35 Burst results for "New York Times Magazine"

Peter Wood and Other Historians Critique 1619 Project for Being Ideology-Based Over Evidence-Based

Mark Levin

01:58 min | Last month

Peter Wood and Other Historians Critique 1619 Project for Being Ideology-Based Over Evidence-Based

"Well in his book, and you remember, I interviewed Peter would President the National Association of Scholars Life, liberty and live in His book called 16 28 critical response to the 16 19 project. Says the larger aim of the 16 19 project is to change America's understanding of itself. 16 19 Project alliance with the views of those on the progressive left to hate America and would like to transform it radically into a different kind of a nation. Such a transformation would be a terrible mistake. It would endanger our hard won liberty or self government and our virtues as a people. Said the 16 19 project has taken ideas that a few years ago were exclusively fringe. A good way into the realm of mainstream opinion. The idea, for example, that the American Revolution was a pro slavery event once circulated only among conspiracy minded activists. Comic book style theories of history. The 16 19 project has brought it from the playground into the classroom, to the consternation of serious historians everywhere. And he condemned the 16 19 project is phony scholarship. He says it's critical race theory dressed up as history. The usual way for disputes about history. To be resolved, he said, is for historians to present their best arguments and their sources and journal articles each side can can then examine the evidence for themselves and hammer out the truth. But the 16 19 project evades this kind of transparency. Hannah Jones, who make some of the most audacious claims sites, no sources at all. The project, as presented originally in The New York Times Magazine can change no footnotes. No bibliography or other scholarly footholds. In December. 2019 The New York Times Magazine, five exemplary historians. A quote expressed strong reservations about important aspects of the 16 19

National Association Of Schola Project Alliance America Peter American Revolution Hannah Jones The New York Times Magazine
The Tradeoffs of the Substack Hustle

Reset

01:45 min | Last month

The Tradeoffs of the Substack Hustle

"So as you mentioned in one of your newsletters. You're sort of in the creator economy. Now which is kind of funny 'cause from by one version of it you've been creator economy pretty much entire life things and sell them and and do different gigs. I'm interested in your thoughts about it. Because i on the one hand think the creator economy is something rob walker's but doing a most of his his life and on the other hand Seems seems like a very cynical way to talk about exploiting teenagers for a couple of minutes on tiktok or selling you know. we're crypto projects. But that idea that the internet can allow people to make a living doing stuff. They're interested in by reaching an audience. That couldn't reach on their own without the internet is pretty appealing. And i'm wondering. Do you think this is a real different version of what you've been doing in. The passers is sort of a natural progression in. This just goes along with book writing and teaching in magazine article. Writing that you've been doing pretty much all your life. Well i think what i of also. I've my context coming to this both as a some longtime freelance writer. But also someone who's written a number of stories. About like i wrote some of the earliest back kickstarter nazi and of written about youtubers. And and all that stuff so it's been Subject of interest to me professionally for a long time and everything he said is true and like it's sort of all of the above. It's always all the above there. Are there are real success stories so what it comes down to him when it comes down to me what i think is somewhat different is just the control you know when you are a freelance writer. Even if you have a call in stretches on my life where. I had him for the new york times and another one for the new york times magazine.

Rob Walker The New York Times New York Times Magazine
A Journey to the Strange World Beyond Our Screens

Outside Podcast

02:15 min | 3 months ago

A Journey to the Strange World Beyond Our Screens

"Questioning. Our relationship to technology is something. We've done a lot of over the years at outside magazine and on this podcast pacific louis. We have investigated the benefits. We get when we disconnect from various devices and instead seek out connections with the natural world and with each other. If you're listening to this show that probably resonates with you it definitely resonates with the people you just heard. They are friends of the journalist. Chris collin he called them up to help us work through some of the big ideas in his curious new book. It's called off the day. The internet died a bedtime fantasy. Here's how chris explains so off is a funny picture book for adults and adult like children. It's a parable about the death of the internet and what happens to us when that occurs. If you were to look at it at first glance it looks like a sort of like a children's picture book with really interesting Beautiful slightly demented artwork. It's i even know maybe thirty something pages. It's a very slim book okay. You're a serious journalist. You've done being reported feature stories for a bunch of publications including outside and the new york times magazine and wired. So how you go from that to writing. What is very much a kind of silly book here. I think we're all a little defensive at this point in our relationship with internet. No one wants to be scolded anymore. About how we spend too much time online. No one wants to be told yet again that we need to break up with our screens or whatever there was something else that was a little more interesting to me and something that i don't think it's talked about quite enough. What gets neglected. Is this other side of ourselves at came to think of it. As our offline cells. It's just sort of slowly. Vanishing right is because of all the time we spent online so these offline selves in us. Basically we have these versions of ourselves about our lives that are not getting lived. And i think there's something valuable in being reminded the big zest

Chris Collin New York Times Magazine Chris
Massage therapists sue Houston Texans QB Deshaun Watson

ESPN Radio

02:47 min | 4 months ago

Massage therapists sue Houston Texans QB Deshaun Watson

"Is disgruntled in Houston. But that's just the football aspect of night ago. He was also swinging back at the filing of a lawsuit against him alleging inappropriate conduct during massages. That lawsuit filed Tuesday. Then on Wednesday, a second lawsuit by a second planet Though both lawsuits are filed by the same attorney. The second suit, claiming Watson's behavior is quote part of a disturbing pattern of preying on vulnerable women. John McClane from the Houston Chronicle. And what we have your two of the most renowned the parties in the country. Rusty Harden, a turning to the superstars in sports. And Tony Busby, who is a wealthy developer Rooms, a law firm has been on the cover of New York Times Magazine. He's tell May all Head here. He's the one that's filed two lawsuits on the half of plaintiffs, one here and one in Atlanta, charging inappropriate sexual behavior and watchin retained Rusty Harden. His list of clients is extremely long, and he's an outstanding attorney. And so we haven't seen a response from Watts and since the lawsuit Became public and the Texans and the NFL had the response. You would expect they're aware of it. They're gathering information. And so I have no idea. What direction it's going to go. How would affect other teams that they would lowball? The Texans is something's that back away. But you know this pretty. They're gonna want these issues resolved. It was NFL investigate. And that could take a long time. Antonio Brown's has still not been resolved since last off season. So there's so much out there, Freddy about which direction it could go. And right now, nobody has any idea when I say the word timing regarding all of this. What do you say? Bad, bad timing for everybody all around bad for the Texans when they want to maximize what they can get from Watson. I've been saying they should pick the Jets and the Dolphins 2nd 3rd in the first round against each other. I have seized rivals and get the maximum deal. You know their stories about Carolina willing toe. Sacrifice the farm to get into the problem with the Panthers. There's eight overall pick, and there's no guarantee of getting a franchise quarterback that general measure necessary a likes. And so there's other reports. He wants to go to Denver. I don't know why. And then San Francisco. I can't understand wanting to play for Palestinian, but they got Jimmy Garoppolo. For while there was talk of Washington, But Washington has solved this problem, at least with free agents. So This to me is not good for watching and it's not good for the Texans.

Rusty Harden Tony Busby New York Times Magazine Texans John Mcclane Watson Houston Chronicle NFL Houston Football Antonio Brown Watts Atlanta Freddy Dolphins Jets Panthers Carolina Jimmy Garoppolo Denver
Take the Plunge With Suleika Jaouad

Forever35

05:02 min | 5 months ago

Take the Plunge With Suleika Jaouad

"Our guest today is to lak- jawad welcomed feber. Thirty five salako here. We are so excited to have you Slake is the author of the instant. Best selling memoir between two kingdoms. She wrote the emmy award winning new york times column life interrupted and her work has appeared in the new york times magazine. The atlantic vogue and npr among others a highly sought after speaker. Her main stage tedtalk was one of the ten most popular twenty nineteen and has nearly four million views. She's also the creator of the isolation journals community creativity project founded during the covid nineteen pandemic to help others convert isolation into artistic solitude over one hundred thousand people from around the world have joined and her book Yes overbook just came out on february ninth. It's wonderful congratulations. Thank you spend so exciting and so overwhelming in a little. I'm so that are for the course. Hannah's book that came out during the pandemic which is just a whole other layer of stuff and it's a memoir which is a whole other layer of stuff layers so many layers to peel back. Well before we really get into it. We we love to ask our guests at the beginning of an interview to share a self care practice that they have in their lives. It can be quite literally anything And so we would love to hear if there's one that's resonating with you right now. I just did it actually before talking chiku and it's A new self care kind of ritual that came about during pandemic and involves thirty five minute screening meditation and then cold water punching other currently although assuming holes nearby frozen could coach our which is why my restricting Yeah l. okay. So i'm so excited. This is what you started with. Because i've been following your cold plunges on your instagram and we already have a question in the document about them so we can just get kate. Kate is very cold. Plunge curious we've had a lot of listeners who have really into us about how Either cold showering cult bathing has helped with insomnia nervous system trauma experiencing things. So can we start from the beginning. Like how did you come into this. What has it done for you in your life. And how do you maintain the practice especially like now that it is twenty two not even twenty degrees. I'm sure it's colder than that where you are very good question that i ask myself. Every time i find myself submerging. My body freezing so I live not far from the great elizabeth gilbert and the first time we had a friend date. We went for a walk. And we pass mccall. She proceeded to rip off her clothes. Jump in the water. So naturally i did the same and it felt so good Especially in this time where you been spending a lot of time out my computer on-scene who calls And it has its way immediately. Resetting are nervous. i'm And so we decided that we're gonna do it every day and because the kind of get more of a ritual and because the best can't stand being cold water for longer be added into screaming meditation and became really interested and but pops and the science behind breathing. So at is what we've done every day until recently just got too damn cold So now i take a cold shower and of jumping in the freezing water. But i think you know. Part of it was My lining to get into meditation on someone who always struggled meditation. I'm incapable of sitting in a chair with my eyes closed for like five minutes and something about the breathing fouts Not just Actions that kind of focusing on the states. You're you're meditating. you're also. Jimmy's pretty strenuous breathing. Exercises and the other piece of it might fat. In this time. Pandemic Really became kind of creative approach to gathering

Feber Salako New York Times Magazine The Atlantic Vogue Jawad Emmy Award Insomnia Nervous System Trauma NPR New York Times Hannah Elizabeth Gilbert Kate Mccall Jimmy
Buyer's Remorse

Dear Sugars

04:33 min | 7 months ago

Buyer's Remorse

"Work in vanity fair the new york times magazine and sports illustrated. Let's give them a call. Let's do it. Hello hi. this is cheryl strayed. Thank you so much for agreeing to talk to us. I have my co host. Steve almond here. I am a big fan of your writing. Thank you thank you so we're talking about spending addictions today and we'd love if you could share with us and our listeners. Your story let's go back to the beginning. How how did this begin for you. I think it began Ten years ago. I think it was frankly. Precipitated by My wife lisa job overseas new york university and abu dhabi. And that's kinda hard to make a weekend trip and i was. I was on my own. And i was an empty nester. My last son had just got off to college. And when i was on my own i sort of just started shop i think it was related to repression. In my case. I think it was related to trying to figure out my sexual identity clothing for me is very Linked to sex and so it's one box two boxes. Three boxes four boxes. I mean no one except the ups guy probably felt it was insane. And you know. I got a sexual rush. Every time i opened the box and you know in some cases When even aware it out and it just would not stop and it got worse worse and frankly i wrote a book was a memoir by one of my sons and it didn't do well and that is when i hit the wall and i just felt the press. I thought i don't really give a crap about anything than you know ultimately went into rehab. Did it take you some time to come to the conclusion that it wasn't addiction. People diminish this experience. I think we say oh. You're you're a shopaholic and it's not really an addiction. I'm curious what your experience with that was well. I hate the term shopaholic. Because i think it. Minimizes what this is. I mean this is an addiction when you're spending six hundred thousand dollars on leather three years. That's an addiction. That's insane when you have over. One hundred pairs of leather pants and over one. Hundred pairs hundred fifty pairs of leather jackets in two hundred pairs of leather gloves. And obviously i'm a leather fetishists. That's an addiction and you know it's like any addiction it can destroy can certainly destroy financially but it can store relationships it harm my relationship To to my wife. So i really hate this idea that you know. It's like that movie shopaholic in it's kind of cute and it's ridiculous and i know because of rehab and and fifteen years of therapy but can you point to the moment where you realized you needed to address it. Get into rehab. Whatever it was. What was the the low point. I think it happened in two thousand fourteen because there are a lot of things going on within me. Begin to abuse myself physically. I mean you know. I would burn myself. I would cut myself I would you know play with frankly. With with weather is fixation hoods by myself and then i knew this was getting dangerous. 'cause you know you can kill yourself and that combination of factor said you. I'm really going down a rabbit hole. And i need more than just once a week therapy. I really need something. Very very Intensive edits help. But it doesn't cure everything and you know the the urge in the addiction still doing well. So what did you. You went into inpatient rehab. Is that correct. Yes and what did what did you learn there. I mean how did you learn how to at least control this. Even though you say it's still with you. Well i mean you know. It's it's like anything in rehab for me. I can speak for others. You know you're trying to get to the root cause and you know it's painful to realize i mean for me. I think this shopping outgrowth of tremendous sexual repression Fear of coming to grips with with who i am and i still don't know who i am sexually which i think is fine. I don't think we have to put labels but my wife had been waived in fear and shame as a child was terrified of my mother i could see her as a dominatrix. I never felt comfortable with myself physically. I never felt comfortable with the way. I looked

Vanity Fair The New York Times Steve Almond New York University Cheryl Abu Dhabi Lisa
Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

Here & Now

04:54 min | 8 months ago

Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

"Some religious groups in new york are celebrating last night's rare late night. Supreme court decision blocking an executive order from new york governor andrew cuomo that restricted attendance at religious services in their neighborhoods because the pandemic ultra orthodox jewish organizations in brooklyn and queens and the roman catholic diocese of brooklyn claim. That cuomo single them out. The state pointed to the recent spike in covid nineteen cases. And then there was that alarming ultra orthodox wedding last week. The two hundreds not wearing masks. The court's decision was five. Four with its newest justice emmy coney barrett considered the fifth vote. Emily brazilan staff writer at new york times magazine and fellow at the yale law. School is here emily. Thank you for taking a break from your thanksgiving thanks. You are welcome. Glad to be here. And we should say the to litigants the ultra orthodox jewish groups and the catholic diocese were already not subject to these restrictions. Because they've been lifted there's a color system for restrictions in new york and Cova cases had obey abated in their area. But what was the argument from the court in blocking even targeted restrictions. Well the corpus arguing that new york hadn't shown that less strict measures would be enough to protect public health. Which is a pretty cursory kind of way of thinking about this. You can see the concur. Ince's by justice gorsuch as justice cavanaugh. That some of the conservative judges didn't like the idea that essential businesses which were permitted to open a new york included stores but did not include houses of worship. And i think the odd thing about the majority's analysis here is what it's comparing so the majority behaves as if people going to stores are the same as people congregating in a house of worship even though it's very unusual in store for lots of people to be sitting together or certainly singing or chanting together for a long time. That's all in a church or synagogue or a mosque and we know that that is a riskier activity. So there was no discussion of the science or scientific public health considerations in the majority's opinion. And what about chief. Justice john robertson. The three liberal justices dissenting. What did they say. Well chief justice. John roberts says there's no reason for us to decide this right now for the reason that you gave earlier new york had a lift these restrictions for now because the krona virus spread is not as bad in the city so these restrictions said that in the red zone the highest risk new york. You could have ten people in a house of worship in the orange zone. You could have twenty-five people but the catholic archdiocese in the docks synagogues that have sued. They no longer are subject to those restrictions and so she's jeff roberts was making a kind of traditional conservative judicial modesty Moved here in which he said. Look if they're subject to these restrictions again maybe they will be proved to be unduly harsh but at the moment. They're not so we don't need to step in here. And this is a classic example of a judge saying you know what. Let's leave this in the hands of public. Health officials not have judges step in to make these decisions. Unless it's absolutely necessary will be clear. What does it mean. I mean be clear. Only because i'm not able to figure this out. Temporary decision made on an emergency basis by the way when ruth bader ginsburg was on the court roberts sided with the liberals and the decision was in favor of restrictions that was when california had restrictions in place. So obviously there's been a tilt here but what does this mean for other states for new york when it comes to restrictions on houses of worship in the pandemic y- i'm kind of scratching my head about that too. I mean it looks like what the court is saying. Is that if you have businesses open you have to treat churches and other houses of worship just like those businesses but without paying attention to the greater risk that the church that you know religious service can entail and that's very strange to me because it seems so at odds with the science and what we know about the spread of coronavirus. And so you're right. This is a decision. That's a temporary restraining. Order against new york. The merits the kind of larger case is still to be thrashed out the lower courts and so one hopes going forward that there will be more attention to these apples to apples. Comparisons and figuring out what the state really needs to do to protect public health and mall many have seen the video from the acidic wedding in brooklyn this month. Hundreds packing a synagogue. No-one wearing masks mayor. Bill de blasio said or organizers will find fifteen thousand for violating restrictions. And so we're keeping an eye on that to see what happens. There might be any kind of consideration of

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Roman Catholic Diocese Of Broo Coney Barrett Emily Brazilan New York Times Magazine Catholic Diocese Justice Gorsuch Justice Cavanaugh Justice John Robertson Cuomo Jeff Roberts Ince Queens Brooklyn Supreme Court Yale Emily John Roberts Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Joy Williams and Unique Views of America

The Book Review

04:44 min | 8 months ago

Joy Williams and Unique Views of America

"Scott joins us now to talk about the latest in his series of essays. The americans tony. Thanks for being here. It's great to be here this time around you write about joy williams for those who are not familiar with her work. Who is joy. Williams joy williams is an american novelist and short story writer. She's still alive. She's in her seventies. She started publishing in the nineteen seventies. Her first novel was state of grace and she had kind of a loyal cult following in a profile of for a few years ago in the new york times magazine dan choice referred to her as a writers writers writer. I was going to bring that up. Which i think is a great phrase because she has a very passionate for. If you look at paperback editions of books you see a collection of big names. Don delillo herald broad key james. Salter all crazing. Her one of the things i discovered and actually wrote about in this as as that. She's a very difficult writer to pigeonhole or to classify. And i came into this piece to doing the reading for its thinking of her one way based on the reading that i'd done some for earlier novels stories and ended up with a different idea of her. I started out thinking of her. As kind of a realist. Almost in the in the sort of raymond carver or and beatty vein very close grain finally detailed reticent realism and ended up thinking of her something almost completely different sort of a fabulous surrealist magical or which he kind of writer okay. I'm gonna ask you all kinds of questions that i think. You don't wanna be asked to try to pin her down. There's a lot in here. I want to actually go first back to that original freeze you used writers writer but actually we'll just simplify it to a writer's writer because i think that is the kind of phrase that people use that to people who are writers baby mean something but that is kind of mysterious to non writers. What do we mean when we use that phrase. I've never really understood the phrase or particularly. Oh my god. And i think what it means. Is that if you think that writers read differently from the rest of us and our maybe more attuned to certain matters of craft and technique that the rest of us rush over. Let's say you know this is a caricature but most people we read for the plot we read for the characters we read for the emotions and maybe writers are looking at something different. They're looking at the brush strokes so to speak at the sentences at the rhythm on the sentence sentence level and i'm not sure that's true but it is true that within any profession there are people you know it's true of standup comedians or actors or filmmakers that there are some who have a special kind of respect from their peers that may be disproportionate to their renown or popularity or fame or a claim out in the world joy williams has won and been nominated for all the major awards and she's very well reviewed in her books stay in print so she has certainly a loyal readership. That isn't just writers. But i think there's something special about her and i think it has to do with her resistance to classification in a way that she's she's writing sentences at stories and characters and plots that are so unusual and that seem to result from kind of total inventiveness. I feel like having read just about all of the fictional msci's published in the last few months. I could say that. I feel like there's a kind of attention to words and sentences and developments within the story and the plot that keep you on the edge of your seat and at the edge of your attention throughout there are writers where you can kind of let your mind wander a little bit and coast a little bit in the okay. I know this passage of description is going to tell me something about the house. This okay these people are having this conversation now and and you could sort of skate already. Can't do that in a joy store. You have to be paying attention every moment because the terms of the fiction what the characters are thinking and feeling how they're relating to each other what is going to happen in the language from one sentence to the next whether it's going to be sad or mysterious or funny is going to change so you just have to keep your eyes on the road at your hand on the wheel the whole time

Williams Joy Williams Don Delillo Williams Raymond Carver Salter Beatty Tony New York Times Scott DAN James Msci
Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 9 months ago

Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

"Last week, The New York Post published a potentially damaging story about Hunter Biden, son of the Democratic presidential nominee. Based on emails, The Post said, were provided by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and originally harvested from a laptop computer left in a Delaware repair shop. There were enough questions about the authenticity of the emails that most mainstream media declined to publish the story, but it's the kind of content that Khun spread like wildfire on Social media. In a remarkable move Twitter on Wednesday Band users from sharing links to the story because it said the emails may have been hacked and contained private information. It reversed course two days later after Republicans accused Twitter of censorship. But the episode illustrates a question our guest, Emily Bazelon, has been thinking about in an age when questionable, Perhaps even fabricated content can sweep through the digital world unchecked. Does our traditional commitment to unfettered free speech still serve democracy. And the cover story for this week's New York Times Magazine, Basil on surveys the impact that lies and conspiracy theories sometimes promoted by foreign actors can have on our political discourse. And she explores how other countries think differently about free speech and its relationship to a healthy democracy. Emily Bazelon is a graduate of the Yale Law School and a journalist. She's a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine and the Truman Capote fellow for Creative Writing at Yale Law School. She's also the author of two books. She joins us from her home in New Haven, Connecticut. Emily Bazelon welcome back to fresh air. Thanks so much for having me you open your piece with a story that began making the rounds some months back, among right wing voices on the Internet that there was a plan by the forces of Joe Biden to stage a coup to take over the government in connection with the November election. First of all, what was the basis of this claim? Great. So this is ahh concocted claim and the sort of colonel at the center of it was a project called the Transition Integrity Project, a group of about 100 academics and journalists and pollsters and former government officials and former campaign the staff staffers. They started meeting over the summer to kind of game out various scenarios for the November election, and so they were basically testing American democracy in the event that President Trump wins in the event that vice President Biden winds To see in various scenario is what could happen. And in the event, there's a contestant result in a long, nasty count. Yes, exactly especially in the event if there's a contestant result in litigation and other possibilities, and so in one of their several scenarios, Biden wins the popular vote but loses the Electoral College. And so in that hypothetical case they imagined the Democrats would get desperate. And they might consider encouraging California and the Pacific Northwest to threaten to secede in exchange for pressuring Republicans to expand the size of the Senate. So Rosa Brooks, who was one of the organizers of this project, She's a law professor at Georgetown. She published an essay where she mentioned this threat to succeed in one sentence in an essay in The Washington Post. On the next day, you see someone named Michael Anton's, a former national security adviser to President Trump. He has an article called The Coming CU Question. Mark and based on Rosa Brooks is characterization of what the transition integrity project was doing. He starts saying that Democrats are laying the groundwork for a revolution and then you see that article take off in extremist online communities. There is AH podcast maker named Dan Bongino, who's a big trump supporter. He makes videos about it. One of them has the tag. They are telling you what they are going to do exclamation point his videos pull in millions of views. Then you see the story. My great toe, a right wing website called Revolver News Revolver. News starts to spin up the idea that Norm Eisen, who participated in the transition Integrity project and is a longtime Democratic lawyer in Washington. That he's at the center of this supposed coup. And from there, Tucker Carlson feature someone talking about this concocted made up story on his show. And then you see it just go viral on social media and get picked up by lots of groups, including, like a county Republican organization in Oregon, So it is Perfect kind of story because it pulls in both traditional media in the form of Fox and also social media. And then you see President Trump get involved. He tweets in praise of Revolver news, and then he tweets quote the November 3rd election result may never be accurately determined, which is what some want. And that's a kind of typical dark, slightly vague, foreboding kind of warning from President Trump that further perpetuates this coup narrative. And then Trump later retreat. Someone talking about a coup with regard to Nancy Pelosi. So you see from this hypothetical project that was really meant to be a kind of academic exercise about the election. This whole sat of conspiracy theories on the right that get a lot of play in the media on social media, and then from the president

President Trump Emily Bazelon Transition Integrity Project Joe Biden Twitter Hunter Biden Rosa Brooks The New York Times Magazine The New York Post Yale Law School New York Donald Trump Revolver News New Haven Delaware Rudy Giuliani Nancy Pelosi
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 9 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 9 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 10 months ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
Paris Fashion Week will go ahead this September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:34 min | 10 months ago

Paris Fashion Week will go ahead this September

"And, finally, on today's program off to Paris to get a roundup of a busy few days in the fashion calendar, I'm joined on the line by Dana Thomas Journalist and author of fashion apples the price of fast fashion the future of clothes always good at talking to maybe just bring us up speed quickly on what has what the show is look like I was in Paris a few weeks ago there was much discussion. Where we're going to be world video presentations again, and many brands saying very committed to actually getting models, and of course, journalists and buyers in seats again and having them walk down a catwalk. What happened. Well some of that's happening. There are shows and people are attending. In fact, there's an official French calendar and on the French calendar, it should it tells who is going to be showing like Gabriella Hurston who is going to be digital chanel showing some people are doing digital. Some people are doing both. The same in Milan summer having shows and some are digital and. I don't know who's attending. I saw that Brian boy the the influence Sir is back in Milan and he's thrilled to be back in. Milan. I saw that on his instagram or his twitter feed but I mean, I know that for example, I contribute to the New York Times magazine is a New York Times as a freelancer, and that team is not coming to Paris spending Friedman's reviewing everything from her home in New York. So you know I know that. Americans aren't really aren't allowed to come to Europe anyway. So there's the whole Chinese can't people can't come to. Europe. A lot of people can't travel. So I, think it's mostly people who are in town who are going I was asked to go to some shows in Paris I have no interest going to watch them on digital. Why do you have no interest I'm curious because you're part of this. You know we're all in this together we that we we have to go out and support and a lot of people say the same thing with sporting events as well. Of course, if the if the guidelines are followed, etc you know. These things tend to drift away and become part of the sideline or do you think that the future is digital? We don't need to go to shows anymore even go into shops. I think that know they're pushing it too soon too fast. I. Think you know we don't need to go into shops and or we don't need to go to fashion shows right now. In fact to me, they feel frivolous and not taking what's going on terribly seriously Yes. We need to boast our our morale a bit by sitting next to people who could have the bro The bug and sitting there with a mask on and you can catch union, catch it through your eyes. You know I don't feel like taking that risk I'd rather be safe and I think that's the most important thing right now.

Paris Milan Europe Dana Thomas Gabriella Hurston Twitter New York New York Times The New York Times Magazine Official Brian Friedman
Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

"Us now is Robert Draper writer at large for the New York Times magazine. He's the author of several books including most recently to start a war how the Bush administration took America into Iraq Arbor draper has just published this landmark piece of reporting the Times magazine. It's called unwanted truth this inside trump's battles with US intelligence agencies among the scoops embedded here is news that. The. White House pressured the Director of National Intelligence to change and intelligence community conclusion that Russia wanted president trump reelected in two thousand, twenty, the intelligence director at the time Dan Coats said, no, he was then fired his successor signed off on the change, but he was then fired after one of his deputies briefed Congress that in fact, Russia is working to reelect president trump this year. Mr Draper I, thank you for this reporting for joining us here tonight to help us understand it. Thanks very much for your time. I've said a lot of words about the. Words that you have reported here and that you have printed. Let me just ask if I got anything wrong or if you think that I'm looking at anything the wrong way around. To actually think presences I did when issue two clarifications the I rooted in the most important is that I am not aware the Joe McGuire had anything to do with the alteration of the National Intelligence Estimate this all took place during his first couple of weeks on the job when his hands were very much full with Ukraine whistleblower incident as you correctly pointed at and so this really. Anthem it matter win the in I was approved on September the twenty six inch testifying on the hill all day long. So he wasn't able to cheer that meeting. So that's the first second thing is that You know they're a don't want the story to give anyone the impression that the intelligence community as a whole has been bent to the will of Donald Trump. There's still plenty of analysts in case officers who are doing very good work. The problem is that the people above them have been in the line of fire with the trump administration and had begun to water down such that the intelligence products do not have the integrity that they once did not mean saying black is why end up as down but they are saying things in a more equivocating fashion and we saw this most recently just out of this past Friday. On a no deny official release this election security report saying that for the first time did yes it did appear the Russia. Trump essentially the same breath saying that China in Iran. Favored Biden is if it were kind of a jump ball or something in that was working patient, you did not see before the trump presidency. I feel like I. Thank you for for those clarifications and for drilling down on those things in that way I feel like. When I read it, the beginning of your piece that Dan Coats was pressured to change the National Intelligence Estimate around Russia's intentions for the two thousand election and he said, no felt like, wow, that's that's really big news about Dan Coats to find out that that happened just before he was fired. Is itself a scoop. But then to find out that the National Intelligence Estimate. was in fact watered down in the way that the White House wanted under Joe McGuire. It it does seem like the sort of bending to the White House's will equivocating on things that aren't equivocal casting things in a way that doesn't you know is designed not to upset the president or put things in ways that he likes it does feel like it's not just pressure, but it's effective pressure that's actually working on the I say. Over sharing in. A. probably Rachel that the matter of. Russia in election security has been a sore subject since before trump's presidency and everyone knew I in the NFC in the West Wing and certainly in the intelligence community that to bring the very matter of Russia interfering in two thousand sixteen, it's likely interference patterns through the midterms and into twenty twenty an most of all that if they were trump would be to call into question the legitimacy of this presidency. That's how he would receive this and so because it was such an unpleasant thing as report out then chief definite Mulvaney and then national security advisor. John was a considerable lengths to to keep this completely off the agenda would get on the agenda for example, when it was a single in a seat meeting at relating to Russia in Election Security Pearson Nelson than the secretary of. Homeland Security didn't get five minutes into it before trump started interrupting her and asking questions about a wall along the Mexican border. So this has been a distasteful subject to him people around him have known that and they have adjusted themselves unfortunately accordingly.

Donald Trump Russia Dan Coats Joe Mcguire Director Of National Intellige White House Robert Draper Mr Draper President Trump United States The New York Times Magazine Writer Homeland Security Iraq Arbor America Rachel Biden Mulvaney Director
Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

The Frame

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

"Is a partisan for the press to say black lives matter news rooms across the country are debating the role that journalists should be playing and particularly when it comes to talking about race in America the twenty sixteen conversation with NPR's code switch then Washington post reporter Wesley Lowery had this to say about the idea of objectivity I don't like the word when we talk about how to be objective we begin the conversation with a lot like we did begin the conversation with the lie that we don't have biases and that we don't receive the welterweights right I strive to be fair and that means I have to interrogate my own biases that fairness means I have to go out of my way to make sure I'm giving a fair critique hearing the people who I know I disagree with journalists at The New York Times revolted over an op ed which many said threatened black lives that same week the Pittsburgh post Gazette barred some of its black reporters from covering the protests over fears that they'd be quote too biased and on the other hand just yesterday the news organization Axios announced that its reporters can participate in protests and that the company fund would cover bail for any employee who is arrested some news rooms across the country appear to be changing fast what could that mean for journalism as a possible to be fair and transparent without being objective I'll tell you this is a conversation that the one eighteen is having a lot and we should note that we reached out to NPR whose standards and guidelines we have bye bye but they declined to take part in the program joining us is Ricardo Sandoval Palos public editor for PBS Ricardo welcome to when I thank you thank you for having me also here is Nicole Hannah Jones reporter for The New York Times magazine covering racial injustice the call welcome back thank you the call start with you in the past couple of weeks past two weeks we've seen several incidents involving newsrooms scrutinizing journalists of color over their inability to be objective here's that word again talk to us about some of those incidents well we saying really three major incidents and and who knows how many others where journalists haven't spoken out about them but we have the case in Pittsburgh and that was where of course to black journalists wonderful one photo journalists want to print journalists were taken off of the beat to be able to cover the protests of the black journalist had posted on social media images of trash everywhere of garbage everywhere and said oh look at you know these looters and then said actually it's it's a Kenny Chesney the end of a Kenny Chesney tail gate and I guess her bosses thought that that was inappropriate to pull her off of the coverage we still have no explanation about why the photo journalist who is also a a black journalists was pulled off of the coverage and then go ahead of well tell me about what happened at your paper the senator Tom cotton's op ed sure so we ran online and op ed written by Tom cotton that was basically calling out for the U. S. military to be imposed on cities and states where the governors did not want that help in order to put down a protest that they felt were violent there was a huge pushback amongst journalists at The New York Times a book of more than a thousand journalists signed a letter put forth by our our our union I'm saying we oppose that in a lot of journalists went and spoke online about it and it was for it was for two reasons one this this editorial did not go through the proper normal fact checking process that any thing that appears in the time should go through but we also felt you we were getting kind of free space to a sitting U. S. senator to suppress their free speech rights of Americans and that that platform should not be given over in that way yeah that this would have been a news story and as a new story it would have been fine but not to allow to be a newspaper and allow someone to talk about using the military to repress free speech I was too far for many of us a lot of journalists were upset about that I remember waking up that morning looking at Twitter and just seeing the operate also the opinion editor James Bennet he resigned on Sunday how significant is that part local I'm you know it's complicated I I've worked with James Bennett and I certainly don't want to speak on kind of internal personnel matters but do you think that was necessary in resigning I I think he made the decision that he felt he needed to make we certainly we as journalists at The New York Times wanted this to be taken seriously yeah and it appears that it

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

"I guess. Today is the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller American wife in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl a thinly disguised Laura Bush who found herself married to a president. It was long listed for the Orange Prize. As was her debut novel. Prep her other books. Include the man of my dreams sustained eligible and the acclaimed short story collection. You think it I'll say it. Her stories of appeared in the New Yorker Esquire Oprah magazine and The New York Times magazine her latest collection of stories to be published in the UK is help yourself. She's also the guest editor for the Twenty Twenty Best American short stories anthology. She lives with her family in the American Midwest. A brand new novel is rotten. And it's been described as bombshell while I couldn't agree more. This is a book that will demand. Attention Curtis Sitton fell. Welcome to meet the rices. Thank you for having me. You'll novel begins in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. Is Hillary Rodham Graduates College? And it brings us right up-to-date in Contemporary America. But I'd like to go back to Cincinnati in one thousand nine hundred seventy five when when you were can you tell us about the second stance surrounding you alive? Oh my goodness it's funny. I'm so much in the habit of of talking about Hillary's lay right now. You'll warm familiar with that than with my own will. I'm the second of four children. I have a sister. Who's less than two years older than I am. And I would say a have not led a very personally dramatic life which might be why I'm a fiction writer instead of a memoir rest but yeah I grew up in Cincinnati. My parents are both retired but still live in Cincinnati and I have two sisters one brother my brother is actually holds elected office in Cincinnati. He's the he's a member of the city council in his third term. So so I guess. Different members of my family are interested in in politics in in different ways but I was very lucky to go to excellent schools in Cincinnati elsewhere. And I would say my family Sort of obsessive readers like we didn't it's not like we. All six sat around each of US feverishly reading a book of our own but there were lots of books in the House. We did sometimes read is a family. My mother was a librarian for a long time for you know middle school or junior high students so ages twelve and thirteen and fourteen and that strong feminist streak. That comes to your writing that being influenced by her. That's an interesting question. My parents have almost opposite personalities. From each other where. My father is very great Gary in very opinionated and my mother is you know I think she has strong opinions and viewpoints. But she's. She's not a very assertive per cent. And she's not she's not she's a very private person even even by saying this should not be. I think she'd rather that like I never talk about her. Other than you know maybe acknowledging that she exists described as relatively progressive. But you know I think there are some families where the children grow up going to protest rallies in that was not my family You'll schooling was obviously a hugely influential. In fact your first book prep which is I. Think long list for the Orange Prize loosely based on that. Would you say so? I went to a boarding school in Massachusetts. When I was I had just turned fourteen and it was sort of strange given you know the area of the country where I grew up. Which is the mid west and it was a little bit unusual to go to a sort of fancier elite boarding school on the east coast just in the sense that a lot of students who go to that school are more from that region and also the other thing is that. I was the only one of my siblings who went which I think sometimes makes people think that I must have been the most academically talented in fact. I was the least academically and by my siblings. Were all you know much more. Well rounded students like. I did well in English but I definitely struggled with other subjects so those a little bit. I feel like I certainly. It was privileged but it was also a little bit random or arbitrary that I went to boarding school and talking about coming from a different at least geographical background from the rest of the students. The story is sort of more than coming of age. It's it's more perhaps one could say it was about a study of of social class. Was that something that you found was very apparent there that it did feel different. This whole kind of I mean I think the thing that we all have this horror of being a teenager comes across in dairy well a particular field and that you didn't fit in that. I think I felt at times that I didn't fit in. Certainly I mean I would say that. It wasn't the main character in prep. Leave your experiences going to boarding school as more of a sort of class shock than I would say I did. And you know class is sort of the air. We all breathe. It's maybe especially obvious. Una Boarding School campus. But you know I think it's it's obvious everywhere you know. You can have a sort of exchange with a person like delivering a package to your house and the two of you could probably like assess each other's voices are accents and no things about each other's class or like defied that one of you is in a house receiving a package one of US delivering. The package also says things about class in our society. You know doesn't necessarily say very good things but I think the To like one yet like I was aware of class. And I don't think I was quite as much of a fish out of water as my protagonist. Although certainly I'm like erotic person was even more neurotic as a teenage you write about teenagehood again in in your next book. And I think we'll come back to that because it will say impacts on on the subject matter of Rodham but you went off to Stanford then and you studied creative writing night. You wrote the College newspaper. You registered magazine. What's being a writer? Always the the obvious career choice. Well I think writing was always really important to me and it was like from a very young age for about six or seven. I spent a lot of time reading and writing because I wanted to. I think it helped me make sense of the world and it held my attention and there weren't as many options on net. Netflix back. Then so entertain yourself a little more so definitely writing always played a huge role in my life. I don't think I grew up with the expectation that I would be a full time novelist. I think sometimes I thought I won't be a lawyer or as I got older. I thought you know maybe a social worker or an English teacher or something. I always the closer my adulthood. I think the more it seems like I would do something writing adjacent. But I just don't think anyone can count on being a fulltime writer as you know how they pay their mortgage and I mean going to someone as you did to study at the Iowa. Writer's workshop is no guarantee of coming out. The other end is a fully-fledged writer. But that does give you a better chance than most doesn't it's a huge success rate. It's a it's a wonderful program and I like I loved being there. I learned a ton but the the thing that people don't necessarily realize is not only. Can you go to an excellent writing program the Iraqis and after that you know not have a stable writing career you can be a writer who has had multiple books published in that. Still not the way. You're supporting yourself. And in fact new writing is my full time job. But that's that's an incredible privilege and it's not. It's not something I take for granted. It's very I know that it's very unusual on special. I feel

Cincinnati Writer Orange Prize United States American Midwest Twenty Twenty Hillary Rodham Graduates Colle Sunday Times Bestseller Laura Bush New Yorker Esquire Oprah Una Boarding School UK Editor Curtis Sitton Hillary President Trump America Massachusetts Netflix
I Live In A Slaveocracy

Toure Show

06:52 min | 1 year ago

I Live In A Slaveocracy

"Nicole Hannah Jones is a certified genius a spiritual warrior and a journalist. Who's trying to change America? She's the spirit behind the sixteen nineteen project at the New York Times which was a takeover of the New York Times magazine as well as an incredible podcast series as well as an upcoming series of books and Articles. All of which are meant to help us further. Understand the way that slavery and it's a long lingering effects have shaped so many aspects of America so widely so deeply that she calls America a slave. Crecy Nicole's also done extraordinary work exploring education and racism. She's an intellectual bad ass. Who's got a MacArthur genius? Grant and a job at the New York Times and a mind full of brilliant ideas. I mean I listened to her and she just blows me away. She's awesome and I'm so honored to have had her on the show. It's the Great Nicole. Hannah Jones on tour ACO when the sixteen nineteen printed project came out. There was this thrill among black people like walking around like caring and cling to it holding onto it and like is like so important. Did you feel that excitement when like people were finally getting their hands on it? And like this is so great. Yeah it was like most amazing thing my life really. I I mean I. I hope we were making something powerful. I knew it was important. But as you know that doesn't mean that people will respond to it in that way and The response far exceeded exceeded any expectation. We we had. What was the pitch that I made to the Times this because this came from you not somebody saying. Hey imagine something but you said No. Let's do something no I I I've been thinking about sixty nine thousand four very long time and I'd been on booklet for about a year and a half and The first thing I pitch when I got back from book leave in January. It was the project and The pitch was very simple We have I I I talked to my editor about it. And then we have a weekly ideas meeting For the magazine and I just brought it up at the meeting and I said that This August will mark the four hundred aniversary of the first enslaved Africans being sold into Virginia and that most Americans have never heard of that date and that I wanted to dedicate an entire issue the magazine to assess as the ongoing legacy whole issue. It's not an article now the whole thing because what I said was that the argument of the magazine would be that you can look across all of these aspects of American life capitalism democracy. Why would only western industrialized country without universal health? Care our culture our legal system that almost nothing has been left untouched by the legacy and I wanted the magazine to look at a modern modern phenomenon across America life and then trace it back to the legacy of slavery and that we were going to be able to make these connections in a way that they hadn't been made and really Do a project place slavery. Actually at the center of the American story and immediately Jake Silverstein. The editor in Chief of the magazine was Ike. Let's do it. That was it and I mean that has been took off from there. I mean what this specific project but it has been part of your genius at getting major media institutions to say yes. Let's do a major project on a very specific deep issue of racism. Right I I came to know your work with you to two major pieces of segregation for this American Life. Yeah and now this major multimedia project for the New York Times just for those of us who are in those spaces or entering those bases. How do we get a room? Full of white folks say yes. We will dedicate a ton of space to segregation or a ton of space to the Slovak crecy of America. When they know a lot of the audience will be like. This makes me uncomfortable. Yeah I think to be clear. It wasn't that big organizations always wanted to say. Yes sir working on these issues for almost twenty years and There were certainly times in my career. Where with a struggle to get my news organization to allow me to do. The work wanted to do. But I think what What I has the benefit of. I've been studying this for twenty five years. I'm obsessed with it. I read widely on the history of raise on the sociology of raise. I have always treated it as an investigative story. And Not Simply. Let me show you how black people are at the bottom of this indicator. Let me show you this Segregation exists because that's not interesting. People know that anything you measure black people suffer the most from it but I always make them. I'm GONNA show you the architecture of it. I'm GONNA show you the intention of it and it's going to be investigative and it's GonNa be surprising to people and I think that's what once you have success doing that. Of course it becomes easier to convince people to let you do it but I think what? My work is always surprising to. People like people are not surprised segregation exist but when? I show them actually. There was a thirty year decision by the Federal Government. Not Enforce Fair housing laws. You know when I can say actually. We don't have universal healthcare because we have fought back against social programs because we thought black people would benefit them for more than one hundred and fifty years. I think it's that of surprise but also really the rigor of the scholarship Racist one of those things because everybody has a race that everybody thinks they know dislike covering education. Everybody thinks they understand how public education should work. Because they've gone to school and when you can approach them With the argument that they never thought they never knew is shocking to them surprising to them. I've been able to to sell those arguments and then you also have to actually be able to deliver compelling narrative rigors scholarship Get people to talk to you. All of those kind of normal reporting things as well.

America New York Times Nicole Hannah Jones Crecy Nicole The New York Times Magazine Great Nicole Hannah Jones Jake Silverstein Virginia Macarthur Editor Grant Editor In Chief ACO Federal Government IKE
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"New York Times magazine. You're listening to left, right. And center. What do you think share your thoughts on today's show on our Facebook page or tweet us at L, RC KCRW and download the KCRW app to listen to left? Right. And center on demand. Back again, with left, right. And center, I'm Josh barrow of New York magazine on the right is rich Lowry, editor of national review on the left lane Olen columnist at the Washington Post Elizabeth Warren is completely serious. That's the headline of Emily Baz lawns cover profile of the Senator and presidential candidate in the current issue of the New York Times magazine a few months ago you could have been forgiven for thinking one of the key strategic objectives for Warren's presidential campaign was to influence the policy agenda of another democratic president after all she's had success with that in the past driving. The creation of the consumer financial protection bureau positioning herself to influence economic personnel choices in a potential Hillary Clinton administration, and generally pushing her party to the left on issues related to Wall Street, but his Warren has risen in the polls driven by an electorate receptive to her fighting message and detailed plans Baz lawn has concluded that no Warren is completely serious about becoming president and about changing the way the economy works when she gets there and Emily Baz, who has staff writer at the New York Times magazine. Joins us now. Hi, emily. Hi dash. So I was interested in your description of how, and why Senator Warren's demeanor changed between when you started interviewing her for this profile in February. And when you last spoke earlier this month like it was clear that she was more mentally prepared for the idea that she might be president. Yeah. That was how it seemed to me when I started talking to her in February she was nowhere in the polls, and she was rolling out all these policy proposals, right? And getting a reputation for being at the vanguard of the democratic primary field in terms of having all these ideas, this whole, like, I have a plan for that was just starting to take off. And I got the sense that she was really happy to be playing that role and that, that could be enough for her even if she didn't win the primary by the time I finished through reporting for the peace last week, she was fully in the race. And I felt like there was this more kind of sense that, like, yeah, maybe I could really be president, and that from my point of view us reporter. Wasn't so great, because it made her more guarded in talking to me, but it demonstrates the way in which she has these rising poll numbers. She can point to. Colin, what Warren is doing with having such detailed policy so early in the campaign is actually fairly unusual. Is this the right way that the campaign should be run because I think one of the arguments, you get against this is that, you know, voters, they want to know about your broad ideological positioning. And then also what you can implement is going to be heavily driven by political circumstances. Once you get into office, so you can have a long list of plans, but you get in, there's not a democratic majority in the Senate. It's not obvious where those plans go should should campaigns be built more around this sort of very granular detail at early stages. I think it's worked for Warren. I mean, this is Warren's brand in away, this is what she has done her entire career. And so it has worked because it feels natural for her. What people didn't expect including Warren is that they felt that she would be there, pushing her fellow candidates to the left. But what happened instead is that she sort of took over sub Bernie Sanders momentum instead of Bernie taking over her momentum, which is what people thought would. Happen. It turned out Bernie was something of an overtones window for her and made her look were reasonable. And then suddenly all her plans became more reasonable, as a result, rich. It is long seemed like President Trump really wants to face Elizabeth Warren as his opponent. He's very eager to talk about the native American thing really thinks that has damaged her as a candidate is that still is she still a week possible opponent for her. I one thing that Emily talks about in her piece is Tucker Carlson, and the sort of the, the praise that Tucker Carlson has had for Elizabeth Warren for populace message. Could she actually be hitting on something her her of economic patriotism, that could appeal to some of the working class white voters that Trump did so well with that seems to appeal at least on some level to Tucker Carlson? Maybe I've never considered her a great political athlete. And I said something disparaging probably about a month ago. Like having policy proposals isn't a substitute for having a brand, but it has been pointed out turns out of policy proposals have the become her brand. And she's had success with the most talking to a Republican candidate in two thousand sixteen it's like wait policy proposals. Get covered out as this were, but she's managed to, to make it work. And she does seem to be a clip thing. Bernie just usual caution that things that seem true. Three months ago. Don't seem so true and things that we think are true right now might not necessarily hold true for the duration. I will say that to, to her not being a good political athlete. I just thought she was oh, always seemed a not very powerful communicator. But maybe I'm being influenced by the rise in the narrative around it, but it just seems as though she's found a more deliberate slow pungent way of speaking, that you socio with successful presidential candidates. And there's a little oh, crack of a whip at at every end of her statements. Now this more emphatic. One thing I would say somebody who's really been following her on and off for twenty years now, is that a more. It has always had a predator natural understanding of how Americans think about finance and money, and how that relates to their lives. And I think that's something that traditional political reporters kind of miss because it's not something traditional political. Reporters are really thinking about that much. So Warid has a way of connecting that people, I think took Washington by surprise. And I think in fact is probably taken Trump by surprise. I think Trump really felt that he had knocked her out in October after the DNA flap. But it turns out he hadn't and that she came back and the reason she came back is because she went back to being who she was and be was her own person, and stuck with the themes that had worked for her for so many years. Can you talk about the tension that you discussed in your piece about how what we've been talking about has been central to Warren's brand has helped and his helped fuel horizon? But then you get these sort of odd. Obviously gendered sort of vague comments about. Well, she seems like too much of a professor and that, you know, she, she building up this expertise has been the thing that makes for relevant as a candidate. But then maybe some people find it off pudding. How is she thinking about that? Is it and is that a big challenge for her as she tries to build a campaign, that can win, not just the primary, but a general election, I think she thinks a lot about how she communicates and is very much trying to work on it and would probably be thrilled with what rich was saying about the improvements. He thinks that he's seeing in her. She is really good at explaining right? Like this has been her strength for decades. And she went on the daily show with John Stewart. And in a few minutes, like laid out this whole theory of the American economic structure, and what's gone wrong that starts like with the founding. She's very good at that. When I was watching her on the trail, I was wondering, whether that was enough, because I think, for some voters, it can feel like she's trying to teach them. And then if they don't get the whole thing that isn't necessarily the easiest way to connect with people. So that's what she's like still working on. When you look at the substance, I think, Elaine is right, that there's this fundamental critique of how the American economy doesn't work for lots and lots of people and more on has this like deep understanding in theory about how that's come about. She sees FDR and the new deal as this moment, where the banks and big companies were being dismantled and regulated and that allowed for greater economic equality for a whole era, and then she blames Reagan and Reaganism, and deregulation for really dismantling the protections that supported workers in the middle class, and allowed the benefits of capitalism and the market to be widely shared. So that's the sort of substance of the message in. It's why people like Tucker Carlson are interested in her and Carlson was using her on his show to kind of. Shame Republicans who including Trump who kind of profess to be for the white working class, but aren't necessarily really translating that into economic benefits for those people. One of the problems with this kind of message. And this is also something Emily gets into in the piece. Is that it there's sort of a contradiction where you basically have to describe how the, the government has failed? The government has been captured by by the interests of the wealthy, and we're going to fix that with a bunch of new government policies. So, basically, how do you get people to at the same time be angry about the way that politics works in his serve them? And then convinced them that the solution also runs through politics. Warren's plans are remarkably consistent and simple, which is something I think people don't realize because they look complicated. I sight but they actually are telling the same story over and over again. Our government got captured it got captured by corporate interests. My plans are to take this apart and restore government to help you so that forbids student debt forgiveness is going to help you. She released a plan that would take a private industry out of the prison business, and also, by the way, private business out of the business of assisting prisoners and making phone calls and and whatnot, which is an enormous profit center. And so her story about this has been consistent and simple. And I think that's something that we hear plans, and we think complicated. In fact, it's a simple story, and I think voters are beginning to respond to that. And what's the Republican response to this in the Trump era, because you could have imagined a Romney era Republican party emphasizing? That, you know, markets are good at allocating capital and markets lead to growth and innovation. And you impose a lot of regulation, and you will stymie that, but Trump is out there sort of stipulating to the idea that the system is rigged. And that there's a swamp that benefits rich elites. So what is the what is the Republican response to say about why Warren is wrong about this? When some of what Trump says would seem to suggest that she's right? It's a little harder for the party to push back against the rig narrative, obviously, because president, I states is Republican has given Kriens that narrative as well. I still think the all of the story may be simple. I think the policies are complex, and we'll have all sorts of unintended consequences and Republicans as soon as there's, especially there's a democrat in the White House at actually begins implementing this the emphasis on freedom. The emphasis on the, the mistakes that come from regulation or over-regulation will snap right back to where they used to be Emily. Elizabeth Warren, have a plan to enact all of these. Plans because we'll talk about Joe Biden in a second. But one thing that drives people on the left and Democratic Party crazy about Joe Biden is that he goes out, and basically, says, well, I come from an era of bipartisanship, and I've gotten Republicans to work with me in the past, and I will convince them or shame them into supporting my agenda and people think that's naive, and maybe it is naive. But what's the alternative Warren, if she's presidential either have a Senate with Republican majority, or eleven narrow democratic majority that relies on red state democratic senators who aren't going to buy into her vision, and all of these plants? So if she wins, what she going to do to actually turn the stuff into policy. Yeah, this is a dividing line between Biden and Warren. I think she has to thoughts about this one is that she is interested in ending the filibuster that would reduce the burden somewhat in the Senate. Another is this thing she says, over and over again, which is like everything is a fight..

Elizabeth Warren President Trump Emily president Bernie Sanders Tucker Carlson Senate rich Lowry Emily Baz Facebook Democratic Party the New York Times magazine Josh barrow Hillary Clinton Joe Biden New York Washington Post lane Olen
"new york times magazine" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And it's so common that people are working in different cultures and different time zones and needing to get stuff done with other people who have an incredibly different values and backgrounds, and so amazing the the importance of depending on others such a core practice, you know, there's a great article in the New York Times, I read recently. And I think it's a couple years old was from the New York Times magazine, I'll try to put this. I'll try to remember to put this in the show notes about a study. That was a big study that was done. I think the author of this article was the guy who wrote the power of habits duhig, and he wrote, and I think. Maybe an excerpt from his follow on book. You wrote about the studies that were done at Google about. What makes us successful team? And he it boiled down to this concept of psychological safety, which means are you comfortable speaking up. Yeah. Yeah. This this study is in that chapter. Depend on others in my book. It's called Google Aristotle right in which they they spent a good deal of resources and time and money and energy into coming to that conclusion that it was also one of the things they found that it that there were norms in groups that there were hard to identify assumptions in how people work together. So the one you're putting your finger on is that right? People spoke at about the same amount of time. No-one no-one took over a particular groups, right, psychological safety. Yeah. One of the big learnings for me in my three sixty was I was not creating psychological safety so Ivan really attuned to that. Yes. And really hard. It's really hard to do it takes it. So you can't it has to be more than idea you have to somehow embody a sense of I think of being more comfortable in your own skin. And then actually. Caring about these other humans beyond what their roles are. And again, there's always tension there because people at work do play a role they do need to get stuff done. But at the same time, they're human beings. So I know we're gonna we still have to get to seven right? Yes. But the so one of the things I think about we're doing a lot of this work internally. Ten percent happier of a committee set up around diversity and inclusion, but it's also really veering heavily into our culture. And the idea of, you know, the now going to resort to sort of platitudes here, but like allowing people to show bring their whole cells to the office, and as sometimes this can look I can get a little. To use a loaded word triggered by some of this because it can come off as pretty tree quickly. You know? Oh, I'm Al how we're gonna start every meeting with everybody talking about how they're doing. And then it lapses into all these, you know, discussions about personalized which actually I really do deeply see importance in power of this. But there's something stylistic about like can we do this without sounding like I remember Beavis and Butthead this show. There's like a teacher and Beavis and Butthead who's an aging hippie, and it just sounds. He just sounds like hopelessly. Combine can we do this without lapsing into that is something that's on my mind. Yes. I think we I think we can I and I think that you know, it's interesting how. I was telling you, I think right? Even before we got started that I feel completely schizophrenic in that..

Beavis New York Times Google Ivan Ten percent
"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome to all of it on WNYC. I'm Charlie Herman business and culture editor at WNYC filling in for Alison Stewart. Thanks for joining me today this morning. The New York Times magazine released its fourth annual music issue. The previous three versions featured twenty five songs at tell us where music is going. But this year, the magazine shifted gears a little bit to celebrate the top twenty five songs that matter right now and the artists behind those songs range from meek mill to Casey musk graves to Mariah Carey Grimes and Bruce Springsteen to break down the list, and what makes these songs matter. I'm joined by New York Times magazine story editor new baba who put together the magazines music issue that is out today. New welcome to WNYC, thanks for inviting me. So what does it mean for a song to matter? You know, that is that is a very general. And it was the same question with you know, when we used to sort of trying to prognosticate a little bit. And and look for trends, and where music is going. I mean, I think it's sort of a call that when we do this. We're trying to find things that that have some kind of grip on on on culture and in any number of ways. And that's sometimes a harder thing to find with music. It's like it's a very decentralized kind of world, but we're we're always looking for things that have have some sort of grip on the culture. And and when you say grip on the cultural, I is that the something about the music itself, that's tapping into something is it about political issues economic cultural. I mean, how do you define that in a way? I mean, I tell you any of these right? Some something that seems to represent something broader happening in the culture it always works. But you know, there's also, you know, when you say twenty five songs a matter right now, you wind up with like baby shark in there because it's sort of undoubtedly one of the things that is dominating. We're we're gonna talk about that one just a minute. But so here's one question. I have is that you started the this series a couple years ago, and you were looking at where music is going, and then you made this change to matter. Why why did that? Well, you know, I mean, I think the the the idea of sort of prognosticating, and like and picking out where things are headed is is always. It's a little bit of a risky game. Or it's very subjective. Right. As you're doing it. So I think we wanted to sort of hold ourselves to maybe higher standard of of like of isolating things that in the moment feel like they have some purchase on. But when you started into that your initial intent we'll look at where songs are going. And then as you started listening to songs this year, he began to say, wait, this is a theme. That's emerging more. This the artists trying to grapple with this with the things that matter in our society right now and everything that's going on. I think that's been there in previous years as well. Right. But there was something sort of pronounce this year that wrote about a little bit in the introduction of this issue that you know, it's become this sort of general tech for people of of all types and persuasions to just sort of acknowledged constantly that that thing. That things seem a little bit crazy right now. Save a little bit bleak right now. It. It's a thing that you deserve see universally this sort of sigh, and particularly I think among younger people who listening to a lot of pop music often the driving pop music. Who who have this ambience sense that things are living bit strange and bleak? These days. That's definitely something that you see a lot of grappling with. Yeah. You mentioned the word bleak. A couple of times there is at a theme. If I go through the list of twenty five songs that I might feel that that doesn't often sound very uplifting. But is that a theme you found a bleakness? Well, it's more like reacting to bleakness laying a theme in this because because the reaction for a lot of these artists, I don't think has been to say, let's make extremely dark or depressing or angry music or anything like that. A lot of them are really sort of looking for. How do you navigate a world that feels sort of high stakes and bleak and stressful and full of exile? There's sort of a recurring thing in here in some of the interviews especially that we did of people trying to figure out how do you create a space for yourself amidst that that feels like a healthy space? I mean when you look back on it. I don't how long did it take you put it together. I mean, you know, we spend months sort of gradually working up to it. And then a big big Russia. The big Russian. You have a moment to breathe and you look at this list of twenty five. Do you look back and say, wow, that's what we ended up with. Yeah. I mean, it does go through a lot of twists and turns in the process is you're figuring things out. So yeah, why the need to put together a list like this. Do you think? Well, I mean, I think it's a good tool for for looking across the world of music, obviously, not the world of music is an extremely Broadwood. But I think trying to sort of answer. This question is a good way to to see a good range of things and actually sort of take the temperature of a certain area of pop music without diving to specifically in any one thing. So let's let's take a listen to some of them. One of them is by meek mill it's called trauma. And I think this might be a good example of a little bit of this theme that you're talking about here about bleakness..

WNYC editor New York Times The New York Times magazine Alison Stewart Charlie Herman Casey musk Bruce Springsteen baba Mariah Carey Grimes Russia mill
"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Not doing that. Really? Why? Well, so I got in touch with the press people at N J D E P, which is like the environmental department of New Jersey. And basically they said we have no interest in commenting on this. Why why would they not even comment? Well, I think you understand that if you know the rest of the story of pedals, there's a lot more to the story. Don't know. All right. Let's hear the rest then. Okay. Well, so what you basically have is you have a collision of two ideas about black bears, and what they are and what they need. So that's John Welham raider at large within New York Times magazine longtime pedals van more out. I knew more about his earlier work like before he got famous. He's written a lot about animals, including pedals, and John explain to us that what you had was this divide where on the one side you had people like Lisa who when they looked at the bear. They fought that there needed help. It's injured seems to be struggling we gotta get out there. But on the other side, you have the state of New Jersey, and they came at it from a completely different viewpoint where they. Were just as interested in, quote, unquote, helping the bear and making sure that the bear could you know? Live. It's I dunno best life. I suppose you'd say, but they wanted to go in a very different way as far as they were concerned. It wasn't. It was a wild animal, and you you don't take awhile animal out of the wild unless absolutely necessary, and the fact that you saw this bear walking onto legs. They basically saw the bipedal bear is a real survivor. This is like a feat of Lucian like this bear evolved. We should just let him do. His thing was still out there being a bear. So we're gonna leave the bare there it's the right thing to do. So this is this is the part of the story about pedals that we we haven't told you yet. So pedals was I found in twenty fourteen I showed up. Yeah. Showed up again the next summer and showed up sixteen. Yeah. Even early two thousand sixteen videos of pedals, and then nothing and then a bear that had become a national.

New Jersey John Welham Lucian New York Times Lisa
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"I think what many of the editors many of the more seasoned. Journalists are saying like don't go to Syria to learn how to be a war correspondent, you know. You can work your way up. There are you know, there are wars where the the sort of hostility is not all focused on the western journalists. You know, that is a case like in Syria where it's very dangerous to be a western journalist. You know, there's ice operating al-qaeda. They're all sorts of jihadi groups that have said, you know, obviously have made it clear that it's more dangerous for western journalists. I think we do, you know, news organizations do reprint and use the work of citizen journalists in the absence of any other people being on the ground. I mean, if you look at for example, Yemen Yemen is a war. I was just in Yemen for two weeks in September for the New York Times magazine, it's a war that is grossly under covered because it's almost impossible to get in. And it's also very dangerous. You know, the the Saudis in the the. The coalition have literally cut off the airspace. So journalists can't fly into Sunol to cover northern Yemen. You have to fly into Aden and make this very treacherous drive all the way north which is almost twelve hours making it very difficult and very dangerous for journalists to cover that. So we have relied on whatever comes out, whether it's from the UN or aid workers or whatever information we can get out of there. So, you know, I think there's a compromise. If there's nothing else coming out of there. I think editors do consider who's on the ground. But we have to put a disclaimer, you know, this is not a trained journalist. It's not a staff journalist were not positive how this image was taken. Let's talk a little bit more about of love more at one time wants to get to reflect on force. If you can is the process will most of putting together a piece like this. It's very different than regular assignment. And you'll sort of curatorial I has been trying to think you right millions of images. But how did that start? Did you have a clear vision for you wanted to include? How you tell a title did you learn by limb by doing was very very difficult. First of all, I didn't really have a vision. I sort of thought. Okay. Well, I've been photographing for twenty three years. I've never done a solo book of photography. I've sort of given bodies of work to certain compilations of photography, but I haven't done a solo body. And so it was a bit overwhelming the whole process, you know, I over the years, I've sort of pulled photographs and bodies of work that have resonated with me over time that I that I always kind of referred to when I do public speaking, those are the bodies of work I show. So those were kind of the spine of the book. That I felt like would be in there. You know, Dr for the war in Iraq, Afghanistan, the corn gall valley, they're all bodies of work that are in there. But then there other bodies of work like the drought in the horn of Africa in two thousand eleven that is a very special body of work. Meet that fell out that didn't make the cut..

Yemen Syria al-qaeda UN Sunol Africa Aden gall valley the New York Times magazine Iraq Afghanistan twenty three years twelve hours two weeks
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

"The busiest women in TV Marti. Hi, I think I have the distinction of being the oldest person you've ever had them. My references are older than you are. Don't worry. You win human. That's true with sharp objects. Yes. Diet land? Yes. Girlfriends at the divorce? Yes. Unreal. Yes. Code block. Well, cub black. I have the distinction of having the best kind of Hollywood job, which is that I helped produce the documentary that it's based on. So I did literally nothing. Ooh. Yeah, it's the job I aspire to. Culture of jobs. So what you're saying is you're lazy. And of course I have loved work since Buffy. Thank you. You've done so much work. You're like Ingley where it's just you're into life of pi and sense and sensibility. Everything. I feel like I did grow up in the ice storm. So that is a wonderful rep. Well, mistake. I'm glad you are here, and you said that your its verb has is well versed in the new New York Times magazine profile of Gwyneth Paltrow was she explained that she internet hatred of her and figured out how to turn it into cash. She calls these moments, quote, cultural firestorms, and she could monetize those eyeballs. How is the longest article is. I thinking, surely this woman has spent enough time with Gwinnett that you find a kicker end this and yet it kept going and going and going. And yet I devoured every word like it was like Chardonnay. And it's funny because we did we, we all were like, this is a must because in a weird way, like I feel like Paul tro is like the cross section of Adora and Verena like Madeira on sharp objects and Berina on diet land like she, she's just draped in Kashmir in such a way drives so many people crazy, but the fact that she's figured out how to make money from that, I think is real proof that when people say like a women should run the world, I'm always like, let's put a pin in that. Win. I always tell little, I knew about her did not realize she was with Brad vaults. Nick realize I think I forgot about the other kid. There was a bunch of stuff. I was like, oh, I have not been paying attention to what this woman has been doing. Congratulations. I love the small details of like one of her daughter's just sitting in the background Straubing Blackbird just like a course. She. It was very like her, like making the clams without an apron. And then Chris Martin just shows up, and then the kids are just now doing the instruments and Brad just walks in now and now they're having, I'm like, yeah, give me a break actually want a TV series of Gwyneth in her little viola Davis moment of like just striding into this college classroom. That's the thing about the goop brand for a while. I was tolerant of it because it's like, all right, look, somebody's gotta make seventy five hundred dollar risotto and it may as well be win of Paltrow. However, then when you get into the Jade vagina, eggs thing where she's just like advocating sexual health, things that are Kuku not even just like all kinds of health shit. She's actually someone who I think would die of capacity because yeah. Bee's sting her in this dive, I been to wait. One of the most interesting parts of this to was the fact that goop split with Conde nast. They were like, we're not gonna. Do Gook is to moral. Fatchett the articles. You can't just be out here like Dr Oz. All of these like doodads. Wire bras gives you breast cancer. Yeah. No. I mean, that is the deep theory of the room, which is I call this theory Donald Trump versus the sun, which is that. I think we're also afraid the climate is actually changing and we're all powerless which brings out the Luddite in everybody, and it brings out it's just like witchcraft. Absolutely. That's true. There's this whole section of like people a lot of money who are going to go crazy that way and be like, we're praying to our bras that don't have under wires, and then there's the people who are like Donald Trump is going to literally fly through the air and fight the sun with his hands and he'll win. We'll be fine. No. Splitting with Conde nast because they aren't committed to truthfulness. Like literally, it's like the white lady info wars. Which by the way it surprises me that she even wanted to be a part of Conde nast. It's like you're clearly your own ivory Kashmir juggernaut. Why do.

Gwyneth Paltrow Conde nast Donald Trump Brad Gwinnett Hollywood New York Times Dr Oz Kashmir Ingley Paul tro Chris Martin Nick Adora Bee viola Davis seventy five hundred dollar
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

"The busiest women in TV Marti. Hi, I think I have the distinction of being the oldest person you've ever had them. My references are older than you are. Don't worry. You win human. That's true with sharp objects. Yes. Diet land? Yes. Girlfriends at the divorce? Yes. Unreal. Yes. Code block. Well, cub black. I have the distinction of having the best kind of Hollywood job, which is that I helped produce the documentary that it's based on. So I did literally nothing. Ooh. Yeah, it's the job I aspire to. Culture of jobs. So what you're saying is you're lazy. And of course I have loved work since Buffy. Thank you. You've done so much work. You're like Ingley where it's just you're into life of pi and sense and sensibility. Everything. I feel like I did grow up in the ice storm. So that is a wonderful rep. Well, mistake. I'm glad you are here, and you said that your its verb has is well versed in the new New York Times magazine profile of Gwyneth Paltrow was she explained that she internet hatred of her and figured out how to turn it into cash. She calls these moments, quote, cultural firestorms, and she could monetize those eyeballs. How is the longest article is. I thinking, surely this woman has spent enough time with Gwinnett that you find a kicker end this and yet it kept going and going and going. And yet I devoured every word like it was like Chardonnay. And it's funny because we did we, we all were like, this is a must because in a weird way, like I feel like Paul tro is like the cross section of Adora and Verena like Madeira on sharp objects and Berina on diet land like she, she's just draped in Kashmir in such a way drives so many people crazy, but the fact that she's figured out how to make money from that, I think is real proof that when people say like a women should run the world, I'm always like, let's put a pin in that. Win. I always tell little, I knew about her did not realize she was with Brad vaults. Nick realize I think I forgot about the other kid. There was a bunch of stuff. I was like, oh, I have not been paying attention to what this woman has been doing. Congratulations. I love the small details of like one of her daughter's just sitting in the background Straubing Blackbird just like a course. She. It was very like her, like making the clams without an apron. And then Chris Martin just shows up, and then the kids are just now doing the instruments and Brad just walks in now and now they're having, I'm like, yeah, give me a break actually want a TV series of Gwyneth in her little viola Davis moment of like just striding into this college classroom. That's the thing about the goop brand for a while. I was tolerant of it because it's like, all right, look, somebody's gotta make seventy five hundred dollar risotto and it may as well be win of Paltrow. However, then when you get into the Jade vagina, eggs thing where she's just like advocating sexual health, things that are Kuku not even just like all kinds of health shit. She's actually someone who I think would die of capacity because yeah. Bee's sting her in this dive, I been to wait. One of the most interesting parts of this to was the fact that goop split with Conde nast. They were like, we're not gonna. Do Gook is to moral. Fatchett the articles. You can't just be out here like Dr Oz. All of these like doodads. Wire bras gives you breast cancer. Yeah. No. I mean, that is the deep theory of the room, which is I call this theory Donald Trump versus the sun, which is that. I think we're also afraid the climate is actually changing and we're all powerless which brings out the Luddite in everybody, and it brings out it's just like witchcraft. Absolutely. That's true. There's this whole section of like people a lot of money who are going to go crazy that way and be like, we're praying to our bras that don't have under wires, and then there's the people who are like Donald Trump is going to literally fly through the air and fight the sun with his hands and he'll win. We'll be fine. No. Splitting with Conde nast because they aren't committed to truthfulness. Like literally, it's like the white lady info wars. Which by the way it surprises me that she even wanted to be a part of Conde nast. It's like you're clearly your own ivory Kashmir juggernaut. Why do.

Gwyneth Paltrow Conde nast Donald Trump Brad Gwinnett Hollywood New York Times Dr Oz Kashmir Ingley Paul tro Chris Martin Nick Adora Bee viola Davis seventy five hundred dollar
"new york times magazine" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Couple three days ago i mean it's amazing to think but it's only like wednesday or thursday of last week i was in washington interviewing here on tuesday and in my business in the magazine business it's just never happens like it was on the website on saturday morning right you know like usually it's weeks months and that's because the kinds of stories of the new york times magazine or other like long form non fiction journalism publications have is because you can predict events you know you can know in january that nafta's gonna be interesting in june and you can have a thoughtful piece about it but this was like choose data friday right so so they were hinting to me that there was going to be a big blow up on the weekend g seven so they they kinda new but yeah you know it's like this is america now this is not fifty fifty this is not you know when they go hi we go or when we they go go hi this is not relitigating twenty sixteen this canada does not make it a station and me when i say that i i mean i mean to say this very sophisticated government you know and unless maybe less the political side than the the the sort of the permanent so canada has a westminster system which is and the minister talked about this which is like a permanent civil class and they and they actually run departments so you don't have all these every four years you swapping out different kinds of people you you get different ministers but the what would they call the deep state is thing in canada and it's the thing that people really like.

washington the new york times magazine nafta canada america four years three days
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Still Processing

Still Processing

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Still Processing

"Women being and they usually come about around some kind of sexual injustice her and there's a real reinterrogate version of a victory czech but what a four too yeah and i don't i mean you know we're in the middle of there are three really good essays that were written about on this subject leslie jameson route one for the new york times magazine that really tried to understand or tried to she tried to understand for herself what it meant to be a person who felt disconnected from a rage um because society is sort of taken that away from her well yes but also she's socialize she's talking about the way women some women are socialized to hide anger that women are socialized to not feel rage or displayed or showed a really engage with it and it's not taken seriously a lot of isn't taken seriously mmhmm i mean i think i can see that with the way the women's march gets talked about two which is that it's treated seriously like semi seriously but i don't think that it's seen is an outgrowth of like waking up with real anger and needing it to go somewhere and so i think that's why the turnout felt it to me at least remotely as strong as it looked last year i mean obviously probably wasn't but i was surprised that the numbers of people that went in the numbers of people that spoke i mean i think this is of it's a real demonstration of that anger at a desire to have it not be aimless think grew women are often discredited as the anger being discriminated and the anger pushing everywhere and the anger getting oliver everything and taking down unfair targets may be comma like as he's in sorry dunno i think one of the things it's interesting about this moment and the rage that i am actually feeling from women even though i don't agree with some of the anger lake did the nature of the anger's wounds not so much of women should be angry but i think ashley fields anger at the journalist to route greece's story.

the new york times magazine anger lake greece leslie jameson oliver
"new york times magazine" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

Bon Appetit Foodcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

"Both sampled parks now it's the are or you're asking me you're asking me over saddam grade uni n frick in peppers and onion us get your adamantly vote for something i've never ahead competitors if it was the best thing i had last year that in the test kitchen okay well i don't i will also i can only speak for myself so there's no recipes people could search will propose arm so poor not true dot com is or one no you make the beau psalm any shredded up yourself and then you take the ginger scallions sauce from which sam sefton lovingly reproduce for the new york times magazine which sent a website yet and then you take that ginger scouting sauce and some napa cabbage and make a slow out of it and throw los racha drizzle travel martin's roles done shadow to sam sifting shadowing sam can i and i would like some can them i'm not you dumb hall a pain is carrying a quick pickle sharia critical we gotta with oils without at the aouzou quick break with like a cucumber or like cuba numbers can i do a saracho may hill yes please okay i'm deputy at ripe satellite rescued fast sounds good oh my god all opinion the helping is gonna be getting there all right so far guys on the swan sauntering up with us on those on those chips and block with them slowing through some vietnamesestyle wings with salon grow into the both psalms style polled pork oh look like the quick pickle that the ginger scallions law let's araya mayo could also take the let us that you would normally be your psalm rapper and no could have that as a part of your sandline opus orbit we got to break that we got a break with a lot of traditions in two thousand eight to the bell is has been wrong guy i've i've eaten iran's and a lot of food in a lot of salt so far in this in this competition on thirsty so remove onto drinks okay cold cheap beer versus cold craft beer.

the new york times magazine martin iran saddam sam sefton cuba araya
"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New york times magazine online article finds there are challenges to crafting effect of early childhood education programmes and in increasing teacher pay and training we'll explore all that in this morning's form program and we're joined by leah austin she's codirector of the center for the study of childcare employment it uc berkeley good morning lee austin good morning thank you for elderly thank you for being here ross drawn by rebecca gomez she's program officer in education at the highest simon's foundation a family foundation working to an hence education for young learners good morning rebecca gomez good morning thanks for having me thanks for being here we're also joined of course by janine 'interland the the author of the new york times magazine piece which is called why are our most important teachers paid the least and it appears in the print version of the new york times magazine this sunday good morning janine inter landi good morning i i'd like to start with you first for this piece how did you define preschool were you also including daycares in that restructured preschool programs centers just curious i think i would wanted the prizes and it is that it's actually very difficult thing to fine um there are lots of programs that bill themselves as preschool but there are actually more like daycare program so it gets a bit by the on for my part because i did find a full as anything that has a three and four year old and had some sort of curriculum that they were advertising regardless of how wealthy and plays accurate kill him and one of the things that you pointed out in your story was that this idea that you can have a profound effect on the cognitive and social development of very young children is relatively new yeah so i.

codirector berkeley program officer simon the new york times magazine leah austin lee austin ross rebecca gomez janine 'interland four year
"new york times magazine" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"New york times magazine here in a few weeks about a story out of minya out of minnesota northern minnesota if i remember correctly and you can i listen to him on the flagrant two podcast gave me a hard time will i kindly and graciously take it without any response subscribe on high tunes hey i something comes adam silver said in a regional on time i am a traditionalist eighth standing for breakfast every day i'm a ridiculous creature of have it you like to quote the movie adaptation describing personality wear meryl streep says one the characters a word i can't say and fish something fish where he's like not vets after years of being gives as the fish are all was just say i don't like change and i'm not excited about this but but adam silver did raise the possibility with our friend sarah make from usa today's boards about down the wind shortening the nba season from eighty two games to adjust to the growing signs about players bodies and to open the possibility of actual regular season games abroad including perhaps in china he have a strong reaction one way or another about the nba season instead of being 82 games being eighty games or seventy five gains or seventy games or whatever they would settle on five absolutely throwing react connecticut off of uh the i think the feed them is quite clearly who long are we wouldn't have this epidemic of good game hitting their best player on backtoback if we didn't have too long but even it is the now of course sort of like the market career russian here uh and frankly the feeding can drag on a little bit uh and he can't get to the point april affleck hierarchy into the playoffs already meet 75 from around there is a great idea go into china now yeah i think that looked at as the next big market for the nba uh my kimber wolves are out there right now in fact uh blamed the maccabi in game uh so i i it mart uh china to become a lot more for the nba than just yaoming it forbids country in the world you gotta do it i it you got it and not just them not to do with.

minnesota adam silver meryl streep sarah china nba New york times
"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"China dot com act act bring shakespeare back to the gary is tony away nominee john douglas thomson takes on the iconic role in hamlet began september 20th act hyphen sf dot org snap judgment ahead of one o'clock this afternoon today the performer the hardest character to play is the character without a script featuring stories from a gay mexican wrestler and x sex worker and neil brennan a writer for the chapelle show that and mora's snap judgment coming up after this american life at one o'clock and again at eleven pm on kqed public radio eighty eight point five fm to smack knife meyer glass today's program essay be what happens when you create a project whose main goal is to integrate schools for the benefit of the weight students there as i work out for everybody if you're just tuning in we're in the middle of a story by reporter mostly secret yasser version of this story this week for the new york times magazine that's it ny times dot com slash integration and for the break mostly was explaining that a guy named johnny holloway decided not to return to be asked for their union for reasons of his own leslie he picks up the story from there a month before i got on the phone with johnny and pretty quickly he told me this um our took a lot of beating um oh no no proof for everyone else who spoke about our no they hadn't johnny told me he was beaten several times always by the same guys and he was certain it was racially motivated he said he never told the other black students about it said there was no point so i went to visit johnny of the search to talk more about this johny searches called couple of salvation it's a storefront church and dorm north.

shakespeare gary neil brennan writer mora reporter the new york times magazine johnny holloway leslie john douglas thomson chapelle yasser
"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It to slater's or for you know people to just worry about weather on innocent people are being convicted girls similarly thus lawn from the new york times magazine law school endlessly political gove first maybe you saw her article the new york times magazine this weekend guilt by omission when prosecutors withhold evidence of innocence so i mentioned that the top the cognitive dissonance that some people might have had reading your article just when the independence of robert moeller in the russia investigation is giving prosecutors the reputation of you know mr and mrs claim in or polarized political system have you thought about it in that light at all yeah absolutely i mean it's so a home tie lang that we are relying so much on muller's personal integrity and reputation right now and now has to do with the federal system the particular role he's playing and the fact that in some ways not as a law but i think as a norm the department of justice and the idea that it can investigate the president of the president in is not above the law that's become a part of our system of checks and balances that makes muller absolutely crucial right now it also spotlights how much power prosecutors have you know trump is railing against muller in part because muller's doing all this investigating and trump doesn't like it well the power of prosecutors can be used to great good and it can also be used on unfortunately in some cases in a way that is not fair and not good and that railroads people and and leads to a guilty verdict ex against some people who are innocent prosecutors would say that that rarely happens that doesn't describe you know most of their work and i think that's true the problem is how much are we willing to tolerate when we're talking about innocent people going to prison thinks about the moeller investigation or leaking out into the press things the we might say would recover dential in a prosecutorial system at a grand jury system the fact that he's working with two grand juries the fuck the grand juries herve subpoenaed evidence having to do with the records of michael flynn and may be finances i mean not to say the muller is leaking but prosecutors often leaked to the press specifically to put pressure on defendants in high profile cases delta that is something.

law school the new york times magazine robert moeller muller president michael flynn slater russia department of justice
"new york times magazine" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"In one sense literally carried by other people in it's really quite beautiful and move me to tears in a couple of spots there was a story that the new york times magazine did earlier this year a ballot career tied to his latest book the kingdom and the title of that story was hallam annual career is changing or reimagined nonfiction and i wanna quote actually from that magazine story which quotes from the book because i think it describes in part what is so incredibly innovative about careers work and i think as far as my reading goes kind of unique to him so this is from white mason's piece about emmanuel career and he's talking about this book lives other than my own there's an amazing little moment in the book that gets it what career was able to do career is just a week into the devastation of the city nami in sri lanka and he's walking around meeting people who were seeking their loved ones in vain he comes upon an english tourist quote in overweight middle aged englishwoman with short hair who had just lost her girlfriend unquote and here's the passage from the book i imagined the two of them getting on in years living in a lovingly tended house in an english town taking part in its social life going on a yearly trip to some distant country putting together their photo albums all that shattered the survivors were turn the empty house each woman's mug with her name on it one of them forever forlorn and this heavy woman sitting slumped at the kitchen table with her head in her hands weeping telling herself that she is all alone now and will be until she dies.

the new york times magazine mason sri lanka emmanuel
"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That if you ratchet up the penalties for violating the law equal shoes to leaf inward proven that they do that chris go back in 2013 with me now are ari bannon seeing a contributing writer for the nation reporting fellow at the nation institute author of the book give us the ballot the modern struggle for voting rights in america published last year and many of you may have seen the long oh file of coal back and his agenda in the new york times magazine that are berman wrote last month and also with us is veneto gupta president and ceo of the leadership conference on civil and human rights former head of the us department of justice civil rights division rem benita welcome to w when we see today had morning brian hi how can morning so arias this commission first of all failing to launch with all this opposition even from republicans states it's pretty remarkable i mean the commission hasn't even had an inperson meeting the first in person meeting is next week and already you have it's now up to forty eight states refusing to provide all of the voter data that chris kulbok asked for so basically on june twenty eight kulbok sent a letter to all fifty states asking for what he called publicly available voter information but then he asked for all of these things that are not publicly available like social security numbers criminal history military history at first a few blue state said no oh places like california then very very quickly opposition increased from red state as you mentioned places like mississippi louisiana arizona that do not usually criticize the trump administration i think people were concerned first off with giving the federal government the data and secondly what were they going to deal with it because either many republicans are skeptical of this commission they don't believe donald trump's claim that three million people voted illegally there's no evidence to suggest that three million people voted illegally but nonetheless trump has stacked this commission with people like chris kulbok that.

donald trump mississippi louisiana california social security chris kulbok brian civil rights us veneto gupta nation institute ari bannon writer arizona red state blue state the commission human rights president and ceo berman the new york times magazine america voting rights
"new york times magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"new york times magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"For breakfast fair he does the all wise conversation right of with the bottom line is is that i would smell the fish okay what would happen is if the door came into the room dougie dog with some every ingredient separately that you put into making your fish and that's what makes them so incredible at sniffing out drugs and bombs and and now diseases as such as diabetes and cancer just amazing i think we're just touching the surface now of how important the old factory of a dog using and you can't fool you can form may be too careful with your cause your body chemistry changes and they pick up on that it is a story the new york times magazine this past weekend had a near their couple of things that i have found in there recently about dogs especially but to animals and whether teaching us about our health as you were just suggesting a one of the things that is highlighted here but also the history of dogs going back forty thousand plus years and how really when you get to this fist he added thinking of dogs even though their communication skills are different they are teaching us so much about ourselves that is is becoming really a very interesting study not only in veterinary schools but in psychology schools to let the psychology of the dog what they communicate through their smelling and there is it really is profound wine i've been doing this for lahti years that learning every single day every minute i spend with a dog or cat or any type of animal i'm learning something you people i like the other doused community with someone asking what is the most important thing that animals have taught me a couple of things number one is you know tomorrow's gone maria don't worry about yesterday be here now that's number one and number two is that you know you don't have to be a phony if you don't like somebody you don't have to buy them a drink i let them know you don't like them right off the bat neither on their shoes that marta when the guy that was that all china have you you what i learned from dogs if you don't.

the new york times magazine china diabetes lahti