35 Burst results for "New York University"

A Sustainable Startup Is Taking a Bite Out of the Toothpaste Market

Business Wars Daily

03:12 min | 5 d ago

A Sustainable Startup Is Taking a Bite Out of the Toothpaste Market

"Something to chew on more than a billion toothpaste tubes or thrown away every year. That's the equivalent of fifty empire state buildings of discarded plastic tubes accumulating in landfills and oceans but wait isn't plastic recyclable. Well, that's what we thought. But earlier this month and NPR and PBS expose found that most recycling companies are only recycling milk jugs and soda. Bottles. That's Right Those Food Containers Yogurt Cups and other plastics that you painstakingly rinse out and throw into your recycling bin get buried in the landfill just like the other trash and toothpaste tubes typically have aluminum in them aren't recyclable at all. Now, one cheeky tooth care startup wants to clean up the sectors act bite toothpaste bits has one of those typical problem solving origin stories. Founder Lindsey McCormack was bothered by the toothpaste tube she threw away in her spare time she came up with a chewable tablet that foam just like her favourite paste the company rack up about fifty thousand subscribers in a year. Bite take sustainability. Seriously the tablets are vegan gluten free and packaged refillable glass jars subscribe to refills and they in sacks you can throw into a compost heap. McCormick also managed to ditch many of the chemicals found in typical household brands. She even made an appearance on his shark tank where she turned down a six-figure offer from Mark Cuban. McCormack said, she wanted to keep more control over the company Bite recently released a line of vegan plastic free dental floss. The startup will have to face down some goliath-sized competitors though toothpaste giant Colgate is making its own sustainability play overseas the brands smile for good toothpaste is nearly one hundred percent natural and certified Vegan most toothpastes can't be certified begin because the animal derived glycerin they use. USA. Today reports smile good uses plant based Glycerin instead, it's also packaged in a plastic tube made from high density polyethylene also called HD. HD. p. e. actually is recyclable is the same plastic us to make milk jugs smile for goods much. anticipated. Packaging has a long time coming. It took the company five years to figure out how to make a recyclable plastic tube soft enough to squeeze. Parent company Colgate Palmolive says all of its products will have recyclable packaging within five years. Smile for good is being rolled out in Europe the company staying quiet on when or if it's coming to the US though these moves away from non recyclable plastics are good news for the environment, and if there are any silver linings to the horrors of this pandemic one may be this sustainability has more selling power consumers are more sensitive to the environmental impact of their purchases, according to progressive, Grocer magazine and July study by new. York University found that sustainability marketed products continue to grow during the pandemic even as other brands floundered. That priority is clearly not lost on companies ranging from scrappy startups, worldwide conglomerates that one a sink their teeth into a bigger space of the market share by.

Lindsey Mccormack Colgate Palmolive Mccormick Grocer Magazine York University Europe NPR Mark Cuban United States Founder Usa.
NYU Freshman Dorm On Lockdown After 4 Positive COVID-19 Cases

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:44 sec | Last week

NYU Freshman Dorm On Lockdown After 4 Positive COVID-19 Cases

"Rubin Hall freshman dorm. Oh as open but is on lock down after four students tested positive for covert, innit? New York University's head of covert prevention team sent out an email saying they're requiring everybody in that dorm to quarantine at least until today. When school officials will let him know if they wanted to keep isolating For longer. It was just a Papa party this past weekend in the middle of venues campus over at Washington Square Park. Hundreds got together for it, and many of whom were not worry mass. But no word of school officials are connecting that party to these four covert cases. Still bears pointing out New York City's Corona virus restrictions bands gatherings of over 50 people, with the point of being to keep the buyers from spreading.

New York University Rubin Hall New York City Washington Square Park Corona
'Astonishingly risky': COVID-19 cases at colleges are fueling the nation's hottest outbreaks

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

02:04 min | Last week

'Astonishingly risky': COVID-19 cases at colleges are fueling the nation's hottest outbreaks

"New cases averaging 34,000 Day, which is a decline of roughly 18%. Over two weeks. College campuses continue to be a challenge, though here, CBS's David beg No. It was another weekend of parties around colleges and universities. Young people gathered in Washington Square Park near New York University. For the second consecutive weekends. Thiss crowded House Party took place near the University of Kansas Video of a party near Florida State University shows very few people wearing masks, according to a New York Times survey of more than 1600 schools. Colleges and universities recorded more than 36,000 Corona virus cases in just the last week. An outbreak at Michigan State University as county health officials urging all students to self quarantine for 14 days, But not everyone is convinced that that plan is going to work long term. Eventually, most people are going to get it. And that is exactly what worries infectious disease experts like Dr Michael Foster home with the colleges and universities, openings with the spillover that's occurring with people experience. Even more pandemic fatigue. We're going to see these numbers grow substantially. This morning. There are encouraging signs on the vaccine front. Listen to what the CEO of Pfizer told market Brennan on face the nation in our base case. We have quite the good chance more than 60%. But we will know if the product works or not by the end of October. The vaccine, developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca will resume political trials and at least two countries. This comes just days after they were put on hold. CBS NEWS Medical contributor Dr David Vegas, a neurologic side effect happened in a second patient. The trial was stopped and it was really by an outside group of people called the data stating monitoring board. All of them felt that it was not related to the vaccine, and therefore they could proceed with the clinical trial of the vaccine that the benefit was obviously significantly greater than any potential chance of harm. CBS's David Beg No

CBS Dr David Vegas New York University Michigan State University David Beg Florida State University University Of Kansas University Of Oxford New York Times Dr Michael Foster Washington Square Park House Party Astrazeneca Pfizer CEO Brennan
New York - Crowds Party In Washington Square Park Again At Non-Socially Distanced Gathering

Fox News Sunday

00:27 sec | Last week

New York - Crowds Party In Washington Square Park Again At Non-Socially Distanced Gathering

"Of late night parties in Washington Square Park has New York University concerned about crowding video shows large gatherings, with few people wearing masks or keeping their distance. On Friday night, the NYPD, he showed up to tell crowds to go home last night. The crowds were back and why you said in a statement. Being outside in the park is not against the rules, but students should wear masks maintain social distance. And avoid the kind of large, crowded activities that have been associated with transmission of covert. 19,

Washington Square Park Nypd New York University
Are Most Words Already Trademarked

BrainStuff

03:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Are Most Words Already Trademarked

"The writer of today's episode. John Perry Tano rescued two cats from a local vet back in nineteen ninety nine and named one Pandora. He says, he was reading a lot of Greek mythology back then. A couple of years later and Dora Brandon jewelry became all the rage. What if John had trademarked that name I, but he and his friend could have been swimming and cat treats. Yet even if he had thought of it according to to New York University, law professors, it probably would have been too late to cash in. It seems that many of the words we use every day are traded marked, which means it's difficult for entrepreneurs to find good names for new companies. Take Pandora for instance, search the US patent and trademark office database, and you'd find a number of companies that already use Pandora in their name avatars and logos. There's a Pandora Hair Collection Pandora radio and yes Pandora's box. The two professors looked at the six point seven, million trademark. Filed at the US patent and trademark office between two, thousand, three and two, thousand sixteen, they then studied a database of the hundred thousand most frequently used words in American English it's called the Corpus of contemporary American English according to the Oxford English dictionary. There are a bit under two hundred thousand words currently and using the English language but according to the website test your vocab dot com, the median adult native English Speaker knows only about twenty to thirty, five, thousand of them. But back to this study, the authors also reviewed a US census list of the hundred, fifty, one, thousand, six, hundred, seventy, two, most frequently occurring surnames in the United. States. What they found will knock your socks off which by the way is also trademarked they wrote in a two thousand eighteen issue of the Harvard law review the data present compelling evidence of substantial word, mark depletion, a particularly with respect to the sets of potential marks that businesses prefer most standard. English words, Short neologisms that are pronounced by speaking and common American surnames. NEOLOGISM is a term for newly coined words or expressions. NEOLOGISM is still available to be trademarked though other common words do have pending registrations including even the word the. Yes. The currently has eleven active trademark resignations. The result of so many trademarks is that new businesses have to strain their noggins and use variations of Noggin are already taken to come up with Mon. occurs that aren't already claimed or resort to what's called a parallel registration. That's when two companies use the exact same name as long as it won't confuse consumers a for example, Delta faucets versus Delta. Airlines. The authors wrote given these conditions. New applicants are increasingly resorting to sub optimal marks. The data indicate that applicants are applying less often for standard English words and common surnames and more often for complex marks as measured by character syllable and word. Count. and. All of this could likely explain why we see more company names like flicker Tumbler and lift olive which leave out letters or incorporate other misspellings of common words.

Pandora Hair Collection Pandor United States John Perry Tano New York University Writer Dora Brandon Harvard Law Review Delta
Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

Marketplace

01:33 min | Last month

Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

"Look at orders orders for for durable durable goods goods to to get get get a a a read read read read on on on on how how how how willing willing willing willing people people people people are are are are to to to to spend spend spend spend on on on on big big big big ticket ticket ticket ticket items items items items that that that that last last last last a a a a few few few few years years years years like like like like refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, office office office office equipment equipment equipment equipment and and and and last last last month month month cars. cars. cars. Eric Gordon teaches at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. I think there was pent up demand in autos, people had been putting it off for a number of months. And the carmakers are offering very strong deals, and the uptick wasn't driven. Just buy cars. Shipments of business machinery were also up for about the level of capital good shipments. That we were at before the pandemic. Daniel Bachman is an economic forecaster for Deloitte and that I consider to be very positive because it does suggest that US businesses at this point I believe that it's worth it. For them to continue investing, which is good news, at least in the manufacturing sector. Abdu Ingi teaches economics at New York University, he says Manufacturing, though, isn't the big concern right now, because he's not a sector that's hurting. We know they're spending on services has lunch, which is being led by a large drop on restaurants and recreation, mainly And that's because of the pandemic. Here's Bachman at Deloitte again. It'll be very hard for the economy to really start recovering until we have a solution to the health problems. But you'll probably still hear politicians talking about a V shaped recovery right up until Election Day in Washington. I'm

Daniel Bachman Deloitte Abdu Ingi Eric Gordon Forecaster Ross School Of Business University Of Michigan Washington New York University Manufacturing
New York University Student Can Stay: Trump Administration Rescinds Plan That Would Force International Students Out Of U.S.

WBZ Midday News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

New York University Student Can Stay: Trump Administration Rescinds Plan That Would Force International Students Out Of U.S.

"Lawsuits in some criticism from allies around the globe, the Trump administration deciding to pull back On a plan to send thousands of foreign students home who may not be able to go back to campus this fall. Why you graduate student Divya Jeff Watley got the good news during a meeting she can stay was the most overjoyed presence is such a huge victory of Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey among the many state attorneys general and universities who challenged the new guidelines. I want those students to know that in this country we have a president in Washington, DC, but we've got a lot of others of us in government to the administration's lost Economies gain foreign students bring in some $44 billion a year. Vicki Barker CBS News

Divya Jeff Watley Maura Healey Vicki Barker Graduate Student CBS DC President Trump Washington Massachusetts Attorney
Facial Recognition Auditing

Data Skeptic

04:39 min | 3 months ago

Facial Recognition Auditing

"Hi I'm. Deborah G and I'm attack fellow at the institute at New York. University will thanks so much for joining us today to kick off. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? I started off studying robotics engineering at the University of Toronto, in Canada, and then I spent a year working on the machine, learning team at clarify, which is a computer vision company in new. York and then wallet clarify sort of noticed that there was in the computer vision community especially with facial recognition in that space in particular there were glaring racial disparities in terms of our data set so data sets being used the facial recognition space in particular, was very visible that there were huge demographic disparities, huge underrepresentation of people of color for example certain demographics cues, and this was in my intuitive At the time. It's since bins empirically demonstrated, but at the time. So I started digging into it, and like exploring it more, and that led me to work with joy blend Weenie at the MIT media lab, and she was working on a project called gender shade, so the gender sheets project was really an investigation into the performance of mainstream deployed machine, learning systems by IBM face plus class and Microsoft and she looked specifically facial recognition systems for the task of gender classification. Is she said what would happen if we evaluated models, these deployed models already out there in the wild already being sold already being used by developers, you know. Know, what would happen if we evaluated these systems on not the demographically benchmarks that we all use in the computer vision community, but what if we created a new benchmark that was not demographically skewed, that was thou- for Gender Representation also skin-tight, so that's what she did. She created this benchmark and evaluated these mainstream computer vision fish recognition API's on demographically balanced benchmark, and what she found out was that there was a huge disparity between the performance on darker skin, females and lighter skinned males, and it was important revelation, especially the facial recognition community to realize that. That a lot of the data that they were using were not demographically representative Ed. There's a lot of racial bias, but also general demographic bias in the models that they were building and deploying so I worked with her that summer, and we did a lot of follow up work to gender shades, analyzing and beginning to try to understand companies didn't response to gender shades how they diversified their data sets in order to do better on the benchmark that we created how certain companies responded or did not respond in response to being targeted for specific audit, and then we. We also kind of looked at particular elements of audit designs that led to impact that led to the company's feeling. Push to change their behavior and at the same time, also I guess about low a research, not at Google I was working with colleagues there to think about documentation. How do we communicate the performance of a machine learning system? And how can we incorporate some of these ideas around auditing into the way that we present and talk about document, the performance of shoe system, and that sort of launched me on this whole dirty, which is where I. I am now like thinking about evaluation of machine learning systems especially under the language of Auditing Assessment Dinky demographic bias, but assessment other ways in other elements of the system, and then also thinking about the communication of the performance of the system. How do we document any of these things in a way that gives us a sense of how the model performs when in the real world and that's really connected to what this paper is about as well. This paper was written with some of the colleagues. It Google. I've been working with on that documentation project also other. Other colleagues from the Computer Vision Phase asking what do we learn and what can we not learn from what we call the gender shade style audit what we learned from these audits on demographic bias, and what is still missing information that we still need to figure out a way to capture document in order to really communicate it understand the full performance of a model or system or AI. System wants US deployed so yeah, that's sort of a brief overview. The whole journey of how we got here and this paper in particular is in response to the fact. Fact that following the generates project and following the subsequent sort of follow up work to under shades. We were realizing that a lot of people were just taking the benchmark from gender shades or recruiting shadow version of that benchmark and using that as a moratorium condition in policy for example or trying to use a similar method to assess the suitability of a model before deploying facial recognition model for demographic disparities and what we found. This paper goes into detail to ethics. There's a right way to do that and there's a wrong way to do that and they're. They're sort of important more nuanced ethical questions involved that need to be consider that need to be talked about when assessing official recognition system for example, but any broad system, and we need to sort of ask ourselves these more careful nuanced questions, the aware of some of these more nuanced ethical tensions before we allow the systems to be deploy,

Google Deborah G York New York MIT Canada University Of Toronto IBM Microsoft United States Representative Official AI
Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

The Big Story

07:44 min | 4 months ago

Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

"Now is the covid nineteen pandemic continues to grow, so are the parallels being drawn between it and another deadly virus that struck the globe more than a century ago, talking about the Spanish flu. Guys. We've been taking a look at some of the video from nineteen sixty eight. There's a lot of pieces of video that look very similar to what we're seeing today. Implementing the images and emotions coming out of Minneapolis too familiar to what happened right here in Ferguson Missouri in two thousand fourteen George Floyd arrest on a Minneapolis street corner, and his frantic pleas for help have given rise to one of the most turbulent periods in recent American history. The question that I can't stop asking myself. How does this all and You may have heard. At various points this year that we are living history right now. The truth is we're always living history. It's just that some of us can afford to ignore it until it boils over. But when racism and police brutality, and the rage that comes in response to that are laid bare for the world to see. In the middle of a pandemic and martial law is threatened. And nobody gets to look away. Everyone wants to know what happens next. Do, we even have a historical precedent for what's happening in America and around the world right now. What is the larger context of how we arrived at this moment? What are we missing when we watch people discuss it on. Cable News. And what needs to happen now? But does each of US need to do? For this to be a moment that changes the world for the better. That's still possible. I'm Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story. Andre Demise is a writer and journalist, a contributing editor at Maclean's and a Nathanson fellow in history at York University. He is one of the smartest guests. We ever have on this podcast hi Andre. How's it going toward? It's going about as well as it can more importantly, how are you? doing my best I'm trying to reduce stress as much as I can by hanging out with my children and you know. Occasionally occasionally seeing partner but we're both in school. We've both got tons of homework were both busy plus jobs and everything else so yeah, we're even busier than before. The whole lockdown happened. Figure that and now you're spending this week with white people like me, asking you to please explain the historical context of this well I mean yeah, yeah, I am spending a lot of time explaining shift away, people. I mean I all. I can say I sincerely. Thank you for it. you know I? Just I find you incredibly smart and able to help me. learn some stuff from this. Thanks for taking the time Oh. Stop stuttered. Stop your flattery. I'm about to Leeann as I can plan. Why don't you just start by telling me while you watch everything? That's been happening this past week. What's going through your head? People say things like we've been through worse or we've been here before, and I have to ask the question. When when when of we've been here before we've been here before. Quote Unquote in nine eighteen during the Spanish flu pandemic. We've been here. Nine, hundred nineteen during the May Day riots and during red summer. We've been here before in nineteen sixty eight. But. My question is when when is all this happened at the same time? This is not this is unprecedented. My. Question is what is supposed to look like when when it's all over when the dust settles. Because at some point, there's going to be a change of some kind. Throughout history what happens in the course of a popular uprising that moves to straight up volt. The two methods that the ruling class can use. To try and tamp it down. One is use of force. This is where the Jimmy breaks down. This is where the state has to reveal as violence. And come out against the people with arms, or can try placating the people you can try it for example, the Civil Rights Act. It can try the declaration of the rights. It can try any number of mechanisms. To make that, the populace still has some faith in the state, but what? This looks like I don't know that there's anything to placate like there's I. Don't know that there's any mechanism. The state can try to convince people that social contract is worth upholding. That's the thing that keeps going through my head. Is You know what kind of concession can be made universally across? You know the entire United States that would actually mollify the anger I do know some of the answers to those questions I do know. That and this is something that I've been talking about over the last few years. That capitalism depends on racism to be able to reproduce and propagate itself. It's just plain fact If you beat Donald Harassed, who is a former economist Stanford also happens to be the father of Kamla Harris the former presidential candidate. But apparently they didn't. They didn't really have much of a relationship, but throughout American history. The the use of Racist promises the promising of white rages. what's been described as racial republicanism by scholars like David. What that does is incentivize the white working class against their black peers. It has the white working class essentially the. Generates like we are the only people that deserve to have. Rights. Everybody else is a on a cast below us. And until that cycle is abolished until we move away from a system of capital that accumulates the value of people's Labor and the crews it to a few select people. And then spreads out the rewards among certain other people, and then makes promises to certain people. Until that cycle is broken. I'm afraid we're going to be seeing this for the rest of our lives. I mean you're a fellow in history what? have. We seen that even close to like this in the past that ended with concessions. You have to go back very far. I mean you can. You can look at for example I mean not. Bolivia has been taken over in ashes coup. But if you look at Bolivia for example, the the presidency of evil, Morales and the Movement for socialism in Bolivia, lifted thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people out of out of poverty. It increased literacy rates incorporated indigenous eighty into the broader society. You had the the coca farmers. The the coca does I their their practices and their agricultural methods were incorporated into the broader nation. So that you didn't have eight of. The United States rating forms and burning crops. You headed that this is this is a a plants, but this is also a way of life that is valid, and the fact that it's been twisted into a normal trade has nothing to do with the people that originated the practice, so look at Bolivia for example like that. That was up until very recently and experiments in creating a broader. Social Democracy that was more inclusive and helped marginalized people, so

United States Bolivia Minneapolis Andre Demise George Floyd Coca Farmers Jordan Rawlings Ferguson Missouri America Leeann Partner York University Jimmy Donald Harassed Contributing Editor Morales David
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

"An federal American car health of the officials pilots are who has warning admitted of a potential to poor judgment problem with in the rapid breaking covert a quarantine nineteen order test to buy used medical across the supplies nation including has become the first at the White foreigner House in prison president in Singapore trump for has breaching healed its the Abbott restrictions laboratories meant test to curb as a game the convo changer not virus delivering results FedEx pilot in up Brian to fifteen Dugan yet again minutes from Alaska these tests was sentenced are highly to sophisticated four weeks very quick his very defense good lawyer used Ronny to test Tomasetti him pleaded and guilty key staff to leaving members his hotel every room day for three but the hours food and drug to buy administration mas says and it's a thermometer looking at preliminary data Singapore suggesting has one the test of the largest can miss outbreaks cases in Asia falsely with twenty clearing six people thousand who could cases then spread more the infection than ninety to percent others of those New infected York University a foreign researchers workers have living reported in crowded results dormitories suggesting the abit the tests tiny can city miss state up to has half strict the penalties infections caught for those by who arrival breach quarantine test rolls down adits by Moscow rejecting in public those findings or fail to and for adhere now to social the FDA distancing says it's measures reviewing the data I'm with abit sorry while I shockingly alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

White Foreigner House President Trump Abbott Brian Dugan Alaska Ronny Tomasetti Asia Abit Moscow Singapore Fedex York University FDA Donnie Washington
US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

"An federal American car health of the officials pilots are who has warning admitted of a potential to poor judgment problem with in the rapid breaking covert a quarantine nineteen order test to buy used medical across the supplies nation including has become the first at the White foreigner House in prison president in Singapore trump for has breaching healed its the Abbott restrictions laboratories meant test to curb as a game the convo changer not virus delivering results FedEx pilot in up Brian to fifteen Dugan yet again minutes from Alaska these tests was sentenced are highly to sophisticated four weeks very quick his very defense good lawyer used Ronny to test Tomasetti him pleaded and guilty key staff to leaving members his hotel every room day for three but the hours food and drug to buy administration mas says and it's a thermometer looking at preliminary data Singapore suggesting has one the test of the largest can miss outbreaks cases in Asia falsely with twenty clearing six people thousand who could cases then spread more the infection than ninety to percent others of those New infected York University a foreign researchers workers have living reported in crowded results dormitories suggesting the abit the tests tiny can city miss state up to has half strict the penalties infections caught for those by who arrival breach quarantine test rolls down adits by Moscow rejecting in public those findings or fail to and for adhere now to social the FDA distancing says it's measures reviewing the data I'm with abit sorry while I shockingly alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

White Foreigner House President Trump Abbott Brian Dugan Alaska Ronny Tomasetti Asia Abit Moscow Singapore Fedex York University FDA Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
New York University Study Raises Doubts Over Effectiveness Of Abbott Laboratories' Rapid Coronavirus Test

KYW 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

New York University Study Raises Doubts Over Effectiveness Of Abbott Laboratories' Rapid Coronavirus Test

"New questions are being raised about a speedy rotavirus test the New York University study says Abbott labs ID now test misses a third to a half of positive cases a concern since the test which returns results in minutes is being used at the White House Abbott is producing fifty thousand of the test today and plan to ramp up to two million by June Abbott says the city of Detroit study found the

June Abbott New York University White House Detroit
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 4 months ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting
How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 min | 5 months ago

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

Rachel Barco Barco New York Jay Inslee Governor Cuomo Gretchen Governor Cuomo New York University School Of Jim Taylor Skinner Washington Vice Dean New Jersey Oklahoma President Trump Whitmer Professor
"new york university" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

18:14 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Them achieve their long term financial goals T. Rowe price invest with confidence put up a physical facility in Dallas we call Deloitte University and eight hundred room said of the learning facility and at the time that was somewhat controversial people ask the question you know is learning about making the tools more accessible and easier to use and I I guess but also thinking about that in the context of where we are in the cycle the unemployment rate is three and a half percent is part of this that there's so much competition for Labor that there's going to remain a skills gap no matter how easy you make it to develop certain of these tools well the beauty is that you have for probably the best environment in half a century for the American worker and there is intense competition and it's an but then upon us is leading employers who are trying to attract in the best and the brightest to demonstrate the attractiveness and the value proposition and of a career at an organization like Deloitte and individuals who have a choice are asking the question what are you going to do to invest back in me does your organization align with my values speakers increasing on what you're seeing that millennials are not that different from past generations at a lottery back they want to have great careers WanNa have great opportunities but what is of paramount importance is that they feel like the organization they're working for is doing good from a societal standpoint and contributing to the community around us and that is taken on such an important role in the overall platform of organization you see this across the business community that this roundtable just put out a revamped statement of purpose for overriding the old historical mindset that shareholder turns or at the Pinnacle and take on a level of primacy in really cementing the notion that organizations exist to serve a broad cross-section it constituencies and we do that right shareholder return should be an outcome well and so on that point I want to ask you both about how has that impacted the decisions your making at your level of how we want to essentially use our brand because even though they're not particularly consumer facing brands right how do you WANNA use your brand to stand for some sort of corporate such because we've seen a lot of companies I think have great success in that area but also make missteps and so how was that I haven't been so proud to be a leader Siemens for just this reason first of all Siemens why aligns with my own personal Y I bringing bringing technology solve big problems is just a joy for me and the fact that Siemens views itself not as speed see not as B. Two B. but as Beata s business society is really I think has been a strong message and one of the most important values we have is creating an ownership culture where eighty percent of all Siemens employees worldwide are shareholders in the company we made we made shares available to employees for free and and still right we still have a few more we need to reach to to become shareholders in the company but but it's that shared value yeah that I think really creates a foundation and then Joe against how does that translate on on your end because you have a lot of teams that are on ten projects might be three or five years somewhere but ultimately oh you are hired help to work with a separate company so how does it I guess to you think about what does it mean to be deloitte person going out into the world representing that brand this is an important part of my role in constructing a vision for the organization in order to protect Deloitte's iconic global brand not just our clients but with our people have a choice as to where they're going to get up and go to work every day we just had a couple of weeks ago at Deloitte University our first annual inclusion summit and we had people from all levels from early in their career through very senior people and the quality of the questions that was asked and the ability to stand up and ask the tough questions what type of client engagements do we take on who are we willing to serve. align our brand with what are the types of positions that we as an organization should be willing to speak out on because they aligned with our values and I have to be stand up and confidently answer those questions that the type of work that we're doing positively impacts our communities and alliance with our values have to leave it there. Barbara Hampton CEO Siemens US Joe Blow Deloitte us. Thanks so much. this podcast is brought to you by.

Siemens T. Rowe Barbara Hampton CEO eighty percent five years
"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

"As you know, I was on Hannity Friday. Many of you like that appearance. I was discussing at some length. Some of the history of past administrations, particularly democrat administrations and the abuse of power and how the media basically gave them a pass. In fact, the media worked with them in many instances Justice, the modern American media has been working with the perpetrators of the collusion hoax. Even though they know that FBI leaks of investigative matters or felonies media been working with them they've been working with Adam Schiff. In other words, they're working with the government against this. Outsider Trump and his administration now pretty much. I don't get to listen to all of it. But pretty much what you're hearing on TV and radio is a fairly. And I don't say this to be disrespectful, but he relatively surface explanation of why this is the case. And ranting and raving about the fact that it is the case. So even though my publisher gets angry when I do this and the publisher does get angry when I do this. We're going to dig into this a little bit. You're not going to know more than anybody else. These things don't just happen, folks. It's not that all of a sudden there's liberals in the media. There's a whole training mechanism. That's taking place a whole school of thought that's taking place. They've been moving in this direction the media anyway, but there's a really strong push. And I want to inform you about it. I want to expose you to this. Then. Yes, this is all in the upcoming book. But I'm just giving you a little flavor here and there so you get a feel for how impactful I believe this is going to be. Most of you don't know who New York University. Professor Jay Rosen. Why would you? Why would you? But you do know that New York University is a hardcore left wing university. While there's a professor there is name is Jay Rosen, and he's a leading voice in the idea of so-called ready for this because the back benches will chew it up. But just this is between us. Public or civic journalism. It's called public or civic journalists that is the purpose driven community based social activism journalism movement that has been spreading throughout America's new newsrooms for the past several decades. And this fellow rose in this professor is a harsh critic of the president. And he wrote in the Washington Post not long ago. Imagine a candidate who wants to increase public confusion about where he stands on things. So that voters give up on trying to stay informed and instead vote with raw emotion. Under those conditions does asking where do you stand sir serve the goals of journalism or does it enlist the interviewer in the candidates chaotic plan? I know what you're thinking journalists. What do you want us to do? Stop covering a major party candidate for president. That would be responsible. Well, true. But this reaction short circuits intelligent debate beneath every common practice. He writes an election coverage. There are premises about. How candidates will behave? I want you to ask do these still apply. I mean, Trump is behaving like a normal candidate is he he's acting like an unbound. One. In response, he writes, journalists have to become less predictable themselves. They have to come up with novel responses, they have to do things they've never done. They may even have to shock us. This is Rosa who's one of the leading lights of this movement. These so-called public or civic journalism, meta social activism journalism movement, which has taken hold at CNN and MSNBC in the New York Times and the Washington Post. This is the first you've heard this because I didn't know anything about it until about seven eight nine ten months ago when I was doing my research Rosen ads in his Washington Post op, Ed. They need to collaborate across new brands in ways, they have never known other words media, we'll have to get together. They the journalists may have to call Trump out with a forcefulness unseen before the may after the breakdown of the in interviews and endure excruciating awkwardness. Jim Acosta, obviously is a social activist journalist hardest of all that will have to explain to the public that Trump is a special case and the normal rules. Do not apply. I want to get on with this guy this guy rose them because it's important because Jay Rosen university of New York University professors having enormous influence now one of the reasons why. I and my publisher are hesitant to do something like this because you will hear talk show hosts down the road. And listen, I'm not I just want you to know how this works by get conflicted. We're going to pick up on this wait a couple of weeks and then spirit as if it's their own. And a lot of people who listen to this show may listen to other shows, and may not know who's saying what I'm telling you that this is very very important. Very very important to understand the core. What's taking place here? Professor Jay Rosen, NYU and other like-minded social activists public and civic journalism. That's what they call social activism journalism reject the traditional standards and notions of the pre of a free press for instead a radical approach to reporting where the media become an essential instrument for what for the progressive movement. For the progressive movement. They call this. The new journalism just say, you know. The new journalism. Grew up thinking of itself as liberal and objective at the same time. It was objective in so far as it separated facts from values reporting, the facts and relegating the values to the editorial page, but to be objective or scientific or scientific and the way was it self a liberal value. But here's more Rosen. Lacking confidence in the intelligence and wisdom is fellow citizens Rosen insists on indoctrination and manipulation by media leaks. Here's what he writes. Quote, if the public is assumed to be out there, more or less intact. Then the job of the press is easy to stay to inform people about what goes on in their name, and in their midst, but suppose, the public leads a more broken existence at times it may be alert and engaged but just as often it's struggles against our pressures excuse me other pressures including itself. That can win out in the end in attention. To public matters is perhaps the simplest of these atomization of society, one of the more intricate money speaks louder than the public problems overwhelming fatigue sets in attention falters. Cynicisms wells, a public that leads. This more fragile kind of existence. Suggests a different task for the press not just to inform a public that may or may not emerge but to improve the chances that it will emerge. Well, what will emerge folks the public for what? For the progressive cause of social activists. And he even cites John Dewey who we've talked about many times before an early progressive. John doing an early hero mine he says had suggested something like this in his book in one thousand nine hundred twenty seven the public and its problems in that book is cited. Not only in this book. But this book the book of Jewish of do is also cited in rediscovering Americanism. So rosen. Seems to be referencing. Dewey's view of news has providing meaning the social consequences of the information. Some of you getting bored. I'm almost done. But I want you to know what's going on out there. I mean, I can beat the drums to, but let's just really focusing on this do we wrote quote, new signifies something which has just happened. And which is new just because it deviates from the old and regular, but its meaning depends upon relations to what it imports to what its social consequences are. So you see reporting events without a social context folks and the relationship to the past as part of a continuum isolates them from their connections. He says even if social sciences has a specialized apparatus of inquiry. We're more advanced than they are. They would be comparatively impotent in the office of directing opinion on matters of concern to the public as long as they are remote from apple occasion. What he's trying to say. Here is writing. Media press reporters. Don't chess report, the news all the news means is something new and different than the status quo. Or something quite remarkable that took place or even on remarkable for that matter. You must give it meaning. Which meaning should we give it you must give it the meaning of progressive, social activism folks, this is part of the progressive movement. It's been going on for a long time. It's being pushed very very strongly by individuals who have enormous influence on modern so-called journalists and journalism over the last several decades. That's why you're seeing it more and more radicalized. Now, there's a ton more to say about this. I'll save it for another day. But there is a reason. A reason why you have a CNN the way you have a CNN. There is a reason you have an MSNBC the way you have an MSNBC. There's a reason the New York Times news pages read like the New York Times editorial pages and same with the Washington Post. There's a reason like they all sound pretty much the same. Is they all embrace. Community slash public slash social activism journalism of the left. And they had these professors these intellectuals who are pressing the case far back is doing. And as recent as Rosa. And there's a lot more of this going on in our colleges and universities, which I explain in the book, I won't explain now. So when you say Jesus, This news coverage is really out there. It is really out there. It's idiological. It's being taught it's being trained. It's being pushed it's being indoctrinated. Our understanding of news is not their understanding of news. Our understanding a news traditional their understanding, a news perverse. It's bastardized. You cannot have pure news. You cannot have objective news. You cannot have truthful news. Now, they I mean that that's their claim and yet many of them. Don't claim it publicly some do. This is a divide among them. Some will say we're objective news sources some will say no you can't be objective. News source. You've got at least explain these things when Chuck Todd announces a meet the depressed now, he's not a particularly bright guy. He didn't finish his political science degree. You know, he's he's he's he's he's a lightweight. Let's just be honest offense. But he is most of the Mark. When Chuck Todd announced several months ago on his show, and we talked about it at length. That there is man made climate change and anyone who disagrees is a denier, whether you're physicist, whether you're meteorologist, whatever your background, you are a denier, and we will not tolerate and he's also the chief political reporter for NBC as well. We will not tolerate that on meet the press anymore..

professor Jay Rosen Rosen Washington Post New York University Outsider Trump New York Times publisher CNN MSNBC Jay Rosen university of New Yo John Dewey Rosa Chuck Todd FBI Adam Schiff Hannity president Trump Jim Acosta
"new york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"So I think everybody has a sense that as a general rule chemicals are bad for you. You don't want a lot of chemicals in your body pesticides. For example, are things you want to keep out of your body. Perhaps you've heard that the receipts you get from gas stations or grocery stores are coated with a chemical called BPA. And if you touch it that can get in your body, and that's not good. And you've no doubt heard that you're not supposed to heat food in the microwave in a plastic container because the chemicals in the plastic can Leach into the food and get into your body. So yes, we all have a sense that chemicals are not good. But what most of us know about this is pretty vague and incomplete, and as it turns out, we need to know a lot more because the science is in and a lot of the news is not good news here to explain it is Dr Leonardo tra- Sunday. He is a pediatrician is vice chair. Chair for research of the department of pediatrics at New York University, and he's author of a book called sicker. Fatter poor the urgent threat of hormone disrupting chemicals to our health and future. And what we can do about it. I Dr welcome. Thank you for having me. You bet so start by making the case here because as I said, I think people have a general sense that chemicals aren't good. We don't want a lot of extra chemicals in our body. There's no real upside to that. But I think the pictures a bit blurry and incomplete so focus it and fill in the blanks. Sure. So let's just talk with about hormones, which we don't think about in our daily lives, but there are basic signaling molecules that our body uses to orchestrate normal bodily.

vice chair Dr Leonardo tra Leach New York University
"new york university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Science Friday

"Program at New York University. Welcome to science Friday. Thanks. You're welcome. Charles Stewart. The third is a professor political science and the founding director of the election data and science lab at MIT. Welcome to science Friday to be here, and it's nice to have you. Larry. I mentioned the Russians hacking during the last presidential election, what areas were the Russians or where the hackers compromising and what were they? They trying to do there. I'm not sure that we know in tireless what they were trying to do. First of all, I think it's really important when we're talking about a lot of conversation about Russian interference in the election in two thousand sixteen, we're there a couple of things that we're talking about when we mentioned that one is attacks on the election infrastructure, but there's also. Kind of political purchase, a political ads, social media, propaganda and attack on campaigns and their emails. Those are those are two separate things. I, if we're focusing on the election infrastructure itself, we saw them targeting, voter, registration databases. Again, not entirely clear what they were trying to do there. And of course, voter-registration databases are the roles that had the names of people and says whether or not they're eligible to vote where they live, where they can vote, and there were phishing attacks against. Election officials. We know that it looks like at least one election systems vendor, which manufacturers e poll books was attacked, but I think. We don't. We don't know exactly what was going on. Unclear, just that there was certainly a lot of looking around on their part. What was that is that the vendor company that was putting PC anywhere on the on the machines maintenance, but the software wasn't taken off? Is that what you're talking about and that case? Is it something different? Know what I'm talking about is there is a company the our systems, my actually I think they may still. They may still. Not have confirmed whether or not there. There certainly was an attempt to hack them. And again, they manufacture e books and and deal with registration databases. Electronic books are what you kind of what are used. They're often. Tablets or or or or computers that are used to check people in and. As I said, last, I checked, I think they have they. They may deny that they were actually successfully breached, but at least in one of the Muller indictments, there was an indication that there was some, then it sounded like them that was actually breached Chow store at the. We were talking about these kind of acts, but how else could a voting machine be compromised? Well. Well, that's actually quite a controversial question you. You mentioned. Well, so let's start off by making distinctions and malaria really helped making the distinctions among the Russians what they were doing in various ways perhaps to influence the elections ranging from affecting the campaigns to maybe affecting the infrastructures. I think if we're asking about what can be done to hack into, say machines and systems. In the first distinction we would make is between, you know, the voter registration systems, which where it was just talking a bit about, you alluded to the twenty one states. They got attacked, those are registration systems, and then there the machines themselves, which can either be electron, including machines that are used in several states or potentially the scanners that are used his scan. Skin paper ballots. And if we're thinking about the voting machines themselves, either they like traffic ones or the scanners. That's actually the answer that question is actually quite quite controversial..

New York University Charles Stewart MIT malaria Larry founding director professor Muller Chow
"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

"So we'll find out what Mike has got, to say about that I'm going to call a throw a flag. On that, one myself, and say. Bunk see what Mike thinks about it before we get, to that though experts say it's actually I'm. Sorry I just can't seem to clear my throat. This afternoon and I drink a lot of water today. I don't know what the deal is experts say it's actually impossible to only. Buy one thing at target Tom Mavis a professor of marketing. At New York's university New York University stern of school Good God New, York university's stern school of business thank you knows a lot about shopping and he says. Maybe it's the layout of the place that compels us. To fill our cards at target he explains that stores know what path the. Shoppers take so they cross products to us by displaying them. Right next to. Each other and. We listen because one target tells us we need something it's usually right Joe Purdue targets vice president of store design explains, that the store goes out of its way to help direct us to what we really really, want stores have product displays that show us how things will really. Look at our homes and they've revamped the beauty. Department to look like a specialty shops so it's just target compelling us to buy, more and I, guess that, really doesn't come as much of a shock, because you know when you're online Serves you up all the ads of the stuff that you want to, see because it's been spying on you and probably listening to your. Conversation so I'm not saying target is quite as. Intrusive but it's certainly I guess not any different than the images and things that, were bombarded with When we're looking online traffic. And, weather every ten minutes on the tens from TempStar heating and cooling products Johnny, hill it's getting hot out.

Mike university New York University New York York university Tom Mavis TempStar Joe Purdue vice president professor of marketing ten minutes
"new york university" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Yeah. When something terrible happens something truly terrible mass shooting or a terrorist attack. There is a man who's phone eventually will ring. My name is Kenneth Feinberg. I'm a lawyer here in Washington. DC fiber grew up near Boston in Brockton, Massachusetts, Brockton high school graduate university of Massachusetts, graduate New York University school of law. And then I was asked by the chief judge of New York state to Clark him. This was in nineteen seventy as fine. Berg's career progressed. He got to know many of the chief judge's other former clerks. One of whom was the very distinguished eminent federal district. Judge Jack b Weinstein in Brooklyn one day in one thousand nine hundred. Four Feinberg got a call from judge Weinstein by this time Feinberg had put in time as federal. Execute her and as chief of staff or Senator Ted Kennedy. Now he was in private practice. What did judge Weinstein Weinstein had assigned to him the Agent, Orange litigation, brought by Vietnam veterans against the chemical industry, Dow Monsanto. Alleging certain physical injuries and deaths attributable to inhaling or swimming in the urbicide Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam for those who don't recall or no Agent Orange was an exfoliating meant to burn the shrubs off to give American soldiers in advantage yet. That's tried so so the Viet Cong couldn't hide an ambush American soldiers while the Vietnam veterans came home with cleric, knee with soft tissue sarcomas with other cancers and judge Weinstein head that case, very complicated, very complex medical case. And on the eve of trial, he asked me, would I be willing to come to Brooklyn to mediate a settlement of that case, and then design and administer a compensation program for eligible Vietnam veterans. The judge Weinstein knew that you very much at mired him. Was that in any way, putting his thumb on the scale in that case? Yes, he put his thumb on the scale to get it settled. I don't think he put his thumb on the scale as to what the amount should be or whether the the chemical industry had a better case than the Vietnam veterans. He put his thumb on the scale only in the sense that let's try and resolve this case rather than litigated the case. And then appeals and five or six more years of uncertainty. He saw the necessity of trying to bring litigation to closure, and he also saw that legally the veterans have tough case they may not win. Were you aware of any previous programs or any previous settlements that were even close to similar to that in terms of scope and really magnitude? No, unprecedented writing on a blank slate. So I accepted the assignment at the request, of course, of the. Court. And in eight weeks, we settled that massive complex litigation once I did that. Everybody started calling me. The Agent Orange settlement didn't please? Everyone factors barely ever a settlement like this leaves everyone happy because underlying each case is a tragedy. That dollars cannot repair a tragedy, requiring a thankless and perhaps impossible calculus. But that's when Feinberg phone rings. It might be a governor Hickenlooper in Colorado after the Aurora movie shootings, it might be a mayor Menino in Boston. After the Boston marathon bombings, it might be the president of the junior university. There was one tragedy that differed from the rest on several dimensions. The nine eleven fund was fascinating because congress authorized unlimited funds. Whatever Feinberg thinks is appropriate, fine with us. We don't have value these lives today, unforgiving radio. How.

Judge Jack b Weinstein Kenneth Feinberg Vietnam chief judge Boston Berg Brooklyn Senator Ted Kennedy Brockton high school Washington Brockton Massachusetts chief of staff New York University school of university of Massachusetts Dow Monsanto New York junior university
"new york university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"University of chicago with jonathan martin of new york university following a heated disagreement they had with some other people on the internet about the national interstate and defense highways act of nineteen fiftysix a group from march till now has gone to ninety five thousand members plus and it's it's the classic neem type thing you see in all of these horrible fake news political things you see but it's about urban renewal and transit and urban design and i just found it fascinating i know it's probably not the only example of this but is it just a passing fad of gen y and millennials because it's sort of absurd or doesn't portend some hot new trend of urbanism well i think the question here is whether or not it's the you know leads to greater political viability for these kinds of plans i mean the idea of the me modification of politics is real and it is here and there are certain segments of the political populace for which pride themselves on their memes and there s posting if you will so this is i think an outgrowth of that certainly very nerdy most imperative it honestly well i do think that there is an earnestness to the idea that these guys want a better sensitive that's true but they're also not taking themselves too seriously which is part of the charm of it as well yeah but that's inherently in the meme chur were sure that there there's an element of self effacing you know an acknowledgement of the facts even if they might be embarrassing that kind of goes hand in hand with a mean i'm just saying if a simcity three thousand playlists gets you excited go sign up you said before the show started that you were accepted into they did they approved my part of the group i am i am i would like a full report tomorrow all right excellent on what you taught you yeah what's that like wired and tie like tired nimbies wired numb talks if anyone got that then i'm here for really there is a lot of talk about unb's on numb tots which is in my backyard yes yhombi is versus the nimbies i don't know i i'm i'm i'm both depends on if it's the fourth of july or not at the twenty eighteen by do creator developer conference happening in beijing this week the company announced it's partnering with intel to deploy isreaeli developer mobile is technology into thomas vehicle effort project apollo by do plans to merge mobilized responsibilities sensitive safety it's an acronym that is our ss although i think that's a terrible idea so i'm going to call it that model onto code of the commercial apologize program and apollo pilots which is the deployment version of project apollo by do we'll also use mobilized surround computer vision kit as the preferred perception solution to project apollo in project around rather and by wants to put it in buses a mass transit opportunity how numb tots is yeah this is this is interesting in another way too because you've got a chinese company by do working with an israeli company mobilize which is owned by an american company intel doing a multinational effort to make self driving vehicles more reliable and safe well good on him yes exactly i think it's a great idea you're not against it i'm so glad hey folks if you want to get all the tech headlines each day in about five minutes be sure to subscribe to daily tech headlines at daily tech headlines dot com all.

jonathan martin new york university University of chicago five minutes
"new york university" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The comments continued from students at new york university a lot of the knock proud of being an american comes from like the history of the us any place the come to mind that'd be better better than the us probably some nice little socialist country in europe michigan president and there's america that we can make that will be great yes and so i say makeamericagreatagain bizarre i'm saying in court right now with scary i'm scared i'm scared in the past we proud to be an american and what made you more proud than i guess it was just ignorance i had no idea how many people in this country where so far right and discriminatory i would first of all reverse everything's from every executive action yeah reverse everything he's done rain out that the economy that things are going pretty well right now in the economy those are pretty i don't think anything beneficial has been his doing at all reverse everything that trump has done i mean the mind follow up question would have been well what would you reverse i and she would say okay we don't separate children at the border that's already been reversed lady one eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is our phone number two polls on this issue gallup poll headline today in us record low forty seven percent extremely proud to be americans this fourth of july marks a low point in us patriotism for the first time in gallup's eighteen year history asking us all's how proud they are to be americans fewer than a majority say they are extremely proud currently forty seven percent described themselves this way down from fifty one percent in two thousand seventeen and way below the peak of seventy percent when did that peak occur when do you think it occurred in two thousand and three under president bush i i do think that this highlights one of my very very big complaints about the democratic party and about mainstream media which is some of the crying wolf it's it's it's so far over the top and by the way they're not the only ones who are guilty i mean you can hear on the right now there is this promotion that the democrats are equal to the nazis and by the way the idea of both sides in our debates trying to say the other side are not sees the other side is trying to destroy america the leftist saying it but people in the writer saying it to and and again if there is a sour feeling in the united states despite our economic prosperity despite indications that we could make progress internationally do i love everything the president trump has done obviously not but for goodness sake to react to it like it some national nightmare that oh my goodness the suffering the horror by by one measure and this goes to yet another poll it's a pew research poll were they go to various countries and ask a fundamental question are is your country doing better than it was fifty years ago and what's remarkable is vietnam leaves the world by the way almost everybody in vietnam i mean it's not over ninety percent recognize it yeah vietnam is doing better today than it was fifty years ago fifty years ago of yet nam was in the midst of a devastating truly horrific war which was mostly a civil war most of the casualties in vietnam where vietnamese people including people who fought on both sides of that conflict both for the government of south vietnam which was aligned with the united states and the north vietnamese dictatorship communist dictatorship but in in the united states does someone really believe we were better off in nineteen sixty eight you think so by what standard we will get to that let's go quickly to james in pittsburgh james you're on the michael medved show thank you you're on yeah i i am any garage and a naturalized american was born in uganda i was born in you good congratulations welcome thank you when they become an american about eight years ago i was proud but in line much about an nabokov and the killing of black man i am black i think the police blacks in passionate no you don't you don't do what leads you to believe that the police are murdering blacks intentionally let me let me give you a very good example of why that's a very foolish belief do you know what happens to police officers who kill a black suspect or any suspect.

new york university fifty years forty seven percent fifty one percent seventy percent ninety percent eighteen year eight years
"new york university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is our phone number the comments continued from students and new york university a lot of the nop proud of being an american comes from like the history of the us any places that come to mind there'd be better better than the us probably some nice little socialist country in europe presidents and there's an america that we can make that will be great yes and so make america great again now what i'm saying supreme court right now with a scary i'm scared i'm scared in the past we proud to be an american and what made you more proud than i guess it was just ignorance i had no idea how many people in this country where so far discriminatory i would first of all reverse everything trump every executive action yeah and reverse everything whose son rain out crash the economy john that things are going pretty well right now in the economy those are pretty longitude and all i don't think anything beneficial has been his doing at all uhhuh reverse everything that trump has done the follow up question would have been well what would you reverse i and she would say okay we don't have children at the border that's already been reversed lady one eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is our phone number two polls on this issue gallup poll a headline today in us record low forty seven percent extremely proud to be americans this fourth of july marks a low point in us patriotism for the first time in gallup's eighteen year history asking us adults how proud they are to be americans fewer than a majority say they are extremely proud currently forty seven percent described themselves this way down from fifty one percent in two thousand seventeen and way below the peak of seventy percent when did that peak occur when do you think it occurred in two thousand and three under president bush i do think that this highlights one of my very very big complaints about the democratic party and about mainstream media which is the some of the crying wolf is it's it's it's so far over the top and by the way they're not the only ones who are guilty i mean you can hear on the right now there is this promotion that the democrats are equal to the nazis and by the way the idea of both sides in our debates trying to say the other side are nazis that the other side is trying to destroy america the leftists saying it but people the writer saying it to and and again if there is a sour feeling in the united states despite our economic prosperity despite indications that we could make progress internationally do i love everything that president trump has done obviously not but for goodness sake to react to it like it's some national nightmare that oh my goodness the suffering the horror by by one measure and this goes to yet another poll it's a pew research poll where they go to various countries and ask a fundamental question are is your country doing better than it was fifty years ago and what's remarkable is a vietnam leaves the world by the way almost everybody in the at phnom i mean it's not over ninety percent recognize it yeah vietnam is doing better today than it was fifty years ago fifty years ago vietnam was in the midst of a devastating truly horrific war which was mostly a civil war most of the casualties in vietnam were vietnamese people including people who fought on both sides of that conflict both for the government of south vietnam which was aligned with the united states and the north vietnamese dictatorship communist dictatorship but in the united states does someone really believe we were better off in nineteen sixty eight you think so by what standard we will get to that let's go quickly to james in pittsburgh james you're on the michael medved show thank you you're on yeah i am in a garage naturalized american i was born in uganda the kid i was born in you american citizen good congratulations welcome thank you when become an american about eight years ago i was proud but in line much about an air costs and the killing of black man i am black i think the police i might have blocks in cash no you don't you don't do what leads you to believe that the police are murdering blacks intentionally let me let me give you a very good example of why that's very foolish belief do you know what happens to police officers who kill a black suspect or any suspect.

nop new york university fifty years forty seven percent fifty one percent seventy percent ninety percent eighteen year eight years
"new york university" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Okay frustrating you want to be able to wait that hard or game but guess what waiting out long's worth it wasn't it because now you get to eat three that's pretty cool for get job so today the marshmallow test it's part of our culture and it's impossible to underestimate just how influential it has been on our understanding of success self control grit and all the other things we find ourselves struggling to maintain overwhelmed in this landscape of fast food novelty in devices in media and email and twitter and politics and all the other things we can use to avoid work for exercise or meditation or eating a salad yeah well you know i think if you were making a pop ten list of sort of psychology studies that people know about who are outside the research community it would certainly make the top ten i mean it may even be in the top five up there with like milk grim and the stanford prison experiment that is childhood development researcher tyler what's my name is tyler watts i am a research assistant professor at new york university and i study education and developmental psychology issues particularly policies around early childhood and early childhood interventions and i'm sort of interested in you know what are the right programs to invest in and what kind of programs are going to lead to longterm effects on kids lives what's studied to be a psychologist but when a friend at uc irvine asked him to join him in doing early education research something that watts was passionate about he left the opportunity and ever since has studied the effects of poverty on childhood development and how to deal with those affects with early childhood interventions in grad school he studied early math achievement and achieving high scores in math early in school is something that was believed for a long time to be a predictor of later outcomes the idea in mini schools was that if you teach math at a high level at an early age those students will be better off in high school and in college in later life but when he dug into the literature he found that those affects fade out to jested that the correlation literature had been wrong right that the sort of predictions that the correlation literature had made weren't right and that made him think what about the marshmallow test because you see there are schools around the world that use michelle's work as a basis for teaching self control at an early age in an attempt to change the way children's lives unfold talking about don't eat the marshmallow brittany in the back so okay so we're talking about control that's the kipp infinity middle school in new york city in this audio is from a pbs report on how the school teaches kids in harlem hell to delay gratification along with other techniques in an attempt to instill those abilities that michel found correlated with performance on the marshmallow test in fact they've been talking about self control since the first day of school when teacher leyla bravo willie gave all of her students the marshmallow test they come in they have a marshmallow on front of them and they're looking around like what what is this that's why we're talking to toddler watts because when he dug into the literature well he just produced a study along with gregg duncan and honing kwan that suggests that all this time we've been learning the wrong lesson from michelle's famous study and to say the least his work has raised eyebrows all across psychology and education it has been pretty busy you threw grenade through a live grenade into one of the most famous you know psychological discussions out there so of course yeah i guess i we kind of knew that it could get some attention but i don't think i really thought through what that would mean for my week what did he find and what does it mean for the future of education and for the legacy of the marshmallow test all that after this break wanted needwe wanted.

milk
"new york university" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"For making it as a nurse absolutely the next email comes from mere hardee's she's like to shadow her little the corey who will be graduating from wake young men's leadership academy in raleigh north carolina on may twenty second with his high school diploma he will begin college in the fall at a prestigious new york university in why you will he he'll be double majoring quantitative analysis in computers ci so absolutely super prow of corey in thanks so much for writing is a meyer either way thank you so congratulations to you the next one comes from marian praise the lord i'll keep the short and cute because i'm fully aware that all of the graduation announcements are flooding your in box i like to give myself a shot off graduating fordham university on may nineteen i'll be receiving my mse d therapeutic interventions in pd professional diploma in school psychology with solid four point only these s three years of graduate school have been incredibly difficult and i feel blessed to have made it out alive and on top all glory to god in my support system love you both in thanks for the laughs every tuesday mere so miriam congratulations shouts you absolutely the next email comes from myra who wants to give a special shout out to her little cousin more like suspicion to your perkins santee will be graduating from geneva early college in flint michigan on friday may eighteenth she graduated with her high school diploma and equivalent of associates degree she'll be starting college in the fall in the family is very very proud of.

hardee corey north carolina new york university meyer myra michigan raleigh fordham university twenty second three years
"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Majority of the doctors lawyers and teachers there graduated from the flagship university little was the fall dealers reporter regal portugal would not have the kind of professional middle class on the house today now some of the universities on the mainland accepting transfer students have sought to mitigate the impact to upr new york university for example is offering full scholarships but upr students will have to pay their regular tuition to the university on the island and most of the bigname private colleges are only offering scholarships for semester says some of those students may well returned to puerto rico one feliciano sees himself graduating from seaney purchase he's excited but he does have some mixed feelings i feel guilty leaving parents and his friends still didn't have electricity when he came to new york as acted corvetta points out feliciano's journey is emblematic of the puerto rican experience goes through migration oregon was legal where the opportunities are and for a young college d age puerto rican those opportunities are mostly on the mainland alexandra start wnyc news w for generations the united states as welcomed refugees fleeing persecution bowl deaths changer these the people we have no idea who they are where they come from wnyc is taking a look at the consequences of president trump's restrictive immigration policies through the experiences of congolese refugees join us for unsettled next week on.

portugal the house new york university new york feliciano oregon united states trump reporter puerto rico seaney puerto rican president
"new york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"F cohen new york university princeton university russian history a marriage has seized western accord dotcom the website to watch cn saw my return there have been events that have been explicative that are particularly important for our conversation about the new cold war the professor nice started years ago looking at the possibility that ukraine would turned into a new a cold war hot new cold war one where people were shooting each other or near too well it's happened it's happened in imagination in these last days first in hawaii a clerk where told an employee of the state state government hawaii pushed the wrong button twice it couldn't just push at once but twice to send out a missile our two peoples cell phones because that's the alert system set up there and for 38 minutes the people of hawaii were not carefully informed that it was a false signal and there are anecdotes coming in from everywhere that people were hiding hiding their children calling friends panic for 38 minutes and now within these last hours we learned that in japan much the same thing not by the state of japan this time by television station sent out a false alert of an incoming missile in both instances these are small windows in what it was like in the first cold war growing up first cold war in the nineteen fifties as i did being told that when the bombs are co incoming you have time enough to power beneath your desk and avoid looking at the big window in the 4th grade and then experiences i've had over these last years when i was in israel during the hamas rocketing of the new gavin than firing rockets as far as tel aviv because that was the technology similar to what we see in a why when a missile launch would trigger a warning on smartphones so that you would know that there was incoming steve a very good evening to you these incoming episodes or false.

cold war professor ukraine hawaii japan windows hamas gavin steve york university princeton univ israel 38 minutes
"new york university" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Future Tense

"One very influential social organisation that's reason in the last few use is black lives matter in the united states it's a complex campaign necrosis constantly between the physical world and the digital world and it's been of taking the focus of interest for professor nicklaus muse off who lectures in media culture and communications at new york university black lives matter is a new form of what he terms visual activism and those future focused tips it's hat he says tool by gone era vigilantism is on this bombs to the very change world in which we now live it's quite extraordinary to consider the possibilties all visual media that are now available on become so quickly available every day people's unto themselves two and a half billion snapchat people recording four hundred hours of youtube uploading every single minute people are taking a look trillion photographs every single year these numbers vastly exceed anything this ever happened before and they changed the conditions possibilty full political activism so in this country united states one of the things we team is one of the highest groups of smartphone ownership for young african americans and pot this is because it is one of the few films that are really open to them full social interaction and unexpectedly what letters monk has been the longterm issues of police violence the killings of young african americans have suddenly become mediated by these new folds.

united states youtube african americans professor new york university four hundred hours
"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Long first amendment two crusader really in an academic colombian new new york university first anonymous for neonazis is the title of the article which i think is pretty much your position he says uh which should have been done at berkeley is should have said we'll call in reinforcements will bring out the national guard of necessary for we're not going to allow any group to intimidate and change the way which caplis is working way campuses work he argue should be free speech and of story that's pretty much what you're saying but then he goes into this whole thing about microaggressions and he's richard up he says address and nuts but is there many people who do feel that this was an assault on them makes them feel less safe the eu novelist for example is really the singling out transgendered people and saint terrible things about them omitted it's important to a point where you almost our sickened by it so what do you do you call in the national guard if necessary than you get into expenses and you get it to costs and yet to keep the people who are not students who wear black uniforms and masks and so forth wreak destruction but just because you have the right to say something doesn't mean that it's right to say it and we need to have deep engaged conversation as the community about our community values we have you have to put as many resources in two hub uh giving opportunities for those voices that can call attention to the many ways in which uh um uh microaggressions are are are not unconscious bias these.

first amendment new york university berkeley assault caplis richard
"new york university" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"I on a doubledecker bus and you developed a cult following because of your your style i i was that at new york university yes at steady in theater and play writing okay i'll is in la la land you probably know the blaze which la la land niantic of enclave of in the mad loop of sites between my ears yorkshire and as somebody in my senior year mentioned that it was in passing in a hallway i remember they said hey you know you're going to have to get a job on whatever rao was the one of the most confusing owns in my life how old are you at this point senior in college okay now when 21 um so i i was pretty desperate to try to brainstorm you know about how i could possibly be constructive to society it just seemed unlikely isn't real unlikely you know i know that so then now the tory guiding appear fanie happening he is like of as the perfect nexus for everything i was doing i love the city was in any way you walk in the streets every night i love the the story of the city the history plus of course the performance aspect of toward a guy of course theater means that to stand up thing to a lot of state of comedians will get jobs i've been told on tour guide bus things because it is it's like doing a set it's idea is ideal.

new york university la la
"new york university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Election's then finally will look into the explosion of hate and ignorance erupting around the country as much against sharia demonstrations took place in st paul seattle washington new york city and san bernardino california attracting counterdemonstrations that led to violence and a massive deployment of police to separate the sides brian levin a criminologist professor of criminal justice and director of the center for the study of hate and extremism at california state university san bernardino joins us to discuss why a nonexistent threat such as sharia law is inspiring rightwing hate groups to emerge from the fringes and joining us now is craig how hoon who who is the global distinguished professor at new york university and the centennial professor and former ahead of the london school of economics cs now the president of the book ruin institute whose mission is to develop foundational ideas and shake political economic and social institutions for the twentyfirst century the big ruinous chewed confers the bruins prize a a one dollar annual award given by an independent jury to a think whose ideas are helping to shape human self understanding in advance humankind welcome to background briefing craig culling good to talk him and things are really in disarray in the uk and it feels like this sort of cereal miss calculation here in terms of what just happened with the snap election that prime minister theresa may announced and then a rather than increase her majority from seventeen she's it's shrunk considerably.

bruins theresa london school of economics california san bernardino new york washington prime minister uk craig brian levin ruin institute president new york university distinguished professor hoon california state university sa director professor one dollar