18 Burst results for "New York Review Of Books"

"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Group. Tell me about the book in two simple sentences. Just try to capture. Just try to describe in your words. What that book is tucson sentences and if you can do that then you're kind of onto solving with the jacket could or needs to be welcome back to working i'm your host isaac butler and i'm your other host ramana long room on. Who was that that we heard at the top of the episode isaac. This week i spoke to rodrigo corral. Rodrigo is a graphic designer in. Actually we get into precisely what he does in this conversation. But i will say that. I knew his name and i knew his work from his many book. Jacket designs. That's great yeah. I'm very excited for our listeners. On this one. Because even though i have been through the cover design process myself twice a lot of that process was still mysterious to me so i have to imagine for people who aren't writers it is exponentially more mysterious one hundred percent. You know i've as you say. I've been through this three times myself actually more than that because i recently had the chance to weigh in on the jacket of genes. Stafford's boston adventure. Which was reissued in paperback. By new york review books. I wrote the intro and so the editor very kindly shared designs with me and in doing so i was just reminded me that this is such a mysterious process but maybe images always feel a little mysterious to people like us who work primarily with words. Yeah yeah definitely definitely one thing. You discuss quite a bit in. This conversation is the publishing house f. g. for our listeners. Who don't know fx. Gee what is it. What are they need to know about it. Sure fairer strauss singer. Row with whom rodrigo has a long standing relationship is one of the great american literary publishers. Just to mention to novelists who i think listeners might know. F g publishes. Jonathan franson and brave and lonnie. So i think it's a publishing house that is really considered on the forefront of american letters. I think that particularly. I discuss in our conversation. It's hard to distill it down to like a single look or single image but it's a very significant part of the american publishing system and so our sleep plus members getting a little something extra this week or what yes always. I talked a little more with virginia about his creative process specifically about the relationship between the work that he does and his family life. Because this guy has four kits which is next level. In my opinion we also got the chance to talk about. You know the book designs that are in stores right now that he responds to. I just really wanted to know from his of professional perspective. What the book jacket that. You could walk into a store right now and see that he really admires. I don't want to miss that. And i'm sure our listeners. Don't want to miss that and hate listeners. Subscribe to slate plus. You won't have to miss that. You'll get exclusive members only content zero ads on any slate podcast full access to articles on slate dot com without hitting a paywall bonus episodes of shows like one year and big mood little mood. And you'll be supporting the work. We're doing right here on working. It's only one dollar for the first month to sign up go to slate dot com slash working. Plus.

isaac butler rodrigo corral Rodrigo Jonathan franson tucson isaac Stafford rodrigo lonnie boston new york virginia
"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:51 min | 2 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Just try to capture. Just try to describe in your words what. That book is tucson sentences. And if you can do that then you're kind of onto solving with the jacket could or or be welcome back to working. I'm your host isaac butler and i'm your other host ramana long room on. Who was that that we heard at the top of the episode isaac. This week i spoke to rodrigo corral. Rodrigo is a graphic designer in. Actually we get into precisely what he does in this conversation. But i will say that. I knew his name and i knew his work from his many book. Jacket designs. That's great yeah. I'm very excited for our listeners. On this one. Because even though i have been through the cover design process myself twice a lot of that process was still mysterious to me so i have to imagine for people who aren't writers it is exponentially more mysterious one hundred percent. You know i've as you say. I've been through this three times myself actually more than that because i recently had the chance to weigh in on the jacket of genes. Stafford's boston adventure. Which was reissued in paperback. By new york review books. I wrote the intro and so the editor very kindly shared designs with me and in doing so i was just reminded me that this is such a mysterious process but maybe images always feel a little mysterious to people like us who work primarily with words. Yeah yeah definitely definitely one thing. You discuss quite a bit in. This conversation is the publishing house f. s. g. for our listeners. Who don't know fx. Gee what is it. What are they need to know about it. Sure fairer strauss singer. Row with whom rodrigo has a long standing relationship is one of the great american literary publishers. Just to mention to novelists who i think listeners might know. F g publishes. Jonathan franson and brave and lonnie. So i think it's a publishing house that is really considered on the forefront of american letters. I think that i discuss in our conversation. It's hard to distill it down to like a single look or single image but it's a very significant part of the american publishing system and so our sleep plus members getting a little something extra this week or what yes always. I talked a little more with virginia about his creative process specifically about the relationship between the work that he does and his family life. Because this guy has four kits which is next level. In my opinion we also got the chance to talk about. You know the book designs that are in stores right now that he responds to. I just really wanted to know from his of professional perspective. What the book jacket could walk into a store right now and see that he really admires. I don't want to miss that. And i'm sure our listeners..

isaac butler rodrigo corral Rodrigo tucson isaac Jonathan franson Stafford rodrigo boston lonnie new york virginia
"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

11:01 min | 4 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Slate's Working

"At the metropolitan museum of art. It lot of it is of course in storage is at the at the british library the british museum. Vna of course in india also. So you know you can just like. It was impossible to travel to india. Also going up in pakistan so in that you know so that all these layers of Access or lack of access but at the same time one emerges as sort of a spokesperson or cultural representative of a language or vernacular that embodies a very complex history to go to the school. Which was your undergraduate thesis project. It is a manuscript painting. it is horizontal. I'm gonna read a little bit of the review from the show from the new york review books by molly crab up all she writes. The scroll is mogul inform existentialist and uneasy content. Sikandar doesn't just hoppy the grades but so internalized their grammar that she could use it to portray any room and it's charge keys in all their particularities time. The present to tradition proving the tradition urgently alive. What she's talking about is that this. Scroll this painting depicts what seems to be your own childhood home. So we're seeing a sort of contemporary domestic space. Were seeing furnishings from the seventies seeing suitcases and telephones rendered with the detail and specificity that painters at court in the mughal empire would have used to paint a thrown or a flower. It occurred to me. This is something that crop up all notes in her review. So it's not my observation. The manuscript form is sort of like a comic book. You render the walls as cut aways of like imply domestic spaces but don't show the whole wall. You read the action from left to right and so the same figure might occur on the same plane but the viewer understands that. It's a single person moving through space and time that makes it sort of like timeless in the strange way it's this old fashioned form but the contemporary i understand what to do with it. Yeah i think that's a great way of describing it. It is meant to be a day a lifetime. The protagonist is almost like a ghost. It's rendered this toughness of form where it becomes very transparent and then often pay but it's it's never situated in that same time s- basis as the rest of the characters. So that there. It's the artist observing the environment. Or whether the protagonist is going back in history and moving forward you know in time like this time listeners is also because i i was really i was interested in in examining even like the painter solid that would be Fourteen hundred ad. So i sort of started to bring that in conversation with contemporary architecture in pakistan. So that's what this unfolding of space is really about is like really looking at the vernacular which is already in conversation with other people. Are the artists other like art. The interior tea is informed by looking at Net yearly dada. But also david hockney. So even if i was looking at hawk me some photo montages. You know the polaroid ones and thinking of space. Even bernard i was looking at cinema to so whether you know. I think at that time probably does a lot of bollywood film but within that some devices of how negative positive spaces unfold as a kind of continuous device. Even satyajit rates were. I would imagine. I think hitchcock time you know it's interesting because you're talking about not just situating yourself with your own. I in historical forum but dragging everyone else along with you. Which is i think. Part of why that work is so feel so gutsy you know. And you don't have to answer this question but i will just say that it reads to me so much like you described. There's sort of central protagonist figures. She's in white. she's got a ghostly presence. I think her i think she's always turned away from the viewer. So we're always looking over her shoulder at these spaces. If you follow the scroll from left to right as i think my i naturally does the story. The narrative concludes with this figure at the easel painting herself. Who's sitting for her And it just fuels to me like this work. That is a portrait of the artist as a young woman and the other thing that i think is so striking about it is that you're using this form that we can date. I mean you said. Some of the reference was really the fourteenth century earlier stolen the sixteenth century. But it doesn't feel ironic. It doesn't feel like a postmodern gag. I don't feel how. I don't feel any joke there. Yes absolutely right. I think this protagonists is a space. That many can inhabit. And though for me at that time it's non necessarily just a self portrait but it is exploring this idea of the poltergeist or later. I can think of it as like even you know. Amnesia or cultural media or or or or eraser in the making of the paintings off for the first process is that to create a large amount of this white collar. You just you. Don't just take it out of the wash to. I don't know the term. But i don't know if you know safaa that would be like i. Maybe it's a bit of limestone but it's a very kind of a material that you make which is white in color very Very absorbent so like when you add the pigments into it it almost gives it translucent and give the color a lot more punch so i was thinking what if i remove all the color if i've removed all the color than what's left is just this body of this white pigment and then how can i play with that idea. And that's when i was like. Oh there is this character which is painted entirely in this reduced color the pigment itself but then it allows than for thanks to be protected onto it The audience yeah insightful. So i think maybe there's that but of course there's so much detail that you can like literally spend hours and you can keep returning to the painting and keep discovering get to me. The thing that happened. When i was thinking about this painting was recently is that it was thinking about this visual form from a time so removed from our on time for centuries at the very least. When i see those manuscript paintings at the metropolitan museum and i see them depict lovers embracing and they're dressed in the manner that you can't even really discern which what gender they are meant to be. It's you that all the cultural context is really lost to us. Now you see people enthroned. You see people holding flowers. It's all beautiful and marvelous but it it's hard to enter the scroll. Does that shows you exactly that same visual language. But it shows you how it's relevant today and so then it sort of reminds you that this depiction of amorous lovers from the fifteenth century or this depiction of a great bell or a tiger leaping onto its prey. It makes that stuff feel more alive because it reminds you that was made by real people on that they felt just as you felt as a girl in the nineteen eighties. you know. it's kind of a remarkable trick. Yeah thank you for saying that. I think It does capture that time in moment in incredible detail but at the same time you know i am drawing connections with this Say the that insular. Sort of opaque world of these manuscripts. And i was thinking like the more i could peru's visually and the more immersed myself into that space us like how can i get to to its essence. Get to the ethos get get to it spirit without basically just appropriating or copying and i think that process is what we as artists can. We can speak to each other about that. Because that's inherent in how creativity functions. It's so abstract and then you give it shape and space in volume and words or colo and it comes alive and that is that act is also embedded in this work in the literally like working the rigor of working fourteen hours a day do not just following a fitting in color. Your relayed divisive ideas. It's made from a lot of curiosity and questioning and a lot of change and shift. That's happening like i. I didn't plan the whole thing out and then went and spent like a year filling in the color. It was and i knew you know for me. Of course at that time the stakes were so high. That was nobody really doing this. And i knew that. I had to bring a lot of people on the other side.

the new york review molly crab Sikandar metropolitan museum pakistan india british museum british library david hockney safaa polaroid hitchcock bernard Amnesia peru colo
"new york review books" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:22 min | 4 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Emmys are scheduled for september nineteenth support for npr and the following message. Come from american express. When's the last time you took a day off or had a meal changed your clothes. Yup sounds like it's definitely time for that break. Luckily amex is here to help you. Get some meantime with offers dining shopping and travel some of the many things you can expect when you're with amex learn more at american express dot com slash with amex terms apply. The stone face is a nineteen sixty three novel by the black reporter and fiction. Writer william gardner smith. It's just been released in a new edition by new york review books and it tells the story of a writer who like smith himself moves to paris in hopes of finding a freedom he couldn't find in america are critic at large. John powers says that this book addresses issues. That could hardly feel more timely today. In recent years many americans have been attempting to reckon with this country's harsh racial history. One happy offshoot of this often unhappy reckoning is that we're discovering glories of black culture that have been undervalued or simply nord and just the last couple of weeks we've had quest- loved summer of soul above the utopian one thousand nine hundred sixty nine harlem cultural festival and the one and only dick gregory about the suave groundbreaking comedian who justices career began to soar. Would skip five thousand dollars night. Gigs in order to head south to fight for civil rights at one point gregory son says his father used to tell him that. You can't really understand any aspect of life until you see the other side. You can't understand happiness and mess you've been unhappy. Can't understand good health. Unless you've been ill. I thought about this as i read the stone face. A nineteen sixty three novel by william gardner smith a black journalist and novelist. I'd never heard of until. I came across this brand new reprint which includes an elegant and useful introduction by adam schatz in one of literature's most romanticized realms the world of americans hanging out in paris. The stone starts out offering a vision of paradise then reveals the other side. The hero siemian brown is a philadelphia journalist. Who wears a piratical. I patch after losing an eye in a racist attack. Following in the tradition of josephine. Baker james baldwin. He moves too late fifties. Paris and enters. Ex-pat bohemia well there's acquaintances are largely for pleasure and the good exchange rate. His african american comrades have come to breathe air. That's free you've racism. Siemian hefty pal babes. Is i came over to get out from under them. People in their prejudice was on the verge of making me thin at first. Paris is heaven. Assuming bob stern clubs and eat food greens and mart the french treaty. With respect he's never known. He gets romantically entangled with a beautiful polish emigre. Maria an aspiring actress who turns her what she calls the froth of life then one night he tussled with algerian guy whom the cops arresting simeon go the next day the algerians friends yellowed him. He how does it feel to be a white man as he comes to know them. Better and learns about algeria bitter struggle for independence from france. He discovers it in paris. Arabs especially algerians. Suffer the same views that black people do in america now. Lots of famous american writers have written about life and expect paris. Well smith doesn't read the memorable prosecco baldwin ernest hemingway janet flannel few do. He's a skillful writer who saw beyond his own circle to capture a social rupture in france. The persists in today's racial conflicts. The stone face explores the shifting nature of cultural identity and social oppression. Nobody is holy innocent well. Simeon suffered racism in america in france. The algerians the pariahs as a polish jew. Maria survived the nazi staggering cruelty only to encounter the virulent anti-jewishness of simians algerian friends smith bills to a harrowing account of the infamous slaughter on october seventeenth nineteen sixty one when police murdered scores. Maybe hundreds of peaceful algerian demonstrators tossing many of their bodies into the sane all of this confronts him in his own privilege and being treated properly his black friends. All know what's going on but having found a safe haven in paris. Choose not to risk being deported. For interfering in french politics ashamed by his own self protective instincts simeon must answer the gnawing question faced by many white people today when you know that your own comfort is violently denied to others of a different color or ethnishity. What part of that comfort will you sacrifice to fight for justice. Dick gregory used to joke. That african americans like football because the one time in american life that a black guy white guy and forty thousand people. Would you just as that line feels a slightly witty today as it did in nineteen sixty one so the issue smith raises in his novel resonate at least as much now as they did six decades ago. Smith may not be hemingway but next to the stone faces portrait of the frothy. But risk torn paris a moveable feast seems as ancient and fanciful as a midsummer night's dream. John powers reviewed the stone. Face by william gardner smith first published in nineteen sixty. Three coming up. We remember civil rights. Activist bob moses. Who died sunday at age eighty six. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor fx presenting the new original series reservation dogs from sterling harjo. And tyco not reservation. Dogs is a comedy that follows the adventures of four indigenous teens in rural oklahoma as they steal rob and save to get to the faraway land of california reservation. Dogs is a breakthrough in indigenous representation on television both in front of and behind the camera reservation dogs streaming august ninth exclusively fx on hulu. We're going to remember one of the pioneers of the civil rights movement bob moses. He died sunday at the age of eighty six. The quiet spoken self-effacing activist helped lead the effort in mississippi to organize in register rural black residents to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty after watching news footage of lunch counter citizens in the south. He left his job teaching math in new york city to help in the civil rights movement when he arrived in mississippi he was one of only a few activists there he joined the staff of the student. Nonviolent coordinating committee and in nineteen sixty four. He helped organize freedom. Summer which recruited college students mostly white students from the north to come down to mississippi to help in the effort to register. African americans to vote and to bring the country's attention to mississippi's entrenched white supremacy here. He is at a news conference announcing.

william gardner smith paris new york review gregory son John powers Dick gregory adam schatz smith siemian brown Baker james baldwin pat bohemia bob stern Emmys america baldwin ernest hemingway janet flannel france simeon npr
"new york review books" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 11 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on KCRW

"I think Beijing just is easily lose. You could read it in l. A one of the things that I think is remarkable. Is that the reader? For much of its length, cannot tell whether the narrator is alive or dead. She's brought in in a coffin at a certain point her soon to be ex husband joins her in the coffin. The delirious Extravagant. Painful improbability of staying alive in a world that has stopped allowing you to feel wanted. His broad Practically into every chapter. And I've read as my listeners know many, many, many eccentric novels, but this is one of the truly great ones. I feel shocked, to be honest that Susan didn't talk to me about it while she was alive because we used to discuss books together on the telephone with great regularity. But I am And we're all lucky that the book has made a new appearance divorcing by Susan Talbot's with very good introduction by David Reef, who talks about the presence of death. In this novel and in the author's life. This is perhaps it's easy to say the next book for you to be reading. Um, I hope that you will order it and read it right away and let us know what you think on. Tell David. I'll tell David how many of you right in and David, I'm very grateful to you. We haven't spoken in years. Thank you for coming on the show and joining us. Well, thank you for having me and thank you for obviously. Amplifying Making people conscious of this wonderful, terrible, tragic book. Wonderful and terrible and tragic on Lee begin to describe it. Um, And yet it's a book that gave me great pleasure and filled me with surprise. I've been talking with David Reef who wrote the introduction to divorcing by Susan Thomas. Published by New York Review Books. Thank you, David again for joining me, and I hope when you're Yugoslavian project is completed, you'll join me again. It would be a pleasure..

David David Reef Susan Thomas Susan Talbot Beijing Susan New York Review Lee
"new york review books" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:07 min | 11 months ago

"new york review books" Discussed on KCRW

"Today's is a very special show. I haven't spoken to my guest David Reef. In some years. He's the brilliant son. Philip brief and Susan Son tank and he has helped bring back to our consciousness and absolutely devastating book. It's a book called the Forcing. It's by Susan Town bus, David wrote the introduction to it, and it's published by New York review books. Look this up wherever you buy your books and order right away because it will disappear if you wait to the end of the show now, David Tell me. Did you rediscover the spoke or was it stuck in your memory? What was your relationship to it? Well, I first of all, it's nice to talk to you again after Many years and in this Strange nether world. We live in there where we're all Ostensibly doing the same things, but we're sort of Not As far as divorces first Susan Thomases novel goes, Of course I've known it all along. She, uh I was in my late teens when she took her own life. Only a week or two after the publication of Divorcing, although, as I'm sure we'll we'll get into she She was not a person who was very attached to the world or well attached to the world or happily attached to the world wherever I mean and Novel came out and I have In my own library by at my my copy from then S o The books very real to me. Of course there is it for me. A personal component as well as literary one. I mean, I don't My work is some of your listeners will know is, you know is very much not about the art. So that time to time I write a preface to a book I like I'm doing another one for Edwin Frank, the editor of New York Review of Books. From a Yugoslav writer of the Of the sixties and seventies. Alexander Tish MMA, but also a very good book. But the Book is real to me and part, of course, because I knew Susan Thomas and the This is an autobiographical Novel, although very much reimagined, though, one another with many components other than the autobiographical, But it is about The end of her Susan Thomases marriage to Jacob Thomas, who was a rabbi and a religious scholar, professor first and Switzerland. Then he came to the U. S. Then he spent the last 20 years of his life and career of the for university. Related to devastating portrait of him rather Harsh and I think, perhaps justifiably so harsh portion because I remember these people because they were in Cambridge, Mass. Uh, in the 19 fifties when I was born and when They were my parents, best friends. They were a kind of a foursome. Uh, the police doesn't sound text wasn't Thomas Jacob Jobless and Susan Topless remained Well, they both remained in my mother's life. I don't think that my father Had much to do with them after my parents were divorced, which was You know, at the end the end of the 19 fifties, but Susan Jarvis remain my mother's closest friend. I think it's fair to say And also, she Thought as a young and structure of At Barnard in at Columbia with Jacob Thomas, who was a professor. There s O. These connections lasted really? Until Isn't offices. Terrible death. Well. The book was published in 1966. It bears with it much off the furor er That was occurring between men and women marriages. Falling apart. Marriage is failing to support the woman while radically giving power to the husband. And so if you should want to read what to my mind is the very finest book. About The relations between men and women in the late sixties as things were beginning to come apart this book by Susan Town bus That's ta u BES called divorcing. Is the book to read. Divorcing is a novel that lasts and it's a great miracle. I think that it's been republished by New York review books. No, the narrative. In addition to being autobiographical is a phantasmagoria on the subject of hysteria, sexual hysteria. The abuse of power between man and woman. What marriage does can you tell me? You still know the Children of this marriage? Least one of them? What is it? Like? What did they feel to hear? It would be republished. Actually, I wondered about that when I was invited to do this project. And when I started discussing it with Ah, Edwin Frank, with the editor of the publishing house. And I thought, perhaps they might have some Well reservations, but to my Pleasure and surprise. Ah, both, Uh, Ethan and Tonya, where the two Children of Jacob and And Susan Thomas were very eager for to be republished. Indeed, I think they hoped very much that What remains of Susan Thomases fictional. Work, which is one long novella and a group of stories. Right. If you know if you're successful and motivating your public to buy enough of these be added to the, uh to the, uh The list of published work in her own lifetime. She did several collections of she's interested in myth. And although she haven't earlier academic interest, isn't Thomas I mean, she wrote her thesis on soon, Veii. Another person whose Relation to the world was tormented in wasn't necessarily sure, she ever sure she wanted to be in it. But, yes, the family. I think it's funny. Behind this and on Bly's, even though for them, it must be very difficult. Reading it. It has a you guys quality. For someone who knew or Knows something about these people. Ah, you know, the it does have a knack spect of a diary..

Susan Thomases Jacob Thomas Susan Thomas Susan Town New York review Susan Son Edwin Frank Susan Jarvis professor editor Thomas Jacob Jobless Susan Topless David Reef David Alexander Tish MMA Philip brief Switzerland writer Cambridge Mass
"new york review books" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"new york review books" Discussed on The Archive Project

"I think his intentions were the best he just didn't happen to realize that. I had written embarrassing up. I think mostly positive for me because I just don't I've gotten into a few what are called flame wars but not very many. Is there a new generation of leadership that has engaged with you primarily through that medium? I don't know because I because I can't ask to every one of them How did you come to this book? I think quite frankly. A lot of them have Have been introduced to my work in in high school because it goes to be taxed. I was kind of horrified by that one. I I found out about because you know. This is a pretty rough book. In some ways in Shirley these young people might be too young for it but apparently not and then I think of what I was reading when I was that age. Okay they can read it. I've been handed a car. That simply says Cuna which means that. It's your turn. I think what we're going to do. Excuse me I think we're we're going to do and somebody correct me if I'm wrong is we're going to take questions on note cards. So right him hand him out to the ushers who are going to be going down the aisles. I have some here. We'll get some more and we'll get to it quite ready. Got Quite a few these. Were just the email ones and there's going to be more. What is your favorite Ursula? K League Win Story or novel well acquainted view of them. A I'm quite partial to the earth. Seen trilogy yeah I understand. It's a different kind of book from the left hand of darkness which is pretty keen on. I I did a An retrospect to about her for the New York Review Books Awhile back which like go through some of these books but also this burst of creativity that she had She she wrote those very close together. They're quite it's quite amazing. This is signed a young writer. Dear Margaret How do you silence your inner critic okay? Here's how nobody is going to see what you write on your pieces of paper unless you allow them to so just do it. That inner critic should not be in the room with you when you were doing that. Writing the inner critic can come along later when you're revising but when you're first writing it's just you it's the it's the page it's the ideal raider and a you can always throw it out if you don't like it. This is a question about the future library project mature involved which is absolutely. It's such a brilliant. Such a brilliant idea. What what is it like to write a novel? That won't be read for one hundred years. Okay so I don't tell you about the Future Library of Norway Project which you can find Online Future Library Dot N. O. End It's the brainchild of conceptual. Artists called Katie Paterson. Who IS SCOTTISH? And she works was slowed time projects so the venture in Library of Norway. A forest has been planted Norway that will grow for a thousand four hundred years and in each year of that one hundred years a different rider from around the globe in different languages will submit a secret manuscript two copies only and nobody else gets to read it and it has to be made of words no images so can be a word can be a poem it can be of noble it can be a short story can be of diarrhea can be a letter can be anything made of words and you're not allowed to tell what it is you can tell the title and the name of the author of in the hundred the year the boxes will be opened and enough trees will be cut from the forest that will have grown to make the paper to print the future library of Norway and when we launch this in two thousand fourteen it got a lot of interest because it's such a hopeful project of it assumes there will be a Norway that the trees will have grown. There will be a library. There will be people people will be able to read in. The people will be interested in reading and those just one great big huge ball.

Future Library of Norway Proje Ursula Norway Library of Norway Katie Paterson Shirley Cuna writer New York Review Margaret
The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 1 year ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
"new york review books" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Was actually quite a lot of time and space to to do. Those new can write quite well in the Dome Car with your laptop prompt up on your knees and and every once in a while you can have a scenic view and then you can have another scenic view and then you hit the prairies. And it's forty forty hours of some more rapid across the prairies. Yes sorta go quite fast but then you go up the rocky mountains you wind up and up and down down your relationship with technology is just fascinating to me. I you have somewhere in the I. I don't know how many million twitter followers this point but do you remember how how you I embrace that that technology don't think embrace quite the word word of learned about so yes. I was building a website for a novel of mine called Near the flood was just after the big financial meltdown. So I thought what. I think I better do this. Because the publishers are running around screaming and they're they're fewer in number than they they once were so I actually built a website for that book and did a A launch that was a musical and dramatic Nick and Conservation Fund. Raising launch was peculiar But it lends itself to that because of the flood there. There are a number of God's gardeners hymns so we can. We can have a musical note which we did and the people building the website said you need to have a twitter feed and I said what is that and they said Oh. It's this new thing. It's really easy we will show you how to do it so actually had a twitter coach. I called McLean graves. He he is unfortunately no longer with us but he was nearly a twitter user. ne-near quite a lot about it. Any he helped get rid of the for other. They're people who were purporting to be me. There were tweeting. These really saw things that I would never tweet. I mean they weren't being unpleasant but they were being very sugary and so it could not be they had to go. What's the ratio of of sort of positive twitter experiences versus the guy who came on to try and explain the handmaid's tale to you in your replies? I don't consider without a negative experience. I consider it a learning experience for him. The I think his intentions were the best. He just didn't happen to realize that I had written embarrassing up. I think mostly positive for me because it's just don't I've gotten into a few what are called flame wars but not very many. Is there a new generation of leadership that has engaged with you primarily through that medium. I don't know because I because I can't ask each and every one of them How did you come to this book? I think quite frankly a lot of them have have been introduced. It is to my work in in high school because it goes to be taxed. I was kind of horrified. Broke fight by that when I first found out about it because you know this is a pretty rough book in some ways in Shirley these young people it might be too young for it but apparently not and then I think of what I was reading when I was that age. Okay They can read it. I've been handed a car. That simply says Cuna which means that. It's your turn I think what we're going to do. Excuse me I think we're we're going to do and somebody correct me if I'm wrong is we're going to take questions on note cards. So right him hand him out to the ushers who are going to be going down the aisles. I have some here. We'll get some more and we'll get to it quite imbo ready. Got Quite quite a few. These were just the emailed ones. And there's going to be more. What is your favorite Ursula? K League Win Story or novel well acquainted view of them. A I'm quite partial to the earth. Seen trilogy yeah I understand. It's a different kind of book from the left hand of darkness which is pretty keen on. I I I did a An retrospect to peace about her for the New York Review Books Awhile back which like go you through some of these books but also this burst of creativity that she had She she wrote those very close is together. They're quite it's quite amazing. This is signed a young writer. Dear Margaret How do you silence your inner critic Eric. Okay here's how nobody is going to see what you write on your pieces of paper unless you allow them to so just do it. That inner critic should not be in the room with you when you were doing that. Writing the inner critic can come along later when you're revising but when you're first writing it's just issue it's the it's the page it's the ideal raider and a you can always throw it out if you don't like it. This is a question about the future. Tur- Library Project mature involved which is absolutely. It's such a brilliant. Such a brilliant idea. What what is it like to write a novel? That won't be read for one hundred years. Okay so I don't tell you about the Future Library of Norway Project which you can find online future library dot and Oh and it's the brainchild of conceptual artists called Katie Paterson who is Scottish. And she works. Twa Slow time projects so the venture in Library of Norway. A forest has been planted Norway that will grow for a thousand four hundred in years and in each year of that one hundred years a different rider from around the globe in different languages will submit met a secret manuscript two copies only and nobody else gets to read it and it has to be made of words no images so can be a word can be a poem it can be of noble it can be a short story it can be Diarrhea can be a letter. Can Be anything made of words and you're not allowed to tell what it is you can tell the title in the name of the author that's of in the hundred year. The boxes will be opened and enough trees. This will be cut from the forest that will grown to make the paper to print the Future Library of Norway and when we launch this in two thousand fourteen it got a lot of interest because it's such a hopeful project of it assumes there will be a Norway that the trees will have grown. There will be a library. There will be people people will be able to read in. The people will be interested in reading and those just one great big huge ball of hope right there so so what was it like. Yeah I think there are two kinds of writers kind that would say. Are you out of your mind. I'm not gonNA write anything can't publish now and then there's the other it kind. Who has children buried things in jars in the backyard and that would be me just thinking that maybe somebody in the future would get a thrill thrill of digging them up? So I've always been interested in archaeology and I'm quite thrilled whenever somebody discovers the new the something or other that they that they've dug up So I said yes immediately and I said there's something you need to add to this. Mix Awesome that would be our Kabul paper because otherwise they'll open. The box will be just little shreds like my copy of South Pacific right now now completely decayed So so I took it on and what was it like to do it well. Well it's like writing in general. It's just that the interval is somewhat longer so when you're writing anything anything there's always a gap between you writing it and somebody else reading it. That's just the way writing is not like being an opera singer in which the audience and the person doing the art are in the same place at the same time so with writing. You're always in a different place in a different sprint time. So other than that she Katie wanted the whatever whatever you wrote to have something to do with time and something to do with words. That's the only constraint the other constraint was the you have to go to Norway with the with this box go through customs or I was afraid they were going to say. What's the bugs? And then I'd have to say I'm not allowed to tell you that then I would get arrested. I could not think of a better question to end on. What is your favorite bird and place to go birding? Well now my favorite bird is probably either the raven the most intelligent of birds or the or the loon. The most haunting of birds. Sounds you WANNA sample now. Please okay. We'll just do the eerie call. That echoes through the twilight. When one loon is trying to contact another loon.

twitter Norway Future Library of Norway Proje Katie Paterson Future Library of Norway Conservation Fund Library of Norway New York Review Nick Tur- Library Project Diarrhea Cuna Shirley writer Ursula Kabul South Pacific Margaret Eric
"new york review books" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

08:45 min | 2 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"I'm perceived by the New York Times, but New Yorker, but New York review books. By New York magazine is a figure on the right? And if he. Advantage of it to lonesome spears, and it's hurt. But I think in this culture where we're so disconnected from one another where relationships are not what they should be the only way to build relationships vulnerability by telling my story, honestly. And then you can tell your story. No each other, even the cruelty vulnerabilities. I do know that you took great pains to protect as best. You could your children, your former wife and your new wife and to all of them. I just say thank you for the permission. They must have given you to be as courageous as you are in this book because I I've spent my entire mediocre. My kids are now grown out of college. And I don't have to worry about it. But I always protected them as best I could from this craziness that goes with being a semi public figure. You've worked on that. But did you get permission from each of them explicitly to be this personal? Sure. And my oldest son. To save. This book is my best book, which meant a lot to me. I'm gonna see my younger, son. We'll talk about it. Dinner tonight until you know, you you wanna let people into my life. I don't want to invade the people around me. Obviously. Drake. Everyone else in try to call everyone else. That's just the nastiness of the world. But this is really about journey. It's deeper understanding of what life should be. And what the best life is. It's it's not their story. It's sort of my story. And I hope it universal story. You know, we all grow up on that. First mountain, the default setting is let me make myself, and the live our culture is that if I have some successful find fulfillment, and that is a lie. And so we fall into the valley. And then we we discover wisdom in the valley, and we find a better way to live in this book is really an attempt to find what's that better way to live. Now, there are two books here. There's a book about society and embedded within it as a spiritual memoir, I'm gonna talk a little bit more about the spiritual memoir, then moved at the society. We have time, and it will all appear at all review dot com. And I want to spend the time necessary to give both of them there. Do this book is a lot like your climb up to American lake it's hard, but it's enjoyable not hard in the writing. But man, the intimacy, and I I'm not sure I wanna know you this. Well, because it's so imbalance. I mean, I see you in the green room or at a convention every two years. But now, I know your whole life story, and there is this imbalance with the reader that. I think is going to be uncomfortable for some people. But when you have a friend like Pete Wehner, what is Pete think about the book. Wrote a very nice piece in the Atlantic. And what he captures very nicely as the mystery of faith. Some people have faith and God is on their shoulder every hour. The order at the restaurant and God is not like that for me. God is mysterious in. And I quote federal the book change downs. If you wake up every morning and read the paper, and you say, can I believe it all over again? And if you that if you say, yes, I believe it all over again ten days in a row says, you're probably fooling yourself some days. You should say. No, I don't believe in all that stuff today. But today's at a ten you should say, yes, I do believe it. And when you say leave it with great laughter. He says. It was impressive to you. That that made an impact on you with great laugh, it did it did if you're gonna save you should have joy. And it should be joyous face. It should be a sense that you've been given a great gift and all your you're going to receive the gift and pass it along. And that's how it feels to me. God is weird. I mean, stronger say that we have multiple number of universes universities in an incident number of universities in the world. That's how they like. That's weird. But God is even weirder than that. We should appreciate and be thankful for God's weirdness. Now. I have not read Baker before. And maybe I will. Now, you also quote him as saying faith is sickness faith is a lump in the throat, that's very Lewis very much. Like Louis would say it's a longing for that. Which we've seen that are present life is just a tiny little glimpse of what the fullness of Gloria's, but about your own faith. You say it comes. And it goes, I don't want people to think by that. You mean, you drop in and out of belief, you just drop in and out of the confidence and belief that true, right? Yeah. One of my leaders here. Beautiful book. And he says, you know, there's certain moments that are poorest should moments. When you get a hint of transcendence where you get into. Great. And the every day every hour, but you try to stay faithful to those moments in not just weird interruptions in your life. Those moments deeper deeper love, I have a friend that quote in the book named cat through Cox fly who says when her first daughter was born I loved her more than evolution acquired, and I've always loved that phrase because it means something's before reasons we do some things to pay the rent, but there's match it in the world that can't be explained by material things by paying the rent. There's a spiritual element in love each other. In the way, we behave or desire to good people that that through from something transcendent, and that's twenty years ago. PBS gave me a bunch of money to go out and do a series on religion called searching for God in America. One of the people I talked to his father Thomas Keating Benedict and monk who lived up in the mountains near Aspen, and he told me in his lifelong journey. He had experienced exactly two moments of transcendence. Now, here's a guy working on it like twenty four seven for forty years. He died a few years ago wrote a lot of books on centering prayer, and I kind of walked away from that thing. What about the rest of us, you're working at twenty four seven and you get to moments where he's basically dancing through the eternal ocean of joy, which is I think how he phrased it from twenty years memory back that is a tough ratio. If you're talking about Twitter ratio. I thought of very good ratio. Devoted herself to the poor. And then for decades and decades, she felt nothing and she she served the poor continuously even though she no longer. And somebody explained to her, you know, you're serving the poor. They have absence and you have absence. You have an absence of safe, and she understood that was the price. She was was going to pay to be of the poor and the poor closer to died, and she embrace that. And so some people, you know. He's on the phone all the time. And but I find that compelling, frankly, but Christians and the Jews who say God comes and goes that's human to me that seems real the ones who say he told me that order cheeseburger, French fries. That doesn't seem real to me. And so I find that the doubting the strong doubters sometimes more compelling than the week hundred percent believers, I appreciate it. You're retelling of Mother Teresa's story. A lot of people do not understand or dark night of the soul. I think her identification with the poor obliging that as you explained in in the second mountain is an excellent way to understand it which I had not encountered before. But you also mentioned I want to quote, you a lot of religious people, and this is nondenominational slam here. And it's true sup standby, I'll be right back with David Brooks book right here relief factor dot com. Nineteen dollars ninety five cents is all you need to make sure that the best amount of the natural supplements that work the at your body going in the morning as you get older is slow down. I'm less here out there walking and working out every day. And if you haven't done that now, I gotta get back doing that. And if you haven't been back doing that relief factor dot com as a doorway to walk. Through to get there. I carrying Kirkman Robert Shaw and omega the four natural supplements that Seth and Pete Talbot of put together and make your day better every single day. Don't wait another day to get started. Go out just to the the banner just go to the banner at hughhewitt dot com. Sieges thing defined hit on it and say, I want my relieffactor Luna starter pack today. Nineteen dollars ninety five cents coming right back with David Brooks, author of the second mountain after this..

David Brooks New York magazine New York Times New York review American lake Twitter Pete Wehner Mother Teresa Kirkman Robert Shaw Atlantic America Baker Thomas Keating Benedict Lewis Louis Gloria Aspen Pete Pete Talbot
"new york review books" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Services magazine offers so perhaps there's a new a new clarity. Certainly in the mind of the folks at clove magazine, you talk a little bit in the briefing notes about clove being a welcome look away from the US and a welcome back away from Europe, we can focus on journeys again, though for you next magazine pick, which is cool to migrant micro Odysseys, and I have to admit this is an extremely extremely intriguing choice. Not one I've come across before slightly smaller than a four format with a lot of use of kind of Flora's text heavy in some places, but then amazing expressive photography full bleed images. An illustration who are enough is this magazine about holy. Well, I'm quite late to the party on this as well. So it's a six part magazine, which is interesting that it sets lifespan. It's kind of what it says. So it's devoted to looking at my Gration. I think what it's trying to do is open up the ways we think of migration so it looking at migrations of peoples all of infrastructure data flows. Flora and fauna. So each issue has lightly different theme. The most recent one which is number five is looking at the world of micro and flow of very small things. It's still very new to me as well. But I just find it very intriguing magazine, it's taking a very serious topic. And I think it topic that could do with a little bit more nuance and could do with some more depth to other time when debates about migration at become very polarized. And I think quite shallow and superficial and aggressive. So I quit my what they're doing looking through. It's kind of serious. Highly researched writing it's academic. But I think has that nice trick of wearing it's not mere quite lightly as he says for beautiful they're already pops of this sort of flora coral running through, and then this kind of metallic goal to has this very well defined color. Palette? That's quite poppy and fun and brings you in. So I think it's clever design job of taking something that could be very of putting in heavy and just giving it that level of injury to make you want to dive in and make you want to engage with that topic. We do have enough time to delve into another title, which is the London review of books. Now. Can I give you a compassion herald? I've never read the London review of books, the New York review books older sibling on which this is based while they're both great cities. Yeah. Both great public relations. But won't draws you to the the unabashed text, heavy newspaper esque stylings under review of books. I think London review of books everyone at Tucson you on their to'real stuff is subscribed to it. It's just the most fantastic research results. So it's extremely long form journalism book reviews. So it takes a topic, and then just delve into essays about that book and engaging with its content, and it kind of shows what you can do if you support long form journalism, and if writers at the time to research, a topic and really get to grips with it. So you get these huge often, very stylishly written all the time. So some quite drawing, but that's kind of what I admire about it. But it's unafraid to take on topics which on the surface could be very dry. They're often quite nation often quite historical. But through the strength of the writing in just the kind of classical journalism that has gone into it really draws you in becomes very gripping. And you you get into topics sort of like about seventeenth century diarist working in. I don't know Dr just writing endlessly about wool prices. But because. The way it's being dealt with it becomes fascinating and my sincere. Thanks to all these travel only. We'll be back to join us in April for the next issue is then you suddenly hype side. Thank you very much. And sadly, that's always have time for today. Next week. We sit down with Spencer Bailey. The charismatic new editor in chief a book publisher fighting and don't forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or our sister podcast Monaco on design Xtra which is available. Each thursday. You could also pick up leaf through a copy of Monaco magazine at your leisure or peruse on library books or travel goods for bit of inspiration monocle on design was produced by definitely Condie's an edited by the ever patient Christie Evans on Josh Harnett, underplay us out its craft work with computer.

clove magazine London review of books services magazine Flora Monaco magazine US Europe Gration Spencer Bailey New York review editor in chief Josh Harnett Condie Tucson Christie Evans publisher
"new york review books" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

13:17 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Thanks for hanging out with us. So we're going to be talking with lily and a leak Danny's having trouble finding her. But this an hour ago. We had a nice little tweet exchange. We've did where I said we're excited to your book Hollywood's eve eve Babson the secret history of LA, and she said, I am too. I hope I don't say anything dumb. I know I know. All right. So maybe we'll get her for like the next. Donald Terner down. I just I don't want you to you know, we go. We had our very fun night at Craig's with Melissa Peterman. It's always a hot spot. There's always somebody famous who there we say Vivica, FOX Erica, Jane, Lisa. Serena Brad grassy, and Gary Gianetti Brad's and lasts in two nights ago. Wasn't Clint Eastwood there with somebody. Yes. And then who was there last night to ya? I went to recognized him out so long to take the only reason people go to Craig's is to get their photo taken. That is not true. It's good food is great. It's a hot spot. It's right. Bahali wooden Beverly Hills and the food is good. And if you want privacy Craig will put you back in here. Here. Right. Yeah. No. It's it's a they're always going in and out of there. The paparazzi just hang out there. Right. That's how many. So anyways. Of me. Yeah. He arrived in left alone. He used lift or Ober. And I did he dine alone. Did he just arrive and leave alone Intel for business or pleasure? When somebody waiting in the back who went in the back still into him Laurie hills. Well, you know, I really like how he's looking bearded glasses being kind of low key, and that kind of long hair. I he he lost it for me. So big time when he was carted around in the fake romance. I know he was a grown, man. He should have known better. Both to think he came to LA to beg Taylor for another chance. Now. I don't think that he went to get a photo taken. Yeah. I'm being honest. Yeah. He if you rival loan and leave he went there to get his photo taken Laurie. Pretty might have eaten there with somebody who lamb the most amazing stake. They do their food is so good. It is everything is good. Yeah. Yeah. All right. All right fine are going to hold down. We are who we are. We do this lily anaerobic is here lily were. So delighted on my God. It is. My pleasure. Thank you for having me. Okay. Gotta tell us the story of how you came to do this Burke, Hollywood's eve eve, baboots and the secret history of LA, we remember reading the Vanity Fair story. Yes. And I remember thinking I want to know more of this lady eve who is such an it swinging. Cool sexy lady in the sixties and seventies. I you know, what I mean. So into the eighty the s he really dragged it out. She did an okay. So give us give us a set up on everything. Okay. Of course. So that was back in two thousand ten. And I saw a quote of hers. About sex. I don't remember the exact quote, but that was the topic. And I was just completely knocked out by it. And there was no information on her our out of print. Get out of print books from Amazon dot crooked. Bananas. You know? And. Anything you can find out about her personally with pretty wild. That naked pictures. She took back in nineteen fifty me she's playing with my soggy shot. Yes. As one does in the sixties. Yep. But I mean her. Yes. I yeah. I mean, I remember seeing that photo because that was in that Vanity Fair story. Kept think she's got these like God with the latest data, really? Yes. Huge boobs. And they were bigger because she was taking birth control for the first and only time totally outside. The circumstances behind that photograph it she had a very boyfriend who was running. The packaging art gallery, and that he was having a big party for my body shop and all of that way was coming. Hopper really twenty. But it's going to be there. We didn't invite he'd pissed off. And this is how she got tight love that. I didn't. I love that. I love that. No, well, we like her. Great. Pretty other people you could find about her and. Rectifier ninety smoking at the bar. You know at the gas. Stop at the center. Southbound buyers there she. Third degree burns over fifty percent of her body and become his reckless. Did it affect her face? No, no, no. It's like, I can't even see it all the time. The torso. You know, you don't really actually be. Yeah. Well, I would know, of course, was intrigued with the story, you know, eve and her Oliver's voracious amazing sexual appetite. And now the quote, I like to suddenly process possessed the power to bleep every single person, you even idly fancy they don't know the physical glamour of that. I mean, I was just so intrigued with her love life. Actually said that about an open because you know, he would wanna rare squeezes. And she went up before he was famous crank dump dumpy club, London fog and she picked him up. You know picked picked him up before she even said Hello to him. Yeah. Take it home. And then he become famous, and she was talking about glamour being a famous. Yeah. But her own sexual. Legendary. He of famous guy before they were famous Perez afford. Dealing pot at Barney's beanery in with a crooked. I did feel great Barton said he was. He had no. This glove guy who drank white wine output getting dragged and and we will let because she was saying and every day. Warren beatty. No, no. Warren now thought he was a status. Vibe on him. She wouldn't go. Yeah. Okay. Well. It kind of makes sense like that. She would have an eye to for the fact that he was so devastatingly handsome, and maybe she could read right away. He's going to be trouble. I guess she was troubled fadeaway our travel. I love that about her. Fine. Great. So did that Vanity Fair story is that would push you into like, I got to know more about this woman. I want to write a book about her and kind of just understand her life. And who she is was that the. Well, so it was back in two thousand and ten that I kind of I had got wind of her. And I wasn't writing for Vanity Fair. Basically just unpublished that point. Living life Hollywood. I I in the white pages. Her brother at USC. I look in the US that would be better than we walked onto our house, and we've letters letters to her collar and all kinds of ways to get to our. I couldn't see anybody close prepare her cousins Abed stock. Yeah. Psycho, but works worked got a chance to see the piece for Vanity Fair. And after that, you just sort of starting to catch on his way and. The New York review books classics reissued, her book kind of point now, Hulu and Sony are making a television show based on a book some crazy. Yeah. What do you think of for writing lily us? We're talking about Hollywood ease eve baboots and the secret history of LA by lily analytic, am I saying that he's got it? So you like her writing her books are. Oh my God. I I think flooding fat company like the great undiscovered Ellen after piece. Oh, I think she's so good. We'll have to read one of those to your book is so good. And how exciting for you. Thank you. Thank you for saying. I mean. You had write ups in Entertainment, Weekly and bazaar and Esquire people magazine. I mean, everyone is really been paying a lot of tension and just about even I think the way because it's not like as you call it a womb to to. Yeah. About someone's life. It's more still alive. Yeah. Someone so it's more like a clause of her life and just really interesting. Like, I we were just in LA that last week hanging out at Dan Tana's. And we were there one night when the ban was leaving the troubadour, it's such a all these places, you know, they've been around for a long time going to Barney's beanery. And there is something. I'm so glad that that Hollywood is still there. Oh, yeah. You can find it goes to everywhere. Stellar out. And a lot of time director that like aren't there? Still there. I think another wreck you can still you can feel it. It's it's a hog city. You know, it has ghost. Yeah. We asked the longtime bartenders that Dan Tana's if they knew eve was and they're like, oh, yeah. You know, Harry dean. Close at hand. And and that was that was his watering hole. So the two, you know, longtime the by the two bartenders that have been there for fifty years. So funny. Yeah. She used to go there with on the air to gone. He ran Atlantic records her powerful boyfriend. I love garlic. You could get a ton of garlic, Dan Tanna. Yeah. So she. Late or early before catching somebody at the troubadour. Absolutely. No, neither sustenance foul after accurate description of eve Babbitt that she was like the Hollywood are Holly go lately of the west coast or LA. Well, I mean, she goes to a serious artists. Writer. Discovered. Otherwise, she just be sort of kind of an interesting groupie. You know, but she's she's an artist. And it's just you want to know more about her. And I love how you describe your friendship with her like, you know, I think she's my good friend. But I don't she kinda just she likes you. But she's also holds you arm's length kinda. Not really I'm blank. I just I think I just failed to totally. Very good looking at the weather in love hands. There you go. I love it. I love. Oh, gosh. Well, this is just such a fun book and congratulations to you. And were you? Are you? Kind of like did you want to be involved in making TV show? Or are you just happy? I actually hate playing with other people I like to be by myself. Collaborator. Look, brooke. It's it's kind of the medium from someone like me. You sell it worked out. Are you stocking? Other people a Corey, okay good. I can't tell you any contract. But yeah, Korn ferry. I'm on the quality to I'm excited to hear who that is what a what a treat to me, you Lilly. A treat for me. Thank you. So much the book. Book is Hollywood's eve eve baboots in the secret history of LA, and it is really Marilyn Monroe Harrison Ford Jim Morrison, Andy were all the sixties seventies egos hammer, and I mean, there's just so many great stories, and then learning about all the city even getting to know her and thinking, I will come to the Hulu. Yeah. There you go. Congratulations to the big breath so much. All right. Six five one six one one zero seven one if you'd like a copy of the book a couple, yes, we do when we come back at mytalk one seven one everything so good, man entertainment. Lori and Julia John Casey.

LA Hollywood Laurie hills Craig Barney Dan Tana Beverly Hills lily Hulu Donald Terner Clint Eastwood Warren beatty Serena Brad grassy Intel Melissa Peterman US eve Babbitt Vanity Fair Babson
"new york review books" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

14:21 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Thanks for hanging out with us so going to be talking with lily, Anna, but Danny's having trouble finding her. But this an hour ago. We had a nice little tweet exchange. We did rice said we're excited to your book, Hollywood's eve eve Babson the secret history of LA, and she said, I am too. I hope I don't say anything dumb. I know I know. All right. So maybe we'll get her for like the next. Danny's Chuck near down. I just I don't want you to you know, we could go we had a very fun night at Craig's with Melissa Peterman. It's always the hot spot. There's always somebody famous there. We say Vivica FOX Erica, Jane, Lisa. Serena Brad, gravity, and Gary Gianetti Brad's and lasts in two nights ago. Wasn't Clint Eastwood there with somebody. Yes. And then who was there last night to? Yeah. I recognized him sept- out. So to take the only reason people go to Craig's is to get their photo taken. That is not true. It's good food is great. It's a hot spot. It's right behind me wouldn't Beverly Hills and the food is good. And if you want privacy Craig will put you back in here, right? Yeah. No. It's it's a they're always going in and out of there. The paparazzi just hang out there. Right. That's how many. Right. So anyways missive of me. Yeah. He arrived in left alone. He used lift or Uber. And I did he dine alone. Did he just arrive and leave alone? In town for business. Or pleasure. Was somebody waiting in the back who ran in the back, Linda ham? Laurie hills. Were you know, I really like how he's looking bearded glasses being kind of low key, and that kind of long hair. I he he lost it for me. So big time when he was carted around in the fake romance. I know he was a grown, man. He should have known better both to thinki- came to L A too. Big Taylor for another chance. No. I don't I think that he went photo taken. Yeah. And being honest. Yeah. He if you live alone and leave he went there to get his photo taken Laurie. Pretty might have eaten. There was somebody who have the most amazing stake. They do their food is so good. That is everything is good. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. All right. All right fine are gonna hold that. We are. We've got lily who. Lily, Eric is here lily were. So delighted on. Oh my God. It's my pleasure. Thank you for having me. Okay. Gotta tell us the story of how you came to do this book, Hollywood's eve, baboots and the secret history of LA, we remember reading the Vanity Fair story. Yes. And I remember thinking I want to know more about this lady eve who was such an it swinging. Cool sexy lady in the sixties and seventies. I you know, what I mean so into the eighties and nineties he really dragged it out. She did an okay. So give us give us a set up on everything. Okay. So back in two thousand ten and I saw a quote of her. It was something about sex, and it remember the Vaquero, but that was the topic. And I was just completely knocked out by it. And that kind of information on her our current. You can get kind of adequate books from Amazon that company in Anna's Bryant, you know. And. Agree. Can you could find out about her personally with pretty wild? Naked picture. She tip back in nineteen each may where she playing with my Saudi front making. Yes. Dozen the sixties. Yup. But I mean her. Yes. I yeah. I mean, I remember seeing that photo because that was in that Vanity Fair story. She's got like. Oh god. Data really? Yes. Huge boobs. And they were bigger because she's taking for the person only time totally out by. The circumstances behind that photograph that she had a married defend running this. The packaging art gallery and having a big party for myself all of LA with coming there. It's going to be there that hopper very swanky. But it's going to be there. We didn't invite he'd. Pissed off. And this is how she got. Tight love that. I. I'd love that. I love that. No. Well, we like her. Yeah. Great. The other piece of information you could find about her in two thousand. Rectifier late ninety smoking at the, you know, at the gap. Doc, the MAC on her soccer dissenters out fires. She. Degree burns over fifty percent of her body and become his reckless. Did it affect her face? No, no. I can't even see it. I see all the cry. The though, you know, you don't really actually be. Yeah. Well, I, you know, of course, was intrigued with the story, you know, eve and her Oliver's voracious amazing sexual appetite and the quote, I like to suddenly process possess the power to bleep every single person, you even idly fancy they don't know the physical glamour of that. I mean, I was just so intrigued with her love life. Actually thought about because you know, he looked one of rare. And she went up before he was famous crank dump dumpy crowd couple, London fog and she picked him up. You know picked him up before she even said Hello to him. Yeah. Tell them to take it home, and then he become famous technocrat glamour Dina Maria. Yeah. But her own actual power. Legendary. Body kind of famous guy or they were famous with Harrison Ford. Dealing pot at Barney's beanery in with a carpenter. I do too of Barton said he. This is not like this guy. Jake white wine when run out getting dragged. And of course, she was thin and every Warren, no, no. Warren. Now, she thought he was a status. Did not want her by on him. She wouldn't go. Yeah. Okay. Well. It kind of makes sense. Like did. She would have an eye to for the fact that he was so devastatingly handsome, and maybe she could read right away. He's going to be trouble. Gagging. She likes to be troubled fadeaway guy, our trouble. I love that about her. Great. So did that Vanity Fair story is that would push you into like, I got to know more about this woman. I want to write a book about her and kind of just understand her life. And who she is was that the pill. So it was back in two thousand and ten that I kind of I got wind of her. And I wasn't writing for Vanity Fair, basically unpublished that. Living life power where I could find her in the white with her brother at USC. I look in my bedroom. That would be better that would walk onto her healthily letters, you know, letters to her. Colin. All kinds of ways to get in. A couldn't be anybody at Croke prepare for her cousin a better stock. Yeah. Only I why psycho. Got the chance for Vanity Fair. And I put that you just sort of out a mistake. Like, the New York review book classics reissued, her Herblock, kind of quaint cry. Now, Hulu and thirty are making a television show based on Gregson. What do you think of for writing lily? If you're heading us. We're talking about Hollywood ease eve baboots and the secret history of LA by lily analytic, am I saying he's got it. So you like her writing her books are great. Oh my God. I think that companies like the great undiscovered Ellen. All I think she's so good. We'll have to read one of those to your book is so good. And how exciting for you. Thank you. You had write ups in Entertainment, Weekly and bazaar and Esquire magazine. I mean, everyone is really been paying attention and just about even I think the way because it's not like as you call it a womb to to. Yeah. Sorry about someone's life. It's more. I'm still alive. Yeah. Someone so it's more like a collage of her life and just really interesting. Like, I we were just in LA that last week hanging out at Dan Tana's. And we were there one night when the ban was leaving the troubadour, it's such a all these places, you know, they've been around for a long time going to Barney's beanery. And there is something. I'm so glad that that Hollywood is still there. You could find it everywhere. You know, you're still around. That like kind of there. Still there. I mean, you think another wreck it you can feel it. It's it's the hottest city. You know, it has though. Yeah. We asked the longtime bartenders that Dan Tana's if they knew who eve was and they're like, oh, yeah. You know, Harry dean. They were by. And that was his that was his watering holes. So the two, you know, longtime the the two bartenders that have been there for fifty years. So funny. She used to go there with on the Aragon. He he read Atlantic record. Was her parent powerful boyfriend? I love garlic. You could get a ton of garlic, Dan Hannan. Yeah. So she something late or early before catching somebody at the troubadour. Absolutely. No could neither sustenance on the foul after accurate description of eve Babbitt that she was like the Hollywood are Holly go lately of the west coast or LA. I mean, she artist writer. Undiscovered like, otherwise, you'd just be sort of kind of an interesting group. You know, but she's she's an artist. And it's just you want to know more about her in a love, how you describe your friendship with her like, you know, I think she's my good friend. But I Don she kinda just she likes you. But she's also holds arm's length kinda. Not really an arms length. I just I think I just totally. Good looking hand. There you go. I love it. Oh, gosh. Well, this is just such a fun book. And congratulations, you and were you. Are you? Did you want to be involved in making a TV show? Or are you just happy? I actually hate playing with other people I like to be by myself. Apodictic collaborator. Look a puck is is is kind of the Beck medium from unlike me. Worked out. Other people acquired. Okay, go ahead. I can't tell you any contract. Yeah. I'm on the prowl too. I'm excited to hear who that is what a what a treat to meet you lily, a treat for me. Thank you so much the book, the book is Hollywood's eve eve baboots in the secret history of LA, and it is really Marilyn Monroe Harrison for Jim Morrison. Andy were all the sixties the seventies egos Martin. I mean, there's just so many great stories, and then learning about all the books even getting to know her and I will come to. Yeah. There you go. Congratulations to the big breath. All right. Six five one six four one one zero seven one if you'd like a copy of the book a couple, yes, we do when we come back. So you can hang out with us while you're running errands. This is a festive weeks Saturday what the best on mytalk one zero seven one. Lori and Julia, I don't worry. AC to serve pot roast on Super Bowl serving. I'm having an absolute fit about it. Why who wants to poverty Super Bowl Sunday? It's it's a real scandal. Make. Just because it's in our freezer cooking by dropping things in a crock pot. Do seven to Super Bowl Sunday. Now, we need chilly. We need something better. I'm with you. You guys are having the fan. I wish we weren't. I wish all of you people were not coming to my house. Embarrassed. For anyone to come to my house. I have a reputation to uphold and I can't even be number my little girl cave packing in irony to know that people have to eat flop like. Wow. Laurie and Julia with producer Donnie love on mytalk one zero seven one,.

LA Hollywood lily Laurie hills Craig Barney Beverly Hills Vanity Fair Anna Clint Eastwood Serena Brad Danny Linda ham Gary Gianetti Brad Melissa Peterman Vivica FOX Erica rice
"new york review books" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"The more precise is the stimulus. You have to put into the I to drive the cell in the retina all you needed was spots of like area v one oriented bars of light higher up in v. One bars of light that are moving in either direction, then higher up still far like moving in this direction. And so on those were so now what happens after area the one? Most vigil information goes onto area v two and what we find an area of two is that there are bands of cells some of which are primarily responsive just to movement. Others primarily to oriented line others that seem to be most interested in color didn't say anything about color in terms of the module that there are specific regions in the middle of these modules that respond selectively to color, so we begin then to see as we move from area b one two area the two that we're now segregating form those the oriented, so they tell you about the form of an image others movement, others color. So do you find from area the two that we go to probably three separate areas and area, quote, the five which selective for movement area before which things to be primarily involved in form. And then finally an area not as well defined. Some people call it VA, which seems to be concerned primarily with color. What is it significance of that? What are the implications of that? Well, you know, have some clinical cases a very famous one described by Oliver sacks. I in the New York review books of a painter who was driving in New York City one day, and it was hit by another car. He seemed to be all right. He went home and went to bed. Very tired woke up the next day and discovered he couldn't see color, and he would abstract painter the case of the colorblind painter. It was called. It was also in one of his anti. Jeez. And what almost certainly happened was that there was damage to his color sensitive areas in the brain where he could see black and white objects perfectly. Well, and he could be moving objects perfectly. Well. Well, he had no color vision. At all, of course for him. It was devastating because his art was based on color, abstract color paintings. Interestingly enough to make a very long story short. He went back to art, but mainly sculpture black and white drawing, and he also became a night person. Because what he said was that he knew the colors are so vivid in the day. He couldn't see them that he preferred to work and live at night because you can't really see colors at night. Very well people who have had strokes or lesions in area v five they can't sing moving objects. They can see color perfectly. Well, they can see static objects perfectly. Well, but they can't tell for example, if a car it's coming at them when they go to cross the road, they say, I look, and I say a car in the distance, and I look the other way and all of a sudden the is much closer. But I couldn't see it moving. They can't pour tea into a Cup because they say, it looks solid though what they do is they boarded overflows because they can't tell that the fluid is rising in the Cup and so on and so forth. Where does it permission visual information, go beyond areas?.

Oliver sacks New York review New York City One bars one day
"new york review books" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:14 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sounds presented David Bowie's Berlin trilogy his groundbreaking albums, low heroes and lodger live at Brookfield place, thousands of people came and the critics raved now in the week where we Mark the anniversaries of Bowie's. Birth and his death. You can hear those stunning performances always music, and the works that inspired it every night this week on new sounds at eleven on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. This is olive on WNYC. Alison, Stewart thank you for spending part of your day with us amused and inspiration. A play thing and intellectual match all could be said About Eve baboots, late music producer. Earl McGrath one said about the subject of our next conversation quote in every young man's life. There is an eve baboots, it is usually if Babette's author Lillian Alec concerns that quote, one of the best things ever said about the alluring author seductive stars and bohemian free spirit eve Babette's is the focus of lily's new book Hollywood's eve ballots and the secret history of LA throughout the course of her turbulent and exciting life e wrote some of the most insightful books about the essence of L A in the nineteen seventies. She was an influence there before that was even a thing convincing Steve Martin to start wearing a white suit. Introducing Frank Zappa to Salvador Dali and dating a young actor who might become something this guy named Harrison Ford, despite her infamy and certain Hollywood circles eve herself. Manage to remain out of the national spotlight for decades until lily decide to track her down and convince her to share her story, Hollywood's eve is out now and other lily analytic is in studio with us, and you're going to be books or magic tonight. I am at seven thirty tonight. Excellent until we said, hi, thanks. Thanks for coming into the studio. Conveyor greeting. So how did you become obsessed with eve so it was back in two thousand and ten and I don't actually know where I saw this quote, it was a quote about LA and sex, and it was said by eve, and I looked her up on the internet. There was almost no information on her just rare these days, I know completely rather is nothing on her and all her books were out of print. But I am I found you could get second hand copies which I did. And I got slowed as fast company, and I read it in kind of a single sitting. And I just was so knocked out by it. I loved it. It was the voice is kind of idiocy chronic voice. It was kind of intelligent, and it was playful, and it was seductive. In totally original. And I just thought I had to find her. So I looked everywhere for her. And there was just no trace no trace of her. But my little brother was at USC at that time he was in business school, and I was getting him, and I opened his white pages. And I looked at beef baboots. And there she was and she was just a few blocks away. And they went better a letter, and I left it at her. At our door. And I did that a couple times was creepy. And I didn't hear back from her. But I kind of kept after her for a couple of years, and then she always ignored me. But I became friends with her sister and her cousin and a couple of her ex boyfriend's she had many, many many ex-boyfriends, and then she told one of the ex-boyfriends I could take her to lunch. And so I did I flew from New York to LA the next morning, and I took it a lunch. And that's how it started with so interesting that you wrote her a letter to get her attention because she did the same. Thank god. Yes. We use explain this letter to folks that it kind of sets the stage for. Yeah. Who she is. Yeah. She wrote this incredible. I guess it's kind of between across between a fan note in a mash note to Joseph Heller, and it would have been she was a I think eighteen or nineteen when she wrote it and he had just come out with catch twenty two. So he was kind of the major writer of the moment. And she wrote him a letter, and it said, dear Joseph Heller, I'm a stacked eighteen year old blonde on Sunset Boulevard. I've written a novel eve baboots. Yeah. So he wrote her back, and he tried to get her published actually with Robert Gottlieb, and it didn't work then it would take ten years for her to get published. But yes, she's a great great letter writer she had a unconventional childhood. Yeah. Can you describe the way she grew up at around whom she grew up. Yeah. No. No. Absolutely. So she grew up in Hollywood. Her father was a musician, and he was a studio musician with I'm pretty sure Twentieth Century, Fox. He's actually one of the cycle, and the movie psycho, which is a purely string score. He's one of his violences when Janet Lee pulls back the car, so he was a studio musician, but also he was kind of a classically trained in a baroque musicologist. And he wrote the violin fingering for Stravinsky eager Stravinsky who is godfather. And her mother may with a a visual artists, you know, dryer and a painter and her parents have this sort of salon in the Hollywood hills. And it was Stravinsky and his wife VERA. And it was Bernard Hermann who did all the Hitchcock scores and Schoenberg and stuff. Smith them Justice the Getty. So it was kind of all these kind of European intellectuals and artists, and that's where she grew up around. Then she went to Hollywood high, and it was a lot of kind of starlets and would be starlets Tuesday weld within her class. Event new. I never know if I'm saying that name, right? Linda Evans was there. So she kind of grew up with that mix. She was that makes of high culture low culture, she seemed sophisticated beyond her year. Oh god. Yeah. That was that the result of how she grew up or do you think that was just who she was? I think it was I'm share a combination. I mean, you can who can separate but. It was all these kind of fast girls, she called them The Thunderbird girls in her high school. And it was kind of girls who are already in acting class and had studio contracts and already had married boyfriends. You know as teenagers. It's kind of very fast crowd that she grew up around. And then there was her family life, and that was kind of fast in an intellectual way. So she was ready early no interest in college. Of course. Yeah. She started early. I mean, only a kind of a sophisticated super hip Hollywood kid could have written Joseph Heller that note. You know, we're talking to lily analytic, the name of her book is Hollywood's eve eve, baboots and the secret history of LA voice. That is interesting about her weight. Specially when you think about the times is that she was. Deeply involved with her sexuality. It was part of herself definition, and and being sensual and sexual and putting it out there and going after famous man and not so famous men. Sure, do you think that she's a feminist? And does she think she was a feminist? I don't know if he thinks in that kind of way, I would definitely say, she's a feminist. I mean, so the first thing she did at brought her public attention. Even though she did it in an anonymous way was this photo taken when she was twenty and it's she's playing chess naked with Marcel Duchamp. And she was kind of famous for being curvy. She was a double d natural double d so to something to look at naked. You know? But she did this to get back at a married boyfriend. She's angry with he he was a guy named Walter hops. He started that Farris gallery, which is the first place to show Andy Warhol, and it showed Edward shea can have all the young California artists. It was it as far as California. Art galleries went in. Anyway, he he left Farris to work at the Pasadena art museum, and he got the first Marcel Duchamp retrospective. Which was this major coup. And he was having a party for it. An Andy Warhol was going to be there. Dennis hopper. It was kind of ultra glamorous and his wife was going to be there. So he did not invite eve and she was so angry. And so when Julian Wasser who was the photographer asked her if she would posed for this photo, she said, yes. So it was it was an odd kind of feminist gesture, but it was I mean, she was always tough. She never never really let anyone walk all over her. And you you mentioned famous boyfriends, but but what's interesting about her famous boyfriends as she was with them before they were famous, and we had this rate. What do they call it major radar grenade? Chris palm good memory. Yes. Major major major radar so Harrison Ford at the time with the carpenter, and I guess a pot dealer as well when she got him and Steve Martin was just kind of a young up and coming comic and banjo player and Jim Morrison. He was in the doors, but they were nobody they were playing a tiny club cutting London fog when she picked him up. So it's interesting you when you described it as the high and the low because she has seems to have really good taste. Yeah. And also bad taste at the same time. Well, there's a good kind of bad taste. Yeah. Yes. She how did she become such a good writer was she someone who wrote with diligence or was she someone who saw something a needed to write about it. That's a good question because is very kind of open. She'll answer your questions, but. One of the few subjects she's coy on with her kind of habits her writing habits. And I would I had to find out from other boyfriends. She's very kind of longtime boyfriend was power shea. Who is the brother of the artist Edward Russia? Who'd also been one of each boyfriends, of course, of course, the Pao with her longtime guy, and he told me that. Well, another boyfriend named Michael Elias said that he never liked to go to parties with eve because she always wanted to get there before it got good. And now she wanted to get there early and leave before it got good because she basically she got up early to right? And she was really interesting. It's interesting. Right. And she's really quite compulsive in her habits and power shea said that should make coffee in the morning, and she made it in a pan, she made cowboy coffee, and she would that's what it's called. Anyway, she would bang the spoon on the side of the pot to wake him up. So he would get the hell out in the morning. So she could says she could right. So she's actually quite disciplined in her habits. Oh, that's so interesting. She Joan Diddy, and we're friends. Yes. Gem dating. In fact, I would give Joan did in the credit for discovering her because they ran the same social circle you've had written a short story on her high school called the chic with about Hollywood high. She showed it to Joan Jen sorta flipped for it and Joan recommended her to Grover Lewis who has an editor at Rolling Stone, which was kind of the hot magazine at the time. And that's how we've got published. So to your point that you googled her name, and you had a hard time finding her why someone who was so big and so extra so out there and such an influencer. What happened to her emotionally physically that she decided to sort of become not a recluse just but not to be in the public eye. Now, I think reckless is pretty much the right? Yeah. I mean, I it's not a hard and fast policy, but she essentially reckless. So nineteen Ninety-seven seven. She was in a very kind of this horrific fire to with. She didn't even smoke cigars. But for whatever reason that day, she was smoking a cigar. And she let it and the match fell on her lap. She was in a car. And she just went up in flames. And it was I think she got third degree burns over fifty percent of her body and her face wasn't damaged at all. It was her torso. And she recovered, but I think it was so kind of damaging and jarring. And she just sorta stopped seeing people after that point, and she really stopped writing at that point as well. What does she think about this project of yours? Well, it started out as a Vanity Fair profile. That's how I did it first and. And I know she she was responsive to that. She liked that. And that sort of is what kind of got the ball rolling. I mean, New York review books classics started reissuing her books and then counterpoint presence Schuster. And now Sony Hulu are making TV show of her and she's kind of very popular with young women. I think this is such a shock to her. I think she is both kind of delighted by it and dismayed by it. She said she doesn't really address it directly. But she did with me once and she said, publicity is great. But not when you're in your seventies. So I think it's kind of odd odd for her. You know, you've been very open about the book, not being a straight biography that it's it's I think this might be yours is kind of a love letter. Yeah. That's true. Some of the capital J journalists out there like you can't do that. You can't do that lily getting chastised. What's your response to that? Well, look. Yeah. I I look at eve love, but I think it's a clear I'd love and it's to me. It's a love without illusions because I'm quite tough on her. I think she wrote a masterpiece slowed as fast company, but I don't like her novels. I don't think they're successful. They don't think they work as novels. So I don't I don't think I'm particularly easy on her. And I think eleven in the right way allows you to see more and allows you to see deeper. I also I believe in honesty, but I don't really believe in objectivity. I think it's fake, you know. To do it. I did meaning to have been this obsessed with her and to of kind of pull her out. You would be pretending. I guess if you try to buy the street biography that would be false false. It would be completely false. So I just kind of dispense dispensed with the the I don't know the formality there. The name of the book is Hollywood's eve, it's by lily analytic Choubey books are magic in Brooklyn for an event tonight at seven thirty pm Willie..

Hollywood LA Edward shea Joseph Heller lily Steve Martin Marcel Duchamp writer WNYC David Bowie Frank Zappa Hollywood hills USC Harrison Ford Earl McGrath Stravinsky Babette Andy Warhol producer
"new york review books" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:45 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stewart thank you for spending part of your day with us amused. An inspiration a play thing and intellectual match all could be said About Eve baboots, late music producer. Earl McGrath one said about the subject of our next conversation quote in every young man's life. There is an eve baboots. It is usually baboots author Lillian Alec concerns that quote, one of the best things ever said about the alluring author seductive stars and bohemian free spirit eve Babette's is the focus of lily's new book Hollywood's eve ballots and the secret history of LA throughout the course of her turbulent and exciting life e wrote some of the most insightful books about the essence of L A in the nineteen seventies. She was an influence there before that was even a thing convincing Steve Martin to start wearing a white suit. Introducing Frank Zappa to Salvador Dali and dating a young actor who might become something guy named Harrison Ford, despite her infamy and certain Hollywood circles eve herself. Manage to remain out of the national spotlight for decades until lily decided to track her down and convince her to share her story, Hollywood's eve is out now and other lily analytic is in studio with us, and you're going to be books or magic tonight. I am seven thirty tonight. Excellent until Emma, we said, hi, thanks. Thanks for coming into the studio a conveyor greeting, how did you become obsessed with eve so it was back in two thousand and ten and I don't actually know where I saw this quote, it was a quote about LA and sex, and it was said by eve, and I looked her up on the internet. There is almost no information on her just rare these days, I know completely rather is nothing on her and all her books were out of print. But I am I found you could get, you know, secondhand copies which I did. And I got slowed as fast company, and I read it in kind of a single sitting. And I was so knocked out by it. I loved it. It was the voice is kind of this idiocy chronic voice, kind of intelligent, and it was playful, and it was seductive. In totally original. And I just thought I had to find her. So I looked everywhere for her. And there was just no trace no trace of her. But my little brother was at USC at that time he was in business school, and I was visiting him. And I opened his white pages. And I looked at baboots. And there she was and she was just a few blocks away. And they went Knight rider a letter, and I left it at her. Door. And I did that a couple times ten creepy. And I didn't hear back from her. But I kind of kept after her for a couple of years, and then she always ignored me. But I became friends with her sister and her cousin and a couple of her ex boyfriend's she had many, many many ex-boyfriends, and then she told one of the ex-boyfriends I could take her to lunch. And so I did I flew from New York to LA the next morning, and I took her to lunch. And that's how it started with so interesting that you wrote her a letter to get her attention because she did the same thing. I did we use explain this letter to folks that have it kind of sets the stage for. Yeah, she is. Yeah, she wrote this incredible. I guess it's kind of between a cross between fan note, a mash note to Joseph Heller, and it would have been she was a I think eighteen or nineteen when she wrote it and he had just come out with catch twenty two. So he was kind of the major writer of the moment. And she wrote him a letter, and it said, dear Jeff Heller. I'm a stacked eighteen year old blonde on Sunset Boulevard. I've written a novel eve baboots. Yeah. So he wrote her back, and he tried to get her published actually with Robert Gottlieb, and it didn't work then it would take ten years for her to get published. But yes, she's a great a great letter writer she had a unconventional childhood. Yeah. Can you describe the way she grew up at around whom she grew up. Yeah. No, absolutely. So she grew up in Hollywood. Her father was a musician, and he was a studio musician. I'm pretty sure Twentieth Century, Fox. He's actually one of the. Inside go in the movie psycho, which is a purely string score. He one of his violences. Janet Lee pulls back the crow. So he was a studio musician, but also he was kind of a classically trained in a baroque musicologist. And he wrote the violin fingering for Stravinsky eager Stravinsky who is godfather. And her mother may with a a visual artists dryer and a painter and her parents have this sort of salon in the Hollywood hills. And it was Stravinsky and his wife VERA. And it was Bernard Hermann who did all the Hitchcock scores and Schoenberg and stuff Smith Justice Getty. So it was kind of all these European intellectuals and artists, and that's who she grew up around. Then she went to Hollywood high, and it was a lot of kind of starlets would be starlets Tuesday weld within her class event. New. I never know if I'm saying that name, right? Linda Evans was there. So she kind of grew up with that mic. She was that makes of high culture low culture, she seemed. Sophisticated beyond her year. Oh god. Yeah. Was that the result of how she grew up or do you think that was just who she was? I think it was I'm Sharon combination. I mean, you can who can separate, but it was all these kind of fast girls, she called them The Thunderbird girls in her high school. And it was kind of girls who are already in acting class and already had studio contracts and already had married friends. You know as teenagers kind of very fast crowd that she grew up around. And then there was her family life, and that was kind of fast in a intellectual way. So she was ready early no interest in college. Of course. Yeah. She started early. I mean, only kind of a sophisticated super hip Hollywood kid could have written Joseph Heller that note. We're talking to lily analytic, the name of her book is Hollywood's eve baboots and the secret history of LA that is interesting about her weight. Specially when you think about the times is that she was. Deeply involved with her sexuality. It was part of herself definition, and and being sensual and sexual and putting it out there and going after famous men and not so famous men. Sure, do you think that she's a feminist? And does she think she was a feminist? I don't know eve thinks in that kind of way. I would definitely say she's a feminist kind of her the first thing she did that brought her public attention. Even though she did it in an anonymous way was this photo taken when she was twenty and it's she's playing chess naked with Marcel Duchamp. And she was kind of famous for being curvy. She was a double d you know, natural double d so to something to look at naked. You know? But she did this to get back at a married boyfriend. She's angry with he he was a guy named Walter hops. He started that Farris gallery, which is the first place to show Andy Warhol, and it showed Edward chez. All the young California artists. It was it as far as California. Art galleries went in. Anyway, he he left Farris to work at the Pasadena art museum. And he got the first Marcel Duchamp retrospective. Which is this major coup. And he was having a party for it. An Andy Warhol was gonna be there. Dennis hopper. It was kind of ultra glamorous. And his wife was going to be there. So he did not invite eve and she was so angry. And so when Julian Wasser who was the photographer asked her if she would posed for this photo, she said, yes. So it was it was an odd kind of feminist gesture, but it was I mean, she was always tough. She never she never really let anyone walk all over her and you mentioned famous boyfriends, but what was interesting about her famous boyfriends has she was with them before they were famous this. What do you call it major radar? Chris palm could memory. Yes. Major major major raider so Harrison Ford at the time with a carpenter, and I guess a patio. Or as well. When she got him, and Steve Martin was just kind of a young up and coming comic and banjo player and Jim Morrison. He was in the doors, but they were nobody they were playing a tiny club London fog when she picked him up. So it's interesting you when you described as the high and the low because she has seems to have really good taste. Yeah. And also bad taste at the same time. Well, there's a good kind of bad taste. Yeah. Yes. She how did she become such a good writer was she someone who wrote with diligence or was she someone who saw something a needed to write about it. It's such a good question because EV is very kind of open. She'll answer your questions, but. One of the few subjects. She's coin was her kind of habits her writing habits. And I would I had to find out from other boyfriends two's, very kind of longtime boyfriend was power shea. Who is the brother of the artist Edward shea? Who'd also been one of these boyfriends, of course, of course, but Paul can with her longtime guy, and he told me that. Well, another boyfriend named Michael Elias said that he never liked to go to parties with eve because she always wanted to get there before it got good. And now she wanted to get there early and leave before it got good because she basically she got up early to right? And she was really interesting. It's interesting. Right. And she's really quite compulsive in her habits and powershares said that she would make coffee in the morning, and she made it in a pan, she made cowboy coffee, and she would that's what it was called. Anyway, should bang the spoon on the side of the pot to wake him up. So he would get the hell out in the morning. So she could says she could right. So she's actually quite disciplined in her habits. Oh, that's so interesting. She Joan Gideon were friends. Yes. Jim did. In fact, I would get Jedi in the credit for discovering her because they ran the same social circle had written a short story on her high school called the chic with about Hollywood high. She showed it to Joan Joan sorta flipped for it and Joan recommended her to Grover Lewis who has an editor at Rolling Stone, which is kind of the hot magazine at the time. And that's how we've got published. So to your point that you googled her name, and you had a hard time finding her why someone who is so big and so extra and so out there and such an influencer. What happened to her emotionally physically that she decided to sort of become a wreck not a recluse, but not to be in the public eye now, I think reckless pretty much. Yeah. I mean, I it's not a hard and fast policy, but she essentially lives like a recluse. So nineteen Ninety-seven. She was in a very kind of this horrific fire. She was she didn't even smoke cigars. But for whatever reason that day, she was smoking a cigar. And she let it and the match fell on her lap. She was in a car. And she just went up in flames. And it was I think she got third degree burns over fifty percent of her body and her face wasn't damaged at all. It was her torso. And she recovered, but I think it was so kind of damaging jarring. And she just sort of stop seeing people after that point. And she really stopped writing at that point as well. What does she think about this project of yours? Well, it started out as a Vanity Fair profile. That's how I did it. I. And I know she she was respond to that. She liked that. And that sort of is what kind of got the ball rolling. I mean, New York review books classics started reissuing her books, and then counterpoint press and Simon and Schuster now Sony, Hulu are making a TV show of her and she's kind of very popular with young women. I think this is all such a shock to her. I think she is both kind of delighted by it and dismayed by it. She said she doesn't really address it directly. But she did with me once and she said, publicity is great. But not when you're in your seventies. So I think it's kind of odd odd for her. You know, you've been very open about the book, not being straight biography. I think this might be your worst kind of a love letter. That's true. Some of the capital J. Journalists are out there. Like, you can't do that. You can't do that lily getting chastised. What's your response to that? Well, look. Yeah. I I look at even love. But I think it's a clear I'd love, and it's to me it's a love without illusions because I'm quite tough on her. I think she wrote a masterpiece slowed as fast company, but I'm I don't like her novel that don't think they're successful. They don't think they work as novels. So I don't I don't think I'm particularly easy on her. And I think eleven in the right way allows you to see more and allows you to see deeper. I also I believe in honesty, but I don't really believe in objectivity. I think it's fake, you know. To do what I did. Meaning to have been this obsessed with her and to kind of pull her out. You would be pretending. I guess if you try straight biography that would be false false. It would be completely false. So I just kind of dispense dispensed with the the I don't know the formality there. The name of the book is Hollywood's eve, it's by lily analytic Choubey books are magic in Brooklyn for an event tonight at seven thirty pm Willie. Thanks for making time for us today. Thank you. Coming up next. We'll talk to the director of the German drama. Never look away. A sweeping epic. Love story..

Hollywood LA writer lily Joseph Heller Steve Martin Marcel Duchamp Andy Warhol Jim Morrison eve Hollywood hills Frank Zappa California USC Harrison Ford Earl McGrath Stravinsky Stewart producer Emma
"new york review books" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on The Book Review

"And she kind of smothers her subject with love. It's kind of like reading a book about Whitman. I mean Whitman was so good at singing himself. And so as Babette's that reading someone else singing Whitman somehow is a step down from Whitman singing himself, and I felt that way about this book rather destroy eve on her own life. But lily analyst has done some homework and bring some fan. To bear on the topics. I have to ask very superficial Newt eve abbots her given name because what a perfect name given your description of her. It was given name. It was given to her by famous composer whose name forgetting. I mean, eve- baboots group in LA in the fifties. And sixties in her parents refunder worked for the studios and her mother was an artisan had this glamorous life. And she posed with Michelle do show when she was eighteen and nineteen naked playing chess, and he was clothed and just from the very start. She had this sort of extraordinarily plugged into the world all sorts of ways, and she easily could have just gone off the rails. And she almost did at one point. I've been thinking about her phrase because here we are a few days after New Year's we're all a little bit party doubt. In her phrase was squalid over boogie that she felt she was going to die from just the drugs and the sex, and she was twenty eight she made a sharp turn and began writing about her life instead of just living it sort of resurgence in the last couple of years. It seems very hot right now. People talk about our people seem to be reading her to sort of become that I'm not sure what happened in her books at the time. Time didn't really sell. But it wasn't like they were one was published by off or one or two worse. It wasn't like she was a nobody but books never quite, you know, sold in the seventies and eighties when they appeared. And so they went out of print and then lily analytic Vanity Fair wrote a piece in twenty fourteen and then New York review books reissue two of them. And now counterpoint is doing the novels, but if you like Ephron, if you like Colette, if you dislike smart observant writing about, you know, being alive, I mean, and it's sort of alternative version of L A sort of a lighter look at a compared to someone like Joan Diddy. I mean, if baboots in some ways road and opposition to Diddy, and whose Porsche valley was kinda gloomy and Babette's sort of way to celebrate it. All right. Let's run down the books that we discussed quickly Pearl. I discussed mouthful of birds by scientists wetland and the book I reviewed this week was act natural by Jennifer track. I heard you'd Hollywood's eve by lily analytic, all right weights, Jen Pearl. Thanks.

Michelle Whitman Babette Joan Diddy analyst Jen Pearl Pearl Newt Jennifer track Vanity Fair LA Colette Ephron New York review Hollywood Porsche
"new york review books" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

13:17 min | 3 years ago

"new york review books" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And joining us now is Jeff magic and regular contributor to the New York review books in a former economics columnist for the New York Times. He's the director of the Benedetto Schwartz rediscovering government initiative at the century foundation and editor of challenged magazine. And he books include age of greed, the triumph for financing the decline of American nineteen seventy to the president and his latest book is seven bad ideas, how mainstream economists have damaged America and the world. Welcome to background briefing. Jeff metrics today with in. So as we get into this new year. And of course, tomorrow, they never Croats will take over the house. The economy is being pretty shaky of late in the least of which is a government shutdown. And of course, the secretary of the treasury didn't help matters by talking to the six biggest Bank is reassuring us that there wasn't a liquidity problem when nobody said there was look. Any problem in the first place because guy? Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. So in terms of the stewards of our economy. We know we've got a bunch of cranks and crackpots like Navarro and the TV guy, and plus we got this. I've known that TV guy for so many years, really. So nobody's minding the store rows economies guy the way he doesn't have an economics degree. I never even finished his masters degree. I'm told right, right? Well, it's the blonde that beat not bad. Not that having an economic makes you could economists. The the bottom line is it's the blind leading the blind here. So what your prognostication for where the economy is heading because if the economy as much as people wanna get rid of this dreadful president the one thing that he's real achilles heel, even with these base hockey's basis just in the FOX bobbling. They won't leave him at all. But about half of the people that voted for him fairly well off middle class, white Americans and them are concerned about that 4._0._1._K. I think yeah. Here's basically what I think the chance to the serious slimmed-down, which means will start growling gross will go down to two or even one percent a year, which would be quite slow and not enough to employ all the people who will be coming into the job market. But second I think there's probably one in three chance of recession. What's going on is several things? One is the rest of the world is slowing down including Europe. So they buy less from us. The economy is not producing productivity growth, which is source of economic growth. That is in simple terms. The amount that is produced per worker that has been very slow and people don't talk about it very much capital investment has begun to slow contrary to the promises of those is supported that. Really seriously wrong headed quite immoral tax Trump and the Republicans who said once business gets a big tax break stone investing. They bested for a few months allow that slowing down significantly investment. Was the only way you get productivity Russ. I'm sure I'm leaving a couple of other things have the final coaches that if we do have continued his will rise and that will upset the stock market even more and the stock market can have an effect on the economy because there was a so called wealth effect as you said anyone people worry about the 4._0._1._K's they stop spending as much indeed even business stop spending as much because the cost is based on their stock price. I know custom capital is now going up. So this is combining to be into. What could be serious? A serious obstacle to economic prosperity within three to six months, and some idea that Trump it keeps saying talking about all the great things. She's done for America. We'll have to confront reality. At that time. None of courses this training or his promoting. So I think there's trouble on the horizon. And again, I'm speaking with Jeff madrick and regular contributor to the New York review books in a former economics columnist for the New York Times. He's a director of the benefit Al Schwartz rediscovering government initiative of the century foundation and editor challenge magazine in these books include age of greed, the triumph for financing decline of American nineteen seventy to the president and his latest book is seven bad ideas, how mainstream economists have damaged America and the world. So. On the foreign policy. Horizon. Trump is just giving away the store in Syria to Putin. And God knows what he'll do. He'll probably end up pulling troops out of NATO, which be the ultimate gift to Putin. Putin runs a gangster state entirely dependent upon the price of oil. And I don't know why we even obsessive him quite so much, and perhaps I'm guilty of that myself. Let me add one other thing, you know. And when Trump talks about what a great leader Putin is wages have been declining and Russia for three years in a row, not just growing slowly, but literally declining. Sure and never seems to come up. Right. And he's on a paddock day because the the so-called pension reform where he's delaying the age of when you can get your pension is absent causing mayhem. So he's riding a tiger. They because the average Russian missed finally figuring out that all of the cream is being siphoned off by these crooks led by Putin, and there's just nothing left for the regular people. So, but I agree. Ben loyal prices are low right and heading down. So what about China, I know the Chinese leaders look over their shoulder around people? We always attributed that they're taking over the world. This certainly doing a lot of geopolitical maneuvers with debt traps where they get countries like Sri Lanka in. Debt on some big infrastructure project. And then they ended up saying, well, if she can't pass back will have a ninety nine year lease on this port as a naval base, etc. But let's talk about their economy because my understanding is a lot of problems the the stock market is more or less. A gambling casino had to be shut down. And there's massive unit. Municipal dead out. There is China the miracle that's going to dominate two thousand nineteen. Try hard to get real data on China people try they they they tried to go around the actual official data by talking to individual corporations, but businesses there, I think China, there's no doubt that China's highly-indebted and that could come crashing down is China miracle. It is it was a miracle. There's no question about it. How they push too hard and expanding their economies debt. I think they probably have they you talk about that traps that they're creating elsewhere in the world, not dissimilar to the debt traps. Wall Street created for some subprime mortgages subprime borrowers and America or you created for Greece Spain, Portugal Italy. So it's not an uncommon founded on common practice by the wealthy. But. Will they write it out? I would say they will probably ride it out. They have an obedient populous who does what they're told. If they're tells the type and their belts think. Well, so I think they will be okay. But I'm I can't say that with great assurance. So what then is the bright spot on the global economy or even on the domestic economy? The bright spot. You say, yeah, I'm I'm I'm trying to be a little optimistic because we tended to deliver relentless bad news. I think the bright spot will be if we don't slow down too much, and we finally kabosh on Trump's trade war. Those will be the bright spots in terms of areas of the economy that I think my take off and propel us to new highs certainly not obvious that high technology computerized boom was building for years and always look like the place that would be the source of robust growth. And finally it was beginning in the late nineteen nineties through the two thousands. We to the reason I brought that issue up in is that we to use that to grow the economy and the two thousand Greenspan wanted a housing, boom. And we we had a housing boom. But on the backs of the relatively poor which Obama did nothing. Who about which? The poor who lost their has is not protected by Obama. When I read it when I say, this financial guys like Paulson bragging about how well they did to save the economy, I get infuriated because they did nothing for those who are in debt. So I I think worry is appropriate right now. And I am one who is not worried about the economy per se when Trump took over because. Because the economy needed pumping up. It was dominated by steady. Even under Obama, sturdy ideas, not building up the federal deficit. But now, of course. It's gone too far the deficit is too big and it, and it's okay to borrow if you spend productively on things like infrastructure. Business spends on productive and productive areas. But that hasn't been happening. So generally speaking, I'm pretty worried, and even I saw a little bit of my small investment account. Let's see months ago. I can't say that. I quite see. A bright spot. I will say this headline ever one almost never sees the bright spot until it's here. So the bright spot in my Welby, the Democrats beginning to take over and my biggest worry because this is my biggest complaint. Big concern. Is that over was anyway that the Republicans with somehow undermined the social net in order to pay for this big tax cut. Now, I suppose the one bright spot is the democratic victory in the house will prevent that from happening. So I think social security Medicare Medicaid is protected. I think ObamaCare is protected because people like it. So I'm thinking on my feet as best I can hear you. But maybe the one bright spot is the people have to learn the value and are learning fabulous government Macaire. They actually like on balance. And I think maybe they'll continue to learn some of that if they learn that, and we begin most during our safety net taking taking care of our poor. And by the way, I'm writing a book about child poverty in America. And and did I say investing in infrastructure taking care of our poor most during our social that maybe we'll become a great country again to quote, our leader. But that's what it's gonna take. Right. And meanwhile, the government shutdown federal pay is frozen and federal employees Trump just took away a rice for all federal employees in the name of of dealing with the deficit. So he's a cruel, man. He's a cool, man. And is only one idea that which is to show his base when a guy is right and blaming Democrats is only strategies to plant. Right. Week and dangerous strongman, and I thank you for joining us. Jeff maverick. Thank you. And again, I've been speaking with Jeff madrick is a regular contributor to the New York review books and a former economic columnist for the New York Times. He's a director of the Benadryl Schwartz rediscovering government initiative of the century foundation and editor challenged magazine. And he's books include age of greed, the triumph of finance and the decline of America nineteen seventy to the president and his latest book is seven bad ideas, how mainstream economists have damaged in America and the world this is being background briefing..

America president Trump Putin China New York Times New York review Benedetto Schwartz director editor Jeff madrick Obama Jeff magic treasury Navarro secretary