of show the progress. Okay now. We work on the next task. Multitasking dozen allow momentum multitasking. Doesn't allow you to get wins and give them motivation to keep going. It holds you back it. Hold your team all back so you wanna make sure you stay away from it at all costs

Facebook Newport
Former Producer and Program Director at WJOX, Pat Smith,  Reminisces About the Show's Infancy

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:08 min | 4 months ago

Former Producer and Program Director at WJOX, Pat Smith, Reminisces About the Show's Infancy

"Pat is The program director. W j. o. x. and of course he He's part of the global system trouble. I'm as i've assisted. Pd in co host. Because our good friend ryan heins program. I i'm always thinking. I had but i apologize but i'm always trying to to do things that i'm not supposed to be doing but it's really good to have you those days. I wanna i wanna go back. Because i ended up moving to a station where you. I think you were an intern But it wasn't too long after that that that you became a producer on the program. And i'm gonna let you kind of tell the story of how all of that ended up to where we are. Now oh wow Kind of a cliff. Notes version Basically like you said you're at another radio station. I think your contract had had come up and and you had Looked elsewhere and i happened to be at a news. Talk station which the sports talk. Show followed rush limbaugh's program and all the sudden you showed up Along with bob walked me at the radio station on that On that fateful I think it was a friday night after had done a show and then Just so happens. You guys came on the air on monday. I happened to be at the right place at the right time. And i was finishing up school at uab. And and you know you. And i developed a quick relationship and and decided from that point in time to kind of try to take the show to the next level and a few years later were able to get syndicated throughout the state of alabama and then mayor obviously sirius xm and then ultimately espn and where you are today at the sec network so just very blessed to be part of it from day one. I want to go back to that moment. Where we were on the affiliate in we are on the station in birmingham. And and you really started thinking You know bigger picture. I i was. I was at the time doing local television. I was still riding a newspaper on. So i i wasn't that the forward thinking but You thought to show could go beyond that area and what was so interesting about it. Is that once. it did There were a lot of people that that thought. Your idea was was insane. Now you're right You know it's so hard and difficult to tell people about this. Because i remember paul when the fax machine became you know a prevalent thing and offices and i never forget when we started getting stuff backs to us like before you came to the radio station because typically you would either be at the newspaper finishing up a column ridgetop by tv station. Then he committed the radio show and people around the south east would be faxing us newspaper articles because we didn't have internet internet was not invented yet. And so it was fascinating for us to be able to to get information from outside of the state of alabama and so that kind of up some different topics that we could do on the show and the one that started thinking. Well you know what you know. People outside of birmingham. We're on a five. Thousand watt am radio station and more people need to hear this program because we're inundated by voicemails and people you know would communicate with us anyway. They could until it's how much they love the show and more and more of the show and so at the time was able to go to to management and and pitch the idea of potentially getting on a few stations in the state of alabama. And that just kind of steamrolled and for many many years we kept adding stations and at one point we had. I believe in the mid thirties before we got on sirius. Xm so it was just a it was a great time in radio and we were very fortunate to have the people that believed in us. Just like you believed in the idea. So it will. And i'm gonna come back to some of the early stories but but i think for i want you to comment on this. I'll never forget. I was in pasadena We're actually newport together for the rose bowl national championship game between alabama and texas. And because i think a an illness in your family with I think your wife's mother or something you weren't able to make the trip and called me out there and you told me that You had gotten a call from somebody at sirius. Xm and i really. I thought you were kidding Because they wanted to run the show as a regular in an in an afternoon time slot in. And i want you to go back to that moment because there was a buzz around our Our crew at the time. And we you know. We have a fairly big crew now because of television and radio. I don't know if even matches the number of people that you had working with that particular moment in time. Because they were they were producers. They were Exa- they were assistant producer. They're dedicated phone. Screeners that That had their own contracts. But i did but i mean would you would. You agree That was the moment that things really started to change. No there's no question about that. And i'm glad that you wanted me to tell about this out of the story because i thought you were going to publicly remained me again for putting you outside the rose bowl at a outside party music. Play okay No no i was. I got i gotta call the blue Someone that are not you know. Never heard of before and they just said you know we'd love to show We want to talk to you about this show going. You know. Nationwide siriusxm You guys be interested in that. And i are you kidding me absolutely and then i remember calling you in pasadena and said you'll never believe this phone call and of course a lot of times like you would whether i'd call you and say hey. We got this coach on today or we got this happening today or whatever the case may be you know you a would you know i can picture you rolling your eyes going. Yeah whatever you know but then it finally sunk in it. You know. Once i told you exactly the full conversation and i think at that point in time you realized that we had we had a bigger entity on our hands than we thought. We did back then

Ryan Heins Alabama Birmingham UAB Rush Limbaugh PAT Espn SEC BOB South East Pasadena Paul Texas
Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

The Broken Cork

05:46 min | 4 months ago

Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

"Welcome back everyone to the broken court. Podcast episode to who. I'm dan aaron jake and right. Now i'm gonna throw it over to my man aaron for our toast since it's real close to valentine's day. I thought i would give a valentine's toast one of those cheesy almost greeting card. Esque toast hallmark. Here's here's to you. So roses are red violets are blue. Don't get me flowers bourbon. Will do cheers. cheers everyone. Damn let's get stuff so right now. World bourbon news. Going around out of new rift still company out of newport kentucky. Something that's kind of Near and dear to my heart. Since i do work in the world fast food. They're doing something really cool for all of us New riff is putting out a fifteen year. Straight bourbon whiskey. they're calling. i believe it's called. Relief is bottled in bond. Just like all of their other products. Distilled in indiana. By what what we can only think is mvp. Because they're the only ones. I think are going to have the stocks that are up there in fifteen years and i think it is. Gp wouldn't surprise me. The barrels were purchased out of mvp and again that's all speculative but they were stored at their warehouse with the remainder of their time and this run is limited to just nine hundred if not less only to be distributed out of their distillery for the price of two hundred dollars. I think i tweeted about that. Too on the burkan broken corker twitter page to if you wanna if you wanna get in more in depth about it. I believe he did. But that two hundred dollars is going to go to benefit Restaurant workers around the ohio and kentucky area. I believe that release is going to benefit. Both the ohio restaurant employee relief fund and the northern kentucky chamber of commerce who's in charge of distributing the funds to people who need it the most for more on that you can check us out on facebook at the broken court crew is our facebook group or you can follow new riff on all of their social media for more information on that release. And i'm sure it's going to be amazing man. I think you know what a great especially this time of year. What a great a cinnamon for them to do. I mean cove is really hit. That service industry pretty hard. It's ruined a lot of people and you don't see a lot of people talking about i. Understand nurses and doctors are at the forefront of all of this kovin but they don't talk a lot about like like your fast food workers who have been working throughout the entire thing. I mean i've been fast food. I have not stopped working since covert started. Yeah and i mean. God bless all the frontline workers as far as medical is concerned because they are. They're in close contact. All that like i said are the forefront of all of this but you rarely hear about anyone else you know. Keeping america fed keeping america clothed. Everything like that. So big shout out to all our healthcare workers and big shoutout to all our fast food workers. Anyone who's working retail right now and all of our truckers keeping everyone delivered to and everyone stocked up so we can get through this together. Definitely a big shout to the truckers. So we have a new segment on the show. And i want mr jake over there to take it over. Oh yeah this is our new segment. It's called what's cracking so basically what it is. We give a shoutout to whatever we've had since last podcast. Something's good something you drink and right now something you wanna tell everybody about to me. It was new roof winter whiskey. I tried that a good friend at a bar. Bought that around for actually me and dan and you talk about unbelievable. That's one of the best new products i've had. It really really is. I haven't had very many and of what i've had it. It's up there. I really so good. It opened my eyes to new roof and made me wanna do a little bit more research into their products. And then i mean on top of all of that. We found out about this thing that you just talked about the fifteen year. Oh yeah what's cracking for you. So what's cracking for me. I've had a couple of new bottles. I'm gonna give a couple of honorable. Mentions i never had seventeen ninety. Two bottle in bonn. I know very very strange. But i had that and it's delicious. If you can get your hands on bottle relatively cheap. I paid forty five ninety nine for man. I think that's right around retail so also from french. Lick indiana lead w sinclair four grain. It's called the iconoclast It's a four product from them. What happened long story short. They had three barrels. That were of the league w sinclair that. We're just a little off. They didn't say whether it was a good offer a bad off. They just said it was often. So they mix those three bottles together and made the iconoclasts. But the one. I really really wanna talk about is the o. H ingram whiskey It is from brown water. Bourbon company out of nashville. Where the whisky comes from. What happens with it. It's really cool. They on the mississippi river in an o o h ingram. Born and so really. Yeah so they have Redone this barge completely rick house out of it and so what

Dan Aaron Valentine Ohio Restaurant Employee Relie Northern Kentucky Chamber Of C Kentucky Jake Aaron Newport Facebook Mr Jake Indiana America Ohio Twitter DAN Bonn Ingram Whiskey
Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

The Broken Cork

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

"Welcome back everyone to the broken court. Podcast episode to who. I'm dan aaron jake and right. Now i'm gonna throw it over to my man aaron for our toast since it's real close to valentine's day. I thought i would give a valentine's toast one of those cheesy almost greeting card. Esque toast hallmark. Here's here's to you. So roses are red violets are blue. Don't get me flowers bourbon. Will do cheers. cheers everyone.

Dan Aaron Valentine Jake Aaron
Capitol rioter seen wearing "Camp Auschwitz" shirt arrested

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

Capitol rioter seen wearing "Camp Auschwitz" shirt arrested

"It was one of the many disturbing images that came out of last week's assault on the Capitol, A rioter pictured wearing a sweatshirt that red Camp Auschwitz today. The man wearing that anti Semitic shirt was arrested in Newport News, Virginia, Robert Packer is charged with unlawful conduct entering the capital without permission and disorderly conduct. CNN says Packer's been convicted three times for driving under the influence. He also has a felony conviction for Forging public records.

Red Camp Auschwitz Robert Packer Newport News Virginia Packer CNN
Rob Pelinka Says Kobe Predicted Los Angeles Lakers' NBA Championship Win

Mason & Ireland

02:39 min | 7 months ago

Rob Pelinka Says Kobe Predicted Los Angeles Lakers' NBA Championship Win

"Joining us. Right now is the architect of the twenty twenty world champion. Los angeles lakers general manager. Rob pelinka rob. Thanks for coming on. We appreciate a man to beyond guys. Good to hear your voices rob great to have you back in california and let me start there. We haven't talked to you since the lakers won the title and actually went back and look this up today. You were hired on march seventh twenty seventeen and we've had john lott before so we know you're a dreamer rob you dream big. I dream big. I think it's a really healthy thing to dream big but in your wildest dreams did you think within three years you could lead the lakers back to the top. Absolutely not. it's interesting. I told this story before and it. It's one that i cling to but i remember when When i when. I got the job. Of course my my i sort of dinner and drinks was was with my best friend. That's who you're going to do to celebrate a new job so so you know. Kobe and i went out for dinner and drinks in newport and he said at the table he said you know. I've i've twenty years working with you partnering with you. I i know your approach. I i know how you think detailed you are and you know and He said i'm looking at the roster. Yeah you said that you're inheriting some tough contracts and not a lot of cafes. He said i'll give you about three years and you'll have the lakers compete for a championship. And i said i was like dude. I love your optimism. But but no shot this is gonna take. This is going to take longer than that. So i think he He saw it before. I did it. It's really a testament to you. Know the the work of people here not me It's the we have an incredible basketball operation. Staff that is deep and thoughtful and hardworking and It's easy as a gm to get or take credit. But you know i. It's really the staff of people here and Lebron i think one time referred to us as beautiful wonderful people or something to that effect and that's really what it is. And i i think our players Especially in the bubble just really experienced that support That are front office and our staff gives to them to put him in a position to be the best they can and that was so necessary. One hundred day medical bubble we i. I knew the team that was the most together and the players that felt most supported by the front office and the coaching staff would have a huge chance to get to the end. And i think that's how we saw play out

Lakers Rob Pelinka John Lott Los Angeles Kobe California Newport Lebron Basketball GM
Lost Bob Dylan Interviews Surface at Boston Auction House

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Lost Bob Dylan Interviews Surface at Boston Auction House

"Long lost interviews with Bob Dylan of surface at a Boston auction house, and they contain some surprising new insights about the singer songwriter Taylor. Transcripts of the 1971 interviews with the late American Blues artist Tony Glover reveal that Dylan had anti Semitism on his mind when he changed his name. They also show he wrote. Lay Lady Lay for singer and actress Barbara Streisand. Really Would have thought it would have been about something like Rita Coolidge. He also discussed how he famously went electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, saying it was a strange night. Yeah, Wass, Okay. Yeah, it

Bob Dylan Semitism Rita Coolidge Tony Glover Barbara Streisand Newport Folk Festival Wass Taylor Boston
Trump plans California fundraiser, Nevada rally

The Steve Holland Retirement Wealth Show

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Trump plans California fundraiser, Nevada rally

"16 days to go. President Trump plans to raise some last minute money in Newport Beach, California. Later, he'll rally in Carson City, Nevada, was the porters will gather shoulder to shoulder outdoors attacked it criticized when his Democratic opponent, Joe Biden, because of the Corona virus pandemic. We do pass out masks at the rallies, and I encourage everyone who is attending a trump rally to put the mask on. They're not not just giving it to you for Christmas tree decorations later on. We also checked folks temperatures. And we remind people to wash their hands. We give him hand sanitizer. Jason Miller, a senior advisor with the Trump campaign on Fox News Sunday,

President Trump Joe Biden Newport Beach Senior Advisor Jason Miller Carson City Nevada California
Trump coming to California for private fundraiser

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:14 sec | 8 months ago

Trump coming to California for private fundraiser

"Trump Today will campaign We're told in Orange County this weekend that word today from his campaign the president has scheduled arrived John winner Boy just before noon Sunday and well that attend a campaign fundraiser in Newport Beach

Donald Trump Orange County President Trump Newport Beach
"newport" Discussed on Northern Kentucky Spotlight

Northern Kentucky Spotlight

04:09 min | 9 months ago

"newport" Discussed on Northern Kentucky Spotlight

"Welcome back to the Northern Kentucky spotlight and right now we are gonNA shine that spotlight on Newport racing gaming and you may not have heard of that but I know you've heard of turf way part and that's where this all started actually started. Long before that. But Chip Bach is here he is the general manager of Turkish Park in Newport racing and gaming and Jeff thanks for being here today. Thanks for having me I. Let's. Let's talk about what's happening at the end of the week. This is very exciting for people who are interested in gaming and gambling. So tell us what's going on in Newport. So we're we're opening up a gaming venue. We have We'll have fifty, five hundred gaming positions in Newport Kentucky. At. The top of mom if and carruthers were kind of where those it's it's an shopping plaza up here law. So have room for simulcasting soaks horse racing fans though finally have a place after we not perfectly down to come back in bed in Kentucky. So we're excited to To introduce our our vegas-style gaining machines to the those people in the area that liked gain that they'll live by a live close to the Newport area, and then we also from back our horse players in give them some new space you bet on the horse. So let's talk about that. Specifically you guys are having hr M.'s historical racing machine. So tell us what that is and how you bet on these things. So it's it's very simple and it's a it's easier to see some. Thais people come down and and we'll show them but Like I said, they're vegas style gaming machines are mutual And that's their legal in Kentucky But as far as the people that enjoy gaming elsewhere, you know they'll recognize some of. Some of the titles that they're used to playing in other places and it's very simple..

Newport Newport Kentucky Northern Kentucky Jeff general manager carruthers Turkish Park M.
Trump holds campaign rally in Virginia

AP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 9 months ago

Trump holds campaign rally in Virginia

"Campaign rally Friday night in Newport News. Virginia. President Trump Relish the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court. We don't have to do it by the election, but we should be even really able, that would be a great victory. Going into the election earlier in the day, Trump told reporters at joint base. Andrews. I'll be announcing the decision tomorrow is very exciting. Five o'clock at the White House Rose Garden. The likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsberg, a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be the sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replaced Justice Thurgood Marshall nearly 30 years ago. I'm

President Trump Justice Thurgood Marshall White House Rose Garden Newport News Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Ginsberg Virginia Andrews
Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
Trump holds rally in Newport News, Virginia

Mark Levin

00:20 sec | 9 months ago

Trump holds rally in Newport News, Virginia

"News Williamsburg International Airport in Virginia earlier at an event in Atlanta. The president expressing support for black votes as the calendar inches closer to the election. I will always put Americans first, and that includes very, very importantly, black Americans. Thie president will officially announces the Bream Court

President Trump Williamsburg International Air Bream Court Atlanta Virginia
Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 9 months ago

Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

"Guys that's Martin from shape. We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. Could you why don't you deduce yourself? It'll. Yeah. Awesome. First of all, thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. Martin. So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. So. If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. So what be? Yes. So it comes with a free standing bag. The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. What about impact? Not The impact is really the velocity. Okay. The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? Yes. So it comes with an APP you can the. Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, and then from there, it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. Really. So if you're advanced, you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. Otherwise, it can literally start at the very first time. You've you're you're throwing your first punch. So we have what we call the prospect where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, seventy, four for you Guys. Yeah, it's really seventy five percent beginners, but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. You know through the program you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. Of course, they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. Yeah. You can't really compete against somebody else right right. So Yeah, you actually can compete but on up put and precision you can't compete on. Actual defense offense. Of course, you're not going to get him. You know and does like a class look like, is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? So it's you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. For for me, you know like me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, and then look at it while I'm like punching out on my back or how should I mention it? Yeah. That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, the Stream directly on on a big screen. TV. Your accent. Yeah. Oh we have a portion of our users. We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, that works as well Yeah. You can mirror exactly. You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. You hear the voice really really properly, the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. Your stats are displayed very big for you. So like you're really into it, you feel like you're you're being tracked in. Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. Saying. It's only on ISLA, its and so why are people doing it Do they just WanNa, get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. Yeah it's interesting. So. Like calm, we have two types of customers. The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. Other portion come straight because they want boxing, but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Boxing Martin San Francisco Founder Apple Newport Beach Instructor Matt Fi Kim Co Founder Hudson Nelson Jesse Ceo Camp JIM
President Donald J. Trump Hosts a Great American Comeback Event in Jacksonville, FL

AM Tampa Bay

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

President Donald J. Trump Hosts a Great American Comeback Event in Jacksonville, FL

"Comeback event in Jacksonville, Florida tonight. This is the most important election in the history of our country believe that This election is a matter of economic survival. The president stumping in Moon Township, Pennsylvania, Tuesday he's expected to rally around the Second Amendment in Newport News, Virginia tomorrow over the states new laws that have led to the confiscation of guns that before he's back in Pennsylvania on Saturday for an event in Middletown following unexpected nomination to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Jeff Man.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Pennsylvania Moon Township Supreme Court Jeff Man Jacksonville Newport President Trump Middletown Florida Virginia
"newport" Discussed on Northern Kentucky Spotlight

Northern Kentucky Spotlight

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on Northern Kentucky Spotlight

"newport" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Tools for hacking the brain and and you know the emotion to the user into all of their APPs right and so every APP now had game game of vacation and notifications and those things that draw you back time and time again so I think you're right when I first started using iphone. There weren't those things or at least they weren't as prevalent. They weren't always on right and so you weren't always drawn back to pick up the phone so it's the game of vacation of the device which has led to such A. It seems to me anyway. I don't WanNa make these statements especially to someone who's studied the thing and Nauseam so I should have said as a question do you think it's the game -cation that has been the primary culprit. Yes I mean it depends how broadly defined game vacation but basically yes. It's a a collection of strategies that helped make these APPs and and so one of the big changes that led this way was for example when the social media companies change the experience so it was no longer about. I post you post because I know you I check what you post. That was the original social media experience original web. Two Point Oh vision. They replaced that with. I hit this APP and there is an incoming stream of social approval indicators about me there's wykes which weren't there it's obviously there's likes for my post there's re tweets there's favorites. There's people moan auto tagging me in their photo so that that was one of the big changes because it meant When you hit that button sometimes you're gonNA see a lot of social approval indicators about you and sometimes you're going to see no social approval indicators about you and sometime you might see that people are upset you the way? Our brain is wired. We can not resist polling that virtual slot machine lever if those are the rewards come out and on the other end and that wasn't a purposeful and then they re engineered the interfaces for for all of these tools to have that game vacation. Feel so now you can have swiped down to reload. That's very slot machine asked right or maybe inlet they go to endless scrolling on certain types of interfaces so that that you you have no easy friction point. That's going to get you to stop facebook. Change their engineers made the original notification badge gray because that was to facebook Palette and the attention engineers came along and said no no. No it needs to be alarm red. Because that's what is more likely to create a sense of sort the distress or urgency in the human brain. You'll be more likely to hit the APP. And so it's a whole reinvention. The be an intermittent stream of social indicators which has nothing to do with the original idea of social media wasn't there it's completely contrived Eddie of a like button photo tax that's all about driving eyeballs coupled with this sort of in a interface reinvention and I got to say and not not the sound conspiratorial. But there's there's a few pockets in academia That specialize on what they call persuasive technology. How do we redesign? Redesigned technologies to actually induce desired action in the user A lot of people who ended up innovating these ideas at the big tech companies came out of these research groups. And so this. This is all intentional. It's why when Sean Parker the original facebook president more recently a couple of years ago came out and said we're hacking your brain you know we're hackers and we figured out how to Hack your brain and I gotta say this was terrible news for the social media companies. The idea that we're exploiting you. This addictive is making you unhappy and I think this is a real reason why they're PR. People told the social media companies. You have to tack car to another topic. And that's why you see the conversation. Almost entirely about things l. like privacy and data portability and content moderation as they had changed the subject they cannot be talking about. Are these services addictive and making people unhappy unhappy. Because that's a problem. They can't solve if they make the service less addictive their revenue plummets. And so there's been this shift in the way they talk about things and say well. Let's deal with with with issues that maybe we can do something about maybe. We can add into inscription to try to reduce privacy violations. Maybe we can keep tweaking. Content moderation standards. There's a reason why they're talking about that and not talking about their former president saying that we're having your brains is because that's playground. They wanted to be playing right well. It's interesting you know I. It takes us a while to to study and acknowledge at a social level to study. Acknowledge the damage that can be done at a broad level from from something like smoking or alcohol all addiction and then to take action against it. Do you think that's going to happen with the brain hacking through these electronic devices or is it just something that the the government's going to be like. Yeah whatever. It's just free market. Well you know you have to keep in mind. We have to get the historical example in mind. I think this is actually an interesting point. So there there's been recently in the news like let's say Chris Hughes one of the Co founders of facebook and some of the presidential candidates coming out and saying Social media the big companies like facebook or like big oil and they need to be broken up the trust that needs to be broken up but maybe the better analogy is actually big tobacco because think about the The government response to BIG TOBACCO WAS NOT WE'RE GONNA somehow regulate tobacco companies to make cigarettes less harmful. There's aunts a big tobacco was we're going to essentially Angelique exit but also educate the public that you probably shouldn't be smoking and I you know I'm wondering if that's not. The more apt analogy here is sitting social social media company. This is a this is a free service based on extracting attention fundamentally it's going to be It's GONNA be addictive. It's going to be exploited if they have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders to be addictive and to get as much use as possible. And so I don't know if the idea of what we need to do as maybe just get more competition in this space is somehow the key to to me. I see this a little bit more through the Linzo how he used to see big tobacco. That's what I'm trying to do with. My books is shift the culture to some degree where people no longer feel comfortable with the idea that this is something that they're just going to slavishly check on their phone. I mean I think when something is unhealthy as opposed to uncompetitive. That's a different set of solutions. To begin to look at right or another. You know option is that we're heading into narrow people because of the exorcist information and the diffusion of information that a lot the people are demanding more social responsibility of the companies that do business with as well as investing. And so you know. I think you're GONNA find companies that exploit things that damage the social fabric having a harder and harder time staying business. That's maybe a dream of mine fine but it's not happening right now. It doesn't seem but you never know right. You never know and the funny thing about a company like facebook is. It's it's historically unique. We've never before in history had a company that was so valuable I mean facebook is valued around five hundred billion dollars. That's almost twice ExxonMobil's valuation and yet at the same time is so dispensable. If you think about facebook I if I came to you and said look. I'm sorry a court order. You're not allowed to look at facebook facebook in ten years. Exactly the people have the same reaction. Oh it's okay I mean if there I'm GonNa look at it and yet it's worth five hundred billion dollars typically when you have a company that valuable it's because let's say they supply oral and our entire economy requires oil the run And it's a necessity and it's a social good but this weird place to social media companies are on on is that their hooks into their audiences is very tenuous and people can very easily leave platform and go to another. I've been documenting pretty thoroughly a lot of people my age just leaving social media altogether like well I tried it was okay. I mean they don't really play. They're an interesting source of distraction. But for most people are not at all dispensable. So they're in this rear precarious situation situation. Where you know? Kim Kardashian says the right thing about instagram tomorrow and they could see their user base plummet by thirty percent. That's a scary position to be in. If you're one of these companies except that they own instagram you know who they are valuable to the business world is doing business on the Internet and spending companies spending millions of dollars a month. Yeah on facebook. which crazy just to attract eyeballs and hopefully convert some users? Yeah well I mean. There's a reason that worth five. Hundred Billion Dollars is because the advertising works but for the advertising the work they have to get the average millennial user now uses social media. Something like one hundred forty one minutes a day. That's what makes them so. Valuable is the fact that they've convinced a sizable fraction of the population to essentially dedicate the bulk of their leisure time to entering data belt themselves in the databases right. Let's talk specifically about your book. Now I saw in some of the notes that Ellison put together for me that you were hoping to get a small Qadri of peeps to do a little experiment and to go off all social media and screens hundred percent for thirty days and you ended up with a boatload of volunteers. How did that come about? And what were some of the surprising things about that. Study so the original L.. Ask and this was an email I sent to my mailing list and so it was a little bit under the radar and I said look. I want to find volunteers to do this thing. I'm calling a digital declutter. Were as you said you take a thirty day break from all these optional technology your personal life and then when you're done the idea was you don't just go back to everything you rebuild from. Scratch so the thirty days the idea the thirty days as opposed to just doing this over weekend. The idea of the thirty days was that you could actually have some time for reflection experimentation. figure out what do I really care about what I want to really spend my time on. Get some clarity on that. So that when it comes time to add back tech you can be much more intentional. I thought I would get I. Don't know a dozen volunteers. I mean that's kind of a big ask ask right. I honestly thought about dozen volunteers and I can talk to him all. I thought this will permit. There'll be twelve people who do this and I'll keep him on the phone and then I can. I can kind of write about the experience in the book what it was like for these people and instead sixteen hundred people signed up. Wow so it became an actual like research search study it became it became like an actual research study was as and then you had the code the surveys and come out. Data was except for to be clear. I purposely did not officially code the surveys or gather data in a quantitative kids because then I would need approval from my academic institution so But it but it became like an unintentional sort of social movement ended up being covered the New York Times. A one of their reporters roommates was doing it and and And that that's what really helped me understand that there is such A. There's such a pent up hunger for change here. But I'll have to say when the big things I discovered from. This experiment is a a people were surprised to discover the extent to which their phone had pushed everything out of their life that they used to care about and they they've been telling themselves this story of well. Look look at my phone occasionally when I have nothing else to do its idle time. I mean the elevator. Not a big deal and that first day when they didn't didn't have the phone to look at they realize I don't know what to do with myself. I have gotten rid of. I have stopped putting in the hard work required to actually build up a meaningful will a meaningful leisure life outside of disk professional activities. So that was the first thing I learned The second thing I learned is that the people who treated this like a detox and I really hate hate to use of the word. Detox in context technology Because I think I think people are completely abusing the concept when they talked about digital detox which was for most people they mean a break which is which is actually a pretty big insult to the substance abuse community where the where the whole notion of detox is is to make actionable change as the foundation for better life. Eddie that you just take a break from the thing that's bothering you is but that's a bit of an aside But the people who treated the thirty days like one these digital detox isn't just tried to white knuckle it. I'm just going to not use my phone. I use it too much. They almost all failed. lasted a week or two and we're back to the people who succeeded needed and making lasting change out of these thirty days for the people who took the thirty days and said I'm GonNa get after it and figure out..

facebook. Eddie president Sean Parker ExxonMobil Kim Kardashian New York Times government fiduciary Chris Hughes Ellison
"newport" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Don't use Tucker an end. It is only useful when it comes to human flourishing when you're deploying tack for very specific intentional purposes that you care about as soon as the tech becomes an end in itself that we start to see problems. Hey folks welcome back to the unbeatable mine. PODCAST is Mark Devine your host. Thanks so much for joining me today. We're GONNA have an incredible show with my friend cal. Newport author of digital minimalism and one of my favorite books deep work Kelso's spoke to have you. I'll introduce more but Jeez it's really good to have you back on the show and Michigan. Yeah it's my pleasure. It's been too long. It has. I've been tracking your work and I know that your your university professor your computer computer scientist actually but I loved when I read and deep work just how you organize your life and so it really was not surprised that you're next work was digital minimalism. Because because you already are kind of a minimalist and I'm really stoked that you went deep into that subject to help other people appreciate the benefits of that. But so let's you know before we get into all that cool stuff. Let's remind our listeners. Or those who aren't familiar with your work or who you are as a person you know just a a little bit about your background and how you came to teach computer science and and what it is it really fires you up and makes you unbeatable. Well I really do too. Thanks thanks so I am a computer scientist. And that's what I've been training for my whole life I went right out of college to Mit. Got My doctorate and now at Georgetown. My focus on the theory of distributed systems. That means I do the sort of non useful type of computer science where we saw the equations at the whiteboard instead of actually building useful things with computers but I have also been a writer in parallel with that whole progression. I wrote my first book when I was still an undergraduate digital minimalism is my six and so I've been writing at the same time That I've been a computer scientist. It used to be the case that the books I wrote were just topics were relevant into my own life at the time so for example back in two thousand twelve I wrote a book about career satisfaction I wrote it then because I was entering the job market and I want the know about satisfaction in two thousand sixteen. I wrote deep work because I really cared about. How do I get tenure or more? Generally how knowledge workers succeed and I really went. Deep defunding the value of focus. I will say however mark that in recent years with this new book and the book. I'm working on now. Really Seen My mission starting to sharpen where I no longer see my life as a writer as something different than my life as a technologist I now see myself primarily right now as a technologist who also writes about the impact. Are these technologies on our culture. And so that's what's really been getting me fired up. Starting with deep work with my new book digital minimalism and the book. I'm writing now about email. That's it's called a world without email is all trying to grapple with the intersection of tech at our culture. Is I think these are the more important issues facing us right now so in a way. It's your it's your apology to culture for screwing US up with all your computers stuff. Yeah this is my apology for what I've wrought with my academic work. uh-huh what you've wrought on. Well you're not alone. There's a whole like a whole bunch of other people working in that area to distract us and to take us away from important things like spending time alone and being quiet and that type of stuff. So let's let's talk about deep worked before we get into your current work or or your more. Recent work with digital minimalism. One of the things I loved about deep work was this notion Russian that if you want just mentioned if you WanNa really contribute and not just skim. The surface of of social media news is in common just like languaging in a social context. If you really WanNa go deep and understand something deeply you have to kind of escape and different people. We'll have different ways to do it. How do you like how do you I mean not escape from reality but escape from unreality and go back to where the true information lies right which is going to be found inside through inside intuition as well as being able to really penetrate a subject by studying with deep concentration so tell us what year discovery was that what worked for you and what works for some other high level thinkers and authors and creators? Well for me like with a lot of people there. Two components to trying to really prioritize depth do type of thing that moves the needle and knowledge work so one component is actually just minimizing the amount of non depth stuff on your plate and so this is an ongoing aggressive effort to try to make sure that you're not adding too much shallow allegations on your plate. So there's this this overall effort to minimize something that I work very aggressively at. I'm sort of try to be very careful about what what I allow on my plate. What I agree to what initiatives I take on? I'm sort of DETTORI. Hard to track down. I say no to most invitations to do most things because because I don't want my time being taken up then when you focus on what is on your plate. I do something that a lot of other people do which is I- also late between periods of deeper work and periods of shallow work. And I do that on many different scales and so that might mean on the scale of an individual day. I like to start start with deep work and then once that energy is spent maybe move over some of the logistical stuff. On the scale of a week I tend to have a balance of some days. Maybe are a teaching as as long as I have to be on campus teaching. I'm going to put other meetings on that day. I'm going to dedicate that day more towards non deep efforts but then other days in that same week might be almost entirely dedicated into deep thinking and then on the scale of seasons as a professor. I do the same thing. I'm entering summer right now. That means going into hibernation mode. I'm about to become very hard to track down because I'M GONNA be reading and writing for months at a time and so having a clear separation between depth shallows at multiple different scales coupled with an overall commitment commitment to be incredibly careful about what I agree. A lot on. My plate has helped me get in enough of the deep cycles to keep doing interesting things. you know that that's awesome and it sounds simple but there's a tremendous amount of self awareness that goes into what you just said in those two big categories. You know saying no in service to that bigger. Yes right there right the self-awareness required to know what to say. Yes to is really the most important born thing right so that that means really getting clear about what is your unique gift to the world. You know at a broad level and then how you're going to express that and really dive into that at this point in time right and that's going to change as you have offer you. It's changed as your interests have evolved right and then the other thing go ahead. Yeah I was just GONNA say briefly. There's an irony to that as well. It's absolutely vital and the irony is as what you're as what you're doing the thing you're working deeply on gets gets more developed and gets more impactful the demands to take you away from it grow as well. It's this this weird binary coin and sort of the the more you become useful useful. The more you're deep thinking becomes useful to the world the more the world is going to try to take you away from your deep thinking which and it's difficult. I mean this is social reciprocity. Just just yesterday. I was showing my wife. I said look. Clean my inbox on Tuesday Earlier in the day and and here it was Wednesday afternoon and I was saying there are now nine request Austin here for my time from people I know and every one of the whos is going to require like a relatively delicate social dance to basically say no to so it gets pretty hard. I mean I think it's worth emphasizing your precise. It's hard work but it's where it's worked. It's absolutely vital to do if you want to keep doing things if impact right and the irony. There is the distractions. Come as you said. Because of the deep work and because of aligning with that purpose of that gift but also The requests are are in alignment with a meaning the more of an expert you become. Let's say digital minimalism. The more avenues. You're going to open up in the more experts and opportunities for things like this podcast. That opened up in his all in alignment with this new vein of gold. That your plumbing but you still then you have to do that like the next layer of selectivity right and so it's not the old stuff that's distracting anymore. It's new stuff. New People new interest new avenues. And like you said that's just a never ending thing. You can't get rid of the distraction. You just keep on sharpening the saw your awareness on what to say yes do and what to avoid so you can keep going deeper in the right lane or follow the vein appropriate to use that metaphor. You know all the way down to the depth fastening because you know we could literally spend the entire time talking about and how to do that right out how to develop that type of awareness. The other thing you said this idea of having a battle rhythm is really interesting knowing how to spend your days where or your energy is going to be best spent on deep work you know the deep work and then also You when you're doing something like you were. Where are you might be doing reading? And writing and then teaching you know some people will say the teaching is the deep work right is is every bit as important because you have to be the engaged. That's where you're offering your gift of the world just in a verbal sense as opposed to a written sense. I'm curious as to why you would categorize teaching you. You know as as shallow work and reading and writing and thinking as deep work well. That's that's a good question because what I should clarify I guess is the reason. Ny Teaching tends to anchor. Shallow Day is not the actual time in the classroom. Because I agree when you're actually communicating. That's very deep. What we're doing now? For example. I consider that are deep work or when I'm in front of Front of my students and teaches a class on computational theory that's deep work it's more than teaching brings me to campus and drew once. I'm on campus. Now it's can do office hours. I can do the meetings with students I can do. So it's once I'm on campus and in a I'm here and available my thought is let's batch. Let's make this a day if I'm going to be here and doing other things. Let's make this a day where I do everything I can. which is like? I'm on campus right now recording this I have a full afternoon of meeting scheduling said. Well let me take advantage of that whereas yesterday I was at home all day and work it on one thing deeply the entire day so these blocks the deep and shallow are pretty large blocks and you fit different things into that block that go go into those categories. Yeah that's right they can be. They can be on all sorts. It's a different scales with their offense. They are often quite large. Yeah that makes a lot of sense and that rings true for me. Whenever I've tried to do you know I'm going to do in our ninety minute? Block of deep work. And and then I'm GonNa go do something else it's just really. I don't know what the right word is just difficult to really go deep and stay there because you're constantly getting pulled out out so for me it's gotta be like a day or like you said a week next week. I'm going out to be alone finish manuscript and that would be my deep work week so it sounds like you have the same thing but I love the idea of seasons and that's kind of unique to your profession. It's difficult for other professionals. To have a seasonality. I think to to their battle rhythm but I think that would be interesting to think about right. If you're an executive you know. Can you arrange a sabbatical or something like that. During the summer months Komo go deep on something. Yeah I think I mean I think that would be a good idea. we see seasonality on a on a more of like the weekly scale. We're seeing this. Starting to emerge in software development where for example the sprint methodology has become big where they're recognizing sometimes the right way develop a software product. It is to actually take two or three days and make it clear that this is all. You're doing you're just working on this. You're just doing one thing just going deep And then when this is over it's a completely the different phase. Okay I'm not in a sprint. And maybe we're being logistical planning. And in general though at what I find surprising is that we have a whole economy based off knowledge. Well IT products. We have a whole mass support of our economy. This based on US using our brain to create value and yet we understand so little about the actual. Let's say cognitive or physical best practices.

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"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"He's one of the people who Did a blurb for your book and I remember talking to him about multitasking. And the idea of going back and forth between things you feel like you're nailing it but in fact you're making your brain work very hard and you're wasting whatever however many minutes it takes when you get back into the project you're working on you you are wasting all the time reengaging turning your brain back to the folder that it was looking at and it's something as simple switching back to you check your email so I know when I'm writing a long form piece for ESPN. I close all my tabs the only tabs that can be opened our research related. Because I don't want to see a notification in my email I don't Wanna be tempted to look up something else And you talk about that too in terms of our ability to not just focus on work but life and the people around us were just taxing our brains by the constant back and forth we are not good at network switching and and it takes time and we yeah. This is the result that goes back to experiments as early as the nineteen twenties and psychology. Now today we have people like attend. Who can actually get into the neuroscience? Explain what actually actually is happening in the brain. We've known this for a century. It takes time to switch our attention from one thing to another and so if for example you're in a work context. The very worst thing you could do. If your work requires you to produce something complicated is to say okay. work on this. Whatever this script this memo this computer program but we want you like the average worker to switch and check an inbox once every six minutes which is about what the average knowledge worker does not as a recipe for incredibly diminished cognitive kind of output? Because every time you do that quick check your switching your circuit before it completely switches. You try to switch back the whole. Thing gets jumbled it takes a long time for your mind to clear it out and before cleared out. Hf again and create a new jumble. The same thing happens in our personal lives When you're trying to say extract value from spending time in nature with the friend every time you a quick check of a phone glance at an inbox or text message you get this? Jumble of network switching and suddenly the richness of the experience is far diminished. And so we do this enough at all all times at work in their personal life that in general our experience of the world is persistent we diminished. We don't even realize it Intel we try experiments like saying go without your phone for months and then suddenly people it says. If you're taking off there is life different or if you're in work you say spend half your first half of every day no email or something like just do an experiment like that. It's as if you're taking some sort of neurotrophic drug like you're under limitless Tillerson uh-huh well and what we're getting back to is actually normal. We don't realize the degree to which were persistently diminishing experience to this sub normal thing that we we we come to think of is just I guess this is what life is. And it's like when you know wizard of Oz. Goes into color at that fifteen minute mark into the movie. That's what happens when you take just constant context which out of your life well and you acknowledge that. We're still relatively new in the age of the Internet and so we're still not even sure about how using using the Internet in our phones and everything else is actually changing our brains and how they work. There are some studies involving young people who have trouble looking into each other's eyes or who you cut out of a conversation right around the same minute as everybody else their age when they aren't in inspired or used by it and immediately check their phone There's all these studies ladies that are going on now to try to help us understand the ways that were either damaging our brains are not utilizing them. Well but a lot of it hasn't come out right so we're the guinea pigs for all this stuff that we will later find out was deeply damaging to how we function with each other and and all that other stuff so let's quickly go over the steps for this digital declutter it. It starts with thirty days and it's not throw your phone out for thirty days. It's identified the things that you really need and keep those and get rid of everything else. Yeah you're basically taking a break from what I call a optional personal technology so these are the technologies and your personal life that you can step away from for thirty days without it being a big deal so for most people this is like social media streaming videos video games online news things you can step away from Fairmont. That's not gonNA cause a big deal. It's not worth things so it's not an excuse to not answer to your boss email unfortunately and where you have overlapped so like if you're work requires you to do a little bit on facebook. For what say recruiting or something like this. That's fine just put some rules around it not on my phone. I do it on my work computer. I have scheduled for the for the purpose of the Thirty Day. Experiment so you're you're essentially cleaning out your proverbial personal digital closet. Ause it so that you can have that the empty to the best of your ability for about a month and then you define the rules very carefully because if someone needs needs to be on a facebook group because it involves their kids after school project or something or needs to be on a facebook group that that helps promote their brand or works on their brand than they would bookmark the page for that group never entering their personal time line so they can't get looped into the suck of WHO. What's this person writing in whose this person doing doing? Never getting on the feed. Only going to that bookmarked page. Yeah and it would be on your computer. You would take the apps off your phone almost certainly unless you really have to do it on your phone. The tricky thing is text messaging because they plays a incredibly important logistical goal for a lot of people. Hate my daughter. You skip picked up from school. That's how I find out text message but it also can be this constant Distraction so what. A lot of people do in thirty days with text message is if they are expecting a key logistical tax. They'll keep it around. Otherwise they tend to put it on. Do not disturb and maybe check every two hours or something like that so the the worst what happened is that their friends or family trying to reach them might have a bit of latency before they respond so so the things. You can't get rid of all the experiment just put some rules around it and the rules of a different for everybody. So it's about holding yourself accountable right. Don't make it too easy on yourself. Nope I think well I technically need this. I don't even know where I would begin to be honest with you because I feel like my job requires crossing over into all these places. And there's obviously benefits like everyone. Who's listening to this? Is Listening on a podcast right. So maybe you decide that podcasts are not a time suck and door. Don't require bouncing around in wasting time. It's intentional you choose news one you listen to it. Maybe you're accomplishing things. While listening. That might be something that you would allow. Well you could. Maybe you would have during your thirty day. Some sort of a schedule for okay. Listen to podcast during this particular activity but not every activity another hacker. Journalists did which I thought was really interesting. Who's going through something like this is that they actually hired someone to check for relevant breaking news on twitter and the person could they check like once every two hours it it gave you know? Here's the particular I won't say what particular field the journalist was in the particular topics I care about and They could call them if the collar Bro. which by the way is something? I'm surprised that more newsrooms don't do. This really should be like one of the first thing they do is the first year Internet media can raise the monitor twitter behalf of of the journalists. Who have been there longer? So you can get creative. You know Whatever gets you as much sort of space from the conflict companion model as possible is what you're trying to do without it? Being a problem I would have some assistant where I'm like. You didn't tell. Tell me about this. MEME that everyone's saying now I didn't use it on this. TV show and it wasn't funny. It would be very difficult. We need someone who who understands the district very well But I guess that would be that would be the search for the perfect. The Perfect Assistant All right so they've got the tricks that they could do to keep the couple of things they need and other than that they try to do this this full sort of reset and then when they reintroduced things. How does that work right so so crucially before that during the thirty day period? It's not just about some sort of detox effect and if anything I'm really wary about the the sort of appropriation of the word detox in this context During the thirty days before you do do you WanNa be doing is very actively do experimentation reflection getting back in touch with what you really matters what you really like. You know what's really valuable to you. So it's a very active active time when you're rediscovering beyond the world of your phone. What do I actually like to do with my time outside work with actually meaningful? Then when you get to the reintroduction you work backwards of course from what you discovered and so for each of these activities you identified during the thirty days as being really important to you you ask. What's the best way to use? Technology to support court. Amplified as you bring back in that technology you put some rules around it to maximize that benefit and avoid other costs and those answers. That's that's what the fines technology and your personal life going forward so everything that comes back into your wife comes back in for a particular reason. It's essentially the digital equivalent of Mary. CONDO Rondo. I didn't know about Mary condo until after I wrote this book now I know a lot about her essentially the digital equivalent of what she says. which don't just sort of mess around with your closet or take out a few things? uh-huh organizers India down to ourselves then just put back into things that you really care about. That's what you're doing. You're starting from scratch with checking your personal life. This time you rebuild it. You're doing it much more intentionally than the first time around. You bring things back into particular very important purposes and because you know why or just an attack you can put really really good optimization rules around it yeah. MERIE CONDO has down. That system works in that whole sparking thing is very easy but vague way to kind of encompass encompass everything does it spark joy..

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"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"You can start to optimize now. You can put rules in place. It will make sure that you get that value. But you don't fall down these traps that have nothing to do with that value. And as soon as people start putting these rules in place optimizing tech for specific specific purposes their entire relationship changes and they go back to two thousand nine iphone type users. They use their tech for these specific high leverage purposes. It gives them huge benefits for the most part. It's not this constant source of distraction. So I mean it seems simple. minimalism is simple. But it's impacts. I've really found to be pretty profound. You work backwards. This is what I WanNa do and then you just look the packers toolbox that you pull things out of very carefully to support these small number of things he really cared about the shift in perspective makes all the difference. Yeah the idea of it being a tool and not a companion and right now for so many of us it's it's essentially a companion. It's who do I talk to one on board who I listen to what I've got nothing else to listen to. Where we we start to create this relationship with our phone that goes beyond using it's specifically for things and instead searching it to find out what might fill our time or what what might be interesting? I want to get to some of the digital minimalism steps. Can you advise for people. But I quickly wanted to have you some some of the things that we're losing out on because of our inability to detach from our phones there's a couple couple things And and starting solitude and why sort of the idea that we're never bored anymore can be bad well so solitude if we used to the definition ah I think is relevant is when you are spending time free from input from other minds so the definition of solitude I care about here is you're not processing another minds outputs you're not talking somebody not listening to something. You're not really something. That type of solitude is absolutely crucial because it used to be essentially the default state default state. Your mind was in your thoughts and observing the world around you then occasion elite you would interact with another human. At which point your mind would go into all hands on deck mode because we're wired to be very social expend a huge amount of resources to manage interactions with other minds as we go into this all hands on deck modell. Let's say have an interaction with a family member or retried number one of the things we have now with the this sort of odd constant companion bottle of smartphones. Is that for the first time in human history. We can banish every last moment of this type of solitude from our life that any possible moment where it might just be us our thoughts and looking at the world around us to look at the screen and there'll be a nice statistical algorithm showing it's something that's been mathematically selected to make us interested the result of this is our brains never get into that default state which they're not at all wired to be. You can't keep your brain revved up in process from other not mine modes all the time. What happens when you try to do that? Things break down with one of the biggest side effects being the sense of anxiety that has become a sort of pervasive background In our in our in our society kind of accepted yeah. We're all this kind of anxious all the time. A lot of that is that we're simply over clocking our brain. They're not meant to always be processing this information. That's sort of misuse of our neuronal hardware. And that's sort of the idea behind meditation right that we need to occasionally a quiet our minds. Whether that's you know in in walking and moving around and trying to focus on one problem or literally meditating and trying to think of nothing. Is this idea that our brains ah break occasionally but you don't even you don't even have to go so far as meditation. It's sufficient just to do stuff throughout the day that you don't have their phone when even if you're just looking around thinking even if your mind it's not clear it's just the fact that it's you and your own thoughts. That's the state that we have to be on a regular basis. Well we used to do that a lot. I remember when I would be on track trips in college. I would sit on a bus and I would stare out the window and think and occasionally I would have journal and the things I thought I would write down. And there's a lot of creativity and space to to solve things this and think about yourself and other people and everything else. When you're not being fed new information constantly which I think is hard because I also am someone who very much likes to use my time to like peak? I talked about my being like Jenga game like I need everything to slide into a little slot because otherwise I won't get it done so if I'm getting my nails done I'm listening to a podcast if I'm working out I'm listening to a radio show to prep from my other show later There's nothing wrong with that right as long as you occasionally get breaks. Yeah as long as I have a similar type of lifestyle but as long as you're regularly scheduling in time where it's just you and your mind and even if it's ten minutes here twenty minutes here or after you shut down at seven or something like just. That's fine while you're trying to avoid is the complete lack of solitude which is incredibly artificial condition. That really wasn't possible until without seven or eight years ago so the opposite of that is also true. We don't need too much solitude. We also need human interaction and the guest. I just I had Jim Hill. Zaki was talking about how the lack of day to day face to face communication because of urban living solo living you know having our pods and everything else else can affect our empathy and kindness toward each other Kate Fagan a colleague of mine. Wrote a book What we made mattie running some of the research and there is about how our actual brains react to talking on the phone versus reading a text versus talking in person and on the phone and in person you at least get some brain activity when you talk to someone you love someone when you love sends you a text about a hard moment? You're going through the brain activity isn't there. You can feel like you've had the same exchange of consolation and kindness but your brain doesn't see it and hear it that way because it actually needs to be triggered by the sound of a voice or you know the the psychosomatic reaction to somebody's face and what they're doing while they're talking to you. That's a huge part of this. Our phones and why there's so much loneliness and mental health issues is we're stepping away from the actual face to face. Communication seems seems to be absolutely true. It helps explain this otherwise paradoxical result that we find again and again that increase social media usage tends to increase loneliness which doesn't make sense on the surface. I mean social media use is a social activity but what seems to be happening is exactly what you're talking about. It's not that being on social media. Yeah that makes you feel only. It's when you replace other types of richer. Social interactions with the social media. You end up with a net loss. I mean all the research is clear. We're incredibly sophisticated. Social animals are our experience of sociology is multi modal to be sure we take an all sorts of different channels of information and the whole thing gets fixed together in different parts of our brain simulate and understand the people were talking to right now for example. I'm really listening to the the timber and pacing of your voice. The careful careful listeners would probably notice that there's some Linden continents going on here. We're actually matching the way that we're pacing the way we talk. This helps create a sense of empathy. So we have the complicated tasted multi modal social computers because this was absolutely crucial to our species. Survival and this complex social computer this evolved over millions of years does not understand glowing ASCII characters on a piece of glass. It probably doesn't know what that is. Just we have no experience with that on any sort of deep evolutionary loosener timescale and so if we take this rich dance that we train our whole lives to do which is to be communicating richly with other humans. And we replace it with ASCII characters and bit met emojis on the small little piece of glass. We think in the frontal CORTEX. I'm out of being so social. I've been on my phone all day long but the rest of this huge complex computer which which is just lying there idle doing nothing. I was like man. We're we're lonely time we've actually communicated with someone I think it's a real issue back with more. That's what she said. Was Sarah Spain in just.

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"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Comes up so hope you enjoy. That's what she said super excited to have cal. Newport on the PODCAST I'm sure. Regulators will see a theme bouncing around from people who engage with each other comment on each other recommend each other for the podcast and and cal came recommended because a lot of what he's written about in his books has come up in conversation on this podcast I WANNA start with way back when in growing up and how you how you found yourself to become an expert on how to work well and now on digital minimalism. So let's talk about being a kid. What kind of kid were you had a nerdy tech science guy from the start? Yeah always a computer nerd. My mom was a computer programmer when I was growing up so I was exposed to programming at a young age. So I I always had a computer hacking on the computer from a young age Also though was involved in other things awesome well quite a social guy was a mid distance varsity track athletes. So I had the life that pulled in a lot of different strands. So I could you you know come from the track back to my high school tech company onto a computer back out to the the exercise room so it definitely an unusual but interesting mixture texture of traits when I was growing up. And where did you grow up mainly in New Jersey near Princeton New Jersey. Okay so you're you're you're balancing the track stuff. I was collegiate heptathlete. So your Your mid distance stuff was always the the bane of my existence but a part of my training training so you. You're bouncing all this stuff. At what point are you a teenager who decides you WanNa Start Your own business. Well the thing to keep in mind about that the timeline which is this is the late nineteen nineties. We're talking about. which was the first tech BOOB? This was the tech boom with pets dot com and Web van. That first time with the Nasdaq was going crazy. And one of the weird side effects of that first tech boom is that otherwise reasonable adults. Figured figured that it made a lot of sense to hire teenagers to watch that contract. There's just a sense of I duNNo. Don't young people know a lot about technology. let's give a lot of money Johny to the sixteen year old who design our website pillar web strategy. I think it was one of the rare windows in the history of business where people would actually think it was a good idea. Yeah Sign Contracts with people who are so young that their dad had the drive them through the meeting so I took advantage of it. I don't do that now with social media. Because they know that they I don't get it so they have to hire young people to explain to them how to be on Tick Tock and how to best sell their social media APPs to other young people. It's funny you mention Napa is Saturday night live always runs an old episode before the new one now shortened version and they ran an old jerry. Seinfeld David Bowie episode from Nineteen. Ninety nine this this past Saturday and there was a sketch for some sort of I think it was. Maybe a law firm but they were late getting to the web and they weren't in a rush and so their website was something awful. Awful like tiny baby penises dot com or something and it was just sort of how absurd the Internet and I can tell you exactly what it was clown. Tina Start Art cloudiness dot fart. I don't know where he came. Up with baby penises. I knew the penis was in there. Yeah and it's funny. I was just I was just thinking eating how incredibly distant that feels. Now the idea of like oh well. We missed the the website with our names. So this is what we're stuck with and it reminded me when I was reading your book you talked about and I'm only going to skip ahead for a second. You talked about the introduction of the iphone and it was essentially an ipod that you could call people on and I completely forgot the introduction of the iphone as being that simplistic and not being about all the things we use it for. You know things move so fast. I mean I went went back when working on that section of the book and talk to the original head engineer. Who worked under jobs on it? And that's what he confirmed. It was an ipod that made calls. The big problem. Solving is that people used to have their ipod and their Nokia Razor. That's two separate devices you'd have in your pocket. There's too much stuff in your pocket and the iphone was what's going to combine them into one and that was the original marketing. Push forget about it. I think it's a great example of how quick how quick things have been moving in this particular regular world of consumer facing tech. Yeah Okay so back to your. I believe seventeen years old and you decide to start a tech company. What was the goal? What did you think you are solving? elving what problem. Nothing that exciting on the surface right on the circus. We were doing essentially website development for companies. Now the big insight right that that I had with my my business partner was my girlfriend Michael Simons big insight. was we figured out early. About outsourcing and so what we were doing as we were going to these meetings and our ills that suits and had the laminated spiral bound pitch books and then we had teams in Pakistan and India. That would do most most of the actual graphic design and development. So we were sort of early to this idea that there was this arbitrage at the time the sort of huge inefficiency and that you had a- ah excess number of heavily train graphic designers and programmers overseas without a rough work and so we were playing that arbitrage game and making the big high profit margins. Doing it what did your parents. I mean your mom's obviously a computer programmer. So is she like. Oh good following the family footsteps or were they concerned about you already diving moving into the business world. Well I think they were fine with the computer programming stuff so you know. I was a programming nerd and I was taking CS courses at Princeton in high school. That type of thing the business. I'm sure made them a little nervous. Especially when there was contracts involved in a lot of money changing hands and interesting remember. Remember the the thing to remember valley nine hundred ninety eight or nineteen ninety nine is not only were there no smartphones. But we didn't have cell phones right so I was running this business in an age where I was either in school or at practice for most of the working days. That's what made it particularly interesting. Is that we had to run a business talk about lack of accessibility. I literally couldn't couldn't be reached for maybe ninety percent of the hours in in the workday so it required a lot of creativity I missed a lot of school and got in some trouble for that because it has been a business meetings and etc but they luckily let me graduate nonetheless. So it's clear from a young age you figured out some some work hacks and some ways to be successful successful. Which is why you started writing books about how to win at college to become a straight a student how to be a high school superstar all that stuff and you wrote those sort of after your own educational educational career Undergrad at Dartmouth your PhD from Mit? And while you're in in your own academia what did you think that you wanted to do with the computer science and with your studying of of sort of how that how that relates to everyday life. Well at first the idea was I wanted it. Just be an academic computer scientists. So when you're studying any field at a high level the ultimate goal this is the message you get from professors. You're studying under is to be the an academic to do original research to push the field forward and so once. I realized maybe halfway in my undergraduate career that maybe had a shot at an academic career in computer science that that became my goal that life style the autonomy of being a professor is what I was what I was looking for. I was writing in books at the same time. But it wasn't until later until later in my Grad student career that the two worlds came together at first it was. I was training to be a computer scientist. Oh and I I also wrote books. Those worlds were completely separate. My doctoral advisor discovered. I wrote books because she came across one at a table at the bookstore. She had no shot just doing the side as well and so they were really separate worlds and then they all kind of came together once. I got the Georgetown and professorship when I realized wait a second I work on technology. I'm also really interested on the impact of technology on society. I could probably be writing about this stuff that I'm also workout and writing about the broader impacts and so those worlds came together gather and and now there's a great conciliates between what I'm doing academic as a writer but until recently quite separate. Yeah Yeah I mean it's it's there's that academia academia and the computer science stuff that would connect you to all the people that also work in that field. And maybe not a lot of other people whereas when you're incorporating the study of communications occasions and how it affects our everyday life in our work. Suddenly you've opened yourself up to the everyday person who who is learning from your expertise without necessarily needing to understand all the stuff that goes into and all the research that Gotcha there so you. You're writing books and you end up back in two thousand sixteen writing deep work rules for focused. Success asked an distracted world. This feels to me like a pivot point for you in understanding The very current conflicts for people in staying focused doing the job job workplace productivity and all these new technologies So tell me how deep work sort of a very short description because I want. I want to get from that to the newer book right. So the idea behind deep work is that In the knowledge sector in particular which is about fifty percent of the US economy right now. The ability to focus without distraction is being widely undervalue. That we're we're very distracted with email and slack and personal digital tech Heckler. Social Media in our attention bounces back and forth all the time and we are forgetting value in sustained attention and so the argument of that book is that this is market mismatch. That's right. This is something that we're getting worse at the same time. It is becoming more valuable so that if you specifically train yourself to be an extra concentrator or if your team organization are your ties is unbroken concentration. It's sort of unfair competitive advantage right now. Yeah so I mean this was a huge thing for so many people and I think a a lot of people were even very slowly able to step outside their bodies and recognize their their their difficulty in focus. There's been some really interesting stories about people people struggling to read books because they have trouble focusing on that for a long time when they're so used to these snippets on the Internet. So you're you right deep at work and the response of so many people to you about social media and technology and how they struggle to balance that with the messages of your book are what led to the digital minimalism right. Yeah because people work was really focused on the workplace it was unintentional consequences of new technologies in the workplace. And this was the big feedback feedback. I began to get from readers after the book came out which was okay. Maybe we by this. But what about the impact of tech and are personalized which was really really focused. Much more on things like phones and social media and the attention economy which is actually quite different than what's going on. Let's say in an office place with your email or slack and so I was getting a lot of pressure from the readers. Okay but what do we do about tech in our personal. It was really something that was becoming clearly a problem in our culture especially starting around two thousand seventeen where it really began to uptick. And so that's what they're digital minimalism was okay. Let's turn from work to people's personal life and find out what they're taking what they should do about it. Well you are. You're thirty eight thirty thirty seven. Thirty eight Sir okay. So you're thirty seven you've never had social media accounts I. I'm not sure how that's possible were you were you so aware before we even learned of all the dangers that you never put your toe in the water. Or how is it possible that you never joined facebook facebook twitter and everything else well..

New Jersey cal Princeton New Jersey Newport David Bowie facebook Johny Nokia Napa Tina
"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"That's what she said that's what she said that's what she said what she said. Well that's what she said breath. Welcome to that's what she said. Conversations with interesting people from the world of sports music comedy and more talking about their lives careers successes and failures. Newport dilemma is that I have way more than I'll ever have time to read okay so I personally judged when Marie Condo told everyone they shouldn't have more than thirty books in the House and then I felt personally seen what a mean popped up. That responded you mean like on nightside table now condo did clarify graphite that if books sparked joy you can keep as many as you like which I most certainly have but.

Marie Condo Newport
"newport" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"newport" Discussed on CarCast

"First void where prohibited see your local autozone store for more details all right so you went and drove the new Lincoln can Corsair Yeah. We talked a little bit about it on the show earlier. This week did a did a great drive in the Lincoln Corsair. The summary is is this like first of all they put on a nice event you drive from San Francisco to Monterey. We stayed at Carmel Valley Ranch and just overall just like Lincoln's up their game the luxury level they make a nice vehicle the Lincoln navigator that we've driven several times we'd love the gators the three row mid-size I I don't I know what sales are doing and maybe just me but I walk my dog around my neighborhood and four years ago I saw a lot more Mercedes eighties youths and a lot more Land Rover Range Rover stuff. I'm seeing a lot more Lincoln. Now I feel like I I don't know maybe matthew McConnell Hey and again. I don't know what sales sales are sort of like. I tell people all the time like you can talk about your show. Being popular you can talk about numbers you can talk about overnights demographics and all that if you're shows popular popular when you walk through an airport people stop you and say hi or say things. If you're not popular. No one will say that you can show me all the numbers you one one but I'll tell you if I can go with you and walk through an airport any airport in the country. No one says anything or looks at your does anything then you're shows not popular and you I can talk like car sales all you want but it's when you start seeing more of them on the road more and traffic more parked in the driveways of Nice houses houses and that kind of stuff well the design is good the luxury levels for good. I got to play around with a phone as a key so we drove around. We'd stop. I'd I'd grab out the phone. They gave us all like phone with the APP loaded up so we didn't have to load it on our phones and start the car locked. The doors unlocked the cars. Do whatever you can use. Here's the key you can use the key pad on the door and inside or the phone APP would that car would that have benefited me when Lynette went out of town and Gabe put the key are her tesla on the tire and then I called one and I said where there is the key and she said it's in the couple there yeah and then I smashed over yes although the car ran and then later on blocked my car in the garage right and then when I later on went to go look for the spare key I found the leather pouch but not the FOB bob cars at home and you couldn't drive either one of them and then when I called Yes lynette tasker where the key FOB is. She suggested that the valley may have stolen it at some point. Would this phone APP have benefited me province point problem solved you could've used the key default you could have used the phone APP and if you right over your phone and the key you can walk to the car type in your code. Get it in type in your other code starts right by the way if you left your key fob at home you could still give a code. It'll randomly doubly generate a valet code. The valley could use it and then when he gives you back the car codes gone forever and randomly generates another code now he's saying I can use my phone APP for the Tesla X. That's right yes okay. Why can't they have some version of of of phone as a key as well but I got to play around with it and it was great and it was it was a fun? It was a fun trip. Lincoln is is is nice and even though the smaller Lincoln because the small wheelbase is a bumpy ride they put all sorts of attention into making a comfortable N. and vh noise vibration harshest. They did everything they can to eliminate as much of that as possible. They made a really nice driving smooth thing and of of course it's guy you know because it's Lincoln even though it's the small Lincoln heated and cooled seats and massaging seats and the great sound system and noise cancellation the sound system. It's it's fantastic. They've upped their game. Yeah I was able to use my phone to call Gabe and ask him. They just send me a text. Tell me that the key was on the tire why why not just translate that transmit that little piece of information mation for me when you drop the car off seemed like something you'd want to convey to the person who's going to drive the car. Here's where the key. I've hidden the key somewhere in the car but I'll leave it up to you. Oh I'll leave it up to you to find it instead of send your taxing. It's on the driver's side tire when you use Lincoln course when I called Lynette. She was like it's in the cup. The Cup holder was like every day so Lincoln's Ki as a phone phone and if these two were imagine they were in the military should be bombing themselves. That's can you imagine that they'd be working in the kitchen and by the way this is this is this this this crime scene is what happens when you take two like minded folks and put them together to create a super super neutron bomb Super Tornado NATO because I did call the net and go where is the key and she's like. I I told gay couple okay. I didn't hear that part. You guys were sitting sixteen inches apart to be how how casuals everybody with everything you know what I'm saying okay yeah or get rid of Gate Aright Rick Shod. I hope I'm saying my saying shout my pronouncing his his name correctly Shad Rick Shad is executive director of the Newport Concourse I think I I just got something. Oh I got yeah. I just got an e mail on this Rick to be with you guys. This is exciting good to be with you. I just and and yet so Jay Leno just bought a place out there. Jay Leno is going to be the the smart choice. Jay Leno is going to be the event chair. this is a I so funny so I woke up this morning. I think I got something from gooding and company or suggested this was going on on and I was looking at it and then later on when I was talking to my guys and they said Newport concourse. We have a newport concourse out here ear yeah and I thought that's what we're talking about food. Yeah okay well. We part right a new Rhode Island. Yeah Yeah Right. I was like where did Jay bought a house over there. Why did you buy Newport beach? I did the exact same thing in Newport and Newport concours. Sorry I just ask somebody to if they were going to this event it was like hey you guys go to the Newport concourse like no where's that it's like Newport all right so so our West coasters over here this is this is this is going on now. I mean this weekend right yeah. I it starts on Thursday actually tomorrow tomorrow so we're in the throes of putting a motor week so it's not just it ends with the concord allegations on Sunday so it's a it's a full you know motoring event the first one of the size on the east coast or definitely in the northeast Amelia's a great event and there's some other events events but this is a massive new motor we hear in Newport Rhode Island and and it's very historic place it was the birthplace of auto racing in America Erica nineteen hundred so there's a reason to do it here and Donald Osborne is work is actually the head of the concord on Sunday and Jay Leno is our chairman for the week and I'm here with Justin Bell and with torque show who's doing the TV on this thing. We're doing a live simulcast and a a whole bunch of different. We have a lot of people coming from the West Coast a lot of great cars from coming from the west coast as well as amazing cars from around the world and here in the east so it's a it's a very very significant event with different things happening on each day and we even have John Legend is playing on Friday night. I've got Kenny loggins playing on Saturday at our at our big gala and it's it's a it's a whole big thing going on here. In gooding and company as you mentioned is our auction house and they'll be doing a full auction here next year this year they just have private treaty cars on display here but it's we have all the big the players are here all the big brands and we have the greatest class of judges group of judges for the different classes on Sunday and we'll be awarding the best in show trophy fi at around three o'clock on Sunday and it's the trophy itself is spectacular solid sterling silver twenty five inches tall about fifty pounds and It's something else. We wish you were out here. You're going on a on a cruise. I I am otherwise I would definitely be out there. I was talking to somebody recently about them. Possibly Franchising goodwood now here and bring it to the East Coast and dot I liked it stuffs popping up all over the place to be nice to just fill in the country with these great car vents. I know how many cars come now to your event. Well we in the classes thirteen classes. We have a hundred cars that'll be judged on Sunday but there's literally I mean thousand cars out here. There's riding right now. The new C. Eight corvette just got here with the huge. GM display we have thirteen cars from the Heritage Centre from General the motors we have cars from the Henry Ford Museum. We have what we think is going to be the largest collection of we got he's in US history here at Belcourt Mansion they're all arriving driving today. just watched the corvette Gulf one from the sixties pull in which was amazing They're going to be thousands dozens of cars here. of all types makes years we're even doing an event similar to the quayle which we call the gathering at rough point which is a huge mansion that was Doris Duke's estate the tobacco heiress and it's a very elegant garden party with a newer cars out there and we're doing several unveils with Aston Martin with his Gado twins were doing the Bugatti Sharon Sky Bucar Kona Sega's bringing gene the Jasko and also the car that the come not pronouncing that right but the one that just broke the speed record is here so I mean it's it's endless. There's just people are really excited about having something like this on the east coast they wanted it for a long long time and and we've been working on this project for his started about the idea start about five years ago and then the investment really started into it about two years ago and that's when we kind of lit the fuse on this thing and started planning it and you know anybody who's got the idea of doing a motor week think twice it's it's a lot of work yeah you were saying you just.

Lincoln Jay Leno Newport concourse East Coast lynette tasker Lincoln navigator Gabe autozone America gooding matthew McConnell Newport beach Newport Rick Shod Carmel Valley Ranch Land Rover Range Rover Shad Rick Shad
"newport" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"newport" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Addiction to email cal Newport wrote the piece which describes this moment and workplace history as one where we all frantically trucker inboxes every few minutes exhausted by the dilution of complex and ambiguous messages while applauding ourselves for eliminating the need to speak face to face yep guilty as charged we'll happily cal Newport is also a computer science professor at Georgetown and he has some thoughts about how we got here and how we might do it better cal Newport welcome thank you for having me so we're gonna get to the evils of email but start with the story that opens your essay we are deep inside CIA headquarters it's the nineteen sixties and nestled inside the walls are something like thirty miles of steel tubing why what was a fourth communication and in particular communication that is asynchronous away for me to send a message to over a hundred fifty different stations in the headquarters where it can arrive in be there waiting for the recipient to read it so they essentially built email but using pneumatic tubes and fibre glass containers electromagnetic switches we're talking about this because as you mentioned this was a prime early example of asynchronous messaging which I gather basically was about convenience I can write you when I feel like it you can reply when you want this was seen as a silver bullet for a really big problem that emerged in the twentieth century which was work spaces that used to just be for five people if I needed something I would just talk to but in the twentieth century we saw the arrival of very large offices and very large organizations and so the problem was how do we coordinate and collaborate when there's eight hundred a thousand two thousand or less in the same building in a synchrony was seen as the magic solution so very systems were tried we're still trying to figure out the perfect system but in the mean time in the late twentieth century email arrives and it's like the killer app of asynchronous communication yeah we assumed this would solve the problem I mean the pneumatic tubes or what have you was interesting but very few organizations could actually afford to build these but email any organization could have everyone could send messages to everyone else when they wanted instantaneously have them be read when the recipient was ready this was seen as the thing that was going to solve the problem of collaboration and big organizations which is why it's spread incredibly rapidly into essentially every corner of knowledge work sound so promising and delightful except as anyone who's ever had an email account news email is great for many things but collaboration and one of them yeah unintended consequences so it turned out that during this same period where people in the world of business thought a synchrony was going to solve all these problems there was mathematicians in my field that were studying a synchrony in computer networks and finding out when you get rid of real time back and forth conversation suddenly becomes much harder to collaborate it's much more subtle it requires much more messages and it just takes longer that experience we've all had of sending two dozen messages back and forth when you could have just picked up your phone or leaned out your cubicle and holler you work right yeah that's right we thought that we could take a five minute conversation replace with one quick email message but the reality is that five minute conversation required fifteen back and forth email messages throughout the day so we soon found ourselves overwhelmed by the massive increase in messages what does that mean for those of us who are sitting here twitching to check our email in practical terms how should we be communicating well what we know is that humans are much better at back and forth in real time so on the phone sing together in the same room on video chat where you can actually go back and forth where I say something and I know that you hear it right away and you can respond right away we can look at our body language we can look at our cues we can look at how our voices changing volume modulation this is an incredibly efficient way for human beings according collaborate so what is the solution we stop checking email so much and pick up our phone more well what I found is that going back to synchrony successfully in the world of business requires structure so if you just say get on the phone more useless email that's probably not going to work but if you have systems in place this is how we collaborate this is we have these meetings at these times here's how we set up this meeting so they don't become long and full of blue VA sent this type of structured synchrony is starting to have a come back in the world of business and people are finding that they're getting by with much less messaging you also write about the old fashioned notion of office hours I'm available at this time I can talk to face to face if you can't come during my office hours too bad to solve your problem or.

cal Newport five minute
"newport" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

Heather Dubrow's World

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"newport" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

"I can't even this was last Saturday night in Newport, Beach, and. Not to mention the fact there were beer cans everywhere. These are all obviously. Yeah. Very underage kids at someone's home, drinking and being antisemitic. It was horrifying. So heard about it Saturday night the the twins heard about it. Yeah. And you know, there were kids from three different schools in the photo. One kid was from the school the twins. Go to we knew someone in the photo. And it's it's just it's just insane on so many levels. First of all. Whose house are they at? Yeah. We're the parents, right. There is a rumor I do not know if this is true, let me qualify that. But there is a rumor that it was one of the parents that took the photo. No. Yeah. I don't have complete confirmation on that. But that's the story that's going around. But I don't know my gosh. But by the way, whether they took it or not where do you think that kind of hate comes from that was just gonna say where how do they even get that idea? Where does it start? The the sad part is what if it's like the cool kids right are doing it. Everyone's doing it. Or there's three main kids are doing it. And everyone else wants to be cool. And that's why you do it. It's just it's such beyond that this isn't taking a hit off a vape or having a beer for peer pressure's. Really, this is this is an anti-semitic terribly racist act. Yeah. That you're participating in. Yeah. The rabbis and the community. I'll put out letters law enforcement meant on Sunday with community leaders, the parents of all the kids in the photo met with at someone's house with a rabbi I heard..

Newport
"newport" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"newport" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"All right. Here's cal. Newport. One thing that I love about the minimalist idea. Here is focuses the new IQ is one of the things that you'd said explain that it's counterintuitive and I love that. Well. I mean, I think in our our modern knowledge economy in particular. What's the skill that, really matters? What's the skill that builds value, and I think it is the ability to focus so if in the mid twentieth century, I q became the big thing we need more engineers people who were smart smart. You are the bed. You're going to do it shifted now. And now the ability to put sustained attention is what's going to become the scarce ability to thing that's going to create a lot of there's various reasons for this. But but this is the the summary pitch is focused as what's going to rule the economy, at least, that's my idea. Okay. And you're sort of analog to this is like the key to thriving in this new high tech world that we have is actually using less tech because the tech this high this Archimedes lever that we have is now kind of come full circle and is now weighing down, right? It's like resting on our head. Yeah. Well, I mean, if you think about if you believe this premise that sustained concentration produce lots of value. Now, you have to worry what's going to be the enemy to sustain concentration. And so it's not technology in general. It's the technology that has either been designed or incidentally, becomes a huge drain on your attention. So what we know from psychology? And this is actually very important discovery. And this is something that we only really got to in the last. Let's say fifteen years context. Which is what kills you write the context? Switching is. And I remember first hearing about this in law school because it was like I'm taking notes they got an IM back to my notes. What are we talking about? Hey, there's another I IM. Yes. For those of you don't know what I are AOL instant messenger change to the game. That did that come before texting. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Yeah. That was early nineties. So that was like the first status updates were on their this is pre Facebook by minute. And so that's where I finally started to realize when I would read things like context witching or task switching or the whole. Hey, you know, you think you're a good multitasker? But you're not. And then I remember asking people going, hey, you know, our teacher will go turn that internet off. Don't use the WI fi. We don't even why don't we have WI fi in the classroom. And of course, everyone went I'm good multitasker. Everyone's grades went and took a total dump well and shifted to. So we used to say that. So we used to say, I'm a good multitasker. And then in the early two thousands, the research became clear, and there's lots of pop articles to sit. Okay. You can't do the simultaneous thing though. The window here. The phone the typing you're talking gibberish. You're doing a terrible work like we learned. Okay. Literal multitasking doesn't work, but we're context witching snuck up on us is that people thought they were single tasking. This is what's happening now because they only have one thing open for the most part. So I'm just looking at Microsoft Word. I'm trying to write whatever illegal brief. But every ten or fifteen minutes. I do the quick check. Which is the look the phone or the quick check of the inbox. It doesn't feel like multitasking because I'm not doing it simultaneously. But we know now from the research is that when I do that quick check. And then come back to the main thing, I'm working on. There's a residue left in your mind. Mind last a long time the clear that reduces your cognitive capacity. So then when you think you're single tasking, you're fighting this attention residue effect. And so what most knowledge workers who are doing sort of elite level knowledge or can think that they're single Tasker are really doing is every five or ten minutes, a quick check of a tab or a phone which puts them in a persistent state of produce cognitive capacity. So it's almost like they're taking reverse. No atropine. Like wanna be dumber? Right..

Tasker WI Newport Facebook AOL atropine fifteen minutes fifteen years ten minutes
"newport" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"newport" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

marijuana Patrick Google Airbnb soccer Expedia ASTA LA MGM Jeff Sessions Mike congress California One hundred twenty seven dolla one hundred fifty dollars Ninety eight dollars eighty dollars ninety dollars
"newport" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"newport" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"H thirteen ten am in newport news regina it's just a matter of time brooke great oh nineteen fifty some way you then you yes darling you're going to need me it's just a matter of time until you you again it's just a matter of time after i you laughed and neo cloud remember in yours ooh no no that one you'll wake up and true it's just a matter oh.

newport
"newport" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"newport" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"This is optimal living daily episode 600 in '66 approach technology like the amish like hell newport of cal newport dark i'm just a mellick the guy the reads blog post to you every day including weekends with permission from the authors it's the weekend's only give you a little break from promotional content so as trump right in as we optimized her life approach technology like the amish by cal newport of cal newport dot com kevin kelley and the amish eight years after dropping out of callers to wander asia kevin kelly returned home to america botin inexpensive bike and made a meandering five thousand mile journey across the country as he recalls in his original an insightful 2010 book what technology wants the highlight of the bike tour was quote gliding through the tidy farmland of the amish in eastern pennsylvania unquote kelly ended up returning to the amish on multiple occasions during the years that followed his first encounter allowing him to develop a nuanced understanding of how these communities approach technology as he reveals in chapter eleven of his book the combination dea that the amish reject all modern technology is a meth the reality is not only more interesting but it also has important implications for our current culture as kelly puts it quote in any discussion about the merits of avoiding the addictive grasp of technology the amish stand out as offering honorable alternative unquote given such a strong endorsement it seems worthwhile to briefly summarise what kelly uncovered during these visits to rural pennsylvania.

cal newport kevin kelley pennsylvania kevin kelly america eight years
"newport" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"newport" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from bonefish grill whether you're dining on seasonal would grilled fresh fish the one and only bang bang shrimp or enjoying a handcrafted martini your shortage catch inexperience unlike any other come see what's fresh at bonefish grill tonight i'm bob boiling with all songs considered in this weekend is the newport folk festival and for both the crowd and the musicians this festival could feel like a cross between summer camp and a family reunion and that's because the festival of small and musicians get to hang out with each other laude and so magic happens whether it's roger waters singing john primed songs are margaret pricing me bobby mcgee with chris christoffersen there are so many surprises between musicians and the fans this year will post live broadcast from newport courtesy of in will also be archiving and podcasting sets in our live concert podcast series so what's in store this year along with headliners john prime fleet fox's wilco and angel olsen they'll be newcomers like the wild reeds joseph pine grove big thief and so much more to tell us a bit of what's in store for newport 2017 i have my annual call with jay sweet the executive producer of the festival and we begin by talking about a special set at newport this year for bans the wanna play intentionally political songs or songs with a message the speak out said is a headlining set that's going right before john prime it's a surprise sat and it's specifically.

bobby mcgee fox wilco newport executive producer npr chris christoffersen olsen jay john