35 Burst results for "New Yorker"

NYC Allowing Non-Citizens to Vote in Local Elections Threatens Federal Election Fraud

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 6 d ago

NYC Allowing Non-Citizens to Vote in Local Elections Threatens Federal Election Fraud

"New York city New York City lawmakers are poised to allow more than 800,000 This is New York Times New Yorkers who are green card holders or have the legal right to work in the United States to vote in municipal elections and for local ballot initiatives What they're trying to say there is these are non citizens who will be able to vote In municipal elections for local ballot initiatives Now considering how poorly that city is run by the cameo and the other cameos in that city How do you think they're going to prevent these people from voting in federal elections and state elections mister producer They're not They're not This is a massive ruse This city councils like the it could be a city council in Havana It could be the sitting council in Moscow That's how creepy radical extremists these tools are The bill is known as our city our vote Would make New York City the largest municipality in the country to allow non citizens to vote in local

New York City New York Times United States Havana Moscow
Eric Reminisces About His Friendship With Larry David

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | Last week

Eric Reminisces About His Friendship With Larry David

"We continue now with Eric's interview at the Babylon B we'll have to ask, because you said that you were friends with Larry David at one point? Yes, at dinner, his apartment. When I was writing the hero pieces, the Atlantic monthly published a couple of them. And there was a humor reading. So it was like 1987 and somebody got me to do a humor reading with Roz chast's husband you know Roz chast, The New Yorker cartoonist, whatever. Her husband did some stuff, and there was somebody else. I can't remember, but I was one of these like two or three people who like in a basement in New York did a comedy reading. And this friend of mine that I met at one of these writers colony says, you got to meet my friend Larry. He will love you. He loves you and he's so funny. He's one of these before he became famous. Like right before. So he came and he loved what I did like the humor pieces. I think these fewer pieces are on my website, Eric and Texas dot com air contacts dot com. Eric and Texas dot com. But the humor pieces are still there. And so anyway, so we became friends and he really loved what I was doing, and he connected me with his manager whom he eventually married, and she was only taking she had him. She had Chris Elliott. You know, like, really, I was like, I've made it now. Yeah. And then I became a born again Christian and I threw it all in the garbage. I burned all of that with my elo albums and all that satanic stuff. Because humors of the devil. No, I never really overtly turned away from it. I just kind of drifted away. But so Larry and I became friends. I remember he had a dinner party in his apartment, and the actual Kramer came in. But at the time, I didn't realize he was the actual Kramer. Did you know he was racist? Or not so funny? That's a funny question. That's a funny question. I would kill to meet Michael Richards. I just love that man so much. But yeah, so I think when I became like a conservative Jesus freak, Larry David probably had problems

Roz Chast Atlantic Monthly Eric Larry David The New Yorker Larry Texas Chris Elliott New York Kramer Michael Richards
Analyzing the New 'Trial of the Century' With Alan Dershowitz

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | Last week

Analyzing the New 'Trial of the Century' With Alan Dershowitz

"With us right now, is Alan Dershowitz who I don't think needs no introduction and does a great job on a variety of different topics and we've had Allen on the show before. Professor Dershowitz, thank you so much for joining the program. My question is what's your take on the Kyle rittenhouse drama and kind of I read an article that said, you believe he should be acquitted, please, the floor is yours. Well, not only do I think he should be acquitted, but I don't think he got a fair trial, whether he's acquitted or convicted. The media has put not a thumb on the scale, but an elbow on the scale. They have told everybody, particularly CNN, New Yorker magazine, MSNBC, they've already told the public, this guy is a white supremacist, a vigilante. He's no good. This will send a terrible, terrible message and a precedent. They have basically tried to take the self defense issue away from the jury and broaden the crime into him being there at all. He never should have been there, you never should have had a gun. He never should have confronted any of these other people. But that's not what he's charged with. He's charged with murdering two people and attempting to murder another. His defense is self defense. And the issue should be limited to the minutes leading up to the shootings and the moments after the shootings. And he should not be put on trial for his activities that whole day, whether we like or don't like what he did that whole day and I don't like it. I wish he hadn't commented, which he hadn't brought his gun. But that's not what he's on trial for. And so the jury has been distracted, I think, from the focus by the prosecution's case, and by the outside influences of the

Alan Dershowitz Kyle Rittenhouse New Yorker Magazine Allen Msnbc CNN
Japan's former princess leaves for US with commoner husband

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Japan's former princess leaves for US with commoner husband

"A Japanese princess who gave up her royal status to marry her commoner college sweetheart is now a New Yorker Paris fashion reporters jailed but the former princess Masako and her husband K. Comaro didn't stop to speak as they boarded their plane in Tokyo Sunday leaving behind a nation that has criticized their romance the newlyweds touched down at JFK airport later in the day to start married life in New York he's a graduate of Fordham University law school has a job at a local law firm but still has to pass the bar exam the former princess declined the offer of a hundred and forty million yen that's one point two three million dollars payment to which she was entitled for leaving the imperial family palace officials said Julie Walker New York

Princess Masako K. Comaro Jfk Airport Fordham University Law School Paris Tokyo New York Julie Walker
NYC's De Blasio Says He Wants Children Ages 5-11 to Show Proof of Vaccination

The Dan Bongino Show

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

NYC's De Blasio Says He Wants Children Ages 5-11 to Show Proof of Vaccination

"So Bill de Blasio the governor of New York the bosio happens to be a communist The bosio's leaving office rather soon He's got a new mayor elect coming in Eric Adams So the ball Zio's figure to himself well listen I've already disgraced myself over 8 years in office driven New York City into the ground made this once shining Mecca of economics and tourism into a hellhole in downtown Manhattan and other areas where places crime is running rampant and he's turned around all of the developments of the Giuliani era So before he leaves office he wants to make sure to stick it to you in the general public one last time Queue up for me come on Jim this is mayor Bill de Blasio saying that he's thinking about requesting proof of vaccination for your 5 and 11 year old To basically do anything going to store to feed themselves go into store to get clothes any of that stuff You want to bring your kids with you May have to stick them with the jab Here's the Blasio At what point will you ask them to also start checking for vax cards for 5 to 11 year olds That's a very good question And honestly one we need to focus on now We wanted to get to the day where we actually could vaccinate the youngest New Yorkers and get that rolling 5 to 11 year olds so just to be clear a virus with a survival rate of 5 to 11 year olds over 99% The ball Zio thinks it's a good idea to demand that the parents vaccinate their kids under emergency use authorization Do you think that's a good idea Bill de Blasio and epidemiologist virologist spike protein expert what is Bill de Blasio The answer is he's a communist who's never had a real job in

Bosio Bill De Blasio Eric Adams Mecca Giuliani New York City Manhattan New York JIM
Biden's Agenda Would Make NY Have Highest Marginal Tax Rate

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden's Agenda Would Make NY Have Highest Marginal Tax Rate

"The headline from the New York Post if Biden's agenda passes New York will have the highest top tax in the nation's 66.2%. That'll be the tax rate for New Yorkers. And it's not just New York. I saw the states listed yesterday, South Carolina. I think it's 58 or 50 where I am right now. 58 or 59%? Derek, can you find that list for me of the states that have what the tax rates will look like if Biden's agenda passes? This is a massive catastrophic history making tax and spend. Disaster. There's another way to describe it. And this is why people were so angry at the Republicans in the Senate and the House. Who have supported Biden's scheme?

The New York Post Biden New York South Carolina Derek Senate House
Mayor: 9 in 10 NYC workers vaccinated as deadline nears

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Mayor: 9 in 10 NYC workers vaccinated as deadline nears

"As the Monday deadline looms for New York City municipal workers to get a covert vaccine the mayor says ninety one percent have meanwhile the FDNY denies any buyer houses up closed because of the mandate fire commissioner Daniel Nigro said in a statement the department has not closed any fire houses you're responsible bogus sick leave by some of our members is creating a danger for new Yorkers and their fellow firefighters they need to return to work or risk the consequences of their actions under the city's vaccine mandate those who haven't received at least one shot will be put on unpaid leave the fire department says it's prepared to close up to twenty percent of its companies have twenty percent fewer ambulances change schedules canceled vacations and turned to outside providers the sanitation department says it will move to twelve hour ships and begin working Sundays Julie Walker New York

Daniel Nigro Fdny New York City Fire Department Sanitation Department Julie Walker New York
NYC braces for fewer cops, more trash as vax deadline looms

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

NYC braces for fewer cops, more trash as vax deadline looms

"Thousands of New York City employees refused to get coveted shots and come Monday they'll have to go on unpaid leave and that could mean piles of uncollected trash fire houses shut down fewer police and ambulances on the street police officers firefighters garbage collectors in most other city workers face a five PM Friday deadline to show proof that they've gotten at least one dose of the cobit vaccine workers who don't comply will be put on unpaid leave starting Monday sanitation workers appear to be skipping garbage pick up some protests and the city's police union went to court to try to stop the vaccine requirement mayor bill de Blasio is not backing down he says if we don't stop cove it new Yorkers will die I'm Rita Foley

New York City Bill De Blasio Rita Foley
Curtis Silwa: The New York Mayoral Candidate Who's Actually From New York

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | Last month

Curtis Silwa: The New York Mayoral Candidate Who's Actually From New York

"You are the ultimate New Yorker, okay? All of us had problems with with Ed Koch. You had real problems with that Koch. But he was in New Yorker. You didn't get the impression that, you know, he kind of took the train down from Cambridge, Massachusetts. He sounded like a New Yorker. You have been in New York, your whole life. Tell us a little bit about your biography for people are just tuning in because I want people to know you who you are. I came out of a blue collar working class background in canarsie Brooklyn. My father, merchant seaman Chester for 55 years and my mother, Francesca raised both myself and my two sisters who are directly involved in my campaign to become mayor. But if we look at it, my father when he would return from being offshore for 8 months of the year, we would go down in the 1960s to an area called the boundary. Right now in Manhattan, you would have to take a reverse mortgage just to get parking space down there. Never mind living space. But back then it was where auditions and the flop houses were. What's called the derelict bombs they referred to them. And my father knew some of these men. Because he had previously been seaman with him. And he said to me, there by the grace of God go you Curtis, at any moment, this could happen to any one of us. I need to have conversation with these men. And I understood that that early age you had to be caring and compassionate. And so that's what I've done for 42 years as leader of the guardian angel. It's not just in New York City, but around the

Ultimate New Yorker New Yorker Canarsie Seaman Chester Ed Koch Koch Cambridge Francesca Massachusetts Brooklyn New York Manhattan Curtis New York City
Eric and Max McLean Discuss C.S. Lewis's Greatest Sermon

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:13 min | Last month

Eric and Max McLean Discuss C.S. Lewis's Greatest Sermon

"I'm talking about one of my favorite subjects ever C. S. Lewis, the author, the Christian apologist, talking to a dear friend, max McLean. Max, you've spent much of your life bringing Lewis to life on the stage. I've seen you do a number of things. They blur together in my mind. I can't remember divorce. Okay, so screw tape, the great divorce and the most in convert, which I saw what? Three years ago, I don't know. It was it opened in New York. It ran for 15 weeks in New York in 2016. Well, not only that, but I was privileged, I think in either maybe it was 2005 to see you it might have been after that, to see you give the sermon the weight of glory. The saint Mary's church in Cambridge, that's the place where Lewis gave that sermon in the 50s, I guess, 41. 41. Really? Wow. One of his most famous sermons. And it's funny as a sermon because, you know, people have different ideas of what sermons are. This is just like a spectacular essay that's also a sermon. But you memorize the whole thing. That was pretty influential in the writing of this play. In fact, the it concludes with a good bit of a weight of goy. There are no ordinary people. We've never met a mere mortal. Yeah. I'll say. I want to convert a lot of what Louis wrote into hard boiled 30s dialog. Gee joy your swell. She probably spoke like that as a New Yorker. You've done so much of this, but to bring it to the screen because that's to me, it's always been one of the frustrations of theater, is that only so many people get to the theater, and that there is something when you can put it on the screen, of course, it's different. But you had our friend Norman stone turn it into a

Max Mclean Saint Mary's Church C. S. Lewis Lewis New York MAX Cambridge New Yorker Louis Norman Stone
Homeland Security Secretary Mayorkas Halts ICE Worksite Raids

Mark Levin

01:02 min | Last month

Homeland Security Secretary Mayorkas Halts ICE Worksite Raids

"New Yorkers Get by is the secretary of Homeland Security but it doesn't believe in Homeland Security He just says she in order to ice to stop work site raids In latest limits on immigration enforcement so illegal aliens working illegally There are to be no more rates These people are breaking existing immigration law Breaking existing immigration law I got to watch my mouth I'm so pissed off You have no idea The lawlessness the attack on teachers the open borders they try to destroy our economic system our constitutional system These rat finks there they're out of the cage They are all they are all over the place like cockroaches Pushing their agenda Pelosi Schumer buying the whole damn bunch of them

Pelosi Schumer
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month. We're going to hear the balloon by donald barthelme which was published in the new yorker in april of nineteen sixty six disability on the part of the balloon to shifted shape to change was very pleasing especially to people whose lives were rather rigidly patterned persons to whom change all the desired was not available. The balloon for the twenty two days of its existence offered the possibility in its randomness of getting lost. The story was chosen by donald antrim. The author of three novels and the story collection the emerald. Lighten the air. His memoir one friday in april a story of suicide and survival will be published this month. High donald. Hey how're you doing all right. So in one of the first podcasts in this series in two thousand seven you read and talked about a different donald barthelme story. I bought a little city. And what made you choose barth again. I loved donald barthelme for one and the balloon is one of my favorite stories of all time and seem too short to read for this. But it's not apparently I have a soft spot. Why do you think you have a soft spot. partly because donald barthelme was one of the first writers. I ever read. Who made me feel like. I wanted to be a writer. I read barth in highschool and there was some sitting on my few copies sitting on my father's shelf and i took them off took them to the beach. We lived in miami. That tom and i just couldn't be bothered while i was reading them. That just went straight to me when you when you first read them back then as a teenager and thought maybe you could write. Were you thinking he would write in a style like that. Not exactly I'm not really sure what it was. I didn't begin writing for a very long time after that. I was still reading when i was younger. I had the feeling that. I had to read everything. And before. I could right before i was allowed to write. It wasn't until i was in. My mid twenties began to write anything in earnest and with the balloon. He said it's your favorite donald barthelme story. Why is that. what is it about this one. It's a love story and for a long time reading it. I didn't really realize that because it comes so subtly at the very end of the story but not long ago i read it allowed to my wife and it really hit me that aspect of it that that fact and i had tears the emotionality. The story is intense for me. It's interesting we'll hear the story but that emotion is well. Maybe it's it's an undercurrent but it's not mentioned explicitly to last paragraph of the story. But you feel it earlier feel it earlier now know after reading it again and again and do you remember when you first read up. Oh i must have been about seventeen or eighteen. I think when. I was trying to read if i were going to be a writer. One day reading everything i could get my hands on reading gauge lawrence reading donald bortolami. Does it very different writers. Sure but you've got to do that. I think you gotta read around. Yeah well we'll talk some more after the story. And now here's donald antrim reading the balloon by donald barthelme. The balloon the balloon beginning point on fourteenth street. The exact location of which i cannot reveal expanded northward all one night while people were sleeping until it reached the park. There stopped it at dawn. The northernmost edges lay over the plaza the free hanging motion was frivolous and gentle but experiencing a faint irritation at stopping even to protect the trees and seeing no reason the balloon should not be allowed to expand upward over the parts of the city. It was already covering into the airspace to be found there. I asked the engineers to see to it. This expansion took place throughout the morning. A soft imperceptible sawing of gas through the valves. The balloon covered forty five blocks north south and in regular area east-west as many as six crosstown blocks on either side of the avenue in some places that was the situation then but it is wrong to speak of situations implying sets of circumstances leading to some resolution some escape of tension there were no situations simply the balloon hanging there muted heavy grays and browns for the most part contrasting with walnut and soft yellows a deliberate lack of finish enhanced by skillful installation gave the surface a rough forgotten quality sliding waits on the inside carefully adjusted anchored the great very shaped mass at a number of points. Now we have had a flood of original ideas on media works of singular beauty as well as significant milestones in the history of inflation. But at that moment there was only this balloon. Concrete particular hanging there. there were reactions. Some people found the balloon interesting as a response. This seemed inadequate to the immensity. Of the balloon the suddenness of its appearance over the city on the other hand in the absence of hysteria or other society induced anxiety. It must be judged to calm mature one there was a certain amount of initial argumentation about the meaning of the balloon. The subsided because we have learned not to insist on meanings and they are rarely even looked for now except in cases involving the simplest safest phenomena. It was agreed that since the meaning of the balloon could never be known absolutely extended. Discussion was pointless or at least less meaningful than the activities of those who for example hung green and blue paper lanterns. From the warm grey underside in certain streets or seize the occasion to write messages on the surface announcing their availability for the performance of unnatural acts or the availability of acquaintances daring. Children jumped especially at those points where the balloon hovered close to a building so that the gap between balloon building was a matter of a few inches or points where the balloon actually made contact exerting ever so slight pressure against the side of a building so the balloon and building seemed to unity. The upper surface was so structured that a landscape was presented. Small valleys as well as slight holes or mounds once atop the balloon a stroll was possible or even a trip from one place to another.

donald barthelme donald antrim High donald barth donald bortolami miami tom north south browns
Last Year's Heroes, This Year's Scapegoats: Frontline Workers Livelihoods at Stake Over Vaccine Mandates

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:24 min | 2 months ago

Last Year's Heroes, This Year's Scapegoats: Frontline Workers Livelihoods at Stake Over Vaccine Mandates

"Unvaccinated. Healthcare workers are being fired in america. They've now got a nursing nursing shortage in new york 'cause they're firing nurses and medical personnel. Who don't wanna get vaccine the vaccine but unvaccinated illegals or pouring into the united states. What kind of a funny farmer we in. I really do feel like we're going crazy. Here is tucker last night with no power whatsoever. Who worked around sick people for the duration of deadly pandemic and rather than thank them. Were firing them. With no unemployment benefits and no health insurance and a lot of them state of new york for example the deadline for healthcare workers. The vaccine is already passed. according to most recent figures. Sixteen percent of the state's hospital workers eighty three thousand people remain unvaccinated. Eight percent of those workers have not gotten a single dose of the vaccine that they're going to be fired so the question is once again who's going to staff the hospitals in the middle of this public health crisis. Well that's an easy answer. According to the new governor of new york one no one voted for the state of new yorkers gonna use the military to do it and then hire temp workers from the philippines it's lunacy and by the way once again why exactly are all these healthcare workers thousands of them nationwide refusing to get the covert vaccine that is entirely fair question and no one is asking it. It might be worth finding out. You can't see this you. People don't understand the science in fact they might know more about covert and healthcare than your average democrat governor. Considering that's what they do for a living they treat people with cova every single day. So it's not like they're uninformed what is this exactly. It's not a few people it's thousands of people why no one cares punish them. The weakest now crushed meanwhile is for firing nurses and doctors were beating thousands of illegal immigrants into this country right now many of them infected with diseases including cove it. You're not supposed to say that because it's some sort of slur but it's factually true. Might be the smartest most profound voice on cable

New York America Tucker Philippines Cova
New York prepares for possible staff shortages as health care COVID vaccine mandate nears

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

New York prepares for possible staff shortages as health care COVID vaccine mandate nears

"Hospitals in new yorker expecting to lay off thousands of workers as a result of the new mandate requiring all healthcare employs to be vaccinated against the covert nineteen. Those who fail to comply with this mandate will be placed on unpaid leave in anticipation of stuff shortages. New york's new governor kathy. How cool is considering bringing in the national guard as well as vaccinated workers from other

Kathy New York
Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

"So Gerald byer who's a right leaning guy I'm not particularly friendly I don't really know him that well But he noticed that there was this article up in The New Yorker Should the climate movement embrace sabotage Apparently this was an actual article up at The New Yorker Should the climate movement embrace sabotage The core of the article the court tenant was that left this should consider environmental sabotage of pipelines bombing pipelines and whatever as a reasonable means to stop energy production in the United States ladies and gentlemen this is The New Yorker So buyer put out on his Twitter feed He put this gas commentator literally calls for blowing up pipelines not a metaphor The New Yorker again he says literally platforming a terrorist Now this is nothing unusual I mean of course the left is in love with violence They have been in love with violence for a very long time But what I found unusual about this is I went down and started scrolling through the comments Folks I could not find one left this comment on this thing from a leftist That was condemning this thing outright I couldn't maybe it's there I didn't scroll through the whole thing to be fair There were quite a few comments on Gerald's tweet But the ones I scored here's just a screenshot It's taken from my phone I got it right here Of just like the top ten I saw These are leftist responses to bombings and environmental actual and not figurative not metaphoric Actual environmental terrorism that could get people killed and disrupt the entire energy industry in the United States One person commented what oil companies do to get their pipelines is terrorism Sabotaging them is self defense

The New Yorker Gerald Byer United States Twitter Gerald
Brewers clinch NL Central, condemn Mets to losing record

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Brewers clinch NL Central, condemn Mets to losing record

"The brewers are NL central champs for the second time in four years following an eight four win over the Mets lead Thomas smacked a two run Homer and had three RBIs as Milwaukee completed a three game sweep of the bumbling New Yorkers Freddy Peralta one for the first time since August tenth ending this kitten which she went oh one two one five starts he allowed four runs and five hits over five in the third Peralta entered with a one sixty two opponents batting average on track to be the best since nineteen twenty losing pitcher Carlos Carrasco was reach for five runs over four innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Freddy Peralta Brewers Rbis Mets Homer Milwaukee Thomas Peralta Carlos Carrasco Dave Ferrie
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:21 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This phonetically celebrated among cooks cups and gabby fans not to mention thrillers and switches. As the great example of jeffrey right plays a food writer. Named roebuck. right. Who's one part james baldwin and one part. Aj labeling who is the new yorkers correspondent on eating and boxing to prepare for the part right watch tapes of baldwin debating. Lima buckley in nine hundred sixty five at the cambridge union. Here's jeffrey wright. Reading from james baldwin's essay equal in paris. I considered the french in ancient intelligent and cultured race. Which indeed they are. I did not know. However that ancient glories imply at least in the middle of the present century present fatigue and quite possibly paranoia that there is a limit to the role of the intelligence in human affairs and that no people come into possession of a culture without having paid a heavy price for it. This price they cannot of course assess but it is revealed in their personalities and in their institutions the very word institutions from my side of the ocean where it seemed to me. We suffered so cruelly from the lack of them had a pleasant rain as of safety and order and commonsense one had to come into contact with these institutions in order to understand that they were also outmoded exasperated completely impersonal and very often cruel similarly the personality which it seemed from a distance to be so large and free had to be dealt with before one could see that if it was large it was also inflexible and for the foreigner full of strange high dusty rooms. Which could not be inhabited one hand in short to come in contact with an alien culture.

james baldwin Lima buckley cambridge union roebuck jeffrey wright Aj jeffrey baldwin boxing paranoia paris
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Her mother who spent the more years in a concentration camp says nothing. I feel as if i were watching to screen simultaneously goal still invisible says.

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

12:50 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The faults. That ross devoted. His life to correcting a grief-stricken friend in boston charged with the task of spreading the news. But two days to talk sensibly said it's all over. He meant that ross was dead but the listener took it to mean that the operation was over here in three easy words. Or the ambiguity. The euphemistic softness the verbal infirmity. That herald w ross spent his life thrusting at ross regarded every sentence as the enemy and believed that if a man watched closely enough he would discover the vulnerable spot the essential weakness. He devoted his life to making the week strong a rather specialized form of blood transfusion to be sure but one that he believed in with such a consuming passion that his spirit infected others inspire them and lifted them. Whatever it was this contagion this vapor in these marshes it spread none escaped it nor is likely to be dissipated in a hurry. His ambition was to publish one good magazine not a string of successful ones and he thought of the new yorker as sort of movement. He came equipped with not much knowledge. Only two books webster's dictionary and fowler's modern english usage. These books were his history his geography his literature his art. His music is everything. Some people found ross's scholastic deficiencies quite appalling. And we're not sure they had met the right man but he was the right man and the only question was whether the other fellow was capable of being tuned to ross's vibrations. Ross had a thing that is least as good as and sometimes better than knowledge he had a sort of natural drive in the right direction plus a complete respect for the work and ideas and opinions of others. It took a little while to get onto the fact that ross more violently than almost anybody was proceeding in a good direction and carrying others along with him under torrential conditions. He was like a boat being driven at the mercy of some internal squall a disturbance. He himself only half understood and of which he was at times suspicious in a way he was a lucky man for a monument. He has the magazine date. One thousand three hundred ninety nine issues born in the toil and pain that can be appreciated only by those who helped in the delivery room. These are his they stand. Unchangeable an open for inspection. So let's do some inspecting. The great city began as a cluster of tradesmen's villages. Only the names remain unchanged the bricklayers. Quarter the butcher's arcade pickpocket cul-de-sac like every living city in the movie. The character that owen wilson plays is her saints says iraq in the film says iraq is described as writing only about hobos pimps and junkies. He's based on. Joe mitchell the original low-life reporter for the new yorker. He covered the waterfront. one of his. Most famous pieces was about the city as a playground for rats. A note of caution shakiness ahead. Here's owen wilson. Reading joseph mitchell in new york as great seaports rats bound. One is occasionally in their presence without being aware of it in the whole city relatively few blocks entirely free of them they have diminished greatly in the last twenty five years but there are still millions here. Some authorities believe that in the five boroughs. There's a rat for every human being. The biggest rat colonies in the city are found in random structures or near the waterfront especially in tenements live poultry markets wholesale produce markets slaughterhouses warehouses staples in garages. They also turn up and more surprising places. Department of health inspectors have found their claws and tail tracks in the basements of some of the best restaurants in the city. They nest in the roofs of some of the l. stations in many live and crannies in the subways in the early morning hours during the long lulls between trains they climbed the platforms and forage among the candy bar wrappers in peanut holes there old rap pass beneath the benches in at least two ferry sheds in the spring and summer multitudes of our species the brown rat live and twisting many chambered boroughs in vacant lots and parks. There are great colonies of this kind of rat in central park after the first cold snap. They begin to migrate hunting for warm basements. Herds have been seen on autumn nights scuttling across fifth avenue. The rats came out by twos and threes and some side streets in the theatrical district. Practically every morning around four thirty the scou- shaped trucks that collect kitchen scraps from restaurants nightclubs and saloons. All over manhattan for the pig farms and secaucus new jersey roll into these streets at that time shortly after the trucks have made their pickups. If no people are stirring the rats appear and search for drop scraps they seem to pop up out of the air away from their nests there. Usually on the edge of hysteria they will severely bite babies. There is an epidemic of this year or so ago in a row of tenements in the wall about neighborhood in brooklyn and they will bite sleeping adults but ordinarily they flee from people if hemmed in and sometimes if to suddenly come upon they attack they fight savagely in blindly in the manner of mad dogs. It is dangerous to poke at them. They're able to run right up. A cane or a broomstick and inflict deep gash like bites on their assailants hands a month or so ago in broad daylight on the street in front of a riding academy on the west side. A stable boy tried to kill a rat with a mop. It darted up the mop handle in toward the thumbnail off. The boys left hand their lease cautious in the two or three hours before dawn and they are encountered most often by milkman nightwatchman scrub women policeman and other people who are regularly abroad in those hours. The average person rarely sees one when he does it is a disquieting experience. Anyone who's been confronted by a rat in the bleakness of a manhattan dawn and a seen at world and slink away its claws. Rasping against the pavement thereafter understands fully. Why this beast has been for centuries a symbol of judas in the stool pigeon of sola snus in general an alcoholic wards. The rat is the animal that most frequently appears in the visual hallucinations of patients. With the dt's in ireland in fact the dt's are often referred to as seeing the rat. That's joseph mitchell writing in nineteen forty four. Now we're going to jump ahead to a whole different era of the new yorker. This is the late nineteen sixties touching narcissism of the young. What do they want freedom to woods. How dare you stop dickering. Go make francis. Mcdormand's character listened to cremins is mostly based on mavis gallant. With a dash of lillian ross thrown in gilan mostly wrote jewel like short stories. Set in paris where she lived but she covered the student uprisings of nine hundred sixty eight as well. Here's francis mcdormand reeling from mavis galanos. The events in may may four hd caught in traffic jam around santa mass. I'm michelle midst of student. Disorders says this is different. They all seem very young. He sees a barricade made a parked cars. They've moved away from the curb is very impatient. Hates disorder talk with mb. She saw the police charge outside. The balls are abroad. Raspberry says their apartment full of tear gas. They live on the fifth floor. Wouldn't let her daughter talk on the telephone inside of windows. Police think nothing to throwing grenades houses that if they could throw one up to the fifth floor says gas makes it impossible to sleep at night crowds. Traffic jams see a crowd. I feel the mixture of tension and curiosity that has always a signal of something happening. And i hear shouting and see police cars. I duck into central metro. I hate these things. See more pictures and papers and account surprising of how students far from fleeing regroup and charge may sex in the night here that familiar wave of sound as during the algerian crisis in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. Get dressed go out. As far as careful. Rospa all confusion students do not run. It is not nineteen fifty eight after all attack in a kind of frenzy. That seems insane courage of these kids. Don't get too near see what is obviously innocent. Bystander hit on the air by policemen. Decide not to tell anyone as friends would have fit all night shouts cries harsh slogans chanted police cars ambulances cars going up and down my one way street running feet. I open a shudder and see that. I am the only person on the street at a window. Are they scared or respectable or what scared of police or a student may fourteenth. Yesterday at the big demo. The woman professor kept looking at me. Coyly with our head to one side and speaking to me as if i were a plucky child recovering from brain fever in a russian novel turned out. She thought i was an algerian. And that was her way of showing. She wasn't racist brief flash of what it must be like to be on the receiving end of liberal kindness. The awful sugar. The police the police involved in last night's tobacco had been brought in from brittany where brito nationalists had been staging a strike. They traveled all night from the morning when they arrived from their breakfast. Time say they were giving no more food. They stood from noon until two o'clock in the morning without one scrap of food they stood. They didn't sit down and they watched the barricades going up knowing they were going to have to demolish them and the kids behind them at around two in the morning they were given the order to charge. They been given clubs to hit with and gas bombs to throw. What were they supposed to do. Boy who lives in my building tells me a story that sounds like a dream how the people who lived on those streets shower. The students with soci- solan chocolate and brought them coffee not the police. How some of the students actually began to talk to the police. Not arguing discussing talking. He says seriously about their problems. And do god the structure society the crs would just people and not all of them middle aged some them only boys at around to their order. King regroup. get back in your lines. Put on your helmets and charge. He says it was unreal. Dream like the tear gas the armed men with those great round. Shields the beatings. But they were the same men. Talk with young barbara. The german students are being deported. She tells me but we need here. They are organized. They can tell us what to do. We news all swan liz alabama. Yes we need the germans..

ross Joe mitchell herald w ross owen wilson iraq milkman nightwatchman fowler webster cremins the new yorker mavis gallant lillian ross gilan francis mcdormand mavis galanos boston Ross saints Department of health Mcdormand
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:55 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Classic new.

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This new yorker. Podcast is supported by kindle kindle designs builds manages and modernizes the mission critical technology systems that the world depends on every day kindle the heart of progress. Wnyc studios is supported by forward waiting months for ten minute doctor's appointment healthcare is backwards. Luckily forward is here to clear things up with on demand access to great care backed by the latest tech and top-rated doctors learn more at go forward dot com. That's go forward dot com listener supported.

The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

ESPN Daily

01:23 min | 2 months ago

The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

"Nick davis. I watched your four part documentary. Once upon a time in queens. It is debut in over two evenings tonight and tomorrow. It's the new thirty for thirty. And the thing that i was struck by about your story here about the nineteen ninety-six. Mets is how much of a character the city of new york is. And i know you're a native new yorker. I am a native new yorker but i was born in one thousand nine hundred five so i could not get enough of the city as you captured it. I'm curious why it was important to you that you did it in that way. Well i think the thing that always struck me about this team was that they captured the spirit of the city as well as any sports team. I can imagine. It wasn't just. The city fell in love with the team Which happens all over the place but the the way the team came together and the the rollicking wild crazy dangerous energy on that team mirrored the city in the eighty and that was always. The goal of the film was to talk about how the team and the city were fused and became one. You think about the nineteen seventy-five cincinnati reg team lots of wonderful personalities. But you don't associate them with cincinnati in the mid seventies the way you do the nineteen eighty six minutes with new york city

Nick Davis Queens Mets New York Cincinnati New York City
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Next new. The new yorker radio hour is co production of wnyc studios and the new yorker. Our theme music was composed performed by merrill garbage of tune yards ca additional music by alexis. Drought this episode was produced by alex. Berenson emily thirteen ave correo ranan. Corby cala leah. David cross now fan and put guelleh louis mitchell. Michelle moses and stephen valentino additional. Help this week from harrison keith. Line and anti chelsea the.

wnyc studios Corby cala leah merrill Berenson guelleh louis mitchell alexis Michelle moses David cross stephen valentino alex harrison keith
Governor George Pataki Explains What He Witnessed 20 Years Ago

Mark Levin

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Governor George Pataki Explains What He Witnessed 20 Years Ago

"Also Governor George Pataki, who was governor at the time, and all the media was covering it because it was this magical and very important moment of all of them coming together, And here is Governor Pataki. Talking about what he witnessed that day 20 years ago. When I went down to ground zero that morning, uh, to try to help and see with my own eyes what was happening? I saw a New Yorkers. Yes, there were those were told to leave Lower Manhattan. But I saw hundreds of New Yorkers rushing to ground zero not knowing whether we would be attacked, again prepared to risk their lives to try to help save their fellow New Yorkers, their fellow human beings. I'm proud of our leadership and what we all did together, but I'm incredibly proud of the people and how they responded on that awful

Governor George Pataki Governor Pataki Lower Manhattan
With the Americans Gone, Afghanistan Enters Its Uncertain, Taliban-Led Future

Politics and More Podcast

01:47 min | 3 months ago

With the Americans Gone, Afghanistan Enters Its Uncertain, Taliban-Led Future

"Robin wright a new yorker contributing writer who covers foreign policy joins me to discuss the unforeseen consequences of the war on terror and the future of afghanistan as a haven for al-qaeda and other terrorist groups. Hi robin welcome to the program. So good to talk to you again. A lovely to be with you dorothy you. I visited afghanistan in nineteen ninety nine when the taliban were in power. And you've been back several times since most recently in march. What have afghans had to say to you over the years about the american occupation. Well of course. Afghanistan is not one country it is a very divided country by ethnicity and tribes bisect. And so they don't have one united view. I do think that at the time of the. Us intervention there was a hope among many maybe even most afghans that repressive rule by religious extremists would end. And a new future would include participatory democracy perhaps a decentralisation of power so that the the divisive provinces would each have more autonomy in ruling themselves unfortunately the government that have succeeded the taliban have all been deeply corrupt and so it was a very flawed democracy. And i think that by the end of twenty years there were many afghans. Even those who didn't like the taliban who were disgusted by the government and that was reflected most of all by the collapse of the afghan army which at the end of the day. Just didn't want to fight for the central government.

Afghanistan Robin Wright United View Taliban Qaeda Dorothy Robin AL United States Afghan Army Government
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

09:22 min | 5 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Spruce too was have two was. We want to leave you with this. This thing last show we play in the encore. By the way encores are weird right. We should just call them what they really are as p breaks. We assume that we're going to get an encore. Because everyone always gets an encore. Seems to be self diminishing We at the end of the night. We like to play this song. I hope you enjoy the last song on our record. And it's kind of what we're talking about earlier. I think it's got the stuff All to skid at all joy way so we run in four of arafat. Sitting creeks sift invisibles. Very rich rain could was the sad time. Panama like anna. Don was a friend of mine could however this is not a fairytale this so.

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

08:46 min | 5 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I was trying to be retro a romance thing. It's like i'm a writer. Better have like a smith corona. the million. The million lyrics came out on their the million lyrics did come out on the typewriter worth every penny twenty dollars. Probably all million. I should add one more little detail. That's kind of a context clue. Is that invention of words to is. It's part of the fabric of at least justin but our friendship and that we used to play scrabble and just completely not use actual words. Only the only rule and this is stone goals. Here's the only rules you just had to confidently define whatever your word was. We got one quick word we have to share was brad's word. Scarlet s. c. u. n. l. It looks gross on paper. It looks gross. But we asked him. We asked them through tears of laughter. What the definition of scarlet was and he just looked at me. Dead in the is he says. It's a group of motorcycle dudes ripping at one eighty at one time in a parking lot to go there boys very shakespearean so just an eye to a very big northern exposure fan and holding for applause exposure fans. I had to resist making this entire cuny about the series. But i have to ask you while we have a minute left on the clock. What are your thoughts about the reboot. There's a reboot. I can't believe i'm telling you this news. I've signed at least five online petitions. And i didn't know i didn't know. When did this happen. You made it happen. Apparently they have announced this year that they are circling the wagons. There's going to be a new and you see some worried yeah. I'm a little worried about that but also uncontrollably excited. I mean. that's the name of the band comes from. If you don't know it was watching an episode. It's called. I snow and it's like the whole episode is like not people going on a diet like eating a lot of pie and pancakes to like going to carbo load for the winter and i just liked. That's my people. And so and then every year for the i know they they walk out and and they greet each other and they say bone avair and i was like. That's it that's my that's me. That's my town that's my upbringing. That's where i exist. I just it's my. It's like i wouldn't call it my favorite tv show. It's my favorite thing ever. It just makes me so deeply. We have time to hear some music so before we leave the stage. I just wanna thank you guys so much for coming. Thank you very much. The new yorkers amanda petra sich speak with justin vernon in two thousand nineteen along with his co producers. Brad cook and chris messina and two years down the line. We're still looking forward to that. Northern exposure reboot stick around for a live performance from the band in just a moment. This is the new yorker radio hour. Wnyc studios is supported by beacon press publisher of nice racism by robin dangelo in this follow up to her bestseller. White fragility de ngelo explores how our culture of niceness inadvertently promotes racism nice. Racism is an essential work for any person who recognizes the existence of systemic racism and white supremacy and wants to take steps to align their values with their actual practice available in hardcover e book and audio. Wnyc studios is supported by armchair expert. If you love celebrating the message of being human. Then you'll love armchair expert with dax. Shepard on mondays and thursdays hosts dax and monica engage in deeply inspiring authentic conversations with different accomplished guests. You'll hear from hollywood stars musicians professional athletes award winning scientists authors and more to start listening simply download the spotify app sign up for free and search for armchair expert listen to armchair expert for free now only on spotify. This is david ramnik every week. Look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that he will subscribe to the new york and get everything it has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way the only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow on politics. Two go tolentino. zadie smith on contemporary culture to subscribe. Please visit our website new yorker dot com or new yorker dot com slash radio hour to get home delivery of the magazine and unlimited digital access to everything including daily cartoons crossword puzzles and our vast archive of ninety five years of issues. And thank you. Thank you for listening and thank you for reading. Your support helps make possible everything we do. I'm david ramnik. This is the new yorker radio hour. Now this hour we've been hearing conversations recorded at the new yorker festival and before we go. We've got a live performance twenty nineteen by the band bonneville led by singer songwriter. Justin the so case you say to with just choose So soon.

Wnyc studios amanda petra sich Brad cook robin dangelo de ngelo justin brad justin vernon chris messina david ramnik beacon press ronan farrow Shepard monica jane mayer hollywood zadie smith tolentino pulitzer prize
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:19 min | 5 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Since then vernon in various bandmates have released three more records and won two grammys. He also became a frequent collaborator with kanye west. The new yorkers amanda petrous spoke with vernon at the new yorker festival back in twenty nineteen. Along with brad. Cook and chris messina who also worked on bony bears album. I come on so a lot of people. I think. I came to know you just kinda dude with guitar. But in recent years you've become something of a master collaborator. It seems to me that one of the central tensions of bony there is that kind of push pull between the individual and the collective. So do you think of bony veras a band. Is it a more kind of fluid enterprise. It's never been nailed down for me. You know if anything the closest i feel to a true way to describe it as it's like a little town that's growing ever forever. It did kind of start out with just me. But i'm always kind of constantly thinking about how you're never really alone. You when you when you are physically alone you got there these evita people that made you who you are and so in a way i think when i thought of that name bona avair for the when it was just playing the music i did imagine a town community so to speak and so. That's that's the closest. I get to to naming the thing so as a bony air nerd my sense of how you guys work is is that it's somewhat modular. You're kind of building a song from pieces in the studio and i'm curious. This is a question for all three of you how you know when a song is done. Yeah i definitely think there's times worse the half the room things asong might be done in the other half dozen and that could be years that goes on but i think what we ultimately figured out. It's a feeling and i think like at least for the three of us. It was a pretty simple litmus test about like where we all psyched on the song. Do we all feel like this is moving us at the car and we left texas feeling pretty confident. We still re-addressed if you little things. But i think that's all it ever it can be with. This is that. Because i think the way they justin rights include so much possibility from source material for example. You know that we just gotta like find whatever the common emotion is and then we sort of go from there and ultimately make room for the voice over that heavens. You're looking at each other in the eye and be like is good and then christie. Do we'd be like no chris. Is that true. Are you the kind of control group. I suppose not always right. This is the most respectable officer on the force. I just an incredible record. So for emma through the new record i think is one of the most masterful for album runs. I can think of and also indicative in my opinion of a really extraordinary range in terms of style tone and sound and i wonder it again. This is a question for all three of you. Do you think about genre. I mean other as listeners or as performers producers is kind of figure into your experience of music. Kind of questioning genres. Is this or even interrogating yourself. In terms of what genres you are drawn to. I've never liked the. I've never liked genres got to meet. Quincy you got to quincy jones. And maybe maybe consciously we try to screw things up a lot to to just like shake loose. Any sort of you know somebody staring at you feel like they're going to melt a laser hole through your brain or something because they're expecting you to do something but i don't think we we don't want that. Yeah yeah so. There's a song on the new record that's effectively titled shittiest day in american history and there are a few other tracks little lewd to the national condition to climate change to our president. I'm curious as songwriters and producers. Sort of how much politics. You're kind of comfortable allowing into the room. Because i think it's a balance. A lot of artists are struggling with right now. Kind of how big of a you know how much space you should give those ideas. It's so tough. It's so tough you you know got you know argument with name name dropping kind enough but got into a big argument with him about about it. You know as willing to listen to a certain point. And then i just wasn't. Because i ran out of patience and i think we all we run out of patience sooner than we'd like to think and it's amazing to me that people that i agree with mostly would be more on the left and i feel like it's you know people with with empathy but when you're looking at when you're looking at the right side or the side that i look at it and i always imagined to be evil or or something to not go there to not approach with like pure love and empathy. It's you're just you're going to be at a battle but then again. I don't really know how i don't know how to do that. I don't want to have that much patience. I don't know how to get not angry. When i'd like to be better at that personally but i mean as a musician you can sing about it and you can mode about it in feel about it. I mean being open to understanding that we aren't right. I think is probably our best. Our best bet and certainly writing songs is vulnerable. Play vulnerable place to be to start so lyrically justin. I feel like your work tends to completely resist narrative extrapolation you. You often are telling traditional stories. Or at least you're not telling them in traditional ways and and i think your language is really beautiful and it's really evocative and it's complicated and i'm curious how you write lyrics sort of what the processes you keep a notebook is it spontaneous and improvised. I mean there's certainly a lot of that. A lot of trying to improvise something into existence that will exist forever but sometimes you also got to just work you know it took it took some pretty firm hand holding of brad because there's just big giant holes or or i'd be like no i think that's it i don't know why don't even know what those words are. They are words but we need to keep it or but just to have the you know you have to put in the work and it isn't it isn't easy just started writing in a notebook again instead of my computer Just to get. If it's much less distraction so you're always here always tweaking. I guess there was a typewriter at one point..

amanda petrous veras vernon chris messina grammys kanye west evita brad Cook justin quincy jones christie emma Quincy texas chris
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

08:07 min | 5 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Magazines archives to read and discuss this month. We're going to hear found objects by jennifer egan which was published in the new yorker in december of two thousand seven. The woman glanced off her soft brown eyes. Moving over. sasha's speights what did she see. Sasha wished that she could turn peer into the mirror again as if something about herself might at last revealed some lost thing but she didn't turn she held still and let the women look. The story was chosen by susan. Choi who's the author of five novels including my education and trust exercise. Which won the national book award for fiction in two thousand nineteen. hi susan. hi so What made you choose this story by jennifer egan to re today. You know a couple of things. One is just that i love the story. And it's so rewards. Rereading i've not just been rereading the straight at teaching it for years now and my students always really connect with it but the other thing is that i i had a feeling it would be really fun to read aloud and it was. The story is about a troubled young woman who steals from other people and is trying to cope with that situation through therapy. Would you think it is in the story that your students connect to they. All is admire the brilliant structure the way in which jennifer egan really enables us to inhabit sasha through especially her description of the objects that tech tilleke and the deliciousness of these objects so my students really admire the writing on the artistry so much but i think also the story speaks to them because it feels really contemporary to them. Because i think this experience of somebody who's broken in this way of it isn't immediately visible but that's really really deep. You know for better and for worse a lot of them really understand that the story was originally written as a standing story and eventually it became the opening chapter of egan's novel. Visit from the goon squad. Did you read it first in the magazine or in the book i read it i in the magazine and then read it in the book and thought it was so remarkable that it was able to function brilliantly. Both by itself and as as the opening of that novel. It's that's not always true. I mean i've. I've loved a lot of stories that then ended up being incorporated into books and thought. Oh i kind of wish the story had remained on its own and in the case of this one it. It is brilliant in both contexts When i teach it usually my students haven't encountered it in the novel and They don't need the novel but it's like an extra bonus to them. Usually a lot of them go on to read it and in the book you learn a little more about sasha's earlier life and about her later life do you think that affects how you now read the story. Oddly it doesn't. I continue to interact with this story on. Its own terms. I don't have that extra knowledge kind of coming in. It's a really interesting thing to me that the story by itself feels utterly complete in that the story in the book also feels like an indispensable piece of something larger And that there's no sort of sense of it being compromised in any way depending on where you're reading it what does some. What has jennifer against writing in general meant for you as a writer. Do you think she's an influence on you. Oh my god. I think she's even more of an influence than consciously realize. It's funny. I love the story. And as i say i've reread the story a couple times a year Since i started teaching it. And when i was reading it just now a number of things popped out at me that i realized i feel like i had pretty much and i'm not sure if this is the place to say it straight up stolen them for my own story flashlight which you published last year. So yeah. I think it's fair to say that her work is enormously influential online and in ways that i'm conscious and unconscious of Let's absolutely positive. Sign for the story that it became absorbed into your psyche. Yeah it became absorbed in the way that you know the stories that i just find indispensable. I can't imagine them not existing and there aren't loads and loads of stories. Like that for me that once i read them they become a touchstone and this is one of them. We'll talk some more after the story. And now here's susan choi. Reading found objects by jennifer egan found objects. It began the usual way in the bathroom of the lasmo mo- hotel. Sasha was adjusting. Her yellow eye shadow in the mirror when she noticed a bag on the floor beside the sink. That must have belonged to the woman who's peeing. She could faintly hear through the fought like door of toilet stall inside. The rim of the bad barely visible was a wallet made a pale green leather. It was easy for sasha's recognize looking back but the peeing women's blind trust had provoked her. I live in a city where people will steal the hair off your head if you give them half a chance but you leave your stuff lying in plain sight and expect expected to be waiting for you when you come back. It made her want to teach the woman a lesson but that wish only camouflaged the deeper. Feeling the sasha always had that fat tender wallet offering itself to her hand it seems so dull so life as usual just to leave it there rather than seize the moment accept the challenge. Take the leap fly the coop. Throw caution to the wind live dangerously. I get it. 'cause her therapist said and take the fucking thing you mean steal it. He was trying to get sasha to use that word which was harder to avoid in the case of a wallet then with a lot of the things she lifted over the past year when her condition s 'cause referred to it had begun to accelerate five sets of keys. Fourteen pairs of sunglasses. A child striped scarf. Binoculars achieved greater a pocket knife. Twenty eight bars of soap eighty-five pens ranging from cheap ballpoints. She'd used a signed debit card. Slips to the aubergine visconti. That cost two hundred sixty dollars online which she lifted from her former bosses lawyer during contracts meeting. Sasha never took anything from stores they're cold inert goods didn't tempt her only from people. Okay she said steal it. Sasha 'cause had dubbed that feeling she got the personal challenge as in taking. The wallet was away for sasha to assert her toughness her individuality. What they needed to do was switch things around in her head so that the challenge became not taking the wallet but leaving it that would be the cure. Although caused never used words like cure he wore funky sweaters and let her call him 'cause but he was old school inscrutable to the point where sasha couldn't tell if he was gay or straight if he'd written famous books or if as she sometimes suspected he was one of those escaped cons impersonate surgeons and wind up leaving their operating tools inside people skulls. Of course these questions could have been resolved on google and less than a minute but they were useful questions. According to cause and so far sasha had resisted..

jennifer egan sasha Sasha susan speights national book award the new yorker Choi susan choi egan jennifer aubergine visconti google
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Emanuel ax on piano. And yo yo ma on the cello. They played beethoven's cello sonata number. Three in a major and they spoke with alex. Ross music critic. For the new yorker alex's most recent book is called wagner ism. This is the new yorker radio hour. Hope you enjoy the show..

Emanuel ax alex Three new yorker Ross beethoven wagner ism
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Hi samantha. Hi deborah. Thanks for having me. How did yin li's work. I come into your life <hes>. That's a great question. I have to say. I think it was originally from the new yorker. It wasn't this story. This wasn't the first. Union story i encountered. Maybe it was extra. This one though sheltered woman has always stayed with me so deeply. There's no easy way to forget it. There's no easy way to feel like i'm done thinking about it. And i've been interested to see how often it returns to me again. And again. And i think that i initially was so attracted to it. Because it's such a complicated story about mothering and mothering. Stories while not rare <hes>. Ones that are complicated enough to satisfy me are rare that to find a story that questions mothering. Or even that digs in to the extent that this one does where you know we're bringing in themes of capitalism and the effects of capitalism on mothering. I mean. I don't know that i've seen that really anywhere else <hes>. Maybe in some amazing science fiction but never in a story that dwells in realism. The way this story does and the fact that yijun decided to kind of capture this luminol moment of one month. You know the first month and to take that tiny quiet microcosm and make it into this devastating huge chasm of a universe. I i find that unbelievable right. The story deals with a character who only takes care of babies in the first month of their lives. And who also takes care of mothers in the first month of <hes>. Of motherhood motherhood is something you have written about a fair amount in your own fiction. Yeah yeah. I am a mother of three and i think that when i became a mother i like most mothers was amazed at how little i knew beforehand. Despite having mother despite being daughter. I knew so very little about how to do this. And the way that it would change my identity the way that it would open me up in a tremendous way and so i. I went looking for literature that reflected that to some extent in. I don't know that i found too much of it. Even the word mother the first place we go is someplace. Really very basic and stereotypical i. You know it's like making dinner making cookies driving mini vans and there's none of that in a sheltered woman and i really appreciated that because i did feel like when i first became a mother having made life became obsessed with death which ultimately you know that makes a lot of sense and yet no one had prepared me for that and no one had told me that was going to happen so i kind of looked for the pieces that dealt with that question and tried to write these stories myself so now. Here's samantha hunt reading sheltered woman by and li a sheltered woman. The new mother groggy from a nap sat at the table is though she did not grasp why she had been summoned. Perhaps she never would anti may thought on the place mat sat a bowl of soybean and pig's foot soup that anti may had cooked as she had for many new mothers before this one many however was not exact in her interviews with potential employers. Auntie may always gave the precise number of families she had worked for a hundred and twenty six when she interviewed with your current employer. A hundred and thirty one babies altogether the families contact information the dates she had worked for them their babies names and birthdays these. She had recorded in a palm size notebook which had twice fallen apart and been taped back together years ago. Auntie may had bought it at a garage sale in moline illinois. She had liked the picture of flowers on the cover purple and yellow unmelted snow surrounding the chased pedals. She had liked the price of the notebook to five cents when she handed a dime to the child but the cashbox on his lap. She asked if there was another notebook she could buy so that he would not have to give her any change. The boy looked perplexed and said no. It was greed that had made her ask but when the memory came back it often did when she took the notebook out of her suitcase for another interview. Auntie may would laugh at herself. Why on earth had she wanted to know books. When there's not enough to fill one. The mother sat still not touching the spoon until tear-drops fell into the steaming soup. Now anti may said she was pushing herself in the baby. A new rocking chair back and forth back and forth this squeaking less noticeable than

yin li yijun the new yorker samantha deborah samantha hunt
"new yorker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"new yorker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Manhattan this is the New Yorker radio hour a co production of W. NYC studios and The New Yorker our if I were at stake the able Sir in the airport black men and black women will be like where you get that thing from today's date and I'll buy it off me right now this is the New York radio hour and this is Marcus feral the political organizer in Atlanta we're not going to increase the the turnout of black women by twenty points because black women already bought at the highest rate Obama won because black man thank you know whether from the boulder that higher rate several his work with the new Georgia project which is leading voter registration drives in the state and he says that the most untapped voting block is black men what about the black man are they are not impressed with the current marking point that candidates are providing them this spring that care they are very comfortable talking about art the thing that black men here about at all right so we want healthcare that might be that might be great but there's no one having conversations about keeping black men out of jail there's no way to have a conversation about increasing trade works African American men can get job to be healthy beneficial parked beside you does a different thing to say I believe in Medicare for all but if you can go to a black man as they are believed in Medicare for all and this is what's going to help you black man then that's a different conversation but no one wants to have that conversation everybody wants to talk and I I would be is general I conversations to forty one year old white women to make them like you and make them feel safe that you're going to be a good pick for president even the media and even the press and even the posters go to people who are already going to vote but you don't win would likely voters you when would turn out voters and turn out people just want to hear what are you going to do for you how are you going to help my life how are you going to help me see My Baby are you going to help me work one job and be able to pay all of my bill how you going to create a living wage how are you gonna stop gentrification in my neighborhood because I'm getting checked out of my grandma my house right now right that's what voters who are unlikely in the unlikely voters of the reason that we're gonna win though some of the most impressive thing have been sounds dire running ed or in in South Carolina speaking about reparations that's one of the reasons walked on star went up in the bowl because there are candidate that thought the black man I just don't think that the candidate the talk to black men have a change Marcus feral the political organizer in Atlanta this very pointed out the last time a Democrat won the White House he had enormous support from black voters and this year with Kamel Harrison Cory Booker out of the.

Manhattan W. NYC studios
"new yorker" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"new yorker" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And The New Yorker welcome to The New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick article one is adopted well one thing that everybody noticed during last week's impeachment vote again and again during that marathon session was the rigidity of American political tribalism the Democrats framed it all as a matter of principle they invoke the constitution the oath of office and the judgment of history Republicans of course called B. S. on that they said this is nothing more than a political vendetta they said you guys have been out to overturn the election from day one they called it an impeachment looking for a crime it's you against us now one of the truly strange things about this political moment is that some of the old ideological battle lines have actually softened since twenty sixteen we rarely hear now about the national debt for example which is one of the great political divides for a generation or more and yet the softening of those battle lines hasn't brought the parties together one inch somehow exactly the opposite has happened today our political correspondent Charles birthday we'll be taking a long and close look at how partisanship is warping our politics and if you think the floor of the house is the most partisan place in America stick with us because Charles may surprise you that's later this hour we'll start there with the actor Peter Dinklage for a long time Dinklage considered himself a man of the theater a downtown off Broadway kind of guy and he has some good roles in small films but then along came HBO's adaptation of game of thrones and he was cast in the role of Tyrion Lannister.

The New Yorker B. S. Charles birthday Peter Dinklage HBO Tyrion Lannister David Remnick America
"new yorker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"new yorker" Discussed on KCRW

"And The New Yorker this is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick a couple of days ago I called Dan a good year who's been reporting from California on the wild fires Dana how are you I'm doing well thank you no it has to be said you among many many other families around the Los Angeles area had to be evacuated take have you ever been evacuated before and what's that like I had not so I've been in California since two thousand five and has as you know often written about fires and to do that I go out trying to find fires and people who have been evacuated and it was weirdly convenient that the story came right to my door it wasn't harrowing from a kind of you know asked falling from the sky in flames looking at the houses point of view for me and my family was just more I was so surprised that the concern and I think the reason that the evacuations were so aggressive this year is that the wind was blowing very very powerfully and and in a direction that put a whole bunch of neighborhoods in the pot potential path of fire so this is the new normal for so many people in California northern California southern California and other part yeah country how does that change your psychology going forward what I loved it last year when Jerry Brown called it the new abnormal stirs perfectly well played bench it it has always been normal here to have seasonal fire that is the ecology of California what's abnormal is to have so much residential development out into the mountain areas housing has pushed into those territories were fired you to burn freely and not bother anybody but there is also obviously the huge factor of the warming climate the brushes very dry and the winds are blowing very very intensely so that has created the possibility not as you know major conflagration separated by fifteen years in which people can recover and forget but every year and that's that's not really different about this fall was in southern California the will the fire which killed three people was very devastating and to have another fire a year later that have the potential to do that much damage or more I think that was a bit of a shift in the psychology for me and and for lots of people I talked to where the idea that this could happen every year or could happen again next month also in the month after that because fire season is getting longer and longer and I think that's that's hard to cope Weston hard to figure out you know well but it's also caused a lot of stories about whether ultimately California is habitable it never which we're hearing a lot of kind of catastrophe riding okay it's fine well I think California will be habitable for a very very long time I I don't think it's as dire as all that in terms of how people or so respond to it you know well we have a reverse dust bowl no I don't think we well but you know I think that it has caused people to question some of the the tenants of the the California dream and well you know California is a place that is supposed to represent a kind of a ideal expression natural beauty and creative possibility and people aren't you know their health fanatics here and and everything is supposed to be about the sort of glorious shiny expression of being your best possible self and the illusion that this place was a refuge from every you know problem and struggle which I think some people actually believe even if they don't really live it out I think that is gone but that was silly and unrealistic anyway do you ever think about leaving California look if if every year there was a catastrophic event that caused me to fear for my children's lives I might think about going somewhere else but I also think that this is a place where people really do innovate and you know if if these kind of problems were not coming home to roost in California some of the potential for the solution wouldn't be here I mean there's an urgent need for solutions to how we're going to live in the future all of us not just Californians and I do have I hope not misplaced confidence in the in the brains that are here and the people who are working in the sciences in particular who you know I have a part of new soils that are being developed that are flame resistant and if the way people are planting now is much much more sensitive to the issues of climate and the water conservation lessons that we got from that extended drought those are lasting in is so there is a way in which I see a lot of the problems originating hearing being manufactured here and also a lot of the solutions any good you thank you thank you so.

The New Yorker David Remnick Dan fifteen years
"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"This New Yorker podcast is supported by indeed dot com. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today at indeed dot com slash New Yorker. That's indeed dot com slash New Yorker. You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry editor of the New Yorker magazine on this program, as you may recall, we ask posts to select a poem in the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with one of their own poems. That's been published in the magazine. My guest today is fierce and Claire who's honors include a award a Metcalf award for the American Academy of arts and letters and OC 'em. Boca's prize for Caribbean poetry and a Ruth, Lilly and Dorothy Sargent, Rosenberg fellowship from the poetry foundation. Thank you for joining us, today, the heaven me, so FIA the poem you've decided to read for us is from the desire field, by Natalie Diaz, which was published as part of envelopes of air are online, feature by Natalie Diaz on eight, only moan it was our first interactive poetry feature at New Yorker dot com. Tell us what drew you to this particular poem, as you were perusing the archives. This poem is to me, so magical in its imagery in its texture and the way she builds not just a system of imagery, but like returning to this refrain of green and desire, what's here it here, a Sinclair, reading from the desire field by Natalie DS. From the desire field. I don't call it sleep anymore. I'll risk losing something new instead like you lost your Rosen moon. Shook it loose. But sometimes when I get my horns in a thing, a wonder a grief or a line of her, it is a sticky and ruined fruit to unfussy, and from despite my trembling. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden. Maybe this is what Lorca meant when he said, Verde kits carer Verde, because when the shade of night comes I am a field of it of any worry ready to flower in my chest. My mind in the dark is gonna best thea on focused hot and if not yolks to exhaustion beneath the hip and plow of my lover than I am another night. Wondering the desire field bewildered in its. Low green glow Belling. The meadow between midnight and morning. Insomnia is like spring that way. Surprising and many Petzold the kick and leap of gold grasshoppers at my brow. I am struck in the Wichita hours of want. I want her green life, her inside me in green, our, I can't stop green vein in her throat green wing in my mouth green thorn, in my I, I want her like a river goes bending green moving green moving fast. Is that this is how it happens soy sonnambula, an even though you said today, you felt better, and it is so late in this poem. Is it okay to be clear to say, I don't feel good to ask. Ask you to tell me a story about the sweet grass you planted and tell it again or again, until I can smell. It's sweet smoke. Leave the thrashed field and be smooth. Well read, thank you. That was from the desire field by now ideas from envelopes of air by -nology as Italy, Mon published on New Yorker dot com in may twenty eighteen carrying the poem everything you said, was, of course, quite accurate about it. It's music and imagery. I was struck also by its language or should I say languages the way it really moves, effortlessly, between Spanish between Highland widget. And, and I wouldn't say, low language, because everything is so grand in the poem. I think that's one of its strengths, but in a very human, you know, lustful way that I think, is a really great. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden, and then she brings up Lorca who you know, has been hovering over the poem. But suddenly, she lets Lorca in tell me about hearing it again, what comes to mind. I do love this ball. Readily tension in the poem, you know, and how the physical is always there, and it's so reflected in the lush texture of the work, you know, it's kind of like a vine, imagine it as like a vine, the way that the lines sort of intertwine with each other. And we come back to this refrain of green of which is, of course, the lore can influence right from his own poem sleepwalking. Yes. And so, I agree that it's so seamless the way she sort of loops in this idea of, of the desire to Lorca on this, this, this refrain of green, how

New Yorker magazine Lorca Insomnia Natalie DS Natalie Diaz Dorothy Sargent Petzold poetry editor Rosen moon Claire Kevin young Boca Wichita American Academy of arts Italy Sinclair Lilly OC Rosenberg