35 Burst results for "New York University"

"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 4 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Number one thing you can do is get vaccinated as soon as you can. Luckily, I know vaccines are still hard to come by in many places. What should people do if they can't get a shot yet? Yeah, you know, I was talking to Joseph osmonds about this. He's a biologist at New York University, and he's been helping lead the effort to stop the outbreak. He says right now, people who are part of queer sexual networks need to be aware of what activities put them at risk. Right now, those are encounters with folks. You don't know well, who you can't have conversations with about risk or places where people meet for sex. In particular, some 30% of cases or so seem to be associated with saunas and other places where folks meet for sex. And he also emphasizes that if you're not part of this group, part of gay and queer sexual networks, your risk right now is very, very low. Okay, now finally, both of you have reported on this since the U.S. outbreak began more than two months ago. What are some of the key questions that you're following and actually hoping to get answered? Let's start with you on that. Yeah, I mean, I have a lot of questions right now. And I think a lot of people do. But one of the main things that we really want to know is how much does the spread from people who don't have symptoms yet, or who don't ever get symptoms. Asymptomatic or pre symptomatic spread is still an open question. Another is for people who have had monkeypox. One question that they're asking doctors a lot right now is when can I start having unprotected sex again? Because it's not clear how long the virus stays in semen and how much it spreads that way. Now, these are important questions because they get to a bigger issue, which is, you know, are we giving people useful advice that they can follow and advice that really helps stop the spread? Yeah, what about you, Michael? Yeah, you know that last point is so key, right? What is going to stop the spread? What is going to in this outbreak or could in this outbreak? And for me, there's one huge question, and that's about the vaccine. You know, will this vaccine be effective enough to slow down transmission? There are some signs that might be true, but this vaccine takes time to work. And right now there is still little vaccine broadly available and we actually have very little data about how effective the vaccine is. So we need to get more information on this vaccine and like pink says, we need to get information that people can use and implement to reduce their risk and reduce the spread. NPR's Mike Lee and dukla and ping Huang, thank

Joseph osmonds New York University monkeypox U.S. Michael dukla Mike Lee NPR ping Huang
"new york university" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:18 min | 5 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on Gastropod

"So let's start with the story from Carla's upcoming book. So one of the stories that I write about is this women named Elizabeth Hansen, who was taken captive. She was a mother of 6 and she had just had her 6 child two weeks prior when she was taken captive by wabanaki raiders during dumber war in 1724. So Hanson was not a new parent and she didn't mention having trouble with breastfeeding before, but being taken captive, walking long distances, not having access to food and doing all this really close to postpartum, her milk dried up, and she was unable to feed her child. So in that situation, it was a wom knocky woman who taught her how to make wob naki baby food, basically. To boil walnuts and water together with fine cornmeal. And this made a food that the baby was able to eat and Hansen said that the baby thrived and looked well after eating this diet. For as long as there have been babies needing to be fed and unable for any number of reasons to be fed on human milk, there have been substitutes. Obviously, there's the milk of other mammals, cow's milk, sheep's milk, even pig's milk. None of those are the same as human milk, even without modern chemical analysis, people could tell cow's milk was thinner and not as sweet as human milk. So, they attempted to remedy that by adding some starch and some sweeteners, some sugar or honey. Carla told us there were two official categories of what was called dry feeding and early modern Europe and the European colonies. These two infant foods were called pap and panada. So pap is milk and flour or breadcrumbs, panada tends to add in broth into that mixture. And then the Native American versions that you see of these things tend to be sort of nuts and corn, sometimes meat or broth in there as well. Once you've got your substitute, you've got another problem, the problem of how to get this pap or panada, or whatever mush into the baby without your breast as delivery vehicle. Carla told us about pap boats, which were super shallow sort of dishes to help the food cool down before feeding the baby. But there were also bottles. There are archeological findings that show types of bottles or gourds being possibly used for infant feeding. Nipples were a problem, so they were sometimes made of cork, made of animal bladder, a glass tube. Amy Bentley has been on the show before. She's a Professor of food studies at New York University and author of the book inventing baby food. We had her on before to talk about introducing babies to solid foods for our episode first foods. But she also researched how infants were fed. There were a variety of types of delivery devices invented glass bottles were manufactured eventually and became the standard and then plastic with rubber nipples. So did any of those babies fed pap and pinata in a gourd with a cork nipple actually make it? Sometimes they did sometimes they didn't..

Elizabeth Hansen wabanaki raiders Carla Hanson Hansen Amy Bentley Europe New York University
Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:38 min | 8 months ago

Biden Wrote College Rec Letters for Kids of Chinese Exec Tied to Hunter

"Turns out there's now a piece of smoking gun evidence that ties Joe and Hunter Biden very closely together in the Biden racket. And it is an email that reveals that Joe Biden wrote a letter of recommendation for a crooked Chinese businessman who was, in partnership with Hunter Biden. So this was a political favor directly extended by Joe Biden. President Biden wasn't the president then, but it was vice president. And this is the same Joe Biden who said, I don't know anything about my son's business deal. I don't have any involvement in any of that. It's nothing to do with me, and this has been the left's mantra now. Now that they can deny the laptop, they are taking refuge in the idea well, Joe didn't know anything about it. Well, let's look at what happened here. Turns out, in 2017, vice president Ben vice President Biden wrote this letter of recommendation for a guy named Jonathan Lee ally. And this guy Lee is the head the CEO of a big company, which was in a joint venture with Biden's Hunter Biden's company, which was called Rosemont, Seneca. Hunter Biden, in fact, had a 10% stake in the Chinese guy Lee's company. And this guy Lee sends a note to Hunter Biden and his business associates, which is Devin archer and Jim bolger, and this is what Lee writes. He goes, gentlemen, please find the attached resume of my son, chrisley. He's applying to the following colleges for this year, and he lists Brown university Cornell University and New York University. And then he attaches, quote, an updated version of his son's CV. Now, what's interesting is to kind of follow this trail. Hunter Biden's associate James Bulger responds with, and he's responding now internally to hunter and Devin archer, he goes quote let's see how we can be helpful here to Chris. In other words, what can we do for this kid? And then a few weeks later, Eric schwinn, who is the president of Rosemont, Seneca. This is the Hunter Biden company. He replies to Lee. And he says, Jonathan, this is Jonathan Lee. Hunter asked me to send you a copy of the recommendation letter that he asked his father to write on behalf of Christopher for Brown university. So what we have here is confirmation that Joe Biden went ahead and as his son asked, wrote the letter for this guy and submitted it to Brown university.

Hunter Biden Joe Biden President Biden LEE Devin Archer Biden Vice President Ben Vice Presid Jonathan Lee Ally JOE Jim Bolger Chrisley Rosemont Brown University Cornell Unive Seneca James Bulger Eric Schwinn New York University Hunter Jonathan Lee
"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 11 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Holds you He's so cool You may have taken a lot of wrong turns but he found the right path and now he's made a lot of money And when he got out of prison in 2020 talent agencies offered Joe up to half a $1 million to be their brand ambassador But it didn't matter because within days authorities announced Joe had run afoul of the quote moral bottom line They declared him a bad social influence shut down his social media accounts and prohibited any talent agency from working with him This kind of state led cancel culture is becoming more and more common As part of China's drive to promote what they call positive energy And what that means and immediately implies is that there is an expectation that at an individual level you are aligned with the expectations and the feelings and the atmosphere of the collective This is Garrett V lander a China studies professor at the university of Westminster She says this push to promote more wholesome and sometimes nationalistic content dovetails with the objective for greater state control In recent years in particular with Thermo wider and ever further reaching policies to get people to correct their attitudes to amend their behaviors Under the banner of positive energy a state performing arts association last year blacklisted more than 80 celebrities for supposedly setting a bad president by swearing too much China's Internet regulator is creating a list of topics celebrities can not touch in an effort to tamp down on quote distorted values Some stars have been made an example of One got a $210 million penalty for tax evasion and the social media account she makes a living off of blocked Politically canceled stars have even been blurred out of videos The state emphasis on positive energy also reflects a greater desire for the Chinese state to both measure and manage public opinion That's hard to do given China is an autocratic state that does not have elections or public polling Here's Angela a media professor at New York University The government is not able to really detect how people actually feel What they can detect with the help of social media analytics is exactly what kind of content are being circulated more widely than others And if that kind of content to the government suggests positive energy then that seems to be a success Wu is describing the rise of public sentiment analysis in China which the ruling Communist Party sometimes uses to gauge public support for its policies And one person measuring positive energy through social media is the director of what mean a data analytics company Anger spreads fastest on the Internet It can trigger cascading negative public opinion The idea then is to promote content that provokes happy feelings QI advises the Communist Party and how to create this positive energy online Positive energy stems from the idea that it's possible to inspire audiences to embody values that are in.

China Garrett V lander Joe banner of positive energy a st university of Westminster Thermo New York University Angela Communist Party Wu government QI
"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:35 min | 11 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Hitlers And now we have these mini traps And so what we've seen is in places like Texas and Florida states are becoming laboratories of autocracy And desantis is particularly disturbing because he wants to have his own civilian National Guard and many states have those But I've discovered doing research that he's also he's also establishing an office for quote election integrity which is code speak for election fraud where it's going to have its own prosecutors and investigators So anybody who if there's an election result in the state that desantis doesn't like he can have his goons go after them and accuse them of violating election law and they've made what used to be misdemeanors and to felonies So these people could be put in jail So this is an example of the kind of authoritarian system at the state level that desantis has planned Ruth Ben gilt I want to thank you for being with us expert in the psychology of authoritarianism and fascism She is the author of strongmen how they rise why they succeed how they fall a Professor of history and Italian studies at New York University and publish She publishes lucid a newsletter on threats to democracy Coming up the CDC is predicting 84,000 people will die in the United States of COVID over the next four weeks We'll speak with emergency room doctor Craig Spencer Stay with us Let's be honest wheelchairs are heavy bulky and ugly If you carry a.

desantis Ruth Ben gilt National Guard Texas Florida New York University United States CDC Craig Spencer
"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:50 min | 11 months ago

"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

"My colleagues know I was the first African American and the first woman from the state of Delaware elected to Congress And I carried this scarf with me It marked an ex that my great great great grandfather used to sign this returns of qualified voter registration of 1867 in Georgia I also carried it on the day of the insurrection Because it is my proof of what we have overcome And it is my inspiration for what is yet to be done As we work towards a more perfect union I continue to have hope even when I feel hopeless because my ancestors would have it no other way And because scripture tells us that weeping may endure for a night but joy comes in the morning And while I remember a great deal that day what I remember most is walking back onto the house floor into the chamber that morning to complete our work The morning when democracy prevailed remember reflect recommit Delaware Congress member Lisa blunt Rochester speaking Thursday We're joined now by New York University professor Ruth then get She's an expert in the psychology of authoritarianism and the author of strong men How they rise why they succeed how they fall She also publishes lucid a newsletter on threats to democracy Can you put what happened yesterday in the context of your study of fascism The anniversary of what happened a year ago.

Delaware Congress Lisa blunt Georgia New York University Rochester Ruth
"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Bad limits around social life going into the Christmas break there are new coronavirus infections and the new variant Austin is a student at New York University I'm a senior all my Friends are 21 SantaCon was this past weekend and people have been getting sick a lot Some people have negative COVID tests nobody I'm directly like was with But I know that stuff is going around Cornell University abruptly shut down all campus activities and moved final exams online So did Princeton will Zhang at NYU with studying remotely The COVID's going around right now And it's coming back and it's better to be safe than hopefully keep school in person in the spring Syracuse university announced all eligible students and employees must get booster shots before the spring term at Stanford no parties or big gatherings for two weeks when classes resume I'm Ed Donahue AP news This is a 20 a.m. WC PT willow springs and streaming worldwide at 8 20 dot com We are Chicago's progressive chalk where facts matter Now your 8 20 Chicago traffic update The atax way outbound entrance rant from dempster is blocked right now with a crash your trip time on the 80s for montrose to lay cook is 17 minutes inbound at 16 Invalid Kennedy delays are canfield to central and Fullerton to the burned circle It's 34 minutes so hair to downtown 23 from montrose 16 in the reversible I found 19 minutes delta out of the airport in about Eisenhower's packed north avenue to the tri state borders could get at 9th avenue 36 minutes three 90 to doubts out 21 from wolf about 25 to three 90 Stevenson 24 minutes from the veterans memorial if you saw the Lake shore draw in about rye a stall near the Stevenson just cleared its 24 minutes from 95th to downtown That's traffic I've Taliban team Mucinex DMs by layer tablet allows for immediate and extended release Relieving both wet and dry coughs and loosening chest congestion for 12 hours Mucinex is your trust to partner to help relieve cough and chest congestion and get your body back into control Available at Walmart Finding great candidates to hire can be like well trying to find a needle in a haystack but not with zip recruiter It's powerful technology actively.

NYU COVID Ed Donahue montrose Cornell University Syracuse university Zhang Chicago Austin Princeton dempster Stanford canfield Fullerton Kennedy veterans memorial Lake shore Stevenson Taliban
Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

"Many many colleges colleges and and universities universities are are telling telling students students to to prepare prepare for for another another term term of of masking masking testing testing and and if if cases cases get get bad bad limits limits around around social social life life going going into into the the Christmas Christmas break break there there are are new new coronavirus coronavirus infections infections and and the the new new variant variant Austin Austin church church check check is is a a student student at at New New York York University University I'm I'm a a senior senior officer officer twenty twenty one one sack sack on on this this past past weekend weekend and and people people getting getting sick sick a a lot lot some some people people had had naked naked photos photos nobody nobody on on directly directly with with so so I I know know that that stops stops going going around around Cornell Cornell University University abruptly abruptly shut shut down down all all campus campus activities activities and and mood mood final final exams exams online online so so did did Princeton Princeton will will Jiang Jiang at at NYU NYU is is studying studying remotely remotely it's it's going going back back and and it's it's better better to to be be safe safe and and hopefully hopefully keep keep score score in in person person in in the the spring spring Syracuse Syracuse University University announced announced all all eligible eligible students students and and employees employees must must get get booster booster shots shots before before the the spring spring term term at at Stanford Stanford no no parties parties or or big big gatherings gatherings for for two two weeks weeks when when classes classes resume resume many many colleges colleges are are planning planning for for potential potential disruption disruption next next semester semester I I bet bet Donahue Donahue

Coronavirus Coronavirus Infect Austin Austin Church Church New New York York University U Cornell Cornell University Uni Princeton Princeton Jiang Jiang Nyu Nyu Syracuse Syracuse University U Stanford Stanford Donahue Donahue
"new york university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hello 877-381-3811 Kay Gabriel Now who would that be She's a faculty member at NYU New York University It's a big school isn't it mister producer It's always been filled with commies by the way May I say that I think I will K Gabriel and why you faculty member in a video podcast in May of 2021 you know a section of American Marxism that I probably haven't talked enough about is this transgender movement If people want to do things through their body who am I to stop them Back you look at some people they ought to do things to their bodies But you understand my point But what is a movement A transgender movement When I started to dig into this a little bit I found out not all but a significant part of it not all but a significant part of it Is once again drawn back to this Marx society ideology Now K Gabriel you won't hear this anywhere else mister producer dug it up Kay Gabriel as I said as a faculty member no doubt tenured And I want you to understand what's going on in our universities and colleges and now going on in our public school system kindergarten through 12 what's going on in our corporate world What's going on now in the military and elsewhere I want you to listen to this Caught one go Trans liberation calls for communist revolution Starting with the big one Okay I'm going to leap on this first but then I promise I will take a dominant say liberal bourgeois reframing of translation as trans rights and recognitions kind of say based in the supposedly successful pattern of say gay liberation transformed into rights and recognitions realized that the path level of the state in some places not everywhere We make the claim that not only is this insufficient but that pouring our energy into this thing is actually not going to get us what we want or what we need This kind of economic transformation that would be a kind of communist horizon a world in which everyone has what they need So why does this immediately matter to trans people Well what trans people in our particularity have to say or to offer that expands the universalism of a communist of a communist society Which is to say when they would be achieved in time through processes and events that we could call revolutionary that we would have to call revolutionary because they would require the abolition of society as it currently is That when we demand society be rearranged in certain ways this is a part of the project Now a lot of this is verbosity a lot of its pedantic But when you cut through these static you get to the core issues here Here's a professor Among others in this video podcast May 2021 hat tip formed Promoting communism It requires the abolition of society as it currently is That when we demand that society be arranged in certain ways this is part of the project Now I don't know why people doubt me I don't know why people say oh it's a red scare It's not about a red scare It's about informing ourselves about what's going on Used to be under the radar Now it's the closets Wide open And this is something we must attend to deal with This is something we have to challenge and confront And so this is May 2021 in a video podcast This is a professor And she's not alone She's not alone in the least She's promoting Marxism Through gender ism Transgenderism It's like promoting Marxism Through racism Promoting Marxism Through socialism the war.

Kay Gabriel NYU New York University Gabriel
"new york university" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Introduce yourself reno mary. Senior fellow and director of afghanistan regional policy initiatives at new york university minister karachi noted that afghans were looking for hope and peace because of the failings of the previous government yet. This all taller. All-male government that a lax entirely lacks inclusivity in terms of ethnicity that has eighteenth sanctioned individuals. Hardly engenders hope and a among the african population. You see this in the exodus of the of han population. You see this internal displacement of the population. It's also an inherently unstable government. Yes so my question to you. As pakistan has seen as having had a hand in the composition of the government there is still a need for a political settlement. What will talk son in the region do in order to engender a government that is not going to lead civil war because that is not what we see right. Now thank you ma'am. That's your opinion that we've had a hand in putting a government together. Believe you me believe you me. The very independent. They do not like to be told what to do and what not to. They have always working and they take their own decisions right and we have in the bossed. Meet certain suggestions. They paid no heed to that. So this impression that you're carrying that the government that is in office over that placement is not correct to begin with if you follow what i'd say earlier on. What are we suggesting. We are suggesting what you are asking we on the same page in a in fact if you if you dispassionately loot or pakistan is advocating pakistan is advocating motorists or the international community is asking you know we we we we are in fact the spokesman's off the international community. We sensitizing them. What the world. How the world is looking at things and how they have to respond a to international indian if they want acceptability and if they do not get acceptability You know how will they will sustain themselves. His country dot was being basically run to international funding to have the resources to maintain these security apparatus. That was in place to run the government that they were running. Don't that money came from the west. The us contributed in large numbers. Europeans played their role. So why do they want to add to the difficulties. They have plenty of. Why would they want to add by ignoring that. We are suggesting we are advocating. What the international community's saying what we are saying is donor. Rub them the wrong way. Nudged them in the right action. That's the difference minister. We will like you be watching events closely and we hope that What i would describe as your cautious. Optimism is borne out by events. And the next time you come here when we welcome the opportunity to welcome you. We can look at the record. That has that has evolved. But i want to thank you for getting us. Back into the business of in-person or hybrid meetings wanna thank you for spending an hour with us this morning. Wanna thank our members years. Virtually and also let people know at ten o'clock tomorrow morning we have the t. shook for those of you not fluent and galaxy that is the prime minister of ireland will be in conversation with us tomorrow. Talking about the situation in ireland northern ireland and europe across the board again does four minutes to crush initial. Can i just clues. One-sentence guess her objectives are the same approaches. Could be different objectives. Remain the same well. I'm i hope that's the case. I am skeptical in a few areas but It's your choice that is My my experience from history. But i'll end identify thanking you and wishing you wishing you and your country walter. For more event audio subscribe on itunes or visit us at c. f. r. dot org..

pakistan new york university karachi afghanistan ireland us northern ireland europe walter
"new york university" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"When i was a grad student in neuroscience. I really wanted to study the things that were the most cool the cutting edge tools. The interesting questions about the brain and i found myself gravitating towards one particular technique that really wasn't available anywhere other than ucla. Or i was located. We were recording the activity of individual neurons in the human hippocampus. And i have to admit that when it comes to electrophysiology and that component of neuroscience there weren't a lot of women in the field there were just a couple of us in the lab and if you looked at all the authors on the seminal papers very few were female identifying but there was one person who stood out wendy suzuki. Her work was just amazing. It was incredibly rigorous. It was really interesting. it was really well written. If her name was on a conference program. You knew that was one you wanted to go to a really looked up to her. And i saw her as an example that maybe women could actually thrive in that particular field but then a few years ago. It seemed like her research. Program shifted direction. Instead of studying the details of neural activity in the human hippocampus or the primate hippocampus. She started asking questions about how exercise influences the brain and it was such a drastic shift that i wondered what happened and then across my desk came her latest book. Good anxiety. Harnessing the power of the most misunderstood emotion and in it she describes exactly what happened. How at one turning point in her life. She decided to make a change not only in her research program but also in how she lives her life. She's a professor of neuroscience and psychology at new york university and her ted talk has more than thirty one million views. She also wrote a book called healthy brain. Happy life. wendy. Suzuki welcome to inquiring minds. Thank you so much. It's such a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited to talk to you about your new book Good anxiety you probably started working on it well before the pandemic but what an amazing timing as all of a sudden the market for your book has exploded. I imagine it has it. Has i had no idea. I was actually worried that it was delayed. And what's going to happen. And but yeah. The timing ended up being perfect so we are in a place where i think everybody has Had some close relationship with anxiety over the last couple of years if not even before then So tell us a little bit about what anxiety is good for because i think most of us just talk about it as something that we try to minimize and avoid and get rid of. But you suggest actually. It's a powerful thing that can help us. Yes yes so. That is a great question to start with and let me start with the simple definitions. Were all on the same page so anxiety or that feeling of worry that is auburn initiated by situations of uncertainty and. I don't know any more uncertain situation than the one that we've all been living through collectively together last nineteen eighteen months so we are in a period of high uncertainty high anxiety. And i think the core of this book the core kind of nugget of knowledge that i really want to share with your listeners is the idea that anxiety while it's associated with negative feelings and uncomfortable feelings at its core. It evolved in us over the last two point. Five million years to protect us. It is protective just as our stress and threat related response that underlies those uncomfortable feelings was evolved to do that is protect us. So how come. I don't feel protected. My anxiety is the big question and the answer that question. The simple answer is too much of anything. Any good thing even is bad too much chocolate bad and so clearly. We have to high level of anxiety and it's lost a lot of its protective features and so the first step in the book and in fact the first part of the whole book is showing us and talking about techniques to decrease our levels of anxiety to that kind of optimum level. That can help protect us. Think about the moment when you are practicing a talk or giving a public speech and and there's a certain level of activation of energy that you need to give your best talk and over that and you start forgetting things and and you know things go awry but Think of that as your anxiety level and we wanna get to that that particular stage of anxiety or level of anxiety that will optimize your performance. That's what we're trying to get to and so you talk right from the beginning though about how anxiety can tap into disorder. And i think it's really important to talk a little bit about that like. When do we go from everyday anxiety to this is an anxiety now that requires treatment in a more formalized way that is a really important question so anxiety lives on a spectrum and so twenty percent before the pandemic twenty percent of the population had clinical levels of anxiety that is anxiety that that should be treated by medical professional like anything else medical a broken leg. That number has gone up since the pandemic is estimated is gone up an additional thirty percent so Started out with forty million americans so thirty percent more have been diagnosed with with anxiety. And how do you know the difference. I think the best way to think about it is that when your worry and anxiety becomes debilitating. It prevents you from walking out the door from participating and engaging in your life that is the moment where you really should start seeking medical professional help so one of the reasons. I'm so excited to talk to you about this. Topic is because you are a pioneer a real expert in our understanding of neuro plasticity in terms of you know how the brain changes over time with our experience in our behavior and so forth and a lot of people. Have this notion that howie respond to anxiety is kinda hard wired in you know. It's an overactive amid deloitte. And there's not a lot you can do about it so i wonder if you could tell us a little bit about how we understand the relationship between our wiring the brain over which we feel like we have no control and this relationship between good or healthy anxiety and the kind of.

wendy suzuki ucla new york university Suzuki wendy auburn anxiety howie
CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

One Life Radio Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

"Mary holland. One of my favorite people. How you doing today mary. I'm grace could yeah. It's great. We're going to call him a mondays mondays with mary. It's gonna be regular well and there's so much to talk about my goodness let me introduce you for people that maybe are listening for the first time mary holland serves as president and general counsel of children's health defense. She left the faculty of new york university school of law where she surfers seventeen years most recently directing. Its graduate lawyering program. Mary received her master of arts and juris doctorate degrees from columbia university and her undergraduate degree from harvard. She has worked in international public and private law and mary is the co author a vaccine epidemic and the hp vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation betrayed. You can find mary at children's health. Defense dot org. That's children's health. Defense dot org. We have a lot to cover today with our children's health defense. Update okay so there were an additional twenty seven thousand reported injuries from the covert vaccine in just one week so from last week to this week. So what kinds of what. Kind of injuries. Mary are being reported. And what about deaths bernadette all kinds of injuries are being reported and death the total deaths so far that have been reported and we know that's really a small faction of what the real number probably is over thirteen thousand and the number of total injuries. That have been reported or over six hundred thousand. I don't think this would be possible. Except for the fact that the government and the industry and the healthcare profession all have liability protection under emergency use authorization status It's really distressing thirty. Two percent of those deaths were within forty eight hours of having developed symptoms after the shot. So i it's it's extremely troubling bernadette It's just there. Were over five hundred fifty deaths last

Mary Holland Mary Children's Health Defense New York University School Of Columbia University Harvard HP Bernadette Government
Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

Q

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Legendary Rolling Stones Drummer Charlie Watts

"Charlie Watts joined the Rolling Stones in the early days of the band 1963. It was a bit of a left turn. His early interest was in jazz, percussion and I love this quote from Charlie about joining the band, he said. It meant decades of quote, seeing mixed bum running around in front of me. Which in a way sums up what Charlie did. He provided the steady beat for the group, a group of rock stars who unlike him, embraced the rock star lifestyle and the limelight. Today. We really wanted to start by talking to someone who can help us parse out how important Charlie's worked with the Rolling Stones was Rob Bowman is a Grammy winner and professor of music at York University, as well as a music writer. He first met Charlie Watts in 2000, and two when he was interviewing him for a Rolling Stones book. And he kept in touch with Charlie ever since. Hi, Rob. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. How are you? I am. Well, I want to say I'm really sorry for your loss. Um, what was the first thing that came to your mind when you when you heard the news that Charlie Watts don't I guess. Shock so numb stand, you know, I've been worried for several years. Sooner or later. One of the Rolling Stones are just it was going to pass away or get sick and they were going to be able to play and, uh Couple weeks ago, Of course, Charlie announced Buddy, You've got an emergency operation and wouldn't play the tour and I thought it was so weird that they were going to do the tour without him, because that's not like them. Keith had always said they would never play without Charlie and figure it out. And, of course, when he passed yesterday, my meat so it is. That's why they decided to play the tour. They knew Charlie was dying, and Charlie. I told him to go ahead play. What do you remember? What do you remember first about meeting him? What was he like? He was an amazing, gentle, humble man with an incredible mind for jazz

Charlie Charlie Watts Rolling Stones Rob Bowman Grammy Winner York University ROB Buddy Keith
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Is not efficient. I mean people are working on making it more efficient but it's structured to trust no monop- described bitcoin as created by the paranoid for the paranoid. Because you trust no one. That's why you need ukrainian miners checking transaction when it happens so i think you need a cryptocurrency that has an element of trust that element of trust is what makes currencies efficient. I mean when you take a twenty dollar bill out of your pocket of every time you have to check to make sure that it is in fact twenty dollar bill. That guarantees not very viable. So i i think. That's what cryptocurrencies have to work on his to think about what they need to do to become more efficient currencies. While i appreciate that response and you do next. I wanna move on to sort of some personal questions about your what led to immense success. I mean i just wanna know if you could share a bit about some of the challenges you face. You alluded to them just a bit earlier. And how if you'd stayed in india you don't think you would necessarily be where you are but i want to know if there were mentors along the way and clearly you love the academic field and teaching and i told you. I don't love the academics guy don't like academia at all the way universities structured in the us. Okay i think is almost criminal. In terms of how much we exploit undergraduate students to fund research that nobody reads so nominee imitator. If i was in teaching in college. I'd be teaching in high school. Devours insomnia. First and foremost and i never set off to me a Success was always being having a classroom. That worked so i know to me whatever. External success have come up with his in purely incremental. It's because my teaching has driven everything that i do. What technology is allowed me to do is actually take a classroom that used to be physically constrained to fifty or eighty or a hundred or even three hundred students by navigator and make the whole would. So it's it's technology that i would. I would view as mentor. The platform that i've been able to use to teach to a much. Bigger audience is basically. What's allowed me to get whatever profile. I have out that savannah fame. That comes your would share nor gladly with the internet while no. I'm pulling right from your blog and use indicate contrary to the widely used in fault. I don't teach because i cannot do. I teach because i love teaching and so aggrastat fully about academia sadly share your sentiments. There any other comments you have before we close out here today and anything that you would offer. I know you're certainly not one to plot your crystal ball but any other comments that you might have as we approach q. For appointing twenty-one. No i think you know it's i think. Kobe reminds us that we live in much more unsettled times parents or grandparents or great grandparents..

insomnia india us Kobe
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"So that's part of the reason. I don't time markets and make judgments based on overall metrics because things change. And i have to be open to the possibility that real changes can cause metrics to look too high or too low but that doesn't necessarily mean that there's a correction on the horizon. Okay that absolutely resonates an could you share a few of your favorite stock market valuation metrics. I guess you sort tonight. I mean to me a metric new digest value business. The present riley the cash flow. That's not even a metric. It's a statement of basic business. So it so it's what a discounted gastro valuation is. It sounds something like something fancy but for as long as people bought and sold businesses. It's been built on. Hey how much degenerate. His cash in cash out cash flows. How quickly going to grow and assert me about. These cashflows began to those questions. Evadne falls zodda. So i value companies so metrics. I think are lazy because you looking for one number. That's going to say. Hey go art do this fact. The only market metric that track is called the equity risk premium. And i'd tried know what that basically is is our backup from what people are paying for. Stocks are back out from that number. What that expected return is going to be in the future. And i do it with judgment as okay. So based on what stocks are big priced at the start of august twenty twenty one investors can expect dwelling five and a half percent year now. That's you're going on in stocks given what to pain for them and you could say that stew low that's too high but that's what your pricing it. At so in fact it's a number reported my website at the start of every month. Been doing it for almost thirty years. But i think it's a number that tracked just to get a sense of. What can i expect to earn as 'cause that has consequences. You're thirty years old. He went to set aside money for a pension. And you're investing in stocks. You might look at the path. Is i think i can make ten percent. But if you'll pricing stocks on five and a half percent sooner.

riley
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Us gave me a chance to do things. I could never have done. The the of nineteen seventy nine. If i'd been born forty years later things that have been very different. But for me when i left in the united seven hours actually coming to a place where it was easier for me. Do not dude things. That i couldn't have done in india that i left. I'm eternally grateful for the opportunities. I got in the. Us to be myself. And no i would never become an academic in india because What it give up become an academic and it would be too much here. I was able to have my cake and eat it too. I was able to tell people what was on my mind and still be able to earn a decent living saying that survivor platform. Now for very simple reason. I say what's on my mind. I don't worry about the consequences. And i'm lucky enough to be at a place in my life where i can do that so i'm grateful for a lot of things that life has given me and my journey has been one of those things. It's been johnny of learning but at the same time a johnny freedom while that an incredible incredible assertion that you make and i really appreciate the fact that you don't speak to n i do think that just speaking from experience and various interviews. I've done some people do comment upon india but but as you stated it's in a bubble based upon what they recall. Perhaps not attuned with what's happening now wanted before i don't up to you but i would say something i just recently valued so motto and enough those them in Familiar didn't online food delivery company and one of the things. I said way sow me now. I point to do as that. Indians have not been as active in ordering food from restaurants as the chinese. The chinese prolific in market is huge to chinese market. Is one hundred. Ten billion in the indian market is three billion and one thing i said in the bog is. Don't take this generalization. But i grew up in india with my grandmother had never ever been to a restaurant in indiana life and a reaction to be asked to do want to go to restaurant was why would i want to go to a restaurant when i can hire a cook to cook exactly the food i want and i said that's the india that i grew up in the that i grew up in ten million people in early five restaurants because people did not go out. But i'd be no emulsified. Said that's the way india's now because this is forty years late. It's very different. Would people go out a lot more. But i think that kind of small experience is what i'm talking about multiplied over and over again in different aspects of life. That's an immensely important observation. You're absolutely correct. And i didn't realize the difference between china and india. What a fascinating variation there. Well i want to move into my first question for you ben. Graham the value investing legend. Like to say that in the short run the market is a voting machine but in the long run it is weighing machine with the stock market achieving new highs on a nearly daily basis and with the price earnings ratio of the s&p. Five hundred approaching. Thirty five a level seen historically only during periods of earning stress. How do you wade long. Run health of the current bull market. And could you share a few of your favorite stock market valuation metrics. I mean i. I think that it's It's food id to play games timing the market. I ain nothing good ever comes of it so you can think the market is overpriced. I can think the market is over priced. But it's kind of irrelevant. The market is not some gigantic machine. It's a collection. It's a consensus of what all i think about the future. I love that quote from ben..

india united seven Us indiana Graham ben china
"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Television media outlets such a cnbc msnbc and bloomberg to name a few uh schwab. Welcome to the show. Glad to be here..

"new york university" Discussed on The Cave of Time

The Cave of Time

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on The Cave of Time

"To the cave of time. Podcast and live stream. Live on odyssey. You say that's just rod. I have no idea from time in my headphones. Maybe i'll try to edit that in for the podcast later if it wasn't playing today we're talking about power. We're talking about dictators. We read the dictator's handbook. We watched how to be a tyrant on net flicks. Mike you've read the dictator's handbook multiple times. This is a this is a really like correct. Yeah yeah so. I started reading. This book I wanna say like two three years ago and it's michelle for a while and it's being something where i mike hot. That's like in the dictator's handbook that. Oh that's the you've brought it up a bunch of times on the podcasts definitely. Yeah so. I thought if will be good to go through again and read and i had an another enjoying it of reread of it and yeah sorry what were you gonna say. I mean i just. I don't know if i'll remember to say later. One of the things that you've brought up on the podcast about this book is the use of feminine gender pronouns. And so i i did notice it but i remember you saying when you brought that up in the podcast. I didn't. i didn't realize you had been talking about this book at the time. I don't think But you said that he keeps flipping back and forth the authors keep flipping back and forth between male and female pronouns. Do they flip back and forth. Because anytime i tried to be the the only thing that stuck out to me is when they're using feminine pronouns like they'd be talking about You know stalin and hitler and all these dictators that were all men and then they would generalize it and say if a dictator wants to do blank. She needs to do blank and wait. She like we talked about men. Who does he use he sometimes. Yeah yeah yeah the use these he. But i don't think they okay because i never i was anytime. I was trying to pay attention. I never caught them using male pronouns. The the the authors are two guys from new york university and they're obviously like very progressive liberals and so two professors at new york university Do not and. I don't know just reading the book. It seemed like they were pretty liberal. No i don't know nothing. This import like liberal democracies on a pedestal and they seem to play but most most people do like so would sean hannity hersher i. Maybe i'm wrong. I'm just assuming they just like fair. University professors living in new york. No i'm not. I'm not disagreeing. Just i didn't no no i..

michelle Mike mike new york university stalin sean hannity new york
Can America Fix Its Trains?

Slate's If Then

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Can America Fix Its Trains?

"Take a trip into the near future with me. A future where amtrak service looks less like the slow old system that we all know and more like the bullet trains that whisked people across countries like japan and france. This is what i think of as normal high speed rail's new york to washington an hour forty five. Maybe forty new york. Boston about the same new york philly should be forty forty five minutes apart. That's alon levy who has spent a lot of time thinking about how to improve train. Service blonde is a mathematician by training. But they're working now on. Something called the transit costs project at new york university. The project keeps track of how much similar train projects cost in. Different countries in the lawn is also an advocate for how american train travel should be what i would call train. Utopia ideally enter. The train station may be five minutes before the train departs. You can find an advance and reserve a seat. If you're with a friend you can reserve seats together. Emperor doesn't let now. There's lots and lots of capacity so you don't need to charge really high prices to avoid the train getting fall. Let's say new york and boston might be forty nine dollars. Tranche are going to be very frequent and the reason is that the northeast. Carter is enormous. How many people live there. It's what fifty million people between four enormous metropolitan areas so instead of having to two hours or half an hour you'd be waiting fifteen minutes.

Alon Levy New York New York University Japan France Boston Washington Carter
"new york university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Investigating political ads. So are out of batory project is down. We are actually about to launch out observatory in germany to monitor that country's election next month we're actually gonna watch that next week. I think our hope is that we can hand over some of these projects to other researchers who can be good could be good custodians of those so that at least some of this research can continue to happen. Some of our public facing tools can continue to inform journalists and the public laura. I appreciate you taking the time to speak with us today. Thanks for having me laura. Laura adelson is a phd candidate and researcher at new york university. We reach miss.

germany laura Laura adelson new york university
Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

"The quickly approaching fall semester has America's colleges under pressure to decide how far they should go to guard their campuses against the corona virus at New York University Monday marked their first in person college tours in sixteen months and there was lots of talk about mandatory vaccines says assistant VP of admissions Jonathan Williams the universe is crying all students to be vaccinated NYU is one of hundreds of colleges nationwide that have told students they must be fully vaccinated but seventeen year old Jessica Abraham who's considering the school still has not gotten one public school I really wanted many more colleges have held off on vaccine mandates in many Republican led states governments have banned such requirements or school leaders face political pressure to limit their anti virus actions I'm Julie Walker

NYU Jonathan Williams Jessica Abraham America Julie Walker
"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"new york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morita Sturcken from New York University has written a book about Selma and Louise. So what was it about the film that Captured the imagination in the summer of 1991. It is actually amazing to think about how the film really sparked several different debates that summer. It was certainly the most talked about film of 1991. And I think that's because The film is on one hand about the relationship of women, two guns to the law to sexual violence, right And on the other hand, it's also about liberation and women breaking free and Doing things that men do without apology and hitting the road and And so there are many ways in which the film does a kind of gender reversal on cinematic genre. It puts women in a road movie and women. In a kind of kick movie, and, um, and so it just defied so many expectations that summer, you were sort of exposed to have an opinion on it was talked about everywhere It was talked about in the bathroom it was talked about in the bedroom it was talked about at the water cooler. It was a film that you were supposed to have seen. And There was a lot of attacks on it in the media. And that sort of also generated this larger discussion about why does the film strike a nerve? Do you remember seeing it for the first time? Oh, yeah, I remember seeing it with a group of friends and you know, my normally timid friend got up in her seat and said, Yeah, you know, I was like, Oh, my God. I have a dumb and Louise live forever T shirt. You know, it was a cultural phenomenon for sure it ruffles Others, though, didn't it? Yes. And I think that really is about the question of women in relationship to guns and in relationship to sexual violence, right. So it was even called neo fascists, just saying that anybody can break the law and we're supposed to identify with them when they're breaking the law. But of course, that happens all the time when men play those roles. Is there an irony that people know it was Ridley Scott's direction but don't necessarily know who wrote it. Kelly Corey earned an Academy Award for her script, and she went on to have a pretty high profile career. So people think of Cali curry as sort of the third woman of some and the waste. But I think the power of the film and And looking back on it now, 30 years. It's a It is a really well crafted film, and some of that is about This very strong script in combination with Ridley Scott's kind of embrace of the American West and and the way in which he uses cinema. To show the women breaking pre out into the West and then the western landscape just constantly cutting them off trucks. Cowboys police airplanes right they there is a sense in which his direction really heightened the way the kind of tension between the sexes that it's really at the core of the film. And people who might not remember much about the film might not even have seen. It will know the final scene. Don't get caught. Are you talking about? Keep going..

Morita Sturcken Kelly Corey Ridley Scott 1991 30 years Academy Award Selma New York University third woman two guns first time of 1991 one hand American Louise Cali curry
The Science of Learning a Second Language

Short Wave

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Science of Learning a Second Language

"All right emily kwong today. We are talking about the science of learning second language because you are learning mandarin chinese which like as far as a pandemic hobby goes more power to more bart. Right for real. Though it is a hard language to learn. Language itself actually is an incredible ability. If you think about it that we humans have it involves many parts of the brain and the study of language spans across many different disciplines. So bilingual's studied in at least three different fields linguistics psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Sarah phillips is a phd student in the linguistics department at new york university. And exactly the person. I wanted to call up to talk about language learning who. Yeah i remember sarah from our episode on six hundred like how the brain responds to sentences with confusing grammar or syntax. Yeah brains and language are hurt. Jam met in korea while her father was serving in the marine corps and they raised her bilingual here in the us. Learning korean was very important to be able to communicate with my mom's side. They family and the same way that growing up speaking african american english was very important in being able to communicate and be a part of my dad's family. She's got a really interesting backstory. And i told her about my project about taking mandarin class for two hours every monday flash cards on the other nights watching movies. I can't understand and listen to us. Someone who is engaging in learning a second language thereby uses another language on a pretty regular basis that means you're a developing bilingual so in essence you are via lingual by by you know we probably exactly if maybe maybe maybe as an alternative to be bilingual. Maybe we should think of. This is developing bilingual.

Emily Kwong Sarah Phillips Bart New York University Marine Corps Sarah Korea United States
Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

Live Happy Now

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

"Week. We're talking with new york times. Bestselling author tau bench shahar. Who's new book happier no matter what looks at how we can cultivate hope resilience in purpose even during the most difficult times of our lives. Let's hear what he has to say. Thank you so much for coming back on. Live happy now. Thank you paula. It's great to be back. Well we had a wonderful reason to have you back because you've got a new book out and it's called happier no matter what one thing that i really like about this book. Is that right up front. You talk about covert and quarantines and how that affected us. So why was it important for you to write a book that specifically spoke to this time in our lives would happen soon as covert hits and new social unrest seemed like a world was or we were losing control over our world. Many people approached me and said you know what is the relevance of science of happiness now. isn't it a bit redundant. One of my friends went as far as suggesting that we quarantine happiness for awhile and in response to that. I wrote the book and the basic argument is that not only is the science of happiness still important. It's actually more important than ever. Yeah and so. Many people are thinking about survival whether that's their physical health. Are there mental health and you point out that happiness and those things are not mutually exclusive. The happiness plays a big role in that. Have very much so you know what would help to me articulate initially for myself and then for my students the importance off the signs that the relevance is actually a concept that was coined by seen. Todd in a seem is a professor at new york university and he writes about the concept of anti fragility anti fragility in other words the opposites affair fragility and what he does is essentially take resilience to the next level. So residents two point. Oh if if you wish specifically you know resilience is about the ability to bounce back. It's going back to where we were before to our original state anti fragility or resilience. Two point oh is bouncing back higher not going back to where we were before but going to a place that is higher better stronger than it was before. This is what resilience to point. Always

Shahar New York Times Paula New York University Todd
Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

The Book Review

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

"Patron kief joins us now. His new book is called empire of pain. the secret history of the sackler dynasty. Patrick thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me back. So let's start with a very basic question. In case people are not aware of the sackler family and why he would be writing about them with title like empire of pain. who are the sackler. So this sort of to waste answer that question until a few years ago what. The sackler name Generally to to the extent that people were aware of this family it was a very wealthy family. One of the wealthiest families in the united states with a branch in the uk in london and they were known chiefly for philanthropy right art museum wings. Hundreds of millions of dollars to art museums and universities and medical research and would very often put their name on these bequests. If you you know in new york city go to the metropolitan museum of art and there's the sackler wing And that was what they were known for. What was more mysterious. Was the source of this wealth and it has People have become more widely aware. Recently that That the bulk of this wealth comes from a company purdue pharma which produces the powerful painkiller oxycontin in this era in which the naming of things and the un naming of things mounting and the on mounting has become very active. Is it still the circle ring. In the metropolitan museum is sackler still emblazoned on all of these buildings and donated wings. Well it's very much in flux. So as i speak today it's still the sackler wing but the has actually announced today initially. They said they weren't taking any future. Donations from the soccer is because of the connection between the family and the crisis and then more recently. They've said that they are You know i think assessing is is the word whether or not the sackler wing will remain the sackler wing. Some institutions have started to take the name down so tufts university took down the sackler name from a series of buildings Because the students there this is at the medical school had said. I don't wanna go to class in a building named after this family and and get my medical education. They're more recently. New york university has done the same. The louvre in paris is taken down the sackler name. So there's a real question for many of these other institutions and there's dozens and dozens of them were the name still stands whether or not they'll keep it

Patron Kief Joins Metropolitan Museum Patrick Pharma New York City London United States UK UN Soccer Tufts University New York University Paris
Massachusetts State Police Sign Pledge to Increase Women in Policing

Cindy Stumpo is Tough as Nails

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Massachusetts State Police Sign Pledge to Increase Women in Policing

"Czar Cohen reports. The Massachusetts state Police have joined the 30 by 30 Initiative, created at the New York University School of Law with the goal of making women 30% of police forces by the year 2030. State police Superintendent Colonel Christopher Mason says. Right now women make up only 5% of the mass state police force. A lot of things that make it difficult to recruit women into law enforcement are the traditional perception of what the job is about the pretty sophisticated job. That requires a lot of skills. A lot of those skills that are skill sets that that women have, He says. The recent turmoil and controversy surrounding police nationally have made recruiting difficult recruiting continues to be a challenge. Not only for the Massachusetts state police but nationally, Mason says the state police hope to learn the best strategies for recruiting and retaining women by working with the other members of the initiative. Art Cohen WBZ Boston's news radio in sports. The Berlin's fault of the

Czar Cohen Superintendent Colonel Christo Massachusetts State Police New York University School Of State Police Mason Art Cohen WBZ Boston Berlin
Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

"Out of Atlanta in response to Georgia's restrictive voting laws, activists are putting other states on notice. Activists are putting pressure on leading companies in Georgia, Texas, Arizona and other states to get corporate America to denounce Republican efforts to tighten state voting laws. As of March, legislators have introduced 361 bills with restrictive provisions. In 47 States, According to the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice at New York University. The fight has put corporate America in a place it often tries to avoid the center of a partisan political fight. This past week, Delta and Coca Cola to of George's best known companies called the new law unacceptable, although they had a hand in writing it. I'm Julie Walker. Coming up after traffic and weather.

Georgia Atlanta Brennan Center For Justice America Arizona Texas New York University Coca Cola Delta George Julie Walker
Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Pressure mounts on corporations to denounce GOP voting bills

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker with with Major Major League League Baseball Baseball moving moving the the all all star star game game out out of of Atlanta Atlanta in in response response to to George's George's restrictive restrictive voting voting laws laws activists activists are are putting putting other other states states on on notice notice that that are are moving moving to to do do the the same same activists activists are are putting putting pressure pressure on on leading leading companies companies in in Georgia Georgia Texas Texas Arizona Arizona and and other other states states to to get get corporate corporate America America to to denounce denounce Republican Republican efforts efforts to to tighten tighten state state voting voting laws laws as as of of March March legislators legislators have have introduced introduced three three hundred hundred and and sixty sixty one one bills bills with with restrictive restrictive provisions provisions in in forty forty seven seven states states according according to to the the nonpartisan nonpartisan Brennan Brennan center center for for justice justice at at New New York York University University the the fight fight has has put put corporate corporate America America into into place place it it often often tries tries to to avoid avoid the the center center of of a a partisan partisan political political fight fight this this past past week week delta delta and and coca coca Cola Cola to to George's George's best best known known companies companies called called the the new new law law unacceptable unacceptable although although they they had had a a hand hand in in writing writing it it I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Julie Julie Walker Walker Major Major League League Base Atlanta George America Georgia Arizona Texas Brennan Brennan Center Center Baseball New New York York University U Delta Delta Coca Cola Cola Coca
Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

The WoMed

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

"Tanya thank you so much for joining me on the woman today. I'm so excited to speak with you. Happy to be here tiny. I think you are our first midwife on the podcast. You very cool yeah. I've had a couple of different fertility. Experts instead steph combat now knowing that's a certified nurse midwife so welcome as my first day. That's so cool. I always knew that you know women and children were going to be the focus of my nursing career. But before i fell into the nikki world i was definitely researching the nurse midwife route. 'cause berth itself is just so cool it is it is. I don't think anyone really gets it unless they're actually a delivery room. I i totally agree. And there's so much you just don't think about ever until you're pregnant. I mean i. I have a twenty year old at this point so my birth and i only have one child. Mike was a long time ago. But i am definitely one of those people that didn't think midwives existed when i was first pregnant. I really thought that you only heard midwife. In historical novels such And so such a learning curve for me to be pregnant. I was young. I was pregnant. But i was notably unhappy with my experience from the very first visit. There's gotta be a better way. And then i was in prenatal yoga class and heard somebody say midwife and my ears perked up it was like what is going over there and before you knew it. I was like sitting in the corner arms and noble reading every book. Get my hands on and kind of knew where i was going to go. Navigating a pregnancy and a new career path essay in time. But it's amazing. How many people. That don't know what a midwife is or if they do they think we only attend home births like all those minds of misconceptions that are you know fun to answer all this questions. So is that kind of what drew you into. Midwifery where are you a nurse. I already at this point or not. I went to performing arts high school. I moved to new york with the state. Can hundred bucks. When i was seventeen years old and then i was pregnant at nineteen years old. It was very sort of meant to be kind of situation. Like i never doubted the moment i was pregnant. I never doubted that thing never crossed my mind to do anything else. I've no judgments about what anybody does ever but for me it felt right even though it was really strange. I didn't think it was supposed to feel right. And you know very quickly. I realized that these two experiences. We're going to be very late to figure it out about midwifery. By the time. I was twelve weeks pregnant. And i was on a hat so like i was my first birth as a dula when i was six weeks postpartum and i went to a few births and i said screw it and i was a nursing school and then i got through nursing school with the sole intention of being a midwife by ban i needed to come up for air for a minute. Yes i waited. I worked for two years. The labor and delivery nurse waiting for my kid to be old enough to go to kindergarten and i went to midwifery school while she was intended artem in first grade. So that's that's how it all happen. So those two journeys were intimately linked for me. I'm going to sound just like alexis on shits creek. But i really loved this journey. Well kids. I can't say i know the reference because i tried to watch a few episodes of ships creek like when it first came out and for whatever reason i didn't get into it and everyone says how amazing it is and how the pandemic has changed the way the show comes across and i feel like i have to give it another. Go definitely definitely give it another go. I think the first time. I watched the whole season through or like the whole first thing like shits creek as a as a whole i am. I watched it all the way through. It wasn't really until the second season that i was like. Okay yeah i really get it. And then i just started rewatching watching it all again because it's sometimes need to turn on those. Those calming lake funny shows like parks and rec is gone off netflix. Now and i still have shits creek and meant just. It's great to have on during the day. And i'm just laughing but off now so i'm gonna have to give it another go with all my free time i would. So what was midwifery school like for you. Like what's all involved in that so midwifery school kind of ties into another big piece of my life. I think i guess. I tend to Dotson things at the same time. I so i went to nyu new york university for nursing. Okay and when it came time to go to midwifery school. I wasn't super excited about going to one of the campus based programs in new york like it wasn't about that i thought i wouldn't get a good education at all the new york based schools. But i knew that they would put me in a clinical site and that it wouldn't be my choice and i had really clear beliefs about time to wipe. I wanted to be and where i wanted to train. I had i gave for a free standing birthing center and i was really interested in doing center. Work home birth. Were all of that. And i just at the time did not really want to be in the hospital understandable. I figured out that there were some distance education programs. And that at some of the distance. Ed programs you actually had to find your own clinical site and while that might be a deterrent for some people for me gave me the freedom to figure it out

Shits Creek Tanya Steph Nikki Artem Mike New York Alexis Nyu New York University For Nu Netflix Dotson
I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

Short Wave

04:52 min | 1 year ago

I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

"Okay so earlier. I did this thing. That probably sounded weird to you. Emily your sentence. It didn't make any sense but you know another day. Another dollar alright. Okay well well so when someone does something unexpected like that when they're talking to you or get this even when you're reading something that doesn't follow the standard conventions of the language. Something kind of cool happens in your brain l. So they can actually measure this right so when we studied brain one of the ways that we can study. Brain activity is by measuring electrical current. That is flowing through your cortex rates so the surface of your brain for the cells to talk to each other. They released electrical current. This is sarah phillips our expert i mentioned earlier. I am a rising fourth year. Phd student in the linguistics department at new york university and also a member of the neuro linguistic slab very cool. She studies bilingualism and code switching which we will touch on in a future episode because it is objectively but for today. She's helping me out as explain. These things called n. Four hundred and p six hundred. He's are measurable responses. That happen your brain as you process language okay so little electrical signals that your brain is always giving off right but these are different from your normal brain buzzing. That would happen. If you're listening to like a quote normal sentence got it basically these phenomena are your brain saying like hey hold up something weird happening here okay so like when i peanut jam your brain that an example of one that can spark some. You know chemistry for you. Oh yeah yeah. I felt wrong and a lot of ways so as i peanut. Jam your brain. That's a good one anyways. Yes in nineteen eighty two psychologists. Marta kunas and steven hilliard published a paper showing that among these electrical signals. There was this big response about four hundred milliseconds person. Reading a sentence came across a word that was like semantic league confusing or the meaning was wrong. Okay so it's like a linguistic oddball sentences thrown your way your brain will produce a end. Four hundred response four hundred milliseconds after you heard peanut gem in that benefits. I peanut jam. Your brain your brain was like whoa. What's that doesn't make any sense. Exactly yeah and your brain. Does this kwong in less than half a second. Which is wild. So sir philip's art linguist from earlier explained. It happens in other scenarios like garden path sentences. So you start to hear a sentence and you think you know what's going to happen next but then something goes wrong okay and so when something goes wrong your brain has to go wait what. I don't think i interpreted this how it was supposed to be. I've got a restart which sarah says can happen with the sentence as simple as he spread the warm bread with socks yummy. This is fun. I like this okay. So how does this compare to. The p six hundred you were mentioning earlier is different than and four hundred the big differences just that they go in opposite directions and they happen at different points so when she says opposite directions. She's talking about how they kind of show up on these science graphs. You've them sure one one shows up in the positive and the other shows up as negative and and okay but for me the easiest thing to hang onto is that they happen at different times so the four hundred happens four hundred milliseconds after the wuxi. The p six hundred. The brain gives off slightly later. That response peaks roughly six hundred milliseconds after the woopsie. That's really it and we're trying to understand when we see this type of fact. What could this affect represent. What is this affect characterizing. What's happening in the brain in. Initially researchers thought that the answers to these questions was that the end four hundred was happening because of semantic errors so involving the meaning of words right and that the p six hundred was showing up because of grammatical errors which not to brag. But i make all this and we've met you for that. Yeah yeah sure okay but but it turns out as research into all this has gone on these effects might be more generalized kind of than researchers previously thought it might just have to do with how your brain processes complex language and this just shows that when we think about language and how we process language. They're actually a lot of steps involved. Starting from recognizing that the sound that you hear is a sound of the language that you speak and how those sounds then combined to form some parts of words.

Sarah Phillips Marta Kunas Steven Hilliard Sir Philip New York University Emily Sarah
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

Marketplace

03:38 min | 1 year ago

How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

"Administration is reviewing its options in many areas of foreign policy, including Afghanistan. It is America's longest war and in a deal with the Taliban. Last year, the Trump Administration agreed to withdraw U. S troops by May, but The new administration says the Taliban is not keeping its end of the bargain, hinting that U. S troops will likely stay longer. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports a former U. S government and U. N expert on Afghanistan, Rina Amiri knows that Americans are tired of fighting endless wars. Now we're trying to win the peace. But she says the Trump administration left a complicated hand. Amiri, now with New York University, says the U. S emboldened the Taliban. By negotiating the withdrawal schedule and keeping to it even as violent spite and Afghan peace talks faltered. And now what we have the situation where the Taliban feels very much they have won this war that they're winning this war that the peace agreement is simply a cover for withdrawal for the U. S. The U. S still has 2500 troops in Afghanistan under the deal with the Taliban, they're supposed to be gone a few months from now. But Biden's national security advisor Jake Sullivan, says the administration is taking a hard look at whether the Taliban are meeting their commitments to break ties with terrorists, reduce violence and negotiate in a serious way with the Afghan government. And in that context, we make decisions and now our force posture and our diplomatic strategy going forward. That's welcome news to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. He told the Aspen Institute last week that he expects a U. S team in Kabul soon, and he's gotten good signals from Secretary of State Tony Blinken. A promised me robust diplomacy in the region. Full coordination with us in a focus on ending 40 years of violence, the bidet administration may be promising too much, though Laurel Miller of the International Crisis Group says it's signaling that it wants to keep some US troops in Afghanistan for counterterrorism purposes and wants a peace deal that protects the democratic and human rights gains of the past two decades. Those are all perfectly fine and understandable things to be saying Again in the very first days of the administration, but ultimately you can't have all of the above. Miller says The Biden administration will have to prioritize. There cannot be both a negotiated peace and keeping some troops even a small number in Afghanistan for counterterrorism or any other purposes Because the Taliban won't agree to that there can't be a negotiated peace and No change in the nature of the system of governance and and writes in Afghanistan. U. S officials have long said they would protect women's rights in Afghanistan. Rina Amiri says not following through on that could send the wrong signal to Islamist groups elsewhere, so she thinks the U. S needs to get the diplomacy, right. And she'd like to see a third party, perhaps from the U. N manage the peace process. It will also be more helpful for the U. S. Because right now, everything right on the U. S. You need a manager of this peace process Right now. We do not have a manager. A State Department spokesperson says the U. S will support the Afghan peace process with a quote senior and robust American diplomatic effort. Trump Administration's envoy, Zalmay Khalilzad, remains on the job. Even a secretary Blinken builds out the team. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington

U. Taliban Afghanistan Rina Amiri Trump Administration Michele Kelemen Jake Sullivan Afghan Government Ashraf Ghani Tony Blinken Amiri Bidet Administration Laurel Miller New York University NPR Aspen Institute Biden Administration Biden America
ACLU, for first time, elects Black person as its president

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

ACLU, for first time, elects Black person as its president

"The ACLU has elected a black person as its president for the very first time New York University law professor Deborah archer becomes the first black president in the one hundred and one year history of the American civil liberties union our expertise is in civil rights and racial justice the ACLU says archer was elected in a virtual meeting of the organisation sixty nine member board of directors the fight against racial injustice is expected to be a top priority for the A. C. L. U. now that Donald trump's presidency is over while trump was in office the ACLU filed more than four hundred lawsuits and other legal actions against his administration I usually after

Aclu Deborah Archer New York University A. C. L. U. Archer Donald Trump
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"new york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More of an impact in arctic regions. But what happens in Arctic areas doesn't just stay there. That's because melting at the polls leads to higher sea levels everywhere. China may be the biggest greenhouse gas emitter in the world. The U. S is still the largest on a per capita basis. But China is also the forefront of renewable energy innovation and also has some of the world's largest conservation projects. Beijing is trying to get to net zero carbon emissions by the year 2060. That means contributing no additional greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. You've alias, studying just how China could get there. He's an environmental researcher at New York University, Shanghai and the author of the recent book China Goes Green. If in your book you Talk about China's ambitious goals envision an ecological civilization. How would you describe what's at the heart of the Chinese government's vision and goals for 2060? The Chinese government is seeing and using this term ecological civilization as a national strategy, and and they're doing this to really describe the Chinese Communist Party. As an actor that tries to restore China back to its former glory. So the official history that a Communist Party has been teaching its people and has been paddling in official history. Ah, graffiti is that China had a glorious past, and it's not just any kind of glory, not just any kind of civilization, a leader The Chinese Communist Party sees itself is building a uniquely ecological kind of civilization. A leadership for the world ecological civilization does sound like a noble goal. But you also described China's green ambitions as coercive environmentalism. Explain that The idea being that if the goal of environmental protection is noble enough, an important enough, and perhaps we can use that gold to justify the means of authoritarianism. In other words, using authoritarians approaches to accomplish environmental protection goes What the Chinese government seems to be doing systematically at home and overseas is using environmental protection to accomplish authoritarians ends right. Well in your book to get specific, Geetha you describe how the Chinese government has used the pretense. Of environmentalism to exert control over communities. Give us some examples of that. Very much. So we're seeing the Chinese government using, for example, facial recognition technologies to control how citizens sort their garbage and recycle under the pretense of a national park initiative or conservation program. They are systematically relocating ethnic minority groups to create new national parks on what China cost the belt and road initiative. The Chinese government is pursuing a lot of government to government deals once again in the name of environmental protection, But these projects turned out to be categorically insensitive. Dissenting voices received the Chinese government using environmental protection as a reason to intensify trade manipulation. So does this model work either and service to the environment or to human or civil rights? Success of China's brand of state led environmentalism doesn't depend on a strong state, and in fact, the success depends on mechanisms that place Chinese state power in check. We see successful moments of Chinese coercive environmentalism when the state is open. To public inputs from all sorts of non state channels. To give you an example, the Chinese government developed to this interesting app, which everybody can download that's called black and smelly waters. Now through this app, the local authorities are getting inputs from the public. When they see a polluted body of water. They snap a picture and send them to the government through this app. In the government, then send their inspectors. What really can help the Chinese government achieved long term in from you know success is opening up the Chinese state to input from various walks of the society..

Chinese government China Chinese Communist Party Beijing Shanghai New York University official researcher