35 Burst results for "New Yorker Magazine"

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

02:36 min | 3 d ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

"That would help and change society. I think honestly what you're doing right now as part of it. You know that we have to. We've had these conversations. Going back to our undergrad years that we have to create a parallel infrastructure as a vet. When one thing we can respond you know that we can change the terms of the conversation that you know. That's why i right. That's why you broadcast. That's why you know all of us. That are doing the work. We're doing fly teach you know and trying to. We need more people doing those things and we need to have more of an infrastructure to be able to say. No you lie about this person. That's not what this is and there's some people who never you believe that you know but there are some people out there are persuadable people who open minded and rational reasonable and i think our struggle is to make that fear in that conversation in a way that works for us. Yeah folks term mood days. Disinformation and what's happened in critical race as a great deal of that that is going on july. Cobb is Helping push back against. Please check out his piece in the new yorker magazine or go dot com brother always a pleasure to have you know. Make it plain right. Vicky took wasn't wasn't expedient workable. thank you brother. what's next piece. you're working on. Oh okay talk about it just yet. But i really important is going to be coming out in the next month or so. Yeah gilani's classroom is brought in just the four walls at columbia. Obviously when he writes his to educate all of us. So thank you brother you. Thanks for getting woken listening to make it plain. Please remember to listen like and wherever you get your podcast. Please give the show a five star rating and please do spread the.

new yorker magazine Cobb Vicky gilani columbia
Jeffrey Toobin Returns to CNN After Exposing Himself on Zoom Call

The Erick Erickson Show

01:02 min | 3 months ago

Jeffrey Toobin Returns to CNN After Exposing Himself on Zoom Call

"Just seven months ago. Jeffrey toobin was fired by the new yorker magazine and went on. Leave from cnn for performing a sex act during a zoom meeting with colleagues. That he did not know was still happening but he returned to the airwaves on thursday. And was they asked this question. It's the one that's been on his mind. Take a look. What the hell were you thinking. Well i wasn't thinking very well or very much and It was something that was inexplicable to me. I didn't think i was on the call. I didn't think other people could see me so often you had turned off your camera wrecked. I thought that i had turned off the zoom call. Now that's not a defense. This was deeply moronic and indefensible. And trying now to say how sorry. I am sincerely in in in in all seriousness. Above all i am sorry to my wife and to my family. But i'm also sorry to the people on the zoom

New Yorker Magazine Jeffrey Toobin CNN
Jeffrey Toobin Returns to CNN After Exposing Himself on Zoom Call

Radio From Hell

01:41 min | 3 months ago

Jeffrey Toobin Returns to CNN After Exposing Himself on Zoom Call

"To the air for the first time in eight months and had to have a pretty painful conversation about why he hasn't been on TV. I feel like we should address. Um what's happened in the months since we've seen you So I guess I'll recap. I'll do the honors. Help yourself. Okay? Um, in October. You were on a zoom call with your colleagues from the New Yorker magazine. Everyone took a break for several minutes, during which time you were caught masturbating. On camera. You were subsequently fired from that job after 27 years of working there. Do I have all that right? You've got it. All right. Sad to say, I think one point I wouldn't exactly say in my defense because nothing is really in my defense. I didn't think I was on the call. I didn't think other people could see me now. That's not a defense. This was deeply moronic and indefensible. But I mean that that is part of that. That is part of the story. Um and you know, I have spent the seven subsequent months miserable months in my life. I can certainly Confess trying to be a better person. I mean in therapy, trying to do some public service working in a food bank, which I certainly I'm going to continue to do, but I am trying to become the kind of person That people can trust again. Uh, You can't watch. Oh, man, I cannot think of anything more awkward to watch than that interview. Give maybe one other

New Yorker Magazine
CNN's Jeffrey Toobin Returns to TV After Zoom Call Incident

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

CNN's Jeffrey Toobin Returns to TV After Zoom Call Incident

"A legal analyst who has been sidelined for months has now returned to the air after a seven month break CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin is back at work on the cable outlet it is the first time he has been on the air after being caught fondling himself when as soon call with staffers on New Yorker magazine that costume is magazine gig but to then went back on CNN to say that he's happy to be getting another chance but not before he got grilled by one of the anchors Alisyn Camerota asked him directly just what were you thinking two bins response he wasn't thinking very well or very much to the apologized to viewers said he had gone through therapy and will try to regain their trust after that to them began giving commentary on a pair of legal issues now when the news I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

New Yorker Magazine CNN Jeffrey Toobin Alisyn Camerota Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ta Obreht Reads Thomas McGuane

The New Yorker: Fiction

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Ta Obreht Reads Thomas McGuane

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine. I'm deborah tradesman fiction editor at the new yorker each month. We invite a writer to choose a story from the magazine's archives to read and discuss this month. We're going to hear gallatin canyon by thomas mccain which was published in the new yorker in january two thousand three. The road stretched before me like an arrow. There was only enough. That left before rigby for me to say perhaps involuntarily. I wonder if we should just get married. Louise quickly looked away. The story was chosen by oprah who is the author of two novels the tigers wife and inland. Hi hi deborah. So you said when we first talked about doing podcast episode that you wanted to read a western story. Why was that. I think that there's a a renewed interest in literature of the west and also by authors. Who hail from the west and the story. I think is so deeply rooted in landscape and space in a certain kind of mentality of the mountain west which it both honors excoriates i am. I've loved the story. Ever since. I first read it and it just feels very emblematic of the space to me. Now when the story came out in two thousand three or a teenager. Did you read it. Then i did not. I'm ashamed to say. I read it some years but i did read it before i became a resident of the mountain west myself and i certainly think it shaped the way i thought about the area. Have you been a longtime reader of maclean's work. I would say that. I've been reading his work for almost the entire duration of my quote unquote literary life. A friend of mine. Who is a huge fan of his work and introduced me to it and I mean there's such range in his stories in his novels there's so much. Discover with mclean. Always

The New Yorker Gallatin Canyon Thomas Mccain Deborah Rigby Louise Oprah Tigers Maclean Mclean
Why Do We Love Coffee?

Talk, Tales and Trivia

01:30 min | 6 months ago

Why Do We Love Coffee?

"Did you know. The powers of a man's mind are directly proportioned to the quantity of coffee drinks. That's a quote from sir. James mackintosh as in the new yorker magazine and two thousand nineteen. It says we're just crazy passionate nerds for our coffee and we are the us coffee championships showcase the competitive side of appreciation for coffee at the coffee champs qualifying round and nashville in two thousand nineteen professionals demonstrate their ability to detect notes of every kind cupping. The gold standard for tasting is practiced by hunching over a series of different samples with a spoon that has shaped like a bowl and slurping intently. The tasters are at tables tasting the various flavors of coffee and as you can imagine analyzing the flavor profile and body of abreu is a nuanced task. The number of arithmetic compounds presented and roasted coffee is greater. Than that of wine younger coffee tasters say confidently that are willing to spend somewhere around four and five dollars on a cup of coffee a day. You may think you are drinking. The best coffee in the world really is that true I

James Mackintosh New Yorker Magazine Nashville Abreu United States
New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

Chicks On the Right

04:00 min | 11 months ago

New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

"Jeffrey Toobin. Was the guy who was on a zoom call right? He's works at CNN. He's a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine. And he's on a zoom call. And well, he's on to zoom calls raison. Assume call with CNN talking about the last election, but he's on another zoom call with I'm not a not 100% sure. But, uh, hey, kind of forgets where he is. It kind of gets out cameras work on a computer and he ends up tilting one of the cameras down. And it turns out that that Jeffrey Toobin Was Hmm. Not wearing Pants. And Jeffrey Toobin, You know he's on the zoom call. He was on another zoom call. But the first zoom called talking about the election was aware of what was going on on the second team calling to the camera got panned down, And then they saw the Jeffrey Toobin was Um He was. How does one say zooming himself? Hey, crazy. What else would I say? The best I could do under the circumstances. Tony Katz, Tony Cats today. So good to be with you. Yes, he was zooming himself. And New York magazine. New Yorker magazine has come out to say that we finished our investigation and he's fired. And he put out a tweet saying I got fired after 27 years. Love the magazine. I love the people maybe a little too much and And that's not have a nice day. I'm out. But he still has a job at CNN. My question, of course, is How How does he still have a job? I mean it if I did that. I can't imagine I would have a job now. Here's what's really weird, Ari. Let's say you did that. Okay, So here's where I'm Here is my oddness, I guess. That someone is that Foolhardy. Is the fireable offenses that somebody was doing? That isn't so. So Here's Here's the difference When this all happened, he said was I thought I had logged off Zoom. I didn't realize you were still on. Well, that's the firing a fence because you don't think that you're being recorded every second your computer's open. I am the guy who has tape. On my cameras. If you look at my I have two laptops. I have three screens, two laptops, and then I've got extra cameras, right? I'm doing Newsmax. I've got the camera for Fox. I've got a whole set up here. It's kind of made and by the way that we're adding another TV on there's another whole computer system coming right? We are. We are like command center. Here we are. We're the NORAD of the Midwest. We're ready. We're ready to launch the missiles do the whole thing. Of course, I tape over the cameras on my computers on my laptops. I don't trust them. Don't trust anything or anyone anywhere. What are you crazy? Not in the slightest And that you thought that, um you did it, And that's enough. You had that much faith in the in the usability of technology. You thought that was okay? That's the firing a

Jeffrey Toobin CNN The New Yorker Tony Katz Tony Cats New York Magazine Newsmax FOX Midwest
New Yorker parts ways with Jeffrey Toobin after Zoom snafu

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

New Yorker parts ways with Jeffrey Toobin after Zoom snafu

"Legal commentator Jeffrey Toobin's lost his job at The New Yorker magazine the announcement came from Jeffrey Toobin himself a long time staff writer for The New Yorker who's been dismissed after reportedly exposing himself during a zoom conference call last month to been rights he will always love the magazine missed his colleagues and we'll look forward to reading their work the sixty year old Toobin had been with the New Yorker for more than twenty years writing about everything from the OJ Simpson murder trial to the impeachment hearings of Donald Trump two bins also put on leave by CNN where he's been a legal commentator I'm Jackie Quinn

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Toobin Oj Simpson Donald Trump CNN Jackie Quinn
New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

John Howell

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin after he reportedly exposed himself on Zoom call

"Tonight, CNN and New Yorker Ah, commentator and author Jeffrey Toobin has He's been suspended by the New Yorker magazine, and for now he's stepping away from his job is CNN senior legal analyst The network calls it a personal matter. The website vices reporting the Toobin had exposed himself during a zoom

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Magazine CNN Analyst
Toobin suspended by the New Yorker for 'personal' reasons

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Toobin suspended by the New Yorker for 'personal' reasons

"A popular author has been suspended from his job Jeffrey Toobin usually gets a lot of exposure on his job at New Yorker magazine and on CNN as a legal analyst but he'll be away from both of those games for a while because of some exposure that happened online vice is reporting that two been exposed himself during the zoom meeting with staffers of The New Yorker and W. NYC radio the nature and details of the alleged exposure are not clear to them is sixty and has written for The New Yorker for twenty years he's a regular on CNN has written several books the most recent of which focused on the trump impeachment saga I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Jeffrey Toobin New Yorker Magazine CNN Analyst NYC Oscar Wells Gabriel
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At The New Yorker magazine this might occur thanks so much for being with us thank you so much last week the immigration and customs enforcement agency ice reported a spike in the number of covert nineteen cases at one of its detention facilities in Arizona in a matter of days the number of detainees infected with the coronavirus inside the alloy detention center went from just over twenty two more than one hundred twenty I said it has quote comprehensive protocols on quote in place to protect staff and patients in accordance it says with CDC guidance but advocates say conditions inside the facility and a neighboring one in Arizona are putting the health of detainees and possibly their lives at risk reporters relating it Fernandez and shoe Joffe block have been following the case of one detainee who tested positive for covert nineteen at the allied facility they wrote about it for the guardian last week and they are with us now from Phoenix welcome to you both thank you both so much for joining us thank you for having us thank you for having us civilians are not as let me start with you tell us about many sought Mendoza the woman whose case you've been following just give us the outlines of her story where is windows it's a forty seven year old woman she's originally from Mexico she's been leading here in the United States for half of her life all of her family is here and she suffers from depression and diabetes type two that's the reason why Madison Mendoza sued the government to ask for her release she was very afraid that she could get sick with cold in nineteen this is like all the way back in March and unfortunately she did get sick there was a federal judge that order immigrations and customs enforcement to put in place certain protections for my soul but according to her attorney they failed for the most part and that's the reason why my diesel got sick how how long has she been in ice detention she's been in the tension for four years and she's not there serving the crime this is immigration detention is not punitive so what is going on is that she is in the middle of a deputation proceedings he's appealing to be able to get it to stay in the country the government is not granted her the opportunity to have bond and how she came to the attention of immigration authorities is because about six years ago she was charged with identity theft she'd been a manager at McDonalds for nine years and she was working with false documents and that's how she came to the attention of the police and eventually immigration authorities to carry into custody said you Jeffrey blocking your PC right that Mendoza sued ice and the private contractor that runs the facility back in March arguing she should be released because of the risk of covert nineteen infections and as you point out your piece choose a greater risk because she has an underlying health condition which is diabetes so do you drive people out what happened with the lawsuit well her lawsuit is still going her attorney actually has plans to appeal to the ninth circuit because so far the judge has not released her the judge did find that she was not being adequately cared for in ice custody and now she's in a medical isolation cell and one of the complicated parts of this is that she suffers from depression and her attorney and some medical experts on her behalf has argued that this kind of isolation could be very detrimental to her ability to recover and to her mental health has ice released any detainees during the pandemic because of the threat posed by the virus they have they've released more than nine hundred immigrants at this point but immigrant advocates say that they need to do a lot more there's a federal judge in California that ordered the agency back in April to do a comprehensive review of all of the immigrants who are particularly vulnerable with pre existing conditions are over the age of fifty five and reconsider their release but you know so far a large scale relief has not happened there are still a very large number of people who are detained and and more than twenty two hundred cove in nineteen cases around the country in these facilities florea I understand that you've spoken to my excellent Mendoza inside the facility how's she doing the first time I talked to her was about a week ago in she was very very the press had very little human interaction she is very concerned for her family and really worried really for her life she's been there for four years in detention and now this is almost like the last drop is it a very very fraught I think vulnerable mental state and literally pleading with the authorities to give her a chance to go back to recover with her family I'd like to understand no again why she was taken into custody to begin with as I understood it at least a twenty sixteen the priority was supposed to be people who have committed crimes or violent crimes and from what I'm understanding from you is that she her crime was that she was using false documents she was not part of some theft ring for example she was not so I'm just I'm still trying to understand why she's been detained for four years what immigration law can be very complicated in this case in Arizona these category of crime is considered a crime that can make you the portables and in the case of my soul she was in working with someone else's name she was working with her real name and and I made up social security number that happened to belong to someone else but she didn't necessarily know that and that's not what she had made it to which he pleaded so there's a difference between those two things and that's at the heart of her keys to Jude I think you were telling us that maybe someone does is one of more than two thousand detainees who tested positive in ice detention facilities and two detainees that we know of have died is that correct so so what is the response to this growing number of cases what we're seeing from ice and CoreCivic that runs the Elijah tension center where my soul as house I mean they continue to say that they are they are following CDC guidelines they are they are treating their detainees appropriately but we're continuing to see these numbers grow and it's not just detainees it's also the guards who work in these facilities at Eloy detention center more than sixty detention officers have tested positive so far and one officer died last weekend so this is an issue that affects the entire community so final thought here what are advocates and that they want us to do now advocates are continuing to call for the release of people ever everybody not just those with below normal conditions in what we've seen in a lot of cases is that people have sponsors they have ties to the community even if they don't have family their people their volunteer them to taking them into their homes where they can continue to be isolated and recover from college nineteen without any risk to to the rest of the community we are speaking with reporters but Maria Fernandez and Jew Jaffe block in Phoenix they've been reporting on conditions inside ice detention facilities.

The New Yorker magazine
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Just go over everything here New Yorker magazine breaking the story earlier this morning apparently Bloomberg will spend ten billion dollars to buy in and tire Lee new personality we'll see if that works the other breaking news is Roger stone what made if it should happen at any moment he's in the court the judge is going to do the sentencing of Roger stone I would assume the president will pardon him or commute the sentence it's absolutely a thousand percent justified these are all just from the mall or a witch hunt you Muller new from week one that there was no rush for collusion but they went around trying to squeeze people get a month process crimes terrorized them into talking revealing something because they had nothing but Roger stone this is like a guy parks eight inches from the curb so you're charged with that in his sentence in the nine years in jail he did exactly what McCabe did the only difference was McCabe did it in a far more serious situation but did exactly what McCabe did have a case McCabe they didn't bother to charge him so Roger stone this is an easy pardon flannel probably good pardon that's easy the problem manifold he's actually guilty of all that stuff it currently make tens of millions overseas this had nothing to trump this is years before his consulting business but you could argue had he not going to work for trump they never would all looked at it so I don't know but manner that could be that some point commute the sentence he's already been in prison a couple years for rushes next Sean Hannity three to six I'll be on with Sean today at some point and then Buck Sexton at six o'clock tonight see you tomorrow on seven ten W. O. R. the only live and local talk show for the ride weeknights six till seven on the voice of New York seven ten W. and the station and we've got thirty three degrees at zero twelve noon good afternoon I'm Jeff McKinney Roger stone sentencing today the former trump political adviser today to be sentence for lying to Congress and witness tampering there has been pushed back against an original recommendation of seven and nine years and Harvey Weinstein jury today in its third day of deliberations in his sexual assault trial the jury is weighing five counts against the fallen movie mobile a look at where jurors seem to be in their deliberation yesterday jurors asked to review the testimony from accuser Miriam Haley she alleges once the assault or in his lower Manhattan apartment jurors also wanted copies of a presentation a psychiatrist gave saying it's not uncommon for sex assault victims to stay friendly with their attackers and jurors also wanted to read testimony from Rosie Perez a friend of one of the accusers who says she was told about one of the alleged rapes I'm scampering will double the authorities and today Mike Bloomberg may be feeling bruised after drawing the majority the attacks during last night's debate but ABC's Rick Klein says it's a sign that Bloomberg is in the thick of the race any slacker Mike Bloomberg might have coming in fade under harsh attack on his wealth on his record and particularly on his treatment of women yes he defended himself but this is by far the Democrats face used to bait and reflected real uncertainties and anxieties about the state of the race yes Bloomberg is one of the front runners so is Bernie Sanders and that has their rivals very worried and they flat out unloaded on each other the Bloomberg accused of delivering a poor performance last night but his campaign today begs to differ more hearing today from Bloomberg senior adviser who says he thought his boss did great last night that he came in wanting to show a very clear and aggressive contrast with Bernie Sanders and they believe he did that they argue this is a two man race right now among Democrats between Blumberg and Sanders and the other campaigns will fade away soon I that's correspondent Alex stone still trying to identify to newborn babies whose remains have been found at a New Brunswick recycling center the medical examiner will determine the cause of death and will determine if the infants were related if people reacting today eight of the news that miles of additional bike lanes will be billed in Manhattan this year ten miles of protected bike lanes coming to Manhattan it's a no brainer because if I'm riding my bicycle and I have a car coming up on me or a taxi it's going to kill me notoriously dangerous gaps and protected lanes include six Avenue from Herald square to Central Park and it was all you take away a lane of traffic always slow down the traffic pattern all it's terrible but you know when I write on it I even smiling from year to year rich says one big hazard remain can't get from here to the point when I started this cell phone and looking at the map more.

New Yorker magazine Bloomberg
First poster for Wes Anderson's 'The French Dispatch' dispatched ahead of imminent first trailer

Lights Camera Barstool

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

First poster for Wes Anderson's 'The French Dispatch' dispatched ahead of imminent first trailer

"I look at the French dispatched. The next move for Sanderson and we're recording on Tuesday. Trey was coming out Wednesday us. We don't have the trailer I imagine we. We know what we can expect a lot of people this movie. He released a poster. It's the most wes anderson poster of all time it's supposed to look like a cover of the New Yorker Magazine Snakes and the New Yorker also had the exclusive rights to release the first images this from the movie Has So many people in the movie. Bill Murray Franson Tilda. Swinton Jeffrey Wright Adrian Brodie Benicio ACL. Del Toro Owen Wilson Timothy Xiaomei Lee said do Liev Schreiber Elizabeth Moss Edward Norton Willem Defoe search around and Kristoff vaults Alz Jason Schwartzman Rupert Friend Henry. Winkler Bob Balabagn. I mean Anjelica Huston. The list goes on and

Del Toro Owen Wilson Timothy X Bill Murray Franson Tilda New Yorker Magazine Trey Adrian Brodie Benicio Acl Anjelica Huston Edward Norton Willem Defoe Liev Schreiber Elizabeth Moss Wes Anderson Jason Schwartzman Sanderson Bob Balabagn Swinton Jeffrey Wright
Rudy Giuliani admits he 'needed Yovanovitch out of the way'

America in the Morning

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Rudy Giuliani admits he 'needed Yovanovitch out of the way'

"Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani has been making the rounds again in Ukraine and Bob Constantini reports the president seems to still view guiliani as his personal lawyer president trump would only say Rudy Giuliani didn't tell me much about the personal attorneys recent trip to Ukraine Giuliani is a firm believer in the theory that you queen actually hacks democratic campaigns in twenty sixteen in order to help Hillary Clinton and he's been lobbying Ukrainian officials to launch investigations into hunter Biden it's a soon to the former New York City mayor met with the president on Friday at the White House so proceeds would not confirm it he's a great person who loves our country and he does this and a lot of the way he does it out of love he sees what goes on he sees what's happening he sees all of the hopes that happens when they talk about impeachment all this work the Russian collusion delusion even some Republicans on Capitol Hill question why Giuliani would go to Ukraine in the middle of the impeachment controversy centered on what the president meant when asking Ukraine's leader for a favor in the phone call Mr trump told voters a Lynskey Rudy very much knows what's happening and he would have Giuliani phone him that was in July after Julie on his first visit to associates who were helping the lawyer gain entree to Ukrainian officials have been indicted for campaign finance fraud he was quoted in The New Yorker magazine article as saying former US ambassador to Ukraine Maria von of which needed to be pushed quote out of the way because she was an impediment to the investigations Giuliani was trying to get started regarding

Rudy Giuliani Ukraine Bob Constantini President Trump Guiliani Hillary Clinton Hunter Biden White House Mr Trump Lynskey Rudy Julie Fraud New York The New Yorker Magazine United States
Trump Undercuts Bolton on North Korea's Missiles

Anderson Cooper 360

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Trump Undercuts Bolton on North Korea's Missiles

"Begin tonight, keeping them. Honest, President Trump back tonight from his state visit to Japan, whether it was the President's Cup trophy created just for him to present an assumed match the rounds of golf or the audience with Japan's new emperor. The trip was designed to flatter him showcase US Japanese unity. Instead, it seems to showcase divisions inside the west wing over what the country's foreign policy actually, is, which is no academic question. Considering that the divide appears to be over at least two global hotspots, Iran and North Korea. And it's especially significant in that it's the president and John Bolton. His national security adviser is third national security adviser so far seems increasingly at odds with each other. Now, you'll recall he was passed over for the job once before, in part, reportedly because of his mustache, the president's been widely reported do not believe. To look, the part, so he picks up one who would end up being a felon, Michael Flynn, then replaced him with three star general H R McMaster, who is a storied military career, but the president once said he looked like a beer, salesman and when he left Bolton got the nod tonight after the president's performance Japan. He's looking increasingly distant from the boss take a little cures Bolton in Tokyo watching as the president undercuts him on North Korean missile testing, which Bolton says, violates a UN Security Council resolution. My people think it could have been a violation, as you know, I view it differently. I view it as a man, perhaps, he wants to get attention or the president went onto rhapsodised about all the great beachfront property. There is North Korea and Spokane Kim Jong UN as, if he were a fellow real estate tycoon, naughty, bloodthirsty dictator of you. John bolton. Clearly does not share never has and the two different Iran, as well with the president talking tough in public, but counseling restraint behind closed doors, which it should be mentioned is certainly his prerogative is chief executive should also be said the president's often see things differently from their national security advisers, sometimes even hiring them to play devil's advocate. That said the president has now hired three of them. He seems secretaries of state defense in u n ambassadors come and go is change course. So many times on so many issues, whether it's North Korea Iran, pulling out of Syria, threatening to leave NATO there, perhaps it's not really possible to say that he and embassador Bolton truly at odds on foreign policy because he so far has no. Real consistent foreign policy to be at odds with other than a preference for appeasing dictators. That's the question at leaves the other, of course, is what exactly did the president? I think he was getting in John Bolton who's who's been nothing if not consistent, and consistently hawkish over the years perspective. Now from Dexter Filkins was written at length about it for the New Yorker magazine in a fascinating piece, entitled John Bolton on the warpath Ken Trump's national security advisor, sell the 'isolation as president on military force. Dexter, thanks for being here. John Bolton has always been John Bolton. I mean he's, he's always said that North Korea cannot be appeased that they're not going to give up nuclear weapons. And yet, there he is working for president who clearly is trying to make a deal. It's, it's, it's I think it's a fundamental divide in the White House, you have Bolton has publicly advocated attacking North Korea into Ron before he was national security advisor. He's, he's called regime change in Venezuela. It's not clear that Trump. Really buys into any of that. I mean, Trump campaign, I think I think so somebody must have said to him. You watch them on FOX saw him on FOX. And I think my impression is what, what the president liked about him was, how blunt he was, you know, it was like very, very blunt and plainspoken. But when when you look at when you look at their to worldviews they, they don't get you for

President Trump Embassador Bolton North Korea Ken Trump Japan Advisor Un Security Council Iran Kim Jong Un Dexter Filkins FOX Michael Flynn New Yorker Magazine Spokane Salesman Chief Executive White House Nato
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And really that's just one of the items in this whole other department of the membership drive. You know, we talked about all these serious things democracy journalism, but we have the thank you gift department to a really popular ones recently. We just mentioned Andy Boyle wits. And of course, he's in the New Yorker a full year subscription to the New Yorker magazine seems to always come in at number one that's the print edition. Hold it in your hands. Clincal the paper New Yorker to your mailbox throughout a full year. Plus, the online access that that comes with people who listen to this show, sometimes like the Brian Lehrer show swag that. We have feels good that you like that. We have Bryan low shall mug of coffee mug on the large side with a really nice New York City skyline design and a tasteful logo. And I promise Nancy. No picture of me. I recommend the mug even just for that. And you mentioned the t shirt before. Yes. It's sky blue tie dye with that sort of you know, pop lettering from the nineteen sixties in orange that says peace love and Brian Lara and you can wear it earnestly or you can wear it. Ironically. You mentioned that we have little electron goodies to most of which is so cool. I got one for myself. We have a little WNYC bluetooth speaker really good sound for two inch cube. We have a little WNYC portable charger called the power Bank. You know for when your phone runs out of juice at just the wrong moment. And we have the cutest little radio in the whole world. The WNYC Mason jar radio. It's a short just a few inches high Mason jar that's tuned to WNYC, and you could see our other. Thank you gifts to on our website or you can ask about them when you call in. But, you know, in addition to all the serious reasons to support not for profit news organizations like WNYC, there's also the thank you gift treats at eight eight eight three seven six WNYC, eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two or online at WNYC dot org..

WNYC Brian Lara New Yorker magazine Nancy Andy Boyle Brian Lehrer New York City Bryan power Bank two inch
PBS’ ‘Retro Report’ to link headlines, history; humor too

AP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

PBS’ ‘Retro Report’ to link headlines, history; humor too

"PBS is launching a weekly hour long series. This fall that will link headline making stories to their historical roots PBS says the magazine format program retro report will be hosted by journalists Celeste. He'd Lee and artist Masud Olifants humorist Andy Borowitz who writes for the New Yorker magazine will contribute a weekly segment PBS's cheap programming. Executive says retro report aims to provide insights and major stories as well as correct the record and expose

PBS New Yorker Magazine Andy Borowitz Masud Olifants Celeste Executive LEE
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A staff writer as well at the New Yorker magazine. Her new book is these truths a history of the United States, and we have an excerpt of it at on point radio dot org. Jill Lepore, welcome to on point. Hey, thanks so much for having me Magna. It is great to talk to you. I have been Rita VIN sort of like gobbling up your book. America's fault five hundred years, MS. Well, let me just start with a really basic question. This is seven hundred plus pages five hundred years of history. What made you want to take this on? You know, I guess partly. I just really wish there were a book like this it just for teaching purposes among other reasons that and also watching my kids go through school, and their AP US history classes that I think that there's lots of great textbooks out there. They're written by teams of authors. But there really isn't a single volume sweeping account of American history with a narrative voice that I think has a proposal for. So actually, honestly it was as much as anything a dare like I was asked by publisher day. This is like can we get it cover all of American history on ours? Like, could you cover all we're doing the pages of single volume book and coming under thousand pages you rose to dare I'm gonna dare you to jump across a canyon. No, it's a bad. It's I'm I'm a little embarrassed. But but because I really did feel like there was. I said you I mean, we're in the bookshelf is this book. And I thought there there should be one because we have a very polarized present. But that rests on a polarized understanding of the past. And I'm not sure like I think a lot of people of goodwill would like to feel like we're doing our part to repair the breach and for me as a historian that kind of begins with understanding the past in a way that we can all find her answers stirs in that story and all wrestle with its, you know, its beauty and its agony. So that's what I just like. Well, this'll feel like I'm doing my part give it a try. Well, so I mean, an and the central the the line one of the threads that you try to draw through this five hundred year history of what's happened on the North American continent is this question of truth, and how Americans have perceived what truth is how its centrality to the American story. You know, the our struggles with it. And I what I read is originally you wanted to. Just sort of stop your book with the presidency of Barack Obama. But notions of truth came front and center once again in two thousand sixteen so he kept writing. Yeah. Or I mean, honestly, I had to keep writing because the election of two thousand sixteen was an important realigning election on people who went out and voted for Trump felt that they were part of a revolution..

Jill Lepore United States Barack Obama New Yorker magazine Rita VIN staff writer America Trump publisher five hundred years five hundred year
Former CBS CEO Les Moonves Denied $120 Million Severance Package

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 3 years ago

Former CBS CEO Les Moonves Denied $120 Million Severance Package

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple, easy, and awesome CBS is accusing les Moonves says of a quote willful failure to cooperate with an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct. That failure atop the alleged misconduct. Is why CBS is denying him a severance payment of one hundred twenty million dollars? So what if the downfall of a legendary executive mean for his company NPR TV critic, Eric Dagens has covered moon vez and CBS for years. He's here either. Eric, hi, according to CBS, at least, and we should note. Moonves denies wrongdoing broadly. What what what is CBS say moon vested? Well, let's go back move. As was forced to step down back in September. At the New Yorker magazine published allegations from several women. Claiming he had sexually harassed or salted them. So the CBS board wound up hiring to law firms to look in the allegations against moon vase, also harassment or misconduct allegations that CBS news and CBS is wider corporate culture. Okay. So we mentioned an alleged willful failure to cooperate was Moonves supposed to cooperate with those law firms. Yes, they expected him to tell the truth when they asked him questions about his past conduct. Now, we haven't seen the reports that these law firms have created, but the New York Times reported on early drafts of the reports which said that investigators have evidence move as had lied to them and had tried to destroy text showing that he attempted to find acting work for one woman who'd made accusations against him in the board statement, they accused move as a breaching his contract and quote, willful material misfeasance now I had to look that word up, but it means performing an official duty in an improper or unlawful manner move as a turn. He has said in a statement that the conclusions are baseless that his client cooperated fully and that he vehemently denies assaulting. Although possession is nine tenths of the law. CBS has the one hundred twenty million dollars. They say they're keeping the one hundred twenty million dollars unless there's some other preceding we don't know about coming. But that leaves CBS trying to move on from losing its top executive in this in this particular way, how deep does the problem run at CBS. Well, you know, this was a company wants known as the Tiffany network. It bills itself as the most watched broadcast network in America, they have all these popular programs. But they also have this history of harassment allegations CBS this morning anchor Charlie rose was fired last year. After a Washington Post story revealed multiple allegations of sexual harassment. Jeff Fager, the executive producer of the top news magazine. Sixty minutes was let go in September. He had sent a threatening text to a CBS reporter who was working on a story about harassment allegations at CBS news. The New York Times reported last week on a nine. A nine point five million dollar settlement with actress Elisha deuce coupe who claim the she was harassed while she was working on the CBS drama bull. So there's a lot. And and as a critic, I pointed out CBS's lack of new show starring women for years. The question now is you know, is CBS really going to look harder at its history. Now or just hope everybody moves on after this crisis pass, you're putting on an interesting connection or parallel. We don't know how closely their connected, but we have allegations of private misconduct, and your noting something wrong with the public faces. CBS the opportunities given to women the representation of women CBS doing anything about these kinds of problems. Well, the board says it's created this new position called chief people officer to revamp its human resources departments. They say their diversity and inclusion efforts have been an adequate and they're going to beef them up. They're giving twenty million dollars to several different groups that are working to combat workplace harassment. But the CBS board is her from employees who said that Powell stars. And. Executives were not held accountable at the company and the question is whether CBS is going to hold them accountable now without big stories in the media to pressure them, Eric thanks so much for sheet. It thank you. That's NPR critic Eric decades.

CBS Les Moonves Harassment Comcast NPR Eric Tiffany Network Jeff Fager New Yorker Magazine Executive The New York Times Eric Dagens Eric Decades Npr Tv Washington Post Elisha Deuce Charlie Rose Executive Producer
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Editor of the New Yorker magazine, as you may know on this program, we invited poets to poem for the magazines archive to read and chat about along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the New Yorker joining us today is Nick Flynn, the author of several poetry collections memoirs. He's received the Erikson institute prize for excellence in mental health media as well as wards fellowships from Penn Guggenheim foundation and the library of congress. Welcome nick. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks cannon. I saw also that you've been translated into fifteen languages is that right? Yeah. Not the poems. The pros. Yes. One one book has been translated into fifteen Lang exciting. That's amazing. I don't point out one book. One book fifteen times. So the poem you selected today is objectively as blanket, but Zoe hit sig tell us what about this piece caught your attention as you're looking through our archives the archives is you know, you have to sort of sort through them. They you don't have a whole list of poets that you know. And then you should like remember poem and see you have to sort of actually sure gauge it page comes up this ten in each page. And I my my attention online is is not huge. And so I got through twenty pages of that twenty pages twenty pages. And then just put in Poland. She wanted to just look through and see the past. I didn't see the little search button. So okay. And I actually didn't want do actor after quite a walks. I realize on each page that'd be like ten poets. And I would know either them personally or know of their work pretty well of most of the pages and occasionally be a name that would that. I didn't know. Right. And then after a while I began to read a lot. The poems and after a while be really interested in the post. I'd never heard of before. Yeah. Sure. And I decided to go for that. Okay. All right. So we hear the poem. Sure. I'd love to you. Yeah. Let's hear it objectively as blanket. No, the police hyenas on hearing five confessions for false in one to irresistible nor the mental health elephant tusks by the state, nor the common sense store twisting at the prosecutors feet, nor the one the one juror uneasy facing eleven pale sheep at bay all day all night for conviction, nor the governor, sir, nor the common sense stork. Now in a not nor the shots. No, the clause unbending nor the clause bending nor seeing his fitful approach did one turn back to flip the window latch for the life form. Nearly breaking himself on glass, nor the next governor nor the state carriage horses trotting ever steady blinders acute to the I nor the widower how he could how could he Puma and pull focus not defense counsel. Not for lack of it, nor the stork is she breathing. Is there such a thing as breathing here? Does it mean? The polyester the Royal blue the blanket on the bed of the mother of two. That was objectively as blanket by Zoe hit sig which ran in the March twentieth. Twenty seventeen issue of the magazine while it's really great to hear you re. I love all those Nores. It's it's the denial before the admission, I suppose, how did you hear those? Yeah. I mean the negating opponent at the beginning. I thought was really interesting strategy just to get me into it and just seem to be willing to like right from the beginning to exist in this state of instability, and you know, already with the first line having not being chromatic Lee, completely correct perhaps, and it just allowing that sort of while tumbling energy along with negation and long with a stuttering to nor the one the one juror without even a comet like just doing a lot of things that are genuine to itself. I think. Yeah. Once invested in language and the ways that we might. Miss your language or hear language differently. And I I love that about it. But it's also I think interested in the kind of rhetoric nor the governor, sir this kind of old fashioned Roderick..

Zoe Nick Flynn New Yorker magazine Erikson institute Penn Guggenheim foundation Editor cannon congress Poland Lang Roderick Lee Puma
No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 3 years ago

No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

"There's new CBS chairman and CEO, les Moonves is leaving NPR's. Steve inskeep. Talks to the New Yorker magazine. Reporter this morning about the newest allegations against moma's CBS says there's no severance package worked out from this pending the results of the investigation, and for CBS the departure has bearing on an ownership battle for the corporate structure of CBS. Marketplace. Nancy Marshall genzer who was Moonves fighting with on the CBS board. He was in a battle with Sherry Redstone over a possible sale of CBS Redstone heads a company called national amusements. She's the daughter of Sumner Redstone Sumner Redstone had controlled CBS. And Viacom they were under one roof. But he split them up Sherri Redstone wanted to reunite them. But Moonves thought that was a bad idea, and why was Moonves against that? Well, Viacom is struggling it owns some cable TV channels that aren't doing well comedy central and MTV moon. Moonves didn't want Viacom to drag down CBS, which has been doing been doing. Well, CBS actually sued the red stones and national amusements national amusements filed a countersuit and on that score. What happens now both sides have dropped their lawsuits. The CBS board has been we shaped with six members stepping down and being quickly replaced share Sherry Redstone in national amusements have promised to wait at least two years before proposing. Merger between CBS and

CBS Sherry Redstone Cbs Redstone Sumner Redstone Sumner Redston Kristen Dickey Viacom IRS Les Moonves Accountant Steve Inskeep Toyota Nancy Marshall Genzer Chairman And Ceo New Yorker Magazine Sherri Redstone James Moonves
Trump Presses Apple & Ford to Shift Production to U.S.

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Trump Presses Apple & Ford to Shift Production to U.S.

"In the entertainment industry. This. TV executive les Moonves is being shown the door. CBS says it's chairman is out hours after the New Yorker magazine posted a story with a second round of accusations against him, a total of twelve women say Moonves mistreated them the allegations include claims of forced oral sex groping and retaliation against women who resisted Moonves has denied the charges though, he acknowledges having what he calls consensual relations with three of the women.

United States President Trump Les Moonves Rafael Nadal Apple Ford Novak Djokovic Pete Sampras New Yorker Magazine Roger Federer CBS Tennis Executive Chairman Schoklitsch America China Thirty One Year
7 injured in Paris stabbing attack; suspect taken into custody

BBC World Service

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

7 injured in Paris stabbing attack; suspect taken into custody

"Seven people had been injured four seriously in an attack by a man armed with a knife and an i n by in the french capital paris the man said to be an afghan national was arrested paris correspondent lucy williamson reports a police source told french media that the attack it began by stubbings three people outside a cinema overlooking the canal one witness who was playing the traditional french game of petanque on the key tried to stop him by throwing one of the heavy bulls the attacker fled but later targeted to british tourists in the same area an inquiry into attempted murder has been opened a source close to the inquiry is quoted as saying nothing at this stage suggests

Serena Williams Mr Gene Alibaba WTA Jack Ma C._B._S. New Yorker Magazine Sweden Petanque Les Moonves Officer Paris Correspondent Brussels European Union Lucy Williamson Myanmar Texas
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on 1A

"The New Yorker magazine announced that an interview with Steve Bannon would Steve Bannon himself would headline in an interview for the magazines festival that's held in October. Now, that announcement did not play well with a lot of people other speakers, including comedian and movie actor, jet appetite, and Jimmy Carey threatened to back out and only day later on Monday New York editor, David remnant announced that he had changed his mind. Steve Bannon is now out now van his aligned himself with the outright and white nationalist his publication. Breitbart has been a hub for those audiences and he spurred on right wing nationalists in Europe, Anita. What happened here? Why did Rennick and the New Yorker reverse course. Well, a lot of people, as you said, we're going to drop out and David remnant quickly turned around. I mean, it was shocking how quick that. Happened, Steve Bannon's response was scathing. I mean, he just basically called, I think actually the word was the word Donald Trump used gutless. He said, David remnant in the near New Yorker was gutless for disinvite him. You heard from a lot of people conservatives who say that they're often the people that are censored if you will, or they, they can't have an actual conversation. You see that a lot on higher education at colleges and universities where they say that conservative thinkers can't come to universities and talk, and they resent that if it's supposed to be, you know, a sharing of ideas. Why couldn't he just have that conversation? Now, a lot of other people say, well, they could have that conversation. David remnant could interview them for for a piece, a story that he shouldn't be headlining. The festival that was the that was the and this is a tough one. A lot of people say you should have an honest conversation as long as honest conversation is the point. Some people have looked at. Steve Bannon and said, his goal isn't honest conversation. It's it's incendiary remarks. It's division David Ramnik issued a long statement saying he had no intention of softball, Steve Bannon. He wanted to go at him in front of a crowd and that he was disappointed. Malcolm Gladwin works at the New Yorker. He said, call me old fashioned, but I would have thought that the point of festival of ideas was to expose the audience to ideas. If you only invite your friends over, it's called a dinner party, Josh. Well, it it is the New Yorker festival they have the right to choose who they want assure. And the central mistake that was made was inviting Bannon as the Representative of the Trump administration or the even the Representative of some of these populist nationalist ideas than than someone else who may be in the White House or have some more influence. I mean, keep in mind Bannon is estranged from from the Trump White House, and I don't think he has a whole lot of influence even in his whole sector of this populist nationalism that he advocates. But once you extend the invite, I think perhaps remnant shouldn't have caved into to the public pressure is it is this. Case of d platforming someone who like it or not like it or not is influencing politics in America and around the world. You know, I don't think Ben in his influence in politics as much as he thinks he is and you look at, you know, he wanted to take on Mitch McConnell. If you remember last year in these Senate primaries, take on every city and Republican Senator who's not conservative enough, and he didn't win a single race. His candidates didn't win a single contest. Well, guys, let's turn to some local politics of the week for a moment on Tuesday, the mayor of Chicago, you've heard of him. His name is Rahm Emanuel. He announced he's not seeking reelection for a third term. Emanuel was elected in back in twenty eleven to become the witty windy city's first Jewish mayor. The work he did over to terms will contribute to a controversial legacy for Rahm. Emanuel is credited with stabilizing.

Steve Bannon David remnant The New Yorker magazine Rahm Emanuel Donald Trump Malcolm Gladwin Breitbart David Ramnik Trump White House Jimmy Carey New York Europe Rennick Senate Mitch McConnell editor Chicago Josh
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"No and get the right one get assembly german won the german one yeah okay it's great and it and then finally i just wanna you know get you on the record here just the new yorker magazine continue to pay you money in any way i don't know whether to reveal the certain no why why do you ask just just curious just wanted to get that on the record and random housetohouse okay i'm on pension blah blah chris put in that my money real game good it foot and less and then just again what's again for the record did you tell jia tolentino to write that profile of us using your extensive connections in the new yorker i i did not tell her i just center a check an of a certain amount of which was not not unusual because i'm trying to cede my by offsprings bank account with money that i can then collect when it's time to go to the home it was all a conspiracy i think that's a good place to leave it daniel manica my dad everybody would you like to do you have anything things like the plug yeah chapo trap it's a great show folks subscribe if if this is one of those die give away capitalistic you have to pay five bucks for it episodes well thank you for that but if you haven't subscribed you know my my medical care depends upon all unita subscriber this'll my my dad will die.

new yorker magazine jia tolentino unita
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"Back now with breaking news and our politics lead first lady melania trump choosing not to accompany the president her husband on his walk to marine one this afternoon but rather arriving for their flight to florida on her own comes as a new bombshell report reveals that another alleged affair by donald trump back in two thousand six was reportedly covered up this according to new yorker magazine which broke the story ronen farrow the reporter joining me now a cnn white house reporter kate bennett kate what are your source is telling you about the first families relationship now well as you said jim traditionally were used to seeing the first couple do that walk across the south lawn to go to marine one to head andras an off tomorrow lago it's a routine thing for them but today because the first lady apparently had scheduling issues her office told me it was easier for her to meet the president at air force one where the flight of florida separately but if we were we're supposed to see them together this of course comes on a day that must be again difficult for the first lady to see these headlines about an alleged affair in two thousand six between her husband and a playboy models reported by the new yorker today um and that this affair was carried on and perhaps was hidden by a tabloid payment of a hundred and fifty thousand dollars a catch and kill story as they call them a story that never ran of course the white house denies the affair happened again however this is a difficult headline the milania trump is having to deal with on the heels of the story daniel scandal we've seen her cancel her trip to davos to accompany the president we've watched her take a separate vehicle upped his state of the union address a do a separate visit in cincinnati so this is a a first lady who is signaling.

president donald trump new yorker magazine reporter florida white house davos cincinnati ronen farrow cnn kate bennett jim playboy daniel fifty thousand dollars
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:44 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Kevin young poultry under the New Yorker magazine and the director of the center for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets twos Apoel from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we asked them to read one of their own poems. That's when published in the magazine Mike s today is Tarrant Hayes a chancellor of the kademi of American poets. Current poetry editor at the New York Times magazine distinguished professor of English at the university of Pittsburgh and distinguished writer in residence at New York University. His many honors include a MacArthur fellowship a Guggenheim fellowship and the national book award for poetry, welcome Terrance. Hey, man. Good to be here. Good to see you. So the poem you've chosen to read his fire by Matthew Dickman, tell us what in particular about this poem Katcher is you're sifting through the archive. Well, naturally, I thought about my own palm, which of my own poems. I would pick. And then I sorta backed up and recalled reading this. Poem and thinking that there in conversation. So I wanted to figure that out with you today just to see what these two poems doing with each other. Let's give it a listen. Here's Terrance Hayes reading fire by Matthew Dickman fire. Oh fire. You burn me at a singing behind the smoke in Kohl's his wife near him. The rest of us below the stars swimming above Washington state burning through themselves. He's like an appellation prince Henry with his banjo and whiskey the court surrounding him and the deer off in the dark hills like the French terrified, but in love and hungry. I'm burning all the time my pockets full of matches and lighters. The blue smoke crawling out like a skinny ghost from between. My lips my lungs on fire. The wings of them falling from the open sky, the top of Michelle's long hands looked like the beautiful coats leopards have covered dark spots all the cigarettes. She would like and then smash out her is the color of hairspray cloudy and stingy and gone. But beautiful she carried her hands around like. To terrible letters of introduction. I never understood who could have opened them read them aloud still thrown her onto a bad still walk into the street. She was still lit what little fuse. She had left. Oh fire. You burn me. My sister, and I and southern comfort making us singer and spark the family ash all around us the way she is beautiful to me in her singular, blaze, my brain lighting up my tongue like a monk in wartime a wash and RH silk and flames.

Michelle New Yorker magazine Matthew Dickman Terrance Hayes New York Times magazine New York University Kohl distinguished professor of Eng Tarrant Hayes poetry editor university of Pittsburgh Kevin national book award Guggenheim fellowship chancellor Washington director MacArthur writer
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deborah tradesman fiction editor at the new yorker last month in honor of the tenth anniversary of the new yorker fiction podcast we asked you to vote for your favorite episode from our first 10 years what amazed us was it out of more than one hundred twenty episodes seventy one different podcast got at least one vote and most of them got many more than that the final winner was an episode from two thousand twelve in which david sideroads fred and discussed the story roy spivey by miranda july the great selection and we're happy to release the episode now thank you to everyone who voted and thank you to all of our listeners for making this podcast such rewarding thing to work on this is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear roy spivey by miranda july he slept for the first hour and it was startling to see such a famous face look so vulnerable an empty the story was chosen by david sideroads who's personal essays and humor pieces have been appearing in the new yorker for nearly two decades he's published eight books including me talk pretty one day dress your family and quarter and dunham and when you were engulfed in flames high david i'd ever similar under july published a story collection called noone belongs him more than you a few years ago and two of her stories of appeared the magazine but she's also perhaps better known as a film director and performer she wrote directed and start into feature movies me and you and everyone we know in two thousand five in last year's the future but what side of her work to you know best i was not from you.

editor new yorker roy spivey new yorker magazine writer david sideroads david noone director david sideroads fred dunham two decades 10 years one day
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deb retracement fiction editor at the new yorker each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear extra by ye lee which was published in the new yorker in december of two thousand three granny lynn gasps she has never had a husband in her life and the prospect of a dead husband frightens her yet auntie wong makes the decision for her right then in there between two fish stance and in a short time she finds granny lynn a match the story was chosen by sarah swan yenbuying them who's the author of two novels miss hempel chronicles and madeleine his sleeping which was a finalist for the national book award in two thousand four hi sarah hi debra so extra was it was the first story by ian lee that was published in the new yorker back in two thousand three and i believe it was only the second story that she'd published anywhere was the first piece of her set you read it was it was an i remember feeling excitement both because of the work itself and also because we had just missed each other at iowa but i had already sort of heard about this wonderful writer who was coming out of the program what impression did the story make on you and you're in it the story felt very poignant to me because the character of granny lynn and i imagine the stories taking place somewhere in the nineties maybe the midnineties or so let character of granny land is around the same age as my own mother um and my mother left china in 1949 and i was struck when i was reading the story of oh if my mother had stayed what might her life had look look like and and in some ways this story offered a window into what another life another self might have looked like river my mother the other thing i was struck by when i first read it.

editor new yorker writer wong sarah swan national book award debra ian lee iowa granny lynn china hempel madeleine
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"But now today ronen pharaoh writing for the new yorker magazine has published his own account of harvey weinstein is alleged behavior and what ronen ferrel has written for the new yorker pushes the story even further and makes the open secret nature of this alleged behavior all the more unfathomable from ronen pharaoh story today quote i was told by 13 women that between the 1990s and 2015 harvey weinstein sexually harassed assaulted them allegations that corroborate and overlap with the revelations in the new york times and also include far more serious claims three women told me that weinstein raped them allegations that include weinstein forcibly performing or receiving oral sex and forcing maginal sex quote four actresses including mira sorvino and rosanna arquette told me they suspected that after they rejected argue weinstein's advances or complained about them to company representatives weinstein have them removed from projects or dissuaded people from hiring them and again this this may be at this point the most unfathomable or at least most jaw dropping part of it quote sixteen former and current executives and assistance at weinstein's companies told me that they witnessed or had knowledge of unwanted sexual advances and touching at events associated with feinstein's films and in the workplace all sixteen said that the behavior was widely known within both miramax and the weinstein company sixteen people who worked there or witnessed it or say they knew about it and they knew that everybody else knew about it too.

new yorker magazine harvey weinstein ronen ferrel new yorker new york times mira sorvino feinstein miramax rosanna arquette the weinstein company
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

Off Camera with Sam Jones

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

"Like i want to be bigger than this but i am i am i announced like maybe a bigger than that is this one of the more autobiographical things you've written i mean it's more i think it's getting a part of my brain that i am embarrassed to say exists and so that part is autobiographical i try to get at personal stuff and then just you know i don't know like like here the dog is very personal to me like chuck and bug and very personal i mean it's like there's an enlightened is very personal answer me so like i i the thing the thing that about this movie that i think is very personal to me though is this which is this now it's like you know like and and it even going on interviews and talking about the the movie i get him you know it's like i don't want to be the guy who lake is jealous of other people early compare myself for look in the box office of my movies are like all those things where you go you know there's a certain kind of shane to that like that's in bear it's just embarrassing once again so and at the same time i feel like it's healthy for me to unpack that can answer in knowledge and admit it you know what i mean 'cause like you want to but i do think and said that part i think is is still the stuff that like even as i'm talking about like i had an interview with like the new yorker magazine and like who you are uber and like and i walk away from me like god i object it just because the nature of the movie brings out this side of me because i am having to talk about it right and i'm like i like it's like the last thing i want is like any every every person in the near could be like my superiors he wishes he added willing whatever the fucking complained that i have like him the thing and it's like and so yes so so it's still it's there's something about the movie that still is leg raleigh embarrassing to me and in that sense i think that that's exciting it's exciting semi to feel like.

chuck shane new yorker magazine lake raleigh
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Thanks to the internet you will be able to can get connected with all the other people who have similar ideas or get excited about the same thing i mean we live in it like comecon is such a crazy example of this where i remember you've been going to come conflict decades back in the day it was sort of initce thing now now everyone's excited about it um and things to the power of the internet has brought all these people together who are excited about it so if you have a vision an end you execute the vision you can find your audience um and believe in yourself yeah how did you decide to do with uh did you come up with could split idea would never talked with yeah yeah so i uh i mean i thought through i was i've been in in heavily influenced through u2 and trauma and your work in uh in the the film commission a growing up on set uh i i've i've experienced first hand the challenges that a lot of at well yes ladies and cam exactly how was men serve and did there's so many difficulties in getting a film together um and meanwhile you know there are more content creators today than ever before um and and the you know there's amazing technology available so we wanted to come up with a platform that made it easier for people to get access to the gear that surrounds them in every city um and i i met my cofounder is when we were all in grad school and christina booed dallas um was she was uh a videographer at the new yorker magazine.

christina new yorker magazine
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on The Daily

"While the defense department referred questions back to the white house what is the policy was the president aware that he can't make policy changes the statements on twitter at the pentagon is saying he was making the announcement of the policy change so the yup in formulated but like i said they were going to have to work out the details on how that all moves forward to lawfully implement that policy change from this point and not since british through faded visit an eightteam fourteen as the white house had so many fires to put out in an expletive filled interview with the new yorker magazine the president's new communications director anthony scaramucci called the white house chief of staff reince priebus oh quote paranoid schizophrenic leaker and vowed to get him fired scaramucci also suggested that white house aides would be prosecuted for leaking embarrassing information about him and said quote i have three to four people all fire tomorrow because he suspected them of being disloyal to the president scaramucci later released a statement but did not apologise quote i sometimes used colorful language i will refrain in this arena he said but not give up the passionate fight for donald trump's agenda the daily is produced by theo balcony lindsay garrison ritual or andy mills and christopher worth lisa tobin is our executive producer cement the hennick is our editorial director are theme music is by jim brown berg and been lands for of wunderle special thanks to martha daniel michaela bouchard peter sale and pedroso's auto.

president twitter pentagon white house new yorker magazine anthony scaramucci donald trump andy mills lisa tobin editorial director jim brown berg pedroso director chief of staff executive producer
"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"new yorker magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Is just a mistake the continues to happen generation after generation old people tend to think younger people and we'll selfabsorbed it turns out as younger people age they have many of the same characteristics of the previous year old cohort yeah this is probably best exemplified by a time magazine cover a few years back referring to my new generation is the maimai generation you've then rewind backed the '70s and it was a tumble thoughts cool in the new yorker magazine which highlighted babies hymns as the major gneration this is just a history or cycle that continues to repay he's a lazy you know i think unfortunately it's just again a normal approach from older people to the young of the day i just started taught them in such a manner when it comes to the to the points on technology and also the credit fuxin senate billy i think those two aspects are actually relatively well accepted or at least identified by many industries as being necessary preconditions to uh well servicing a millennials however i'm not sure how much that notion has actually penetrated the died in a business models it's much easier to identify technology and digital access and delivery as critical than to actually spend the money and make the necessary business changes to implement that and so i'm just telling me what you say that runs and cyclical nature of these developments does it mean it than generations we can start looking at how they themselves will presumably follow the millennials lead in some of these areas.

time magazine new yorker magazine