6 Burst results for "Newnham College"

"newnham college" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

Women Making Waves Podcast

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"newnham college" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

"You for being very honest about that. It's always very hard. I think to say that. But you i think was what was really hard was when you said that you had to wash your face so many times speak. I'm white. i find that. Really really heartbreaking as well as everything else that you've been through please. I'm not demanding anything but i find that bit very hard. You know you are a person. You are a wonderful person. We're all humans and to see that his is awful. Just go back a little bit. You oversee your mom and dad met. While they were at cambridge university had a relationship they had you any students who has a child. It's quite a cultural shock. Whatever you do for your mom and your dad. It must have been incredibly difficult as well. Did your mother want to talk about that time in her life. Obviously you have the book that you've written. Was that quite a very sort of charged moment to talk about says. Well i never asked a questions about it. I asked a couple of times in let in a letter. Could you tell me about her life. And so she did reveal then that The shock and horror of when her parents realized she was pregnant and I also had a clearer picture of the circumstances. I then it was clear to me that my mother was. The brightest of the family are very gifted job that she had got a scholarship to newnham college to study classics in nineteen forty five so the last year of the second world war that my father had come from nigeria older than my mother and he was completing is law decree. It was trinity hall and then he went back tonight area but but basically what. I did discovering the letters that my mother had never told me was that i'm mother at one. Point was engaged to my father and that the plans was that he he was going to go back to nigeria and that she would join him at some point with me..

cambridge university newnham college trinity hall nigeria Point
"newnham college" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"newnham college" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The british museum has just opened a huge show looking at niro. The roman emperor who came to the throne as a sixteen year old fifty four ce and died a violent death at thirty after if you believe the sources killing his mother and two of his wives singing and playing his liars. Rome burned around him in the great fire. Sixty four ce which gave rise to the phrase fiddling while rome burns and then beginning the persecution of christians the shows could narrow the man behind the myth and is an attempt to grapple with the realities of near his time and the legend that was constructed about this last emperor of the judea claudia dynasty by historians amid the dynasty that followed the flavian. I spoke to mary be at the broadcaster and author professor of classics at cambridge university and fellow of newnham college and classics editor of the times literary supplement about niro and the exhibition. Mary the first object that we see when we go into the british museum is a portrait bust of nero which only a tiny fragment is from the ancient bust and the rest is a construction much later and it seems to me. This is a really emblematic. Object it when we're telling the story of niro was in terms of how on earth can we tell the story of this man yeah. I think there's two things you see when you go into the show. I start hugh of supposedly niro as a teenager narrows twelve thirteen..

two two things newnham college sixteen year old first object Mary roman niro judea cambridge university mary fifty four ce twelve thirteen earth Rome wives claudia dynasty christians Sixty four ce british
"newnham college" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"newnham college" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"What i learned a when. I was admitted in circumstances and yeah it was six months of age. I started in the for the hudson's hung's which was for the younger children. And then i moved on three and a half a pint State that until i was when i went to stay with my mother and stepfather. I'm going to talk about that in a second if i may. But first of all let's rewind slightly until your to your mother and father meeting. I mean you've talked about in in your book but They met at cambridge didn't they. That's fine my mother was in her. Another was studying classics. She went in one thousand nine hundred five so the last year of the second world war. She got scholarship. And your mother's irish. Yes heritage in the sense that it was her. Great grandparents was the generation that were born talking armand. My grandparents were born in liverpool in eighteen. Ninety six and my mother was born in liverpool in nineteen twenty six. I actually commissioned genealogists from dublin to look into irish richard side fascinating because there wasn't much records except my great aunt. Cade had written a letter to mind cousin setting out. Quantum bits of family history on the genealogy said that that was upset. Fantastic those with the If the clues that he needed to explore much much much more deeply into our irish have and he was able to go back to the eighteen forties. Maywood as good work actually. That's very good work with the lack of where you know. Show the record. Dot billion for various reasons terms of the one of the key sentences eighteen something other eight was fire in dublin. Destroyed destroyed lots of of the of the records but it was the church records coast where everybody registered at birth and death in the church in omlund thought in this country is wrong dot spin a huge source of information for many people looking for their family history so your mother is of our heritage in studying classics at cambridge at cambridge. And my father was nigerian and he hadn't been awarded a scholarship to study law in again in cambridge. And we're talking about the second period of the second world war. My father came over in nineteen forty two in the middle of the second world war. I thought was interesting. He started his studies. I think trinity hole on my mother. I was nineteen forty-five at newnham college to study classics. I don't. I've never found out how they met or anything like that would have be nice but by the time i was really curious about the the both deceased any us. Anybody so your your your mother your mother your father and you follow the metro mother. And you -able nine months and nineteen forty seven and my mother wasn't married and catholic. The whole irish catholic heritage can imagine so you can just unimaginable. The shock was for my mother when she was pregnant. And i've only caught is quite good that i had this. I have the oral history from my aunts. My mother's youngest sister unfairly very close to him and my mother wouldn't didn't tell parents she was pregnant. It was my grandmother. The realized situation when she was finishing signed address for my skirt was during the fitting tight. Measure around my mom's waste when she six months pregnant of my grandmother quickly. What the situation was to horror. Everybody's ora my grandfather was a stalwart of the catholic church was friends with the local parish priest and he went straight the parish priest to seek advice and they and also. My mother was a bright student at cambridge university. You know it was a bit of status going on there and a desire to enable another to complete studies which she didn't in the end but not due to lack of support. I mean i think some of retaliation that my mother to drop out in spite of oil oil the connections and support that she got between the church and my family on university university Knew that she was pregnant. They told that she talked to nervous. Breakdown Bring a billeting enough Island at an for me. When i came across these papers i was fascinated because i was bought up very much in a strict catholic environment in a company. Come on and on my contact with the catholic church lasted until i was sixteen. When i left my gren-grenada grandma mother's house and you know you're taught never to lie and bitter and sort of see all these papers. The collusion going on between the church and the university said university to so the lies that were being told and think well. That's interesting so you can lie in certain circumstances but not in others but there was a multi support from my mother had to sign. Yes so at three months old you will take it into the Into the care of the church. Six six months was taken into the father. Hudson's homes which were in birmingham. And i stayed the Until i was five. I think and then i moved to the not with house convent. The children's side again in birmingham and my memories of nostrils I don't remember. I vaguely have a memory of being on the verandas as a toddler so that would have been the father hudson sons. But it's it's not with house children's home that i remember that i started describing intensify memoirs. Blow your resort overall..

cambridge richard side liverpool omlund dublin newnham college armand Cade Maywood hudson catholic church cambridge university grenada birmingham Hudson
"newnham college" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

Surprisingly Brilliant

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"newnham college" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

"Sirens going off and drills this daily thing. Cambridge is surrounded by a military basis. Or it's at risk of being attacked by german bombers when the alarm sounds students are supposed to grab the gas masks run outside but nineteen. Year old rosen. However stays in her room or she wants to do is study. Oh my god. I cannot even imagine studying for an extremely difficult stem degree with that. All going on that's incr- just so. She studies super hard. She does really well and eventually she's awarded a research fellowship at newnham college in the lab of one ronald george raeford norrish a biochemist who were later received the nobel prize but this is part of the second reason why life was hard for rosalind. They were only to women's colleges a cambridge so she was very much in the minority women particularly in the science faculty very strongly discriminated against. Discrimination will be repeated part of this story frustrated salting with ronald norris who Runs the lab that she's been offered the fellowship in. She didn't guess. I'm very well with him understatement. She actually called him quite stupid. Bigoted deceitful. ill-mannered anti-wrinkle good for her. I'm glad she's outspoken about it at the very least okay. Here's my question though. Why would she even have been given a place in the lab if he was such a horrible man like does he get any say having a woman in the lab and he's like oh yes i will just have this person just wants the person power god and she's really good. He's gonna want the best students that he can be into her because he can will ahead quite an impact actually because she stopped during a phd. She said to her father that she thought it was more important to do. More work than gets phd. Any guesses what she moves onto next. I know a lot of women became nurses. not necessarily. I would be so impressed if you got this. I guess some kind of x ray operator. Okay well that's clever so she gets a phd. in col- i'm sorry coal. Yes as in like a lump of coal yup so yeah rosalie. Franklin leads to london and she works with a british coal utilization research association studying the structure of coley..

ronald norris Cambridge research fellowship ronald george raeford nobel prize newnham college Franklin london
"newnham college" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"newnham college" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Van Gogh and Monet. So, why was Ross able to eclipse Alexander to such an extent? It may come down to something as simple as likability. Alexander. was passionate an animated prone to rambling even singing off key. Ross on the other hand was laid back funkier and on threatening peace nick. Ross saw this distinction as did PBS station managers who realized as The New York Times reported is expanding circles. Viewers were for the most part not even painting. Nor did they have any plans to start? They watched the joy of painting simply because it was the most relaxing show on television. It is unfailingly simple a three camera production with black backdrop and at Ross's insistence no edits. Ross wears the same thing every time blue jeans and John Henry Shirt and in twenty six minutes not only completes a painting but also in his soft lullaby voice murmurs familiar Bob, `ISMs like. Happy little trees and what the heck. Let's give him a little friend over there and. There are no mistakes only happy accidents. The show was so nice to listen. that. It was even popular with blind viewers. Obscuring outselling his teacher aside, the Internet isn't wrong with its love affair. For Bob. Ross. Not only could he be called the Orgy of Asmar but you've gotTa love a guy who wants did an entire episode working only in shades of gray because he got a letter from a fan who said he couldn't take up painting because he was colorblind. Russ's trademark Afro was actually a perm that he'd initially gotten to avoid the cost of properly maintaining his crew cut and then when the show took off found, himself basically stuck with it. People would often tell Ross that his show put them to sleep. Did he mind. Now, he enjoyed that just as much as the people who said that he'd inspire them to paint. And one time he did the show with a tiny baby squirrel in his pocket. So you gotTa love that. From art we moved to science. What do you think is the worst part of working on a group project? Is it trying to come to a meeting of minds on what you're going to do? Is it that person who accepts their share of the assignment and then doesn't do anything? Or is it when someone takes all the credit for one of the greatest advances in our understanding of biology? Probably, the third one. That's what happened to the discoverer of the double helix shape of DNA English chemist and x Ray crystallography Rosalind Franklin. There's probably no other woman scientists with as much controversy surrounding her life and work as Rosalind Franklin. Asterisk for Marie curious love life. But that's another show. Franklin was responsible for much of the research and discovery work that led to the understanding of the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA. Born in Nineteen. Twenty. Franklin excelled at science and attended one of the few girls' schools in London that taught physics and chemistry. When she was fifteen. Sided to become a scientist and despite her father stance against higher education for women and his wish that Rosalind become a social worker she enrolled at. Newnham. College. Cambridge in nineteen thirty eight. She held a graduate fellowship for a year, but quit in nineteen forty two to work at the British coal utilization. Research Association. where she made fundamental studies of carbon and graphite micro structures. Cole was not only important for power, but charcoal was a key component in gas masks. Her research was her contribution to the war efforts, of world, War Two and was the basis of her doctorate in physical chemistry which she earned from. Cambridge. University in Nineteen forty-five. After. Cambridge. She spent three productive years at a laboratory in Paris where she learned x Ray diffraction techniques. X Ray Diffraction is an important non-destructive method for analyzing all kinds of matter from fluids to powders to crystals. The technique involved bombarding the sample with xrays rays, the electron cloud of the atoms in the sample, bend the X ray slightly. This makes a picture of the molecule that can be seen on a screen. In nineteen fifty one Franklin returned to England as a research associate in John Randall's laboratory at King's College London. It was in Randall's lab that she crossed paths with Maurice Wilkins. She and Wilkins lead separate research groups although both were concerned with DNA. Assigned Franklin, a DNA project that had already begun but no one had worked on, for, months. Wilkins was away at the time and when he returned, he misunderstood her role behaving as though she were an assistant disappointing but not surprising given the climate. Only, males were allowed in the university dining room, for example, and after hours, Franklin colleagues went to men only pubs. Nevertheless. Franklin persisted on the DNA project. Her techniques allowed her to take better images of the structure of DNA than anyone ever had before. Jd. Brunell. Scientist who pioneered the use of x Ray crystallography in molecular biology called her x Ray photographs of DNA the most beautiful x ray photographs of any substance ever taken without Franklin's knowledge or permission Wilkins showed these images and her data to James Watson and Francis Crick who were themselves working on DNA projects that. Photo was essential to the findings they published in nineteen fifty three again without Franklin. Knowledge. She was aware of their research but had no idea that her work had been subsumed into it as she was not credited at all. The closest she got was the journal Nature citing her work. To Bolster Watson and Crick's claims. Rosalind? Franklin. Can be working until her death from ovarian cancer in nineteen fifty eight. Four years later, Watson and Crick were awarded a Nobel prize for their discovery. They shared the award with Wilkins but made no mention of Franklin. Admittedly, Nobel prizes aren't awarded posthumously. So we'll never know if she would have finally received the credit she had been denied during her lifetime. But credit where credit is due I have to give thanks to people who have left reviews lately both for the podcast and for the book. On the various podcast players iceman eighty, eight, eighty, eight said, how can you not love this show five stars Love Moxie love you to iceman. And John Ravens bottom who deserves five stars of his own for that amazing surname said, this show is fantastic brilliantly written, paced and presented each episode contains so much depth that they are easily heard again and again with something new coming from each listen Moxie is very talented. Her usage delivery are perfectly suited to the material I look forward to learning more fascinating facts and amusing anecdotes from this incredibly.

Rosalind Franklin Ross Maurice Wilkins Ray scientist Cambridge Bob Francis Crick James Watson Nobel prize Asmar Van Gogh Alexander The New York Times Russ John Ravens John Henry Shirt Monet
Josephine Butler and the fight for women's equality

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Josephine Butler and the fight for women's equality

"Let's talk about Josephine Butler. Josephine was born on April thirteenth eighteen, twenty eight in Northumberland, the northeastern region of England to a prominent family. Her Father John. Gray was a wealthy landowner and cousin to the British prime. minister. Earl. Grey who led between eighteen, thirty and eighteen, thirty four. Josephine's father was a strong supporter of progressive social reforms value. He passed along to his daughter one of Seven Children Josephine was educated by her father at home. He educated both sons and daughters equally an uncommon practice for the time in eighteen fifty two at the age of Twenty Four Josephine Mary George Butler an examiner of schools who shared her commitment to social reforms. In their first five years of marriage the couple had four children in eighteen sixty, three Josephine's only daughter and youngest child Eva fell to her death. To cope with the overwhelming grief, Josephine turned to charity work. Josephine. started by finding shelter for the city's homeless women often taking them into her own home. Many of these women were prostitutes suffering the terminal stages, venereal diseases. Josephine also worked with Aunt Jemima. Cloth a prominent suffragette. To establish academic courses for advanced study for women. In eighteen sixty seven. Appointed president of the north of England Council for Higher Education of women. She campaigned for Cambridge. University, to expand opportunities available to women, students, and her efforts resulted in one of Cambridge's all women, colleges, Newnham College. During this time Josephine published multiple books about the social issues. She championed her views on a woman's place in society conflicted with some feminists of the time. Straight from the idea that women should be viewed in the same terms as men instead she argued that women deserve the vote because they were different than men and had a separate responsibility within society to protect and care for the week. To Josephine ensuring a woman's right to vote was away to strengthen the morality of the nation. In eighteen sixty nine Josephine began publicly campaigning against the contagious diseases acts of eighteen, sixty, six, eighteen, sixty, nine. These acts were initially introduced to curtail the spread of venereal diseases in the armed, forces. But in order to do so sex workers were heavily targeted and penalized. Under, these acts police were given the authority to arrest suspected prostitutes living in seaports and military towns and subject them to forced medical examinations. Have worked with sex workers at the start of her career. Josephine felt sympathy for these woman. She believed they were forced into this work through low wages and minimal opportunity for Josephine these acts represented troubling double standard. Sex workers were punished, but the men who sought out there surfaces were not. Josephine was a powerful orator who drew large crowds as she traveled the country gaining support for the Act's repeal. George now, a prominent figure in academia was criticized for letting his wife discuss sex in public. Despite threats to his career George, continue to support Josephine's advocacy. And Josephine charged on. She teamed up with other prominent social workers to expose the insidious world of human trafficking and child prostitution in London. Her hard work paid off. In eighteen eighty, five parliament passed the Criminal Law Amendment Act which raised the age of consent from thirteen to sixteen. And the following year eighteen, eighty, six parliament formally repealed the contagious diseases act. In her final years Josephine supported the suffrage movement and published her most famous work personal reminiscences of a great crusade. It promoted social reform women's education and equality. Josephine. Butler died on December thirtieth nineteen O six. She was seventy eight years old. Her Fiber Women's equality especially for those who often exist on the margins of society remains highly relevant to this day.

Josephine Mary George Butler Seven Children Josephine Josephine England Council For Higher Edu England Northumberland Earl Cambridge John Newnham College Gray Grey President Trump EVA Aunt Jemima Prostitution London