4 Burst results for "New York State Pavilion"

"new york state pavilion" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"new york state pavilion" Discussed on Pantheon

"You put some change in and you. You turn a button and this window would open up and you pull a sandwich out I mean it sounds disgusting but it was considered very very advanced in those days. and. I have my camera with with me one night and the under study by that was doing on the roof. And the the under study was for the lead part was was on stage. I knew the show backwards and forwards and I knew there was a my daddy stand on stage right and called lighting cues. Just off the wings, you know if you peaked around Bernie could see the audience and I knew the show backwards and forwards and I knew that the the. The actor was going to have a speech to do right near where my dad would call the lighting cues. You know the stage right and and I knew all the laughs were I snuck a picture. Of Him Luckily, during during an audience, laugh so that no one could hear the shutter go. I found out years later that my dad told me that he he could have been hit as as a production stage manager he could have been hit with a ten thousand dollar a photo call. From the Union. Stage ending but anyway took this picture and it came out really great. It's it's actually it's in the the the exhilarating exhausted right and I I saw the picture and I made a couple of five by seven prints and and my dad gave one to the actor and he hit my dad to give me a set of these big four or five big photography books And I learned everything I knew about geography from those books those stuff that I had already catered out on my own and that was the extent of my education I was going to go to college for photography, and I woke up one day and decided I didn't want to go to college I was already. Working professional already been published wasn't making any money, but I was already on the road. To a career without knowing I was. and I've walked to my mom and dad's bedroom one day and I said. and. I was already accepted tall three colleges I applied to I was going to go to Philadelphia. College bar they they'd already put down a deposit on the tuition. Their bedroom on one Sunday morning and I said the I'll go and get the Sunday Times and I'll pick up the lots and bagels I'm not GonNa go to college and I'll get the dry cleaning. Tried to slide on an and. They were not very good with the curve ball. ENOUGH KEEP HANGING His a quick word from her sponsors we'll be back in a bit. And now back to the program but. They they were relatively cool about it I mean to play. To play my mom and dad I I signed up for. One semester of tonight courses. School visual arts and I think I went to two classes and I said that's it because I was overqualified even at that point you knew right away. Yeah. I remember the the instructor, Professor. Teacher whatever the hell he was. I ended up going out and shooting some garbage cans on the street corner that were. Thrown over and You know was like street Photography Bullshit and I thought it was really like. Ground level learning you know and I had already been a few notches above that. So I didn't go to college and then a year later on October Fifteenth Nineteen seventy-one. I walked down the hallway to a cab went to Jeff Gay moved to California. Why did you do that? Well La was the epicenter of the whole record business. You know the whole fantasy land of of the business and It just I'd been to La while I've been there once With my mom and Dad. When my dad was doing a national company of my Fair Lady. But then that the summer seventy-one, I was part of a press junket. The twenty five journalists, joggers, journalists. From New York and Twenty Five Mil a descended upon Dallas for three dog night's. Concert at the Cotton Bowl. And Those are the days where you could switch around plane tickets and things like that. So instead of going from New York Dallas New York because I was to education a three dog night I went from. NEW YORK DALLAS THAN DALLAS TO LA. And because I had some friends in L. A. and I stayed there. For months. And Right. Before I came back to New York I hooked up with this girl is a publicist. And decided to. Got Back to New York and then decided I wanted to move back to L. I want to move to La You know permanently which I did and moved in with her. For a while and I I've been there ever since YEP. So email L. A.. As I tell a story where I. I looked at the cover of the flying burrito brothers I. Think it's Gilded Palace, of Sim. News you see Graham loosens guys. There's a couple of. on the cover and I thought, wow, every girl in la I bet looks like that. And they did. Then I found out then I found out later that they were two hookers, the Grand Parsons had hired for the outburst. No cares. Very. Very good. Very good. So you were shooting before that and got invited to shoot three dog night. Was the first band that you actually Doug your teeth in. The first I WANNA make this. Go I I think this is the direction well, you know what? I was fortunate in that when I still was in New York and still is in high slow shooting at the fillmore east. you know all the venues around New York. Is the cerebral in Queens which then became Louis Armstrong Tennis Stadium, and now I think called something else. There were shows there. To, friends of mine were the promoters airy covers than Shelly Finkel. Shows there on what was a the New York's what had been the new. York. State pavilion, at the world's fair in nineteen, sixty four. So I was already getting in my feet wet you know going to Gary and Shelly shows, and and then the fillmore and a I was meeting a lot of people that worked for different magazines, record companies, and things like that. and. You know. I was at the led Zeppelin press conference. I don't even remember how I ended up there. But Jimi Robert did a press conference in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. because they leads up on the had won the melody makers readers. To as the biggest band on the world, the Beatles had one that every year since sixty, four, sixty, three, or sixty, four, and.

New York La Dallas York Bernie Shelly Finkel Union Beatles California Philadelphia State pavilion Jimi Robert Queens Gilded Palace Jeff Gay Grand Parsons Graham L. A. instructor
"new york state pavilion" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:50 min | 3 years ago

"new york state pavilion" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's also one of the most iconic of Warhol's paintings. I don't be done in his maybe wanna say something done, actually, you say about this. I also wanted to add here that you later on. You see work that looks at drag queens, and transgender identity and so forth, you well, I mean, I think that if you start to look at Marilyn Monroe, you know, you could see her at a variety of different ways. And I think this is where the complexity of Warhol is so extrordinary, you know, because it really depends looking at it, and this. Where he has a coded language that, you know, if you're a gay man, you're gonna get in some way. And if you're a straight woman, you could also see, you know, Elvis as this great love interest. So I think this is really where the fifties, very important to see because it's more hidden when you get into the sixties and the other thing about the most wanted men still mazes me is that it appeared on the facade of the New York state pavilion, at the world's fair. And the reason it was taken down. I think the homoerotic aspect was missed. It was really Rockefeller, who was very he was worried he was running for reelection and number of the accused were of Italy American heritage. And he was afraid of losing his constituents. And so that was the principal reason. And of course, Warhol than said, I'll put up a giant portrait of Robert Moses, which the fare didn't want either. But it's such a public thing I still think it's so radical to think of that work in nineteen sixty four on the world. I can't think of anything that comes close to it. So he was outrageous war, and it was so willing to sort of test the limits of what was seen as proper or conventional. And I think that's throughout, whether it's using the silkscreen, whether it's the oxidation paintings, which were made by having people urinate on a on a on a copper ground. He is pushing the envelope all the time, and yet he always looks like this shy retiring man, who says kit from nothing exactly exactly little working class from Pittsburgh. I wanted to our caller, a lot of people want to join us. But I have to ask you because. Producer Tina lover walked away talking about. We both talking about that series of photographs. He took an photograph book with a lot of quarters in his pocket. That story either one of you, that's the portrait of Ethel scull. So Ethel scull and her husband were great collectors in the nineteen sixties. And she wanted commission Warhol to do her portrait, and they went to the factory. And I think she thought it would be a conventional ship photo shoot. But instead, he took her down to Times Square with a lot of quarters fed them into the photo booth. And you know she really performs for the camera. And when you see this painting, which is, you know, her image and multiple poses over a series of modular. A rectangular canvases in different colors. I mean, it really does have the sense of first selfie. And it's really one of the great works. It's actually she, she gifted it to the Whitney and met co-owned by both institutions, and it's just, you know something where Phil mic cinematic and it's just the most incredible. And in a way, very straightforward. This is the thing about war. He does things that if you scratch your head he would say, well, what a great idea what I think of it. Of course, we didn't think of it, and I think people will really enjoy seeing that work figuring out thinking about let me read a comment callers from Robert didn't Warhol, simply rebrand, existing photographic images. For example, Brando and Marilyn Monroe as his own. Is he not a greater marketer, like Jeff Koons than an artist? Please discuss why we should consider as work historically exception. What we've been doing that? I think this whole segment hair, but what about that idea that, you know, he was just in fact, I think I was telling you, both when we're going taking me through maintain that I had recent a recent opportunity to interview and Tibo for the California academy of the arts, and he comes from very commercial background. I mainly dry goofy and Mickey Mouse for Walt Disney. There seems to be often an attitude that if somebody comes out of that background, somehow they're not as sacred or they're not as deserving our veneration. As artists Michael, I would say about that. You know, most people know were whole from reproduction, and there hasn't been partic- so much of the work directly. And that's why we wanted to do this kind of exhibition because WorL is I call him a formalist he made lots and lots and lots of decisions about how he was going to make painting how an image was going to be presented. So how it was formatted, how cropped the, the way it was the colors, the inks and once you see the works themselves, you see how much decision making went into them, and that he was actually very precise, and very disciplined about the making of these works of art. I think he was a genius. And I'll say that very publicly and without even slight. In addition, here's Juanita's our first caller, you're on the air. I'm calling to find out your opinion of, of a great pop artist by the name of Carita head to contemporary and million with her work as I went to school. It was. And just wanted to know I think she was aware of Warhol. With her. Nobody your what are your kids? I don't know that he I can't say for certain that he was aware of her. But I think our work is extraordinarily and powerful and has that freshness and capacity to communicate. So I'm really glad that you've brought her up because I think they're just many fans and there's a lot of artists actually who are also big fans of her work. And thank you, Anita. Let me go right to another caller. That's Louis Louis you're on the air. Good morning. Michael and gap. You bet. Awards several years stack. And I'm recalling a work called Jack and Jackie which if I'm not mistaken, within black and white, and I, I was not aware before seeing that exhibited Andy work in black and white. And I'm wondering in your guests comment on that he often. Yeah. There are number of things that are done in black and white. You know, it's interesting, the color, of course, the black overlay that you see in Warhol's, work ink is always black, and then the colors are underneath. It's interesting, you bring that up because you'll see in the celebrity portrait's there are a number of artists. Michael Heiser, the great artists who worked in the land, and we also had in New York's several others. There's a portrait of Keith haring we're hall. It's interesting that number of the artists, he chose to portray or he did in black and white. Which, of course, has a graphic quality to it. And so, I think that's an interesting. Observation on your on your part, and I thank you for the call. I want to say something because many of our listeners, very political minded, and there's a lot to glean from this exhibit there. There's actually a painting of Richard Nixon, and it says vote for McGovern on, but there's also you know, from the civil rights movement, their stuff there from whether case assoiation from news. Really, I mean he was eager absorb tabloids, and he used that in his work as well. But also just going into current events and making them palpable in his art. Here's another caller, David. That's you. Good morning. Yeah. Good morning guys. Just had a couple of observations one, somebody who's not an art expert. I just love the way he would take these iconic images. You know, the Campbell Soup can these various commercial things that I think are super interesting. And how you know, he just looked at the world trade different lengths. I think that's incredible. Secondly, I just wanna comment my brother. I was a gay man who died of aids. And I think Warhol's icon, ecstatic as this gay liberation leader had a huge impact on my brother's life. And I just be interested in you got on on those two point. Thank you so much for taking my call. Thank you. Well, let me maybe the last the last point Warhol has been a, you know, that he, he was he did not cover up being gay, and that he was, you know, it was any celebrated gay a lot of gay imagery gay content, and so on and. And I think he is admired as a pioneer. There have been many other artists who were gay, who were much much, much more hidden about that part of their identity. So stonewall and his work. For example. Yes, he again, he celebrated these drag queens, and transgender people, and did these glorious portraits of them. And one of them is Marsha p Johnson. Johnson Marshall Johnson, who was one of the leaders of the stonewall rebellion in the bar. And then she also is one of the first people to become very involved in gay activism, in New York in the seventies, people are asking questions about the right age for an audience for the exhibit someone says, I have a ten year old who is introduced the artists last year and third grade would love to bring her to see the exhibit with exhibited information, be age appropriate for an upper elementary school audience. Teresa, another listener says, what would you say about Warhol to someone knows nothing about him? I'm taking my twelve year old to s. Moment next week. So two questions kind of connected age appropriate and I will say that, you know, at the Whitney, I cannot tell you the number of school groups that we had come and I loved going through the galleries and watching them draw frankly sit in front of the of the Campbell Soup can and make their own drawings. And I think that the color of war world colors and the immediacy of his images is just draws people in of any age. I do think there's something for everyone in Warhol. And I think that I think it was an incredible generosity and Warhol because I, I mean, clearly there different levels of meaning that one can glean deeper that you look, some of them, obviously dealing with heavy things about everyday life, and life and death. But I also think that there was this celebration of the every day that Warhol wanted people to enter into at no matter what age, we're talking with Donna. Salvo deputy director for international initiatives, and senior curator at the Whitney museum of American art, and Gary Garo senior curator of painting and sculpture does have moment. Exhibit Andy Warhol from eight to be back again runs from Sunday through September second..

Andy Warhol Michael Heiser Marilyn Monroe Warhol Campbell Soup New York state pavilion Robert Moses New York Ethel scull Elvis Rockefeller Jeff Koons Pittsburgh Johnson Marshall Johnson Italy American heritage Whitney museum of American art Keith haring Marsha p Johnson Whitney principal
"new york state pavilion" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:40 min | 3 years ago

"new york state pavilion" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is complete. But how much of it will the public? See? Well, I am concerned with the noises that are coming from the Justice department may decide not to share information with congress. That would be a terrible double standard house until chair says he could subpoena the special counsel, if congress doesn't get to see the underlying evidence. But we know about the report this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. Weekdays starting at four on WNYC. You're listening to WNYC you welcome back Campbell Soup cans sculptures, made of brillo boxes. And even the Rolling Stones Tom logo. Make no mistake. Andy Warhol is one of the most recognizable artists of the twentieth. Century made art that even non patrons of the art world and countered on a regular basis and yet hard as it is to believe Warhol has not had a full career retrospective in the US and more than three decades. But that all changed last November with the opening of Andy Warhol from a to b and back again a monumental exhibit at the Whitney it runs through this Sunday, March thirty first before moving on to Chicago, and San Francisco the exhibit was curated by the Whitney's, Donald salvo. We spoke to her back in November the week the show opened here's our conversation. What were your goals in incubating? It was really an attempt to bring some clarity. I think to an artist who so profuse made so much work that in a way it's almost impossible in certain way to grab. Apple with it all but also to sort of situate, the work and its development over the course of Warhol's career and see his experiences as a commercial illustrator when he first comes to New York as well, as you know, how Warhol is really grappling with the fundamental problems of of of art making and that's often lost. And so much of the discussion that has happened during Warhol's era when he was alive and even after he died as just the man with the funny wig who went to a larger parties, and he's so much more than that. He was so prolific in deciding what would be in this exhibit. How'd you make your choices? And how did you decide to organize it? Sure. Well, I think first of all I decided that the best thing was to do it largely chronologically because it's it's the way to track in a sense, the development of Warhol's thinking, his ideas, and there are certain key works that you just can't imagine a Warhol retrospective. Without the thirty two Campbell Soup cans from the museum of modern. Art or the Marilyn diptych, you know, from the Tate or nine Jackie's from the Whitney's own collection. So they're just sort of key works, and I done a show years ago on the fifties called successes a job in New York at the gray or gallery that was of the commercial work. So I knew a lot of that work the hardest thing, of course, is there so much really really great work. And you know, I had certain feelings about certain works that just do certain things and so had to be very judicious in making those decisions about either. Introducing a new idea new paradigm shift or that show, how Warhol engages with color, and then re engages with it and also painting hand painting and a lot of that you see in the early days of the sixties, but then again in the seventies and eighties and we're holds career had fallen off. And then throw on top of that film, photography video publishing television. It's it's tough. Tough. But it's one of the key challenges that you live for curator. Sure. I'm sure I want to talk about a couple of of the pieces that I didn't know that. Well, and I think a really interesting, ladies and gentlemen, from nineteen seventy five it's one of his history. Portraits where we don't know the we don't know the identities. They're anonymous for a reason we tell people about the sure so he was approached by a dealer in Italy to do a series of portrait's of the term would be used then of of drag Queen or trans people, and he he did not want. The superstars of the of the factory candy, darling. He didn't want them. And so we're home win on a search with his friend Bob cola cello to find a sitters, and he went to a New York club called the guilty grape where there are a lot of direct performers and they were each asked to pose for they didn't know they were posing for Warhol. They got paid a very little amount of money like fifty dollars and Warhol may Polaroid's of them, which we then translated into photographs. Now, it's interesting because when he showed them they were called, ladies and gentlemen, and they're very there are very few paintings were hall. Also features people of color, and so in our showing of them and others. I think a followed have done even earlier than us. We've actually included the names because we know who they are they signed the Polaroid's and one of them in particular is Marsha p Johnson who was a very leading figure the gay rights movement very involved with stonewall villa Meena Ross who had a band. So it's interesting times have changed. Luckily, luckily, and I think we're sensitized to, you know, saying, well, they're not just anonymous individuals, and it's part of the complexity of Warhol in the different circles in which he moved in those he didn't move within their also introduced color in an amazing way. And there's a great essay and the catalogue by the artist Glenn log on who really talks about that. Who speaks from the perspective. And as an African American man, an artist of colored and color, and really you see we're home with these exuberant colors, and the poses are kind of amazing to see these individuals who were performers and full of life in these. Portrait's so it's an incredible series. And there are hundreds of them. We only have small selection, but we have a one that's really large scale. That's fantastic. There's also his first ever public artwork. The most wanted man yet. Most wanted men when was it created and what four well, he beat it for the New York state pavilion of the world's fair. So Philip Johnson the architect designed the pavilion any commissioned a number of artists. Many of the pop artist ROY Lichtenstein Klaus Oldenburg has long with Ellsworth Kelly to make works for the facade of the pavilion and Warhol was decided that he would use these images taken from a New York City. Police bulletin of individuals wanted for crimes, and he silkscreen them onto a huge canvas. And they were put on the facade of the pavilion. Now, they fair organizers weren't so happy about this. They thought that they were perhaps not the image. They should project in to the fair and family friendly. They asked him to submit something else. He wanted to have a portrait of Robert Moses, the great either destroyer or maker of New York, obviously, he's a contentious figure, and they said, no. So he painted them over in silver. And that was it. He also made a film series called the thirteen most beautiful boys. So this is where you see these dual mass specs of Warhol. And I still think it's incredibly outrageous thing to have put it the world's fair at that period of time. This is pre stonewalls very different type. But not everybody got that reading of it people knew who were in the know. Anyway, that's why and they're the anti hero. They're the complete opposite of what you would have expected. But it's why it's such an incredible series. We're speaking with Donna desalvo's. She curated the Andy Warhol show from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney it just it just opened up. There is the death and disastrous series as well. Which really you get a sense of how obsessed he was with media and. Headlines in terms of the series. How does it fit into his whole career? Sure. Well, it's a very important series. And it's often seen as one of his pivotal series of works. I mean, he was obsessed with media because we're obsessed with media. So he was reflecting in a sense, the cultural desire for news, and you know, spectacle and tragedy sadly cells so he picked up on that. So many of the images were discarded from AP wire photo or UPI because they were too gruesome some of them actually appeared in magazine. So he was gonna do a show in Paris, which was gonna call death in America. And these were that's where they were first shown. So you have images of car crashes suicides, and you have some where there really speaking to Stoorikhel moment. So it must race riot which uses the famous Charles Moore photograph of the civil rights protests in Birmingham, where they protesters are attacked by dogs or there's one of two women who die as a result of eating. Painted tuna fish, they botulism or you also have a suicide of a woman who's fallen from jumped from the Empire State building. Some of these appeared in life magazine, some of them never made it because they were so gruesome, but I think what you see there is you move from celebrity to this anonymous because we don't know who these people are. And it also gives you the darker side of Warhol's whole project. You know, there's a dark side to Warhol there's a dark side to consumption to overconsumption and also look we're there's a base insect that attracts us to looking at some of these images we're bombarded with them. And you know, we're whole is grows up in the age of radio TV comes into the what into the picture like mid fifties. So we're more and more that culture that time. People are looking at images former they're the great pictorial magazines life, look as well as New York Post Daily Mirror. Some of these things don't even exist. Anywhere. So the picture became the language, and we're we're in even more today. I think about that. Sometimes I was walking through what about Andy Warhol were alive during the internet. Yes. That's what it makes your head Smith. He's a pre digital guy. Yeah. It's an amazing. It's amazing thought there's also some very interesting behind the scenes I was like quotidian pictures of him vacuuming gallery where he's going to have a show. Why was it important to have that be part of the that's actually a work of art? So he well because I think that when we're home was shot in nineteen sixty eight by Valerie Solanas who had written a book called scum. This society for cutting up men, and he she was very unhappy with Warhol he promised to produce one of her maker, whatever screens into a move. It didn't happen and she shot him, and he was faith. I mean, there was a near fatal shooting. He comes has a period of convalescence. You know, oftentimes people think this is when Warhol's work declines, and what you see through some of these experiments in this period of sixty eight to seventy two are actually how fertile his mind is an I believe you learn a lot from an artist by seeing the works. Actually, never make the quote unquote, big time because they show the process, you know, it's never a to z. It's a to be a to z ADD back and forth. And so that gallery that's actually a project. He was asked to do for a non x. A women's college that doesn't exist anymore. And he along with a number of other artists were invited to do projects in the gallery. So what does he do something? So simple as you say so quotidian he vacuums the gallery, it's documented and he leaves behind the bag of dirt. So all that exists. And I I just think shows him as a conceptual artist show, some has humor also looking at almost kind of emptiness nothingness, which is a serious read serious and funny Tena Asli. There's also one of these time capsules why did he do those? So they start from very pragmatic place. He was moving. Stay removing factories moving the studio he had all this junk that people sent him fan letters invitations all kinds of things. So it started very practically Vincent Fremont who worked with him for many years. They just got these boxes, and they started he started packing things away at a certain point. He just systematize. So there's. Six hundred sixty of these time capsules and they just have an array of things, I think they're so great because they might be the kind of thing you might find an anthropological digs archaeological dig someday. And we have one on display from the period around nineteen seventy two seventy three and their fan letters Christmas cards things from each cell Laurent artists. Like Ray Johnson. It runs the gamut from the famous to the unknown. Some of them are their books. Apparently, they opened a time capsule at the end of Warhol museum that had a a birthday cake that wasn't eating. So you get the sense of the stream and the flow of culture, and in a way, that's the that's the source for so much of what were hall brings into all aspects of his art. We're speaking Madonna desalvo. She curated Andy Warhol from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney. Where do we see his background? He's Andy Warhol. He grew up Catholic. Where do we see this in this show? Sure. Well, there's an early room in the exhibition. We're actually there's only a few pieces from his time when he was a student at the Carnegie institute of technology now Carnegie Mellon and one of them is from a class for social observation and he likes to show to bake a painting of his family's living room..

Andy Warhol Warhol museum New York Whitney Polaroid NPR New York state pavilion congress Justice department US special counsel museum of modern Philip Johnson Ray Johnson Italy New York Post Chicago
"new york state pavilion" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:28 min | 3 years ago

"new york state pavilion" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well, I am concerned with the noises that are coming from the Justice department may decide not to share information with congress. That would be a terrible double standard house until chair says he could subpoena the special counsel, if congress doesn't get to see the underlying evidence. But we know about the report this afternoon on all things considered from. NPR news. Weekdays starting at four on WNYC. You're listening to WNYC. Welcome back Campbell Soup cans sculptures, made a brillo boxes and even the Rolling Stones Tom logo. Make no mistake. Andy Warhol is one of the most recognizable artists of the twentieth. Century made art that even non patrons of the art world and countered on a regular basis and yet hard as it is to believe Warhol has not had a full career retrospective in the US and more than three decades. But that all changed last November with the opening of Andy Warhol from a to b and back again a monumental exhibit at the Whitney it runs through this Sunday, March thirty first before moving on to Chicago, and San Francisco the exhibit was curated by the Whitney's, Donald salvo. We spoke to her back in November the week the show opened here's our conversation. What were your goals in incubating? It was really an attempt to bring some clarity. I think to an artist is so profuse made so much work that in a way it's almost impossible in certain way to grab. Apple with it all, but also sort of situate, the work and its development over the course of were career and see his experiences as a commercial illustrator when he first comes to New York as well, as you know, how Warhol is really grappling with the fundamental problems of of of art making and that's often lost in so much of the discussion that has happened during Warhol's era when he was alive and even after he died as just the man with the funny wig who went to a of parties, and he's so much more than that. He was so prolific in deciding what would be in this exhibit. How'd you make your choices? And how did you decide to organize it? Sure. Well, I think first of all I decided that the best thing was to do it largely chronologically because it's the way to track in a sense, the development of Warhol's thinking, his ideas, and there are certain key works that you just can't imagine a Warhol retrospective. Without the thirty two. Campbell's soup cans from the museum of modern. Art or the Marilyn diptych from the Tate or nine Jackie's from the Whitney's collection. So they're just sort of key works, and I'd done a show years ago on the fifties called successes a job in New York at the gray or gallery that was of the commercial work. So he knew a lot of that work, the hardest thing, of course, is there so much really really great work. And you know, I had certain feelings about certain works that just do certain things and so had to be very judicious in making those decisions about either. Introducing a new idea a new paradigm shift or that show, how Warhol engages with color, and then re engages with and also painting hand painting and a lot of that you see in the early days of the sixty s but then again in the seventies and eighties and Warhol's career had fallen off. And then throw on top of that film, photography video publishing television. It's it's tough. Tough. But it's one of the challenges that you live for sure I'm sure I want to talk about a couple of of the pieces that I didn't know that. Well, and I think a really interesting, ladies and gentlemen, from nineteen seventy five it's one of his his portraits where we don't know the we don't know the identities. They're anonymous for a reason we tell people about them. Sure. So he was approached by a dealer in Italy to do a series of portraits of the term would be used then of of drag Queen or trans people, and he he did not want. The superstars of the of the factory candy, darling. He didn't want them. And so we're home win on a search with his friend Bob cola cello to find a sitters. And he went to a New York club called the Gilbert grape where there are a lot of drag performers, and they were each asked to pose for they didn't know they were posing for Warhol. They got paid a very little amount of money like fifty dollars and Warhol made Polaroid's of them, which we then translated into photographs. Now, it's interesting because when he showed them they were called, ladies and gentlemen, and they're very there are very few paintings were hall. Also features people of color, and so in are showing them and others. I think of followed have done even earlier than us. We've actually included the names because we know who they are. They signed the Polaroid's and one of them in particular is Marsha p Johnson who was a very leading figure the gay rights movement very involved with stonewall villa Meena Ross who had a band. So it's interesting times have changed. Luckily, luckily, and I think we're sensitized to, you know, saying, well, they're not just anonymous individuals, and it's part of the complexity of Warhol in the different circles in which he moved in those didn't move within their also introduced color in an amazing way. And there's a great essay and the catalogue by the artist Glenn ligon who really talks about that. Who speaks from the perspective as an African American man, an artist of colored and color, and really you see were home with these exuberant colors, and the poses are kind of amazing to see these individuals who were performers and full of life in these. Portrait's so it's an incredible series. And there are hundreds of them. We only have a small selection, but we have a one that's really large scale. That's fantastic. There's also his first ever public artwork most wanted man. Yeah. Most wanted men when was it created and what four well he made it for the New York state pavilion of the world's fair. So Philip Johnson the architect designed the pavilion any commissioned a number of artists. Many of the pop artist ROY Lichtenstein Klaus Oldenburg has long with Ellsworth Kelly to make works for the facade of the pavilion and Warhol was decided that he would use these images taken from a New York City. Police bulletin of individuals wanted for crimes, and he silkscreen them onto a huge canvas. And they were put on the facade of the pavilion. Now, they fair organizers weren't so happy about this thought that they were perhaps not the image. They should project in to the fair and family friendly. They asked him to submit something else. He wanted to have a portrait of Robert Moses, the great either destroyer or maker of New York, obviously, he's a contentious figure, and they said, no. So he painted them over and silver. And that was it. He also made a film series called the thirteen most beautiful boys. So this is where you see these dual aspects of Warhol, and I still think it's incredibly outrageous thing to have put it the world's fair at that period of time. This is pre stonewalls very different time. But not everybody got that reading of it people knew who were in the know. Anyway, that's why and they're the anti hero. They're the complete opposite of what you would have expected. But it's why it's such an incredible series. We're speaking with Donna desalvo's. She curated the Andy Warhol show from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney it just it just opened up. There is the death and disaster series as well. Which really you get a sense of how obsessed he was with media and. Headlines in terms of the series. How does it fit into his whole career? Sure. Well, it's a very important series. And it's often seen as one of his pivotal series of works. I mean, he was obsessed with media because we're obsessed with media. So he was reflecting in a sense, the cultural desire for news, and you know, spectacle and tragedy sadly cells so he picked up on that. So many of the images were discarded from AP wire photo UPI because they were too gruesome some of them actually appeared in magazine. So he was going to do a show in Paris, which was going to call death in America. And these were that's where they were first shown. So you have images of car crashes suicides, and you have some where there really speaking to historical moment. So it must race riot which uses the famous Charles Moore photograph of the civil rights protests in Birmingham, where they protesters are attacked by dogs or there's one of two women who die as a result of eating. Tainted tuna fish. They do botulism or you also have a suicide of a woman who's fallen from jumped from the Empire State building. Some of these appeared in life magazine, some of them never made it because they were so gruesome, but I think what you see there is you move from celebrity to this anonymous because he's we don't know who these people are. And it also gives you the darker side of Warhol's whole project. You know, there's a dark side to Warhol there's a dark side to consumption to overconsumption and also look, we're there's a base insect. That attracts is to looking at some of these images, we're bombarded with them. And you know, we're whole is grows up in the age of radio TV comes into the what into the picture like mid fifties. So we're more and more that culture that time people are looking at images for more, and they're the great pictorial magazines life, look as well as New York Post Daily Mirror. Some of these things don't even exist. Anywhere. So the picture became the language, and we're we're in even more today. I think about that sometimes as I was walking through what about Andy Warhol were alive during the internet. Yes. Sorta make sure heads pre-digital guy. Yeah. It's an amazing. It's amazing thought there's also some very interesting behind the scenes quotidian pictures of him vacuuming gallery where he's going to have a show. Why was it important to have that be part of the essentially a work of art? So he well because I think that when we're home was shot in nineteen sixty eight by Valerie Solanas who had written a book called scum the society for cutting up men, and he she was very unhappy with Warhol he promised to produce one of her maker, whatever screens into a move. It didn't happen and she shot him. And he was fate. I mean, it was a near fatal shooting. He comes has a period of convalescence. You know, oftentimes people think this is when Warhol's work declines, and what you see through some of these experiments in this period of sixty eight to seventy two are actually how fertile his mind is an I believe you learn a lot from an artist by seeing the works, actually. Never make the quote unquote, big time because they show the process, you know, it's never a to z. It's a to be a to z ADD back and forth. And so that gallery that's actually a project. He was asked to do for a non x a women's college. That doesn't exist anymore. Right. Yeah. And he along with a number of other artists were invited to do projects in the gallery. So what does he do something? So simple as you say so quotidian he vacuums the gallery, it's documented and he leaves behind the bag of dirt. So all that exists. And I just think it shows him as a conceptual artist show. Some has humor is also looking at almost kind of emptiness nothingness, which is a serious read serious and funny, similar Tena Asli. There's also one of these time capsules why did he do those? So they start from very pragmatic place. He was moving. They removing factories moving the studio. Uh-huh. Yet. All this junk that people sent him fan letters invitations all kinds of things. So it started very practically Vincent Fremont who worked with him for many years. They just got these boxes, and they started he started packing things away discern point. He just systematize. So they're six hundred sixty of these time capsules, and they just have an array of things, I think they're so great because they might be kind of thing you might find an anthropological digs an archaeological dig someday. And we have one on display from the period around one thousand nine hundred seventy two seventy three and their fan letters Christmas cards things from eve seller on artists. Like Ray Johnson. It runs the gamut from the famous to the unknown. Some of them are their books. Apparently, they opened the time capsule at the end of Warhol museum that had a birthday cake that wasn't eaten. So you get the sense of the stream and the flow of culture, and in a way, that's the. The that's the source for so much of what were hall brings into all aspects of his art. We're speaking Madonna desalvo. She curated Andy Warhol from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney. Where do we see his background? He's Andy Warhol. He grew up Catholic. Where do we see this in the show? Sure. Well, there's an early room in the exhibition. We're actually there's only a few pieces from his time when he was a student at the Carnegie institute of technology now Carnegie Mellon.

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