35 Burst results for "New York University"

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

One Life Radio Podcast

02:04 min | Last month

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

"Mary holland. One of my favorite people. How you doing today mary. I'm grace could yeah. It's great. We're going to call him a mondays mondays with mary. It's gonna be regular well and there's so much to talk about my goodness let me introduce you for people that maybe are listening for the first time mary holland serves as president and general counsel of children's health defense. She left the faculty of new york university school of law where she surfers seventeen years most recently directing. Its graduate lawyering program. Mary received her master of arts and juris doctorate degrees from columbia university and her undergraduate degree from harvard. She has worked in international public and private law and mary is the co author a vaccine epidemic and the hp vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation betrayed. You can find mary at children's health. Defense dot org. That's children's health. Defense dot org. We have a lot to cover today with our children's health defense. Update okay so there were an additional twenty seven thousand reported injuries from the covert vaccine in just one week so from last week to this week. So what kinds of what. Kind of injuries. Mary are being reported. And what about deaths bernadette all kinds of injuries are being reported and death the total deaths so far that have been reported and we know that's really a small faction of what the real number probably is over thirteen thousand and the number of total injuries. That have been reported or over six hundred thousand. I don't think this would be possible. Except for the fact that the government and the industry and the healthcare profession all have liability protection under emergency use authorization status It's really distressing thirty. Two percent of those deaths were within forty eight hours of having developed symptoms after the shot. So i it's it's extremely troubling bernadette It's just there. Were over five hundred fifty deaths last

Mary Holland Mary Children's Health Defense New York University School Of Columbia University Harvard HP Bernadette Government
Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

Q

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

"Charlie Watts joined the Rolling Stones in the early days of the band 1963. It was a bit of a left turn. His early interest was in jazz, percussion and I love this quote from Charlie about joining the band, he said. It meant decades of quote, seeing mixed bum running around in front of me. Which in a way sums up what Charlie did. He provided the steady beat for the group, a group of rock stars who unlike him, embraced the rock star lifestyle and the limelight. Today. We really wanted to start by talking to someone who can help us parse out how important Charlie's worked with the Rolling Stones was Rob Bowman is a Grammy winner and professor of music at York University, as well as a music writer. He first met Charlie Watts in 2000, and two when he was interviewing him for a Rolling Stones book. And he kept in touch with Charlie ever since. Hi, Rob. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. How are you? I am. Well, I want to say I'm really sorry for your loss. Um, what was the first thing that came to your mind when you when you heard the news that Charlie Watts don't I guess. Shock so numb stand, you know, I've been worried for several years. Sooner or later. One of the Rolling Stones are just it was going to pass away or get sick and they were going to be able to play and, uh Couple weeks ago, Of course, Charlie announced Buddy, You've got an emergency operation and wouldn't play the tour and I thought it was so weird that they were going to do the tour without him, because that's not like them. Keith had always said they would never play without Charlie and figure it out. And, of course, when he passed yesterday, my meat so it is. That's why they decided to play the tour. They knew Charlie was dying, and Charlie. I told him to go ahead play. What do you remember? What do you remember first about meeting him? What was he like? He was an amazing, gentle, humble man with an incredible mind for jazz

Charlie Charlie Watts Rolling Stones Rob Bowman Grammy Winner York University ROB Buddy Keith
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Is not efficient. I mean people are working on making it more efficient but it's structured to trust no monop- described bitcoin as created by the paranoid for the paranoid. Because you trust no one. That's why you need ukrainian miners checking transaction when it happens so i think you need a cryptocurrency that has an element of trust that element of trust is what makes currencies efficient. I mean when you take a twenty dollar bill out of your pocket of every time you have to check to make sure that it is in fact twenty dollar bill. That guarantees not very viable. So i i think. That's what cryptocurrencies have to work on his to think about what they need to do to become more efficient currencies. While i appreciate that response and you do next. I wanna move on to sort of some personal questions about your what led to immense success. I mean i just wanna know if you could share a bit about some of the challenges you face. You alluded to them just a bit earlier. And how if you'd stayed in india you don't think you would necessarily be where you are but i want to know if there were mentors along the way and clearly you love the academic field and teaching and i told you. I don't love the academics guy don't like academia at all the way universities structured in the us. Okay i think is almost criminal. In terms of how much we exploit undergraduate students to fund research that nobody reads so nominee imitator. If i was in teaching in college. I'd be teaching in high school. Devours insomnia. First and foremost and i never set off to me a Success was always being having a classroom. That worked so i know to me whatever. External success have come up with his in purely incremental. It's because my teaching has driven everything that i do. What technology is allowed me to do is actually take a classroom that used to be physically constrained to fifty or eighty or a hundred or even three hundred students by navigator and make the whole would. So it's it's technology that i would. I would view as mentor. The platform that i've been able to use to teach to a much. Bigger audience is basically. What's allowed me to get whatever profile. I have out that savannah fame. That comes your would share nor gladly with the internet while no. I'm pulling right from your blog and use indicate contrary to the widely used in fault. I don't teach because i cannot do. I teach because i love teaching and so aggrastat fully about academia sadly share your sentiments. There any other comments you have before we close out here today and anything that you would offer. I know you're certainly not one to plot your crystal ball but any other comments that you might have as we approach q. For appointing twenty-one. No i think you know it's i think. Kobe reminds us that we live in much more unsettled times parents or grandparents or great grandparents..

insomnia india us Kobe
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

03:14 min | 2 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

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Do percent <Speech_Male> gannon doesn't <Speech_Male> matter what the fed thanks <Speech_Male> even placements. <Speech_Music_Male> Full percent <Speech_Male> rates are going <Speech_Male> to go up. <Speech_Male> It's not a question of <Speech_Male> whether to quest no wet. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> we're gonna find out sooner <Speech_Male> or later and i <Speech_Music_Male> think it remains. <Speech_Male> I think the biggest <Speech_Male> danger to <Speech_Male> this economy in <Speech_Male> this market is <Speech_Male> if inflation stays <Speech_Male> persistently <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> high. There's <Speech_Female> no question about that. <Speech_Female> Well you <Speech_Female> know. You've been an outspoken <Speech_Male> critic <Speech_Female> of bitcoin. <Speech_Female> Saying that <Speech_Female> is neither a store <Speech_Male> of value <Speech_Female> nor currency <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> how can bitcoins <Speech_Female> popularity be <Speech_Female> explained and <Speech_Female> what changes <Speech_Female> are necessary <Speech_Female> in cryptocurrencies <Speech_Female> drummer <Speech_Female> for them to survive <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Male> become more <SpeakerChange> mainstream. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Popularity is primarily. <Speech_Male> Has a speculative <Speech_Male> game right. <Speech_Male> It's not as a currency <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> in essense added in. This <Speech_Male> is the biggest problem <Speech_Male> bitcoin hash. <Speech_Male> If you ask most <Speech_Male> people. Why should <Speech_Male> i put my money in <Speech_Male> bitcoin. Their own <Speech_Male> answer seems to <Speech_Male> be because you can <Speech_Male> make a lot of money. It's <Speech_Male> not because you can use it. <Speech_Male> By a hauser <Speech_Male> so even <Speech_Male> though you get little <Speech_Male> pieces of news <Speech_Music_Male> about bitcoin being <Speech_Music_Male> used as a currency. <Speech_Male> It seems to <Speech_Male> me that it's right <Speech_Male> now. Please restricted <Speech_Male> salvadoran <Speech_Male> hackers. Trying <Speech_Male> to get your money. <Speech_Male> It's not a mainstream <Speech_Male> currency and <Speech_Male> the reason is very simple. <Speech_Male> No if you <Speech_Male> have bitcoin would <Speech_Male> you spend to buy <Speech_Male> a house <SpeakerChange> right now. <Speech_Male> My guess is not <Speech_Male> because of <Speech_Male> what i call the full <Speech_Male> factor <Speech_Male> which is a fear of <Speech_Male> missing up. <Speech_Male> Which if you paid <Speech_Male> for your house <Speech_Male> with bitcoin in <Speech_Male> two days later <Speech_Male> bitcoin jumps thirty <Speech_Male> percent. You're gonna look <Speech_Male> back. And say what did i do <Speech_Male> so beep <Speech_Male> on willing to <Speech_Male> spend bitcoin. Because <Speech_Male> holding it as <Speech_Male> speculative trae <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and that <Speech_Male> to me has always been <Speech_Male> the problem that bitcoin <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> the people pushed. <Speech_Male> Bitcoin have used <Speech_Male> the speculative <Speech_Male> trade argument <Speech_Male> to lock more than <Speech_Male> a currency argument <Speech_Male> so cryptocurrencies <Speech_Male> direction <Speech_Male> become currencies. <Speech_Male> I think they need <Speech_Male> to stop being <Speech_Male> gains. You're <Speech_Male> playing with the <Speech_Male> of trait and <Speech_Male> currencies <Speech_Male> big to actually <Speech_Male> be currencies. Which <Speech_Male> is you want to build an <Silence> efficient system <Speech_Male> for <Silence> checking transactions. <Speech_Male> Bitcoin <Silence>

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"So that's part of the reason. I don't time markets and make judgments based on overall metrics because things change. And i have to be open to the possibility that real changes can cause metrics to look too high or too low but that doesn't necessarily mean that there's a correction on the horizon. Okay that absolutely resonates an could you share a few of your favorite stock market valuation metrics. I guess you sort tonight. I mean to me a metric new digest value business. The present riley the cash flow. That's not even a metric. It's a statement of basic business. So it so it's what a discounted gastro valuation is. It sounds something like something fancy but for as long as people bought and sold businesses. It's been built on. Hey how much degenerate. His cash in cash out cash flows. How quickly going to grow and assert me about. These cashflows began to those questions. Evadne falls zodda. So i value companies so metrics. I think are lazy because you looking for one number. That's going to say. Hey go art do this fact. The only market metric that track is called the equity risk premium. And i'd tried know what that basically is is our backup from what people are paying for. Stocks are back out from that number. What that expected return is going to be in the future. And i do it with judgment as okay. So based on what stocks are big priced at the start of august twenty twenty one investors can expect dwelling five and a half percent year now. That's you're going on in stocks given what to pain for them and you could say that stew low that's too high but that's what your pricing it. At so in fact it's a number reported my website at the start of every month. Been doing it for almost thirty years. But i think it's a number that tracked just to get a sense of. What can i expect to earn as 'cause that has consequences. You're thirty years old. He went to set aside money for a pension. And you're investing in stocks. You might look at the path. Is i think i can make ten percent. But if you'll pricing stocks on five and a half percent sooner.

riley
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Television media outlets such a cnbc msnbc and bloomberg to name a few uh schwab. Welcome to the show. Glad to be here..

Can America Fix Its Trains?

Slate's If Then

01:34 min | 2 months ago

Can America Fix Its Trains?

"Take a trip into the near future with me. A future where amtrak service looks less like the slow old system that we all know and more like the bullet trains that whisked people across countries like japan and france. This is what i think of as normal high speed rail's new york to washington an hour forty five. Maybe forty new york. Boston about the same new york philly should be forty forty five minutes apart. That's alon levy who has spent a lot of time thinking about how to improve train. Service blonde is a mathematician by training. But they're working now on. Something called the transit costs project at new york university. The project keeps track of how much similar train projects cost in. Different countries in the lawn is also an advocate for how american train travel should be what i would call train. Utopia ideally enter. The train station may be five minutes before the train departs. You can find an advance and reserve a seat. If you're with a friend you can reserve seats together. Emperor doesn't let now. There's lots and lots of capacity so you don't need to charge really high prices to avoid the train getting fall. Let's say new york and boston might be forty nine dollars. Tranche are going to be very frequent and the reason is that the northeast. Carter is enormous. How many people live there. It's what fifty million people between four enormous metropolitan areas so instead of having to two hours or half an hour you'd be waiting fifteen minutes.

Alon Levy New York New York University Japan France Boston Washington Carter
Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

"The quickly approaching fall semester has America's colleges under pressure to decide how far they should go to guard their campuses against the corona virus at New York University Monday marked their first in person college tours in sixteen months and there was lots of talk about mandatory vaccines says assistant VP of admissions Jonathan Williams the universe is crying all students to be vaccinated NYU is one of hundreds of colleges nationwide that have told students they must be fully vaccinated but seventeen year old Jessica Abraham who's considering the school still has not gotten one public school I really wanted many more colleges have held off on vaccine mandates in many Republican led states governments have banned such requirements or school leaders face political pressure to limit their anti virus actions I'm Julie Walker

NYU Jonathan Williams Jessica Abraham America Julie Walker
The Science of Learning a Second Language

Short Wave

01:57 min | 4 months ago

The Science of Learning a Second Language

"All right emily kwong today. We are talking about the science of learning second language because you are learning mandarin chinese which like as far as a pandemic hobby goes more power to more bart. Right for real. Though it is a hard language to learn. Language itself actually is an incredible ability. If you think about it that we humans have it involves many parts of the brain and the study of language spans across many different disciplines. So bilingual's studied in at least three different fields linguistics psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Sarah phillips is a phd student in the linguistics department at new york university. And exactly the person. I wanted to call up to talk about language learning who. Yeah i remember sarah from our episode on six hundred like how the brain responds to sentences with confusing grammar or syntax. Yeah brains and language are hurt. Jam met in korea while her father was serving in the marine corps and they raised her bilingual here in the us. Learning korean was very important to be able to communicate with my mom's side. They family and the same way that growing up speaking african american english was very important in being able to communicate and be a part of my dad's family. She's got a really interesting backstory. And i told her about my project about taking mandarin class for two hours every monday flash cards on the other nights watching movies. I can't understand and listen to us. Someone who is engaging in learning a second language thereby uses another language on a pretty regular basis that means you're a developing bilingual so in essence you are via lingual by by you know we probably exactly if maybe maybe maybe as an alternative to be bilingual. Maybe we should think of. This is developing bilingual.

Emily Kwong Sarah Phillips Bart New York University Marine Corps Sarah Korea United States
Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

Live Happy Now

02:27 min | 5 months ago

Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

"Week. We're talking with new york times. Bestselling author tau bench shahar. Who's new book happier no matter what looks at how we can cultivate hope resilience in purpose even during the most difficult times of our lives. Let's hear what he has to say. Thank you so much for coming back on. Live happy now. Thank you paula. It's great to be back. Well we had a wonderful reason to have you back because you've got a new book out and it's called happier no matter what one thing that i really like about this book. Is that right up front. You talk about covert and quarantines and how that affected us. So why was it important for you to write a book that specifically spoke to this time in our lives would happen soon as covert hits and new social unrest seemed like a world was or we were losing control over our world. Many people approached me and said you know what is the relevance of science of happiness now. isn't it a bit redundant. One of my friends went as far as suggesting that we quarantine happiness for awhile and in response to that. I wrote the book and the basic argument is that not only is the science of happiness still important. It's actually more important than ever. Yeah and so. Many people are thinking about survival whether that's their physical health. Are there mental health and you point out that happiness and those things are not mutually exclusive. The happiness plays a big role in that. Have very much so you know what would help to me articulate initially for myself and then for my students the importance off the signs that the relevance is actually a concept that was coined by seen. Todd in a seem is a professor at new york university and he writes about the concept of anti fragility anti fragility in other words the opposites affair fragility and what he does is essentially take resilience to the next level. So residents two point. Oh if if you wish specifically you know resilience is about the ability to bounce back. It's going back to where we were before to our original state anti fragility or resilience. Two point oh is bouncing back higher not going back to where we were before but going to a place that is higher better stronger than it was before. This is what resilience to point. Always

Shahar New York Times Paula New York University Todd
Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

The Book Review

02:23 min | 6 months ago

Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

"Patron kief joins us now. His new book is called empire of pain. the secret history of the sackler dynasty. Patrick thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me back. So let's start with a very basic question. In case people are not aware of the sackler family and why he would be writing about them with title like empire of pain. who are the sackler. So this sort of to waste answer that question until a few years ago what. The sackler name Generally to to the extent that people were aware of this family it was a very wealthy family. One of the wealthiest families in the united states with a branch in the uk in london and they were known chiefly for philanthropy right art museum wings. Hundreds of millions of dollars to art museums and universities and medical research and would very often put their name on these bequests. If you you know in new york city go to the metropolitan museum of art and there's the sackler wing And that was what they were known for. What was more mysterious. Was the source of this wealth and it has People have become more widely aware. Recently that That the bulk of this wealth comes from a company purdue pharma which produces the powerful painkiller oxycontin in this era in which the naming of things and the un naming of things mounting and the on mounting has become very active. Is it still the circle ring. In the metropolitan museum is sackler still emblazoned on all of these buildings and donated wings. Well it's very much in flux. So as i speak today it's still the sackler wing but the has actually announced today initially. They said they weren't taking any future. Donations from the soccer is because of the connection between the family and the crisis and then more recently. They've said that they are You know i think assessing is is the word whether or not the sackler wing will remain the sackler wing. Some institutions have started to take the name down so tufts university took down the sackler name from a series of buildings Because the students there this is at the medical school had said. I don't wanna go to class in a building named after this family and and get my medical education. They're more recently. New york university has done the same. The louvre in paris is taken down the sackler name. So there's a real question for many of these other institutions and there's dozens and dozens of them were the name still stands whether or not they'll keep it

Patron Kief Joins Metropolitan Museum Patrick Pharma New York City London United States UK UN Soccer Tufts University New York University Paris
Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

02:17 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

"Very very excited today to have dr theodore belfour on the podcast. I heard about dr bell. Four in james ness doors. New book called breath. And we're gonna be talking about all of that today on the show and dr belfour. He's of new york university college of dentistry and a senior certified instructor for the international association for orthodontics in the nineteen sixties. Dr bell was sent to vietnam to work as the sole brigade dentists for four thousand soldiers of the hundred ninety six light infantry from the jungles of vietnam to park avenue in manhattan upon his return opened his own private dental office in new york city and has been private practice for more than forty years and dr belfour specializes in the treatment of the cranial facial system. And that's what we're gonna be diving into today. So dr bill for welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure excellent. So what are we. Start by talking about how this all began and go back to. You know what happened. That change the cranial bones the cranial structure our skulls that led to this epidemic of of airway issues breathing issues at all of the health issues. That come with that well How we develop. How would grow and develop is based on how we breathe Aloe and we chew so just looking at how we chew. According to the us department of agriculture today in us sixty three percent of diet is processed and refined foods so without the proper stimulation to the body. We are not fully expressing on jeans when not developed in to offer full potential because that particularly when off jaws do not grow forward enough Do you re trues. Those jaws helps to push the tongue backwards into the airway and down to throw sanal. We have compromised sleeping breathing.

Dr Belfour Dr Theodore Belfour Dr Bell James Ness New York University College Of International Association For Vietnam Dr Bill Manhattan Us Department Of Agriculture New York City United States
Massachusetts State Police Sign Pledge to Increase Women in Policing

Cindy Stumpo is Tough as Nails

01:03 min | 6 months ago

Massachusetts State Police Sign Pledge to Increase Women in Policing

"Czar Cohen reports. The Massachusetts state Police have joined the 30 by 30 Initiative, created at the New York University School of Law with the goal of making women 30% of police forces by the year 2030. State police Superintendent Colonel Christopher Mason says. Right now women make up only 5% of the mass state police force. A lot of things that make it difficult to recruit women into law enforcement are the traditional perception of what the job is about the pretty sophisticated job. That requires a lot of skills. A lot of those skills that are skill sets that that women have, He says. The recent turmoil and controversy surrounding police nationally have made recruiting difficult recruiting continues to be a challenge. Not only for the Massachusetts state police but nationally, Mason says the state police hope to learn the best strategies for recruiting and retaining women by working with the other members of the initiative. Art Cohen WBZ Boston's news radio in sports. The Berlin's fault of the

Czar Cohen Superintendent Colonel Christo Massachusetts State Police New York University School Of State Police Mason Art Cohen WBZ Boston Berlin
Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

"Out of Atlanta in response to Georgia's restrictive voting laws, activists are putting other states on notice. Activists are putting pressure on leading companies in Georgia, Texas, Arizona and other states to get corporate America to denounce Republican efforts to tighten state voting laws. As of March, legislators have introduced 361 bills with restrictive provisions. In 47 States, According to the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice at New York University. The fight has put corporate America in a place it often tries to avoid the center of a partisan political fight. This past week, Delta and Coca Cola to of George's best known companies called the new law unacceptable, although they had a hand in writing it. I'm Julie Walker. Coming up after traffic and weather.

Georgia Atlanta Brennan Center For Justice America Arizona Texas New York University Coca Cola Delta George Julie Walker
Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 7 months ago

Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker with with Major Major League League Baseball Baseball moving moving the the all all star star game game out out of of Atlanta Atlanta in in response response to to George's George's restrictive restrictive voting voting laws laws activists activists are are putting putting other other states states on on notice notice that that are are moving moving to to do do the the same same activists activists are are putting putting pressure pressure on on leading leading companies companies in in Georgia Georgia Texas Texas Arizona Arizona and and other other states states to to get get corporate corporate America America to to denounce denounce Republican Republican efforts efforts to to tighten tighten state state voting voting laws laws as as of of March March legislators legislators have have introduced introduced three three hundred hundred and and sixty sixty one one bills bills with with restrictive restrictive provisions provisions in in forty forty seven seven states states according according to to the the nonpartisan nonpartisan Brennan Brennan center center for for justice justice at at New New York York University University the the fight fight has has put put corporate corporate America America into into place place it it often often tries tries to to avoid avoid the the center center of of a a partisan partisan political political fight fight this this past past week week delta delta and and coca coca Cola Cola to to George's George's best best known known companies companies called called the the new new law law unacceptable unacceptable although although they they had had a a hand hand in in writing writing it it I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Julie Julie Walker Walker Major Major League League Base Atlanta George America Georgia Arizona Texas Brennan Brennan Center Center Baseball New New York York University U Delta Delta Coca Cola Cola Coca
International Education with Dr Steve McDowell

Diversity Talks Podcast

07:49 min | 7 months ago

International Education with Dr Steve McDowell

"Know that you're originally from canada. When did you move to the us I came down in a nineteen ninety four to permanently. I was actually had a congressional fellowship so i was in washington for a year and then went to michigan state for a year and been at florida state since nine hundred six. So you've been in the us for reading longtime right. Would you consider yourself as a canadian or a canadian american. Now i'm a us citizen and Still have family in canada and still try to visit a couple of times a year. But this is my home in tallahassee. And that's wonderful. I know that what i'm about to ask you is is a tough question because oftentimes it's harder for people to talk about themselves and put themselves into a box but i would love to learn a little bit about some of your core values to who you are and on your cultural identity. So how would you define new cultural identity. Certainly as you pointed out. I'm from canada so growing up. Some of the debates and controversies that we had in the sixties and seventies included a role of french and english languages and cultures in canada and the role of multiculturalism. That there was a lot of new canadians coming from different parts of the world and also their relationship with first nations who have often instill Experience discrimination ill treatment and so's debates. I think kind of shaped my sense of what it meant to be a canadian. And what meant to be a citizen in a country where you have those types of debates animating public discourse and when you're thinking about some of your core core values what are some of those things considering you know your background in canada and was issues of multiculturalism in the air i think Interest in other cultures is one thing that i've enjoyed and really benefited from over my life and also a respect for other cultures my own personal intercultural Experiences included working for my sister and brother-in-law and a farm in quebec when i was a teenager and then after high school doing church service project in mississippi and arkansas and united states and getting to know people in those cultures. So i think my i really do think that interest in other people other cultures one of core values and then trying to understand what it means to respect and understand each other. Sounds like you have a pretty multicultural upbringing. I know that you received your international affairs like myself but yours is from york university in canada than you got a fellowship that brought you closer to some of the south. Asian countries like india. And i know that you work is built on the foundations of diversity and you work with international students. You're very supportive of international students. You are teaching course on international communication. So when you're thinking about all of your personal experiences in canada in southeast asia on here in the united states can you give us some specifics. Specific examples of how these experiences shape your personal perspectives on international education. Certainly i think as a starting point We have to kind of understand that our personal experiences are one of many possible experiences that people might have in the world. So it's it's easy for students in the united states to think. Oh this is the way that television is. This is the way that people Communicate with each other or enjoy sports and so many of our cultural practices and focused primarily on media practices. we think. Oh that's how it's done and so a big part of my Focus on international. Communication with students is to try to understand how people use media. How the media organized. How cultures organized in different countries. So my courses themselves don't focus as much on the the interpersonal intercultural communication which we think of is intercultural competency. But i'm trying to understand media systems and media use in different countries around the world. Let's talk about diversity equity and inclusion and higher education because this is a term that you know we hear a lot about and people. Do you have a different conception of what diversity really is. And what am. I look like in colleges and universities because for some people this concept can be purely domestic as opposed to others it could involve a lot of internationalization and international aspects. So for you. What does diversity and inclusion mean here at fsu. And how are we growing this concept on our campus. Certainly starting from the domestic debates the united states diversity equity inclusion would say. Well how do we include the The groups that haven't had access to education public services and economic activity united states so making sure that people of color people from rural areas people from you know less wealthy backgrounds Have access to the opportunities that higher education provides and certainly. Fsu has really taken some major initiatives in that area with student. Success initiatives with the care program Trying to welcome really support students and not just getting them into the university but making sure they're going to be successful in getting the support from a cohort of friends and fellow students from faculty and staff. So i think that's one area of diversity equity inclusion is. Who are we serving in terms of the students. Considering the role of international students is also important because they bring through their personal experience and their relationships with people on campus windows into the world. That you can't get in a textbook or just in a video so you get to know people and build relationships and that's hard even if we're sharing the same space. It's hard to build those relationships so one of the programs on campus. That does a great job with that. Is the center for global engagement. That has a whole bunch of different programs like international coffee hour to facilitate the building of relationships between students from united states and countries around the world so i think domestic inclusion in our programs thinking about international students and i think perspectives that we have in our research questions are research are another important part of diversity that includes international so many of our faculty have research projects that are all around the world. Learning systems institute is a research unit that has projects a lot of them in africa but also in southeast asia and so really strong record of international education consulting and then part of our curriculum and program what we teach what the subjects. What's the content of courses. I think is another of diversity that that's the job of university to open up the world and have music languages cultural studies as well scientific and you know engineering studies that really engage the world and reach out to the

Canada United States Tallahassee Michigan York University Quebec Florida Washington Arkansas Mississippi Asia India FSU Center For Global Engagement Learning Systems Institute Africa
Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

The WoMed

05:42 min | 8 months ago

Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

"Tanya thank you so much for joining me on the woman today. I'm so excited to speak with you. Happy to be here tiny. I think you are our first midwife on the podcast. You very cool yeah. I've had a couple of different fertility. Experts instead steph combat now knowing that's a certified nurse midwife so welcome as my first day. That's so cool. I always knew that you know women and children were going to be the focus of my nursing career. But before i fell into the nikki world i was definitely researching the nurse midwife route. 'cause berth itself is just so cool it is it is. I don't think anyone really gets it unless they're actually a delivery room. I i totally agree. And there's so much you just don't think about ever until you're pregnant. I mean i. I have a twenty year old at this point so my birth and i only have one child. Mike was a long time ago. But i am definitely one of those people that didn't think midwives existed when i was first pregnant. I really thought that you only heard midwife. In historical novels such And so such a learning curve for me to be pregnant. I was young. I was pregnant. But i was notably unhappy with my experience from the very first visit. There's gotta be a better way. And then i was in prenatal yoga class and heard somebody say midwife and my ears perked up it was like what is going over there and before you knew it. I was like sitting in the corner arms and noble reading every book. Get my hands on and kind of knew where i was going to go. Navigating a pregnancy and a new career path essay in time. But it's amazing. How many people. That don't know what a midwife is or if they do they think we only attend home births like all those minds of misconceptions that are you know fun to answer all this questions. So is that kind of what drew you into. Midwifery where are you a nurse. I already at this point or not. I went to performing arts high school. I moved to new york with the state. Can hundred bucks. When i was seventeen years old and then i was pregnant at nineteen years old. It was very sort of meant to be kind of situation. Like i never doubted the moment i was pregnant. I never doubted that thing never crossed my mind to do anything else. I've no judgments about what anybody does ever but for me it felt right even though it was really strange. I didn't think it was supposed to feel right. And you know very quickly. I realized that these two experiences. We're going to be very late to figure it out about midwifery. By the time. I was twelve weeks pregnant. And i was on a hat so like i was my first birth as a dula when i was six weeks postpartum and i went to a few births and i said screw it and i was a nursing school and then i got through nursing school with the sole intention of being a midwife by ban i needed to come up for air for a minute. Yes i waited. I worked for two years. The labor and delivery nurse waiting for my kid to be old enough to go to kindergarten and i went to midwifery school while she was intended artem in first grade. So that's that's how it all happen. So those two journeys were intimately linked for me. I'm going to sound just like alexis on shits creek. But i really loved this journey. Well kids. I can't say i know the reference because i tried to watch a few episodes of ships creek like when it first came out and for whatever reason i didn't get into it and everyone says how amazing it is and how the pandemic has changed the way the show comes across and i feel like i have to give it another. Go definitely definitely give it another go. I think the first time. I watched the whole season through or like the whole first thing like shits creek as a as a whole i am. I watched it all the way through. It wasn't really until the second season that i was like. Okay yeah i really get it. And then i just started rewatching watching it all again because it's sometimes need to turn on those. Those calming lake funny shows like parks and rec is gone off netflix. Now and i still have shits creek and meant just. It's great to have on during the day. And i'm just laughing but off now so i'm gonna have to give it another go with all my free time i would. So what was midwifery school like for you. Like what's all involved in that so midwifery school kind of ties into another big piece of my life. I think i guess. I tend to Dotson things at the same time. I so i went to nyu new york university for nursing. Okay and when it came time to go to midwifery school. I wasn't super excited about going to one of the campus based programs in new york like it wasn't about that i thought i wouldn't get a good education at all the new york based schools. But i knew that they would put me in a clinical site and that it wouldn't be my choice and i had really clear beliefs about time to wipe. I wanted to be and where i wanted to train. I had i gave for a free standing birthing center and i was really interested in doing center. Work home birth. Were all of that. And i just at the time did not really want to be in the hospital understandable. I figured out that there were some distance education programs. And that at some of the distance. Ed programs you actually had to find your own clinical site and while that might be a deterrent for some people for me gave me the freedom to figure it out

Shits Creek Tanya Steph Nikki Artem Mike New York Alexis Nyu New York University For Nu Netflix Dotson
I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

Short Wave

04:52 min | 8 months ago

I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

"Okay so earlier. I did this thing. That probably sounded weird to you. Emily your sentence. It didn't make any sense but you know another day. Another dollar alright. Okay well well so when someone does something unexpected like that when they're talking to you or get this even when you're reading something that doesn't follow the standard conventions of the language. Something kind of cool happens in your brain l. So they can actually measure this right so when we studied brain one of the ways that we can study. Brain activity is by measuring electrical current. That is flowing through your cortex rates so the surface of your brain for the cells to talk to each other. They released electrical current. This is sarah phillips our expert i mentioned earlier. I am a rising fourth year. Phd student in the linguistics department at new york university and also a member of the neuro linguistic slab very cool. She studies bilingualism and code switching which we will touch on in a future episode because it is objectively but for today. She's helping me out as explain. These things called n. Four hundred and p six hundred. He's are measurable responses. That happen your brain as you process language okay so little electrical signals that your brain is always giving off right but these are different from your normal brain buzzing. That would happen. If you're listening to like a quote normal sentence got it basically these phenomena are your brain saying like hey hold up something weird happening here okay so like when i peanut jam your brain that an example of one that can spark some. You know chemistry for you. Oh yeah yeah. I felt wrong and a lot of ways so as i peanut. Jam your brain. That's a good one anyways. Yes in nineteen eighty two psychologists. Marta kunas and steven hilliard published a paper showing that among these electrical signals. There was this big response about four hundred milliseconds person. Reading a sentence came across a word that was like semantic league confusing or the meaning was wrong. Okay so it's like a linguistic oddball sentences thrown your way your brain will produce a end. Four hundred response four hundred milliseconds after you heard peanut gem in that benefits. I peanut jam. Your brain your brain was like whoa. What's that doesn't make any sense. Exactly yeah and your brain. Does this kwong in less than half a second. Which is wild. So sir philip's art linguist from earlier explained. It happens in other scenarios like garden path sentences. So you start to hear a sentence and you think you know what's going to happen next but then something goes wrong okay and so when something goes wrong your brain has to go wait what. I don't think i interpreted this how it was supposed to be. I've got a restart which sarah says can happen with the sentence as simple as he spread the warm bread with socks yummy. This is fun. I like this okay. So how does this compare to. The p six hundred you were mentioning earlier is different than and four hundred the big differences just that they go in opposite directions and they happen at different points so when she says opposite directions. She's talking about how they kind of show up on these science graphs. You've them sure one one shows up in the positive and the other shows up as negative and and okay but for me the easiest thing to hang onto is that they happen at different times so the four hundred happens four hundred milliseconds after the wuxi. The p six hundred. The brain gives off slightly later. That response peaks roughly six hundred milliseconds after the woopsie. That's really it and we're trying to understand when we see this type of fact. What could this affect represent. What is this affect characterizing. What's happening in the brain in. Initially researchers thought that the answers to these questions was that the end four hundred was happening because of semantic errors so involving the meaning of words right and that the p six hundred was showing up because of grammatical errors which not to brag. But i make all this and we've met you for that. Yeah yeah sure okay but but it turns out as research into all this has gone on these effects might be more generalized kind of than researchers previously thought it might just have to do with how your brain processes complex language and this just shows that when we think about language and how we process language. They're actually a lot of steps involved. Starting from recognizing that the sound that you hear is a sound of the language that you speak and how those sounds then combined to form some parts of words.

Sarah Phillips Marta Kunas Steven Hilliard Sir Philip New York University Emily Sarah
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 9 months ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

Marketplace

03:38 min | 9 months ago

How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

"Administration is reviewing its options in many areas of foreign policy, including Afghanistan. It is America's longest war and in a deal with the Taliban. Last year, the Trump Administration agreed to withdraw U. S troops by May, but The new administration says the Taliban is not keeping its end of the bargain, hinting that U. S troops will likely stay longer. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports a former U. S government and U. N expert on Afghanistan, Rina Amiri knows that Americans are tired of fighting endless wars. Now we're trying to win the peace. But she says the Trump administration left a complicated hand. Amiri, now with New York University, says the U. S emboldened the Taliban. By negotiating the withdrawal schedule and keeping to it even as violent spite and Afghan peace talks faltered. And now what we have the situation where the Taliban feels very much they have won this war that they're winning this war that the peace agreement is simply a cover for withdrawal for the U. S. The U. S still has 2500 troops in Afghanistan under the deal with the Taliban, they're supposed to be gone a few months from now. But Biden's national security advisor Jake Sullivan, says the administration is taking a hard look at whether the Taliban are meeting their commitments to break ties with terrorists, reduce violence and negotiate in a serious way with the Afghan government. And in that context, we make decisions and now our force posture and our diplomatic strategy going forward. That's welcome news to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. He told the Aspen Institute last week that he expects a U. S team in Kabul soon, and he's gotten good signals from Secretary of State Tony Blinken. A promised me robust diplomacy in the region. Full coordination with us in a focus on ending 40 years of violence, the bidet administration may be promising too much, though Laurel Miller of the International Crisis Group says it's signaling that it wants to keep some US troops in Afghanistan for counterterrorism purposes and wants a peace deal that protects the democratic and human rights gains of the past two decades. Those are all perfectly fine and understandable things to be saying Again in the very first days of the administration, but ultimately you can't have all of the above. Miller says The Biden administration will have to prioritize. There cannot be both a negotiated peace and keeping some troops even a small number in Afghanistan for counterterrorism or any other purposes Because the Taliban won't agree to that there can't be a negotiated peace and No change in the nature of the system of governance and and writes in Afghanistan. U. S officials have long said they would protect women's rights in Afghanistan. Rina Amiri says not following through on that could send the wrong signal to Islamist groups elsewhere, so she thinks the U. S needs to get the diplomacy, right. And she'd like to see a third party, perhaps from the U. N manage the peace process. It will also be more helpful for the U. S. Because right now, everything right on the U. S. You need a manager of this peace process Right now. We do not have a manager. A State Department spokesperson says the U. S will support the Afghan peace process with a quote senior and robust American diplomatic effort. Trump Administration's envoy, Zalmay Khalilzad, remains on the job. Even a secretary Blinken builds out the team. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington

U. Taliban Afghanistan Rina Amiri Trump Administration Michele Kelemen Jake Sullivan Afghan Government Ashraf Ghani Tony Blinken Amiri Bidet Administration Laurel Miller New York University NPR Aspen Institute Biden Administration Biden America
ACLU, for first time, elects Black person as its president

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

ACLU, for first time, elects Black person as its president

"The ACLU has elected a black person as its president for the very first time New York University law professor Deborah archer becomes the first black president in the one hundred and one year history of the American civil liberties union our expertise is in civil rights and racial justice the ACLU says archer was elected in a virtual meeting of the organisation sixty nine member board of directors the fight against racial injustice is expected to be a top priority for the A. C. L. U. now that Donald trump's presidency is over while trump was in office the ACLU filed more than four hundred lawsuits and other legal actions against his administration I usually after

Aclu Deborah Archer New York University A. C. L. U. Archer Donald Trump
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | 9 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
"new york university" Discussed on WDUN AM550

WDUN AM550

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on WDUN AM550

"And we want to say good morning to the author of that tomb, and that is none other than Johnson, Jakubowski and Jonathan. I'm waking up this morning, I guess in Ohio how's the weather there? Well, it's getting colder and colder Bill. Thanks so much for having me and I appreciate it. It feels like winter. Yeah, I would agree with you very much So here, especially it just sort of came on. But let's talk about another winter that's going on, and I think that's a sort of the feeling of winter in politics. And of course, we've dealing with our situation here in Georgia, with the runoff coming up on January, 5th in the struggle that's going on here for the Senate. But I want to talk a little about bellwether blues. Tell me about how you came about writing this and what drives you? Sure, so I come from one of the few swing counties in America and I received a call and 2018 before the midterms from New York University as they were doing an analysis of the swing counties, they said over 3000 counties in America, there's only 58. That have this unique bellwether status that having voted twice for Bush twice for Obama, and once for Trump in my county would county, Ohio was one of those counties and I found that to be absolutely fascinating, so I decided to take a deeper dive. And specifically, one understand more about how my generation the millennial generation voted because my county would county is one of three counties in the state of Ohio of 88 that has that bell on the status and we're the largest The youngest of those three, so I knew there were a lot of millennials that must have changed their votes from 2012 to 2016. So we did that deep dive and found out a lot of information. That was surprising. A lot.

Ohio America Johnson Jakubowski Senate Trump New York University Georgia Obama Bush
"new york university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"And I'm here to tell you that personalized nutrition is going to be a $64 billion business by 2040. And you could say You heard it here first, Because I am carnage. I stay upon the research. I'm not trying to pack my own bags. I'm just telling you the truth and super super passionate about what I do. I truly believe Everyone can have a happier, healthier life. If they just stop eating all that crap is in our food, right? So we know that, um There's a lot of, you know about the GMOs and things that are in our food and what we can do about that, and I'm not totally against bio technology. I'm not even necessarily against all GMO food, and I'll explain that in a minute, but I hear him here to acknowledge that you know there's certain Experts stress how much uncertainty remains about the safety of our food, and it was actually some research at the New York University who were researching GMOs genetically modified foods also noticed the emos right genetic. I'm sorry. Genetically modified organisms G M O's acronym represents a massive experiments on us on us, Okay, guys, and so we're going to talk about what we can do to combat that, but I don't know. You guys, but I don't want to be eating weed killer and unfortunately, you know, if you are eating any weak, you probably are. There's other fruits and stuff We'll talk about in a minute. What we need to take the steps to be as proactive as we can stop using excuses. Like I was stopped blaming, you know. Oh, well, I didn't know that was bad for me. So I'm sitting there for years, and I thought it was good. Well, okay, you know, maybe, but, you know, Start waking up, Okay? And that's why I'm here again. 86693866 1909 for 55 You get the phone? Never. That's not what I'm going to even type it in the screen here, 8669 to 0. 9455. And if you are, there's number 866 19 0945 by And if you guys are ready to, you know, have some fun today. I'm excited to be here. I don't know about you, but I'm I get super excited to do the show every Saturday from 11 to 12 on Now we're going live on Facebook and instagram, and it's also going to be replayed on Facebook. I'll pin it up to the top of harmony with food Facebook. Page. If you haven't liked my page, what else the matter with you go ahead. And like my cage, Okay, I would be super super grateful to you. I know some of you guys don't want to call it so the least you could do is like my page. And now if you're going to tell me you're not a Facebook, I'm gonna sprain because I mean, get with the program. Guys. There's so much going on out there with YouTube and Facebook and Instagram and I'm not saying it's all good because it certainly isn't but a lot there is. There's always a silver lining, even with Kobe, right? Some really good silver linings with Kobe. And so I am super super Happy to be here, so let's get started. So we're talking about G M O's. And I believe that in companies that are pushing these products to us, there's clear evidence that they are causing some harm. And you know, and if that position makes knee seen outlandish, let it be. Let it be. That's all I can say. Because I'm here to get you guys follow fear. That's my job. And I don't want to do it halfway. I don't want to do it like okay. You know, like I could just, you know, worked at a hospital done my words going home every day charge charge charge. Get over where you know, not really not really helping people because nobody wants to see a dietician and a hospital A d'Italia? It's not really a good place to be learning. No, you know, I have said before, sometimes people at heart attacks and they're like ears wide open because that wakes them up. Unfortunately, is that what it takes to wake some of you guys? I hope not. Because I don't want to see you in the hospital after you've had a heart attack. Why don't work in hospitals any more. But what I'm saying is that I opened up a business. It's called harmony with food. I do this radio show every Saturday from 11 to noon. And here for you guys, I haven't changed the time in years and I actually have a block and I put my radio shows up after and I put my Facebook lives up after so if you miss a show, you can share it with our friends. So if you know somebody that you think isn't taking good care of themselves, Tell them about the Harvey within shell. So You know, I am struggling against these chemicals that air going in our food, and that goes hand in hand with the GMO crops. So round up weed killer a mixture of glass phosphate and serve apt ins. Um, you know that this stuff My neighbors use it. My neighbours used round up and my husband even said to my own neighbour One day. Hey, you know my husband's name is job was Jeremy. He got he. He lost his job back in January, but he found another job. But we decided that nickname kind of stock. So that's his name called J. J or Jobless, Jeremy. But he said to my neighbor, you know Hey, you know that's that's not really good, because we're thinking our dog. Maybe that's why I got died. Seriously. I think that my other dog died of cancer. I don't know for sure. But you know he's spraying that stuff over there on his lawn to get rid of weeds. And you know, I just think, Oh, my God. What? Forget about him. Let's talk about Monsanto on the giant industrial agricultural company had sold around jock to farmers and consumers around the world for years now. And the genetically modified versions of certain cross like corn, soy sugar Bates, canola, and much more have been developed with stand being sprayed directly with a round of weed killer. Okay, so worry, eating things that have rocked up on it. What the heck, I don't want to do that. So today we're going to talk about Why? Maybe you have the eye issues. Could that have something to do with it? Could that be? Why so many people are getting cancer? Um, could that be? Why so many people just don't feel good all the time. They have headaches and oh, my goodness. So we're going to talk about eating fresh, healthy food every Saturday from 11 to 12 on the Harvey with food show. And if you want to three EPO, you could go to harmony with food dot com Recipes of shopping less. I even have videos of me in my own kitchen, making something healthy and you could follow log. You could get the recipe. You could do the same thing. So we're going to be talking about Rhonda. We're going to be talking about the big food cos the big pharmaceutical companies and the big.

Facebook instagram Jeremy New York University Kobe YouTube G M O Rhonda Monsanto J. J
"new york university" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on 710 WOR

"New York University. Hey, doctor. One of things I've noticed is people's tempers are getting ah, a little short. You have a lot of mask shaming going on people yelling at other people if they're not wearing their masts, and it's getting a little ugly. I mean, what's the best way? What's the best way to handle a situation If I'm in the grocery store? Let's say, and there's somebody who isn't wearing a mask. So I just ignore that person. Ooh, I challenge that person. Do I shame that person do I'd be rate that person? How should I handle that situation? You know my advice. When you get asked about this from the ethics end of it is to say, Could you help? Protect me s is if you were asking for help. Because if you confront than people get their backs up, and you know pretty soon sometimes you're in the middle of a fight or an argument. You're not changing behavior. But if I say you know, I've got diabetes or I've got a lung condition. I'm really afraid to get sick. Could you help me by wearing a mask? I think you'll get a better response. So my My ideas appeal to the sense of wanting to help others, and, you know, I still can't guarantee they're gonna put the mask on. But I think that's a better approach than saying, Hey, jerk. Uh, you know, get your mask on here. Yeah, that's Redl. You know you're dealing with Redl here, so you can't guarantee that. Hey, Doc. What about the FAO CI deal? I assume, you know, found she the White House can, whether they like him or not. Now, all of a sudden, Trump says he loves them. What do you make of that whole dustup with Fauci? Trump doesn't love about church is a straight shooter. He tells you the fact I think he's been around at the National Institutes of Health and their infectious disease expert. He's been around longer than wins. But alive..

Trump Redl New York University National Institutes of Health Fauci White House
"new york university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Our main web address Clark dot com so how active you on social media most recent report in Facebook's quarterly profits that were great in spite of all the clouds over Facebook over two billion people around the world on Facebook and a lot of people use in addition to Facebook any of a number of other social media outlets and here's the thing there was research done by professors at two universities Stanford and New York University they found that if you will deactivate and their study specifically focused on Facebook if you de activate your Facebook account for just twenty eight days a little less than typical month set for February and you just step away from it for those four weeks you will find that your life improves dramatically your mood what you do with your time that you in fact have a much happier life by many different measures then you do with all the time that you're on that social media feed guess how much additional time you pick up on average in your life per day just by stepping away from that Facebook feed for a month in our day is back in your life so you reconnect with people family and friends you do more activity and you're just flat out happier so it can become addictive is there a step in between well there is if you use the chrome browser on a windows computer mac computer or obviously a Chromebook there is what's known as an extension that you can use on chrome and one of the ones there is the news feed a radic cater for Facebook it gets phenomenal reviews our producer Joel started using it because he felt he was getting sucked in too much by Facebook and what it does is it changes the way Facebook presents so that your feet is not continually updating and so you have to actively decide you're going to be involved instead of passively like a drone just looking again and again and again and it's been a huge improvement for gel when his life and it didn't take him to the step of stepping away from Facebook completely ready did get him more quality of life think about it I'm sorry how do I say your name is it Baboo here but I I want to welcome you to the car carriage show how you doing and and it's an honor to talk to you well great to have you here you are interested in real estate investing in our home I do have a question regarding real estate investment interesting even from background we currently nextel on both of our Ontario and conditions as well as mayor awful auntie conclusion of pork and we also fully contribute.

Facebook Stanford Joel Ontario New York University producer nextel
"new york university" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"By New York University school of medicine and the center for drug use and HIV H. C. VI research researchers looked at how much alcohol was being consumed by people over the age of sixty five more than ten percent of the elderly are binge drinking when they get to tell Jim and don't tell anybody if they're going to get in thirty packs the ice bag and there's they're sitting in their houses getting toasty this is no good way for star search to come on star search no here's the problem it puts older people like when you get drunk when you're older it's worse than when you're like twenty and you get drunk you know young of you know that I was waiting for two days to get over hang on them once they put some more risk for complications with other health problems they may already be battling such as high blood pressure heart disease and diabetes and the chance of them falling down having adverse reactions of medicine it's also a problem and then after that I heard study not too long ago the old people are getting even free gear in their own you know to me I think I probably got doubt yes so yeah that on so Dennis just hits me on Twitter right now it is a direct message you know Dennis says to me you got these depressed breads and young people getting together with the old people and get loaded that's not an answer is the answer if you're an older person you want to tie one on.

Jim Dennis Twitter New York University school of H. C. VI diabetes ten percent two days
"new york university" Discussed on Labor: Know Your Rights

Labor: Know Your Rights

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Labor: Know Your Rights

"In November two thousand nine the United States sportswear company. Russell athletic made a startling announced. It would reopen one of its under clothing factories that had closed ten months earlier reaction to the is Asian of the plants one thousand two hundred workers. It took this unusual step, which included rehiring the workers as a direct result of a national campaign by the United students against sweatshops youthful American activists who had pressured Boston College Columbia harbor. New York University in ninety two other to suspend the lucrative sports where licensing agreements that allowed Russell to imprint sweat, shirts and other clothing. With the schools, names and logos. The problem unions tend to have when dealing with some companies is their willingness to move up rations to developing countries. The question is how rally organized labor. Can't like the United students against sweatshops pivot to confront similar challenges. They have managed equally dramatic shifts before those who see reason for hope are increased by the possibility that organized labor can reinvent itself, because has done it before in nineteen Eighty-six, only five years after Pacos demise, the replacement air traffic, controllers had themselves organized s national air traffic controllers association and had began to echo, many of the same grievances waste by their predecessors. The work culture was changing some blame globalization. But reality is that many things were involved, the down world Trinh in union since the late nineteen seventies a disenchantment with workday. Life, a generalized in education levels, and a diverse cultural influences, along with an increased desire for work that holds intrinsic.

Russell United States Boston College Columbia harbor New York University five years ten months
"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WTVN

"As you know, I was on Hannity Friday. Many of you like that appearance. I was discussing at some length. Some of the history of past administrations, particularly democrat administrations and the abuse of power and how the media basically gave them a pass. In fact, the media worked with them in many instances Justice, the modern American media has been working with the perpetrators of the collusion hoax. Even though they know that FBI leaks of investigative matters or felonies media been working with them they've been working with Adam Schiff. In other words, they're working with the government against this. Outsider Trump and his administration now pretty much. I don't get to listen to all of it. But pretty much what you're hearing on TV and radio is a fairly. And I don't say this to be disrespectful, but he relatively surface explanation of why this is the case. And ranting and raving about the fact that it is the case. So even though my publisher gets angry when I do this and the publisher does get angry when I do this. We're going to dig into this a little bit. You're not going to know more than anybody else. These things don't just happen, folks. It's not that all of a sudden there's liberals in the media. There's a whole training mechanism. That's taking place a whole school of thought that's taking place. They've been moving in this direction the media anyway, but there's a really strong push. And I want to inform you about it. I want to expose you to this. Then. Yes, this is all in the upcoming book. But I'm just giving you a little flavor here and there so you get a feel for how impactful I believe this is going to be. Most of you don't know who New York University. Professor Jay Rosen. Why would you? Why would you? But you do know that New York University is a hardcore left wing university. While there's a professor there is name is Jay Rosen, and he's a leading voice in the idea of so-called ready for this because the back benches will chew it up. But just this is between us. Public or civic journalism. It's called public or civic journalists that is the purpose driven community based social activism journalism movement that has been spreading throughout America's new newsrooms for the past several decades. And this fellow rose in this professor is a harsh critic of the president. And he wrote in the Washington Post not long ago. Imagine a candidate who wants to increase public confusion about where he stands on things. So that voters give up on trying to stay informed and instead vote with raw emotion. Under those conditions does asking where do you stand sir serve the goals of journalism or does it enlist the interviewer in the candidates chaotic plan? I know what you're thinking journalists. What do you want us to do? Stop covering a major party candidate for president. That would be responsible. Well, true. But this reaction short circuits intelligent debate beneath every common practice. He writes an election coverage. There are premises about. How candidates will behave? I want you to ask do these still apply. I mean, Trump is behaving like a normal candidate is he he's acting like an unbound. One. In response, he writes, journalists have to become less predictable themselves. They have to come up with novel responses, they have to do things they've never done. They may even have to shock us. This is Rosa who's one of the leading lights of this movement. These so-called public or civic journalism, meta social activism journalism movement, which has taken hold at CNN and MSNBC in the New York Times and the Washington Post. This is the first you've heard this because I didn't know anything about it until about seven eight nine ten months ago when I was doing my research Rosen ads in his Washington Post op, Ed. They need to collaborate across new brands in ways, they have never known other words media, we'll have to get together. They the journalists may have to call Trump out with a forcefulness unseen before the may after the breakdown of the in interviews and endure excruciating awkwardness. Jim Acosta, obviously is a social activist journalist hardest of all that will have to explain to the public that Trump is a special case and the normal rules. Do not apply. I want to get on with this guy this guy rose them because it's important because Jay Rosen university of New York University professors having enormous influence now one of the reasons why. I and my publisher are hesitant to do something like this because you will hear talk show hosts down the road. And listen, I'm not I just want you to know how this works by get conflicted. We're going to pick up on this wait a couple of weeks and then spirit as if it's their own. And a lot of people who listen to this show may listen to other shows, and may not know who's saying what I'm telling you that this is very very important. Very very important to understand the core. What's taking place here? Professor Jay Rosen, NYU and other like-minded social activists public and civic journalism. That's what they call social activism journalism reject the traditional standards and notions of the pre of a free press for instead a radical approach to reporting where the media become an essential instrument for what for the progressive movement. For the progressive movement. They call this. The new journalism just say, you know. The new journalism. Grew up thinking of itself as liberal and objective at the same time. It was objective in so far as it separated facts from values reporting, the facts and relegating the values to the editorial page, but to be objective or scientific or scientific and the way was it self a liberal value. But here's more Rosen. Lacking confidence in the intelligence and wisdom is fellow citizens Rosen insists on indoctrination and manipulation by media leaks. Here's what he writes. Quote, if the public is assumed to be out there, more or less intact. Then the job of the press is easy to stay to inform people about what goes on in their name, and in their midst, but suppose, the public leads a more broken existence at times it may be alert and engaged but just as often it's struggles against our pressures excuse me other pressures including itself. That can win out in the end in attention. To public matters is perhaps the simplest of these atomization of society, one of the more intricate money speaks louder than the public problems overwhelming fatigue sets in attention falters. Cynicisms wells, a public that leads. This more fragile kind of existence. Suggests a different task for the press not just to inform a public that may or may not emerge but to improve the chances that it will emerge. Well, what will emerge folks the public for what? For the progressive cause of social activists. And he even cites John Dewey who we've talked about many times before an early progressive. John doing an early hero mine he says had suggested something like this in his book in one thousand nine hundred twenty seven the public and its problems in that book is cited. Not only in this book. But this book the book of Jewish of do is also cited in rediscovering Americanism. So rosen. Seems to be referencing. Dewey's view of news has providing meaning the social consequences of the information. Some of you getting bored. I'm almost done. But I want you to know what's going on out there. I mean, I can beat the drums to, but let's just really focusing on this do we wrote quote, new signifies something which has just happened. And which is new just because it deviates from the old and regular, but its meaning depends upon relations to what it imports to what its social consequences are. So you see reporting events without a social context folks and the relationship to the past as part of a continuum isolates them from their connections. He says even if social sciences has a specialized apparatus of inquiry. We're more advanced than they are. They would be comparatively impotent in the office of directing opinion on matters of concern to the public as long as they are remote from apple occasion. What he's trying to say. Here is writing. Media press reporters. Don't chess report, the news all the news means is something new and different than the status quo. Or something quite remarkable that took place or even on remarkable for that matter. You must give it meaning. Which meaning should we give it you must give it the meaning of progressive, social activism folks, this is part of the progressive movement. It's been going on for a long time. It's being pushed very very strongly by individuals who have enormous influence on modern so-called journalists and journalism over the last several decades. That's why you're seeing it more and more radicalized. Now, there's a ton more to say about this. I'll save it for another day. But there is a reason. A reason why you have a CNN the way you have a CNN. There is a reason you have an MSNBC the way you have an MSNBC. There's a reason the New York Times news pages read like the New York Times editorial pages and same with the Washington Post. There's a reason like they all sound pretty much the same. Is they all embrace. Community slash public slash social activism journalism of the left. And they had these professors these intellectuals who are pressing the case far back is doing. And as recent as Rosa. And there's a lot more of this going on in our colleges and universities, which I explain in the book, I won't explain now. So when you say Jesus, This news coverage is really out there. It is really out there. It's idiological. It's being taught it's being trained. It's being pushed it's being indoctrinated. Our understanding of news is not their understanding of news. Our understanding a news traditional their understanding, a news perverse. It's bastardized. You cannot have pure news. You cannot have objective news. You cannot have truthful news. Now, they I mean that that's their claim and yet many of them. Don't claim it publicly some do. This is a divide among them. Some will say we're objective news sources some will say no you can't be objective. News source. You've got at least explain these things when Chuck Todd announces a meet the depressed now, he's not a particularly bright guy. He didn't finish his political science degree. You know, he's he's he's he's he's a lightweight. Let's just be honest offense. But he is most of the Mark. When Chuck Todd announced several months ago on his show, and we talked about it at length. That there is man made climate change and anyone who disagrees is a denier, whether you're physicist, whether you're meteorologist, whatever your background, you are a denier, and we will not tolerate and he's also the chief political reporter for NBC as well. We will not tolerate that on meet the press anymore..

professor Jay Rosen Rosen Washington Post New York University Outsider Trump New York Times publisher CNN MSNBC Jay Rosen university of New Yo John Dewey Rosa Chuck Todd FBI Adam Schiff Hannity president Trump Jim Acosta
"new york university" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on KTRH

"Everybody. Mark Levin here. Our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. I hope you had a good weekend. As you know, I was on Hannity Friday. Many of you like that appearance. I was discussing at some length. Some of the history of past administrations, particularly democrat administrations and the abuse of power and how the media basically gave them a pass. In fact, the media worked with them in many instances, just as the modern American media has been working with the perpetrators of the collusion hoax. Even though they know that FBI leaks investigative matters or felonies media been working with them they've been working with Adam Schiff. In other words, they're working with the government against this. Outsider Trump and his administration now pretty much. I don't get to listen to all of it the pretty much what you're hearing on TV and radio is a fairly. And I don't say this to be disrespectful but a relatively surface explanation. Why this is the case? And ranting and raving about the fact that it is the case. So even though my publisher gets angry when I do this and the publisher does get angry when I do this. We're going to dig into this a little bit. You're not going to know more than anybody else. These things don't just happen, folks. It's not that all of a sudden there's liberals in the media. There's a whole training mechanism. That's taking place a whole school of thought that's taking place. They've been moving in this direction the media anyway, but there's a really strong push. And I want to inform you about it. I want to expose you to this. And yes, this is all in the upcoming book. But I'm just giving you a little flavor here and there so you get a feel for how impactful I believe this is going to be. Most of you don't know who New York University. Professor Jay Rosen. Why would you? Why would you? But you do know that New York University is a hardcore left wing university. While there's a professor there is name is Jay Rosen, and he's a leading voice in the idea of so-called ready for this because the back benches will chew it up. But just this is between us. Public or civic journalism. It's called public or civic journalists that is the purpose driven community based social activism journalism movement that has been spreading throughout America's new newsrooms for the past several decades. And this fellow rose in this is a harsh critic of the president. And he wrote in the Washington Post not long ago. Imagine a candidate who wants to increase public confusion about where he stands on things. So that voters give up on trying to stay informed and instead vote with raw emotion. Under those conditions does asking where do you stand sir serve the goals of journalism or does it enlists the interviewer in the candidates chaotic plan? I know what you're thinking journalists. What do you want us to do? Stop covering a major party candidate for president. That would be a responsible. Well, true. But this reaction short circuits intelligent debate beneath every common practice. He writes an election coverage their premises about. How candidates will behave? I want you to ask do these still apply. I mean, Trump is behaving like a normal candidate is he he's acting like an unbound. One. In response, he writes, journalists have to become less predictable themselves. They have to come up with novel responses, they have to do things they've never done. They may even have to shock us. This is Rosa. Was one of the leading lights of this movement. These so-called public or civic journalism activism journalism movement, which has taken hold at CNN MSNBC in the New York Times and the Washington Post. This is the first you've heard this because I didn't know anything about it until about seven eight nine ten months ago when I was doing my research Rosen ads in his Washington Post op, Ed. They need to collaborate across new brands in ways, they have never known other words media, we'll have to get together. They the journalists may have to call Trump out with a forcefulness unseen before the may after risk the breakdown of decorum in interviews and endure excruciating awkwardness. Jim Acosta, obviously is a social activist journalist hardest of all then we'll have to explain to the public that Trump is a special case and the normal rules do not apply, and I want to get on with this guy this guy rose them because it's important because Jay Rosen university of New York University professors having enormous influence now one of the reasons why. I am I publish are hesitant to do something like this because you will hear talk show hosts down the road. And listen, I'm not I just want you to know how this works by I get conflicted. We're going to pick up on this wait a couple of weeks and then spirit as if it's their own. And a lot of people who listen to this show may listen to other shows, and may not know who's saying what I'm telling you that this is very very important very very important to understand the core of what's taking place here. Professor Jay Rosen, NYU and other like-minded social activists public and civic journalism. That's what they call social activism journalism reject the traditional standards and notions of the pre of a free press for instead a radical approach to reporting where the media become an essential instrument for what? For the progressive movement. For the progressive movement. They call this. The new journalism just say, you know. The new journalism. Grew up thinking of itself as liberal and objective at the same time. It was objective insofar as it separated facts from values reporting, the facts and relegating the values to the editorial page, but to be objective or scientific or scientific and the way was itself a liberal value. But here's more Rosen. Lacking confidence in the intelligence and wisdom is fellow citizens. Rosen insists on indoctrination and manipulation by media elites here's what he writes. Quote, if the public is assumed to be out there, more or less intact. The job of the press is easy to stay to inform people about what goes on in their name and in their midst, but suppose, the public leads a more broken existence. At times, it may be alert and engage, but just as often it struggles against our pressures excuse me other pressures including itself that can win out in the end in attention. To public matters is perhaps the simplest of these atomization of society, one of the more intricate money speaks louder than the public problems overwhelming fatigue sets in attention, falter, cynicisms wells, a public that leads. This more fragile kind of existence. Suggests a different task for the press not just to inform a public that may or may not emerge but to improve the chances that it will emerge. Well, what will emerge folks the public for what? For the progressive cause of social activism. And he even cites John Dewey who is talked about many times before an early progressive. John doing early hero mine he says had suggested something like this in his book in one thousand nine hundred twenty seven the public and its problems in that book is cited. Not only in this book. But this book the book of Jewish of dewey's also cited in rediscovering Americanism. So rosen. Seems to be referencing. Dewey's view of news has providing meaning the social consequences of the information. Some of you getting bored. I'm almost done. But I want you to know what's going on up there. I mean, I can beat the drums to, but let's just really focusing on this duly wrote quote news signify, something which has just happened. And which is new just because it deviates from the old and regular, but its meaning depends upon relations to what it imports to what its social consequences are. So you see reporting events without a social context folks and the relationship to the past as part of a continuum isolates them from their connections. He says even if social sciences as a specialized apparatus of inquiry. We're more advanced than they are they would be comparatively impotent in the office of directing opinion on matters of concern to the public as long as they are remote from application what he's trying to say here is in his writing. Media press reporters. Don't report the news all the news means is something new and different than the status quo. Or something quite remarkable that took place or even on remarkable for that matter. You must give it meaning. Which meaning should we give it you must give it the meaning of progressive, social activism folks, this is part of the progressive movement. It's been going on for a long time. It's being pushed very very strongly by individuals who have enormous influence on modern so-called journalists and journalism over the last several decades. That's why you're seeing it more and more radicalized. Now, there's a ton more to say about this. I'll save it for another day. But there is a reason. A reason why you have a CNN the way you have a CNN. There is a reason you have an MSNBC the way you have an MSNBC. There's a reason the New York Times news pages read like the New York Times editorial pages and same with the Washington Post. There's a reason like they all sound pretty much the same. Is they all embrace community slash public slash social activism journalism of the left. And they had these professors these intellectuals who oppressing the case carries far back is doing. And his recent as Rosa. And there's a lot more of this going on in our colleges and universities, which I explained in the book I want explain now. So when you say Jesus, This news coverage is really out there. It is really out there. It's idiological. It's being taught it's being trained. It's being pushed it's being indoctrinated. Our understanding of news is not their understanding of news. Our understanding a news traditional their understanding. A news is perverse. It's bastardized. You cannot have pure news. You cannot have objective news. You cannot have true full news. Now, they I mean that that's their claim and yet many of them. Don't claim it publicly some do. This is a divide among them. Some will say we're objective news sources some will say no you can't be objective. News source. You've got at least explain these things when Chuck Todd announces a meet the depressed now, he's not a particularly bright guy. He didn't finish his political science degree. You know, he's he's he's he's he's a lightweight. Let's just be honest offense. But he is most of the are. When Chuck Todd announced several months ago on his show, and we talked about it at length. That there is man made climate change and anyone who disagrees is a denier, whether you're physicist, whether you're meteorologist, whatever your background, you are a denier, and we will not tolerate and he's also the chief political reporter for NBC as well. We will not tolerate that on meet the press anymore..

Rosen Jay Rosen Washington Post New York University Outsider Trump professor New York Times John Dewey president Jay Rosen university of New Yo Chuck Todd FBI MSNBC Adam Schiff CNN publisher Mark Levin Hannity Rosa Trump
"new york university" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

12:34 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on KTOK

"Everybody. Mark Levin here. Our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. I hope you had a good weekend. As you know, I was on Hannity Friday. Many of you like that appearance. I was discussing at some length. Some of the history of past administrations, particularly democrat administrations in the abuse of power, and how the media basically gave them a pass. In fact, the media worked with them in many instances, just as the modern American media has been working with the perpetrators of the collusion hoax. Even though they know that FBI leaks of investigative matters are felonies media been working with them they've been working with Adam Schiff. In other words, they're working with the government against this. Outsider Trump and his administration now pretty much. I don't get to listen to all of it pretty much what you're hearing on TV and radio is a fairly. And I don't say this to be disrespectful but a relatively surface explanation. A why this is the case? And ranting and raving about the fact that it is the case. So even though my publisher gets angry when I do this and the publisher does get angry when I do this. We're going to dig into this a little bit. You're not going to know more than anybody else. These things don't just happen, folks. It's not that all of a sudden there's liberals in the media. There's a whole training mechanism. That's taking place a whole school of thought that's taking place. They've been moving in this direction the media anyway, but there's a really strong push. And I want to inform you about it. I want to expose you to this. Yes. This is all in the upcoming book. But I'm just giving you a little flavor here and there so you get a feel for how impactful I believe this is going to be. Most of you don't know who New York University. Professor Jay Rosen is why would you? Why would you? But you do know that New York University is a hardcore left wing university. While there's a professor there is named Jay Rosen. And he's a leading voice in the idea of so called ready for this because the back benches will chew it up. But just this is between us. Public or civic journalism. It's called public or civic journalism that is the purpose driven community based social activism journalism movement that has been spreading throughout America's new newsrooms for the past several decades. And this fellow rose in this is a harsh critic of the president. And he wrote in the Washington Post not long ago. Imagine a candidate who wants to increase public confusion about where he stands on things. So that voters give up on trying to stay informed at instead vote with raw emotion. Under those conditions does asking where do you stand sir serve the goals of journalism or does it enlists the interviewer in the candidates chaotic plan? I know what you're thinking journalists. What do you want us to do stop covering a major party candidate for president? That would be a responsible. Well, true. But this reaction short circuits intelligent debate beneath every common practice. He writes an election coverage. There are premises about. How candidates will behave? I want you to ask do these still apply. I mean, Trump is behaving like a normal candidate is he he's acting like an unbound. One. In response, he writes, journalists have to become less predictable themselves. They have to come up with novel responses, they have to do things they've never done. They may even have to shock us. This is Rosa who's one of the leading lights of this movement. These so-called public or civic journalism. Let a social activism journalism movement, which has taken hold at CNN and MSNBC in the New York Times and the Washington Post. This is the first you've heard this because I didn't know anything about it out seven eight nine ten months ago when I was doing my research Rosen ads in his Washington Post op, Ed. They need to collaborate across new brands in ways, they have never known other words media what have to get together. They the journalists may have to call Trump out with forcefulness unseen before the may after risk the breakdown of the corm in interviews and endure excruciating awkwardness. Jim Acosta, obviously is a social activist journalist hardest of all there will have to explain to the public that Trump is a special case and the normal rules do not apply, and I want to get on with this guy this guy rose them because it's important because Jay Rosen university of New York University, professor having enormous influence now one of the reasons why. I and my publisher are hesitant to do something like this because you will hear talk show hosts down the road. And listen, I'm not I just want you to know how this works by get conflicted. We're going to pick up on this wait a couple of weeks and then spewed as if it's their own. And a lot of people who listen to this show may listen to other shows, and may not know who's saying what I'm telling you that this is very very important very very important to understand the core of what's taking place here. Professor Jay Rosen, NYU and other like-minded social activists public and civic journalism. That's what they call social activism journalism reject the traditional standards notions of a free press for instead a radical approach to reporting where the media become an essential instrument for what? For the progressive movement. For the progressive movement. They call this. The new journalism just tell you now. The new journalism. Grew up thinking of itself as liberal and objective at the same time. It was objective insofar as it separated facts from values reporting, the facts and relegating the values to the editorial page, but to be objective or scientific or scientific and the way was it self a liberal value. But here's more Rosen. Lacking confidence in the intelligence and wisdom is fellow citizens. Rosen insists on indoctrination and manipulation by media elites here's what he writes. Quote, if the public is assumed to be out there, more or less intact. Than the job of the press is easy to state to inform people about what goes on in their name, and in their midst, but suppose, the public leads a more broken existence at times it may be alert. Engage but just as often it's struggles against our pressures excuse me other pressures including itself. That can win out in the end in attention. To public matters is perhaps the simplest of these atomization of society, one of the more intricate money speaks louder than the public problems overwhelming fatigue sets in attention falters. Cynicisms wells, a public that leads. This more fragile kind of existence. Suggests a different task for the press not just to inform a public that may or may not emerge but to improve the chances that it will emerge. Well, what will emerge folks the public for what? For the progressive cause of social activism. And he even cites John Dewey who is talked about many times before an early progressive. John doing early hero of mine. He says had suggested something like this in his book in one thousand nine hundred twenty seven the public and its problems in that book is cited. Not only in this book. But this book the book of Jewish of is also cited in rediscovering Americanism. So rosen. Seems to be referencing. Dewey's view of news has providing meaning the social consequences of the information. Some of you getting bored. I'm almost done. But I want you to know what's going on up there. I mean, I can beat the drums to, but let's just really focus in on this. Do we wrote quote new signify something which has just happened? And which is new just because it deviates from the old and regular, but its meaning depends upon relations to what it imports to what its social consequences are. So you see reporting events without a social context folks and the relationship to the past as part of a continuum isolates them from their connections. He says even if social sciences as a specialized apparatus of inquiry. We're more advanced than they are they would be comparatively impotent in the office of directing opinion on matters of concern to the public as long as they are remote from application what he's trying to say here is in his writing. Media. Press reporters. Don't just report the news. All the news means is something new and different than the status quo. Or something quite remarkable that took place or even remarkable for that matter. You must give it meaning. Which meaning should we give it you must give it the meaning of progressive, social activism folks, this part of the progressive movement. It's been going on for a long time. It's being pushed very very strongly by individuals who have enormous influence on modern so-called journalists and journalism of the last several decades. That's why you're seeing it more and more radicalized. Now, there's a ton more to say about this. I'll save it for another day. But there is a reason. A reason why you have a CNN the way you have a CNN. There is a reason you have an MSNBC the way you have an MSNBC. There's a reason the New York Times news pages read like the New York Times editorial pages and same with the Washington Post. There's a reason like they all sound pretty much the same. Is they all embrace community slash public slash social activism journalism of the left. And they have these professors these intellectuals who oppressing the case carrots far back is doing. And his recent is Rosa. And there's a lot more of this going on in our colleges and universities, which I explained in the book I want to explain now. So when you say Jesus, This news coverage is really out there. It is really out there. It's idiological. It's being taught it's being trained. It's being pushed it's being indoctrinated. Our understanding of news is not their understanding of news. Our understanding a news traditional their understanding. News is perverse. It's bastardized. You cannot have pure news. You cannot have objective news. You cannot have true full news. Now, they I mean that that's their claim. And yet many of them. Don't claim it publicly some do. And this is a divide among them. Some will say we're objective news sources some will say no you can't be objective. News source. You've got at least explain these things when Chuck Todd announces a meet the depressed now, he's not a particularly bright guy. He didn't finish his political science degree. And now, he's he's he's he's he's a lightweight. Let's just be honest offense. But he is most of the Mark. One Chuck Todd announced several months ago on his show, and we talked about it at length. That there is man made climate change and anyone who disagrees is a denier, whether you're physicist, whether you're meteorologist, whatever your background, you are a denier, and we will not tolerate and he's also the chief political reporter.

Professor Jay Rosen Rosen New York University Washington Post Outsider Trump professor New York Times publisher John Dewey CNN MSNBC Jay Rosen university of New Yo Chuck Todd FBI president Adam Schiff Mark Levin Hannity Trump America
"new york university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Soft yolk, soft boiled, soft poached, soft scrambled in butter, and that gives them all the stuff is brain function properly. You have something called D stress also capsules well. Yeah. These throw that in these three capsules twice a day. A de-stress actually has the nutrients necessary for the brain metabolism helps the brain. And you can even throw in the ultimate nice and plus one or two of those twice a day. And it's amazing one of the things that they have two seconds here to talk on dementia. Sure, different dimensions. And one of the reasons why there's so much craziness over dementia and misinformation is doctors will always cause no matter which one it is. And there's no rule that says you can't have one or three or five or all eight of them at the same time. Doctors will always call them Elsner a us because when you look at the insurance code book, Alzheimer's disease treatment pays out the most. And so you can get things like Pelagia causes dementia. Okay. Vitamin d three efficiency. You can get Bashar dementia. We have plaque in the arteries in the brain. You can have of course, com syndrome, which is a deficiency of a single vitamin. And I've had one guy who was treated for three years. My male clinic, New York University medical school and Wake Forest university in North Carolina. Feed him for three years for dementia for diagnosed with dementia. He goes into a coma for eight years. G two eight years hoping that a we come along training. This is the gospel truth story, and when his his sister told me his name is Raymond Gregor. And there's a newspaper story says I'm giving out any information. I shouldn't and she calls me and Tel Aviv this coma for eight years. He's in brainwaves are just about zero when the ready to pull the plug on is or anything, it'd be done giving the hell debate and heart PAKs of three eggs twice a day. Destroys cancelled as you pointed out the snap. And let's put all these things together and give it the force of the stuff you're mixing up every day at breakfast lunch dinner bedtime, and then call me every couple of weeks. I'm you know, he's doing one on the fourth day she calls. She's crying. He had gotten up. He thought he was only sleeping for one night. He shaves. He gets dressed. He goes to work in the banks. And so the, nurses the nursing home says if you wanna see your brother Ray, you gotta go to the Bank because he's at the Bank his old desk. After eight years in a coma. How about that five days? How about that John and reading Pennsylvania's with us on the wildcard line? Hey, John, go ahead. Hi, George nice. Dr wallich. I appreciate your taking my call. My wife is forty years old. She's five to in about two hundred and eighty four pounds. She is trying to work on a weight she's relatively healthy up until this past March. She was diagnosed with conjunction vice pink eye, and then it quickly turned into autoimmune disease and was told she had sojourn syndrome where her try is are dried out she takes pains drought or body. She's been on antidepressants for years. They put on a new ended oppressing last March right around the time, she got the surgeon. So we don't know if that's causing. I wanted to your ten, but we have on hemp oil right now, they have on the doctors they'll have on all different kind of pain medicine, not helping have her on five different antidepressants doesn't help. So what in your opinion on what you know, what do you recommend? Actually, we do arguing like I said the ham boil we're trying to do olive leaf extract. Here's. Trying give me already the answer 'cause she's tried all these treatments drugs herbs hemp oils. Okay. And nothing's helping her right? Well, there's only one possible reason here, and she's not absorbing any of that. Does she have any history? Respiratory Stephanie asthma bronchitis. She does have asthma and she is on a C Pap machine for sleep apnea. Okay. Does she have any skin problems Madrid China's psoriasis? No, but she's actually just diagnosed two weeks ago shingles. And now they're trying to treat that it seems like your auto. Just gone haywire. Yeah. Here's the deal. She she's not absorbing responding a medication natural or prescription. I think she needs to do is get up. All the bad says, you do everybody in the household the dog to can't the bird the fish kids. Mother-in-law? Do you have children by her? Does. She have children. Yes. We we have to did he have asthma or skin problems. My my daughter has one my oldest has excellent. Yeah. My youngest is not yet though. Yeah. Okay. Well, yeah. So he's passed it onto them. She has gluten problem so everybody household. It's going to be dropped dead. Gluten free. No, Weeden O'Brien rhino, oats, Darna such things as looking for. You. Don't buy that lie. That'll creates inflammation to correct all know fried foods. No process means no oils. Gluten and then I'd have take she's close to three hundred pounds. Ideally, she would take three healthy, brain and heart PAKs per month. Okay, and full breakfast, lunch and dinner. Also, I would never take the glucose gel fifteen day five five and find a month for cartilage, ligaments, tendons, connective tissue, just between the vertebrae. And then I for weight loss at JoAnne are Tito, caramel, shake and and meal bars two meals a day, she should have one of these Kito caramel meals. It can be either or not. But when they kind of fill you up don't take talk fill you up, and they help you burn calories when you have obesity five to two hundred eighty two pounds. She's actually nutritionally deficient. She absorbing calories because they're tiny little things that she can't absorb big clumsy nutrients, and that's why she's having all these problems. And so the omissions very important here to omit all these, bad foods, fractures, processed meats. Charleston. Gluten and then take the three held abandon heart PAKs. If money's a problem drop it down to two, but it'll be very slow compared to taking three. Okay. And then for the weight loss, I would throw in those the caramel Kito that two meals out of the three the third meal steamed vegetables in a couple of poached eggs are steamed vegetables and ice cream scoop full of maybe some steam fish are some poultry baked or grilled breast..

coma John Alzheimer's disease Tel Aviv autoimmune disease Bashar Raymond Gregor Pelagia Dr wallich asthma North Carolina New York University Madrid China Ray psoriasis Charleston George Wake Forest university Weeden
"new york university" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"With less than one half the length of our thirty five day shutdown if pharaonic found decreased life satisfaction and increased work family conflict and physical cognitive and emotional burnout five weeks after the shutdown ended, a we haven't reached the end of those five weeks yet Gerald Smith retiring thirty two year old intern or thirty two year long Internal Revenue Service employees admitted to the Washington Post, but he found himself crying and no longer feeling valued because of shutdown stress. Steve Reeves, a Federal Emergency Management agency safety official in Fort Worth told the Washington Post me and my family argued more. I was moody short tempered. I am a retired soldier. It was real similar to my combat deployments. Yes. Reset said. The stress of the shutdown was like the stress of war and reuse added that my PTSD was barely in check. Thanks to the shutdown. On some of those valuable government employees boys with decades of experience or thinking of taking the easiest path out of their jobs and retiring, David see Corolla, an Internal Revenue Service employees in New Orleans told the Washington Post all the stress is not worth it. So we've got all of this damage, basically, we have shafted eight hundred thousand nearly a million workers. Well, it's way too many. That's for sure thank you Howard. Appreciate you being on the program or rans official news agency is reporting that a fire in the country's space research center has killed three scientists the Sunday report quotes, the telecommunications minister are saying that the three researchers have died because of a fire in one of the buildings of the space research center. Iran plans to launch a satellite into orbit despite US criticism that such launches benefit its ballistic missile programme, leaving Facebook may be good for your emotional wellbeing. But you could be less informed about current events. A new report from researchers at the New York University and Stanford University looked at what happened to people who d- activated their accounts. The researchers paid people one hundred and two dollars to turn off their Facebook accounts for four weeks the Facebook free people reported being happier while not using the site being less active online, and using other social media sites less. The study found that the subjects were less polarized politically. But less informed about factual news after being off Facebook for a month. Interesting. Let's check in with Warren Weinstein, our expert on the internet. What do you think of that Lorne? I went and I read the full study because I wanted to see what the what the details were. And you know, they used Facebook in this in this study, they're kind of extrapolating to other social media, generally they're trying to. With all due respect to the authors. Studies the study reports is full of data charts. It's got statistics. It really strikes me like a skyscraper built on a foundation of San because they admit their sample size was quite small. It wasn't well-balanced from a statistical standpoint and the effects that they're talking about these happiness the ticks really relatively small. So you're really left with a question. But a study like this does it really give you any information to get you past you know, sort of your basic intuitive feeling. Yeah. If you spend less time social media, find other things to do that. Maybe you're more interesting. When you start talking about concepts like being happier in a study like this, you're dealing with rather hazy, very subjective self reported measures, and you're left wondering, you know, could you ab-, actually, okay? You get some more happiness leaving social media. But what you have gotten even more happiness with a nice big chunk of chocolate. That's a good point. Wh what it does tell you the Lauren a lot of people are getting their news on the internet. And and and that's not just social media. Of course. I mean, there's lots there are news sites. I get. I actually get most of my news throughout through an old school the mechanism called RSS, which is apparently gaining in popularity again, which lets me look across a very broad range of sites to see what's being discussed. Not just on one satellite, but decentralized across the internet in terms of of news headlines, but yeah, most people do centralized and social media and to the extent that they do that at one site. They're going to be vulnerable to all the positives. And negatives of that kind of approach that we've talked about in the past. Thanks, lauren. I'm sure we'll be talking with you this week more people over the age of seventy five should be taking statins..

Facebook Washington Post Lorne Gerald Smith Lauren Steve Reeves Federal Emergency Management a PTSD Internal Revenue Service Warren Weinstein Fort Worth intern New Orleans New York University official Howard US Iran
"new york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"So I think everybody has a sense that as a general rule chemicals are bad for you. You don't want a lot of chemicals in your body pesticides. For example, are things you want to keep out of your body. Perhaps you've heard that the receipts you get from gas stations or grocery stores are coated with a chemical called BPA. And if you touch it that can get in your body, and that's not good. And you've no doubt heard that you're not supposed to heat food in the microwave in a plastic container because the chemicals in the plastic can Leach into the food and get into your body. So yes, we all have a sense that chemicals are not good. But what most of us know about this is pretty vague and incomplete, and as it turns out, we need to know a lot more because the science is in and a lot of the news is not good news here to explain it is Dr Leonardo tra- Sunday. He is a pediatrician is vice chair. Chair for research of the department of pediatrics at New York University, and he's author of a book called sicker. Fatter poor the urgent threat of hormone disrupting chemicals to our health and future. And what we can do about it. I Dr welcome. Thank you for having me. You bet so start by making the case here because as I said, I think people have a general sense that chemicals aren't good. We don't want a lot of extra chemicals in our body. There's no real upside to that. But I think the pictures a bit blurry and incomplete so focus it and fill in the blanks. Sure. So let's just talk with about hormones, which we don't think about in our daily lives, but there are basic signaling molecules that our body uses to orchestrate normal bodily.

vice chair Dr Leonardo tra Leach New York University
"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're a co production of the BBC World Service PRI and W G B H here in Boston. We are in a national emergency actually more than two dozen of them serious. I'm not talking about Donald Trump declaring a national emergency to get his border wall. Built Trump said today, he's not going to do that immediately. He will leave it to congress. But here's something you might not realize we took a tally, and there are currently thirty one national emergencies still active President Trump declared three of them before that Barack Obama put nine in place. The oldest active one goes back to Jimmy Carter. So how does a national emergency actually work is it an exclusive power of the presidency. Or does congress have a say Andrew boils with the Brennan center for Justice at New York University school of law. Unfortunately, congress does not have to be involved in continuing declarations of national emergency. The president is required to renew national emergency. Every year or they oughta medically expire, you say, unfortunately, congress isn't involved. What do you think? That's unfortunate, my view and the view of the Brennan center is that over the years. The congress has not done its work. There needs to do in order to ensure that its operates sufficient oversight of the president's ability to declare national -mergency to use emergency powers, one fix to that would be to set up a regime, for example, where the president is allowed to initially declared a national emergency. And then it's incumbent on congress to renew those national emergencies after a certain amount of time. Yes. So there are a number. I mean, close to over thirty national emergencies that are still in effect. So what does that mean are they all ongoing and still active, and if they're not why was the original declaration, not rescinded? Yeah. I'm so since the national emergencies act took effect in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight there have been a large number of national emergencies declared as you as you noted thirty one of them are still in effect some of them have been rescinded since that time, and they are essentially renewed every year, the longest.

congress President Trump president Brennan center Brennan center for Justice BBC Barack Obama Boston Jimmy Carter New York University school of Andrew