35 Burst results for "New York Magazine"

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

News, Traffic and Weather

01:34 min | 3 months ago

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

"New York Governor Andrew Cuomo continues losing support among fellow Democrats over allegations of sexual harassment. ABC is Trevor Old has more Andrew Cuomo says he has never harassed anyone never assaulted anyone never abused anyone. And he never would, Though. Now seven women have accused him of some form of inappropriate behavior. The most recent writing her story in New York magazine, a former reporter here at the State House. Detailing a number of instances like a 2014 holiday party where, she says while posing for a photo. The governor grabbed her hand, refused to let go and allegedly said, Am I making you uncomfortable? I thought we were going steady now. Cuomo has not responded to this most recent allegation, but he's repeatedly denied any misconduct. He's appeared to spend this weekend so far largely hunkered down on the grounds of the governor's mansion. His press team has sent out a number of releases about state issues like the vaccine rollout. Seemingly indicating the work is ongoing, as Cuomo is refusing to resign, But he is bleeding support from his fellow Democrats. Now 16 of the 19, New York Democrats in Congress and both of the state. Senators say Cuomo should step down. He is so far refusing all of those cries, though Some lawmakers like the majority leader from the state Assembly say Cuomo deserves a fair process. To determine whether or not he is guilty, and there are two investigations underway one from the State Assembly, another from the state attorney general's office and one of Cuomo's accusers. Former aide Charlotte Bennett is scheduled to speak with investigators from the State ages office. As these investigations swiftly move

Governor Andrew Cuomo Trevor Old Cuomo Andrew Cuomo New York Magazine State House New York ABC Congress State Assembly Charlotte Bennett State Ages Office
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

Our Auto Expert

01:34 min | 3 months ago

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

"New York Governor Andrew Cuomo continues losing support among fellow Democrats over allegations of sexual harassment. ABC is Trevor Old has more Andrew Cuomo says he has never harassed anyone never assaulted anyone never abused anyone. And he never would, Though. Now seven women have accused him of some form of inappropriate behavior. The most recent writing her story in New York magazine, a former reporter here at the State House. Tailing a number of instances like a 2014 holiday party where, she says while posing for a photo. The governor grabbed her hand, refused to let go and allegedly said, Am I making you uncomfortable? I thought we were going steady now. Cuomo has not responded to this most recent allegation, but he's repeatedly denied any misconduct. He's appeared to spend this weekend so far, largely hunkered down on the grounds of the governor's mansion. His press team has sent out a number of releases about State issues like the vaccine rollout, seemingly indicating the work is ongoing, as Cuomo is refusing to resign, But he is bleeding support from his fellow Democrats. Now 16 of the 19, New York Democrats in Congress and both of the state. Senators say Cuomo should step down. He is so far refusing all of those cries, though some lawmakers Like the majority leader from the State Assembly say Cuomo deserves a fair process to determine whether or not he is guilty. And there are two investigations underway. One from the State Assembly, another from the state attorney general's office and one of Cuomo's accusers. Former age Charlotte Bennett is scheduled to speak with investigators from the State ages office. As these investigations swiftly move

Governor Andrew Cuomo Trevor Old Cuomo Andrew Cuomo New York Magazine State House New York ABC State Assembly Congress Charlotte Bennett State Ages Office
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo loses the support of more Democrats, refuses to resign

"Seven. Women have leveled accusations against governor andrew cuomo but the new york democrat says he won't step down. Latest accusation comes from journalist. Jessica bay commend. She spoke to the new york magazine. Saying andrew cuomo's hands had been on my body on my arms on my shoulders the small of my back my waist. Fox's alex hogan in new

Governor Andrew Cuomo Jessica Bay New York Magazine New York Andrew Cuomo Alex Hogan FOX
New York Gov. Cuomo Rejects Calls to Resigns, Says He Won't Bow to 'Cancel Culture'

The Steve Holland Retirement Wealth Show

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

New York Gov. Cuomo Rejects Calls to Resigns, Says He Won't Bow to 'Cancel Culture'

"News, two dozen federal lawmakers and 135 state lawmakers believe it's time for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to step down. But the embattled Democrat isn't budging. People know the difference between playing politics. Bowing to counsel, cancel culture and the truth. Seven women have come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct. The latest Jessica Bateman, a journalist who covered New York state politics, she described in New York magazine that Andrew Cuomo's hands had been on my body on my arms, my shoulders the small of my back, Fox says

Governor Andrew Cuomo Jessica Bateman New York New York Magazine Andrew Cuomo FOX
Cuomo refuses to resign despite calls from top New York Democrats

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Cuomo refuses to resign despite calls from top New York Democrats

"York's democratic governor. Andrew cuomo is in water that appears to be getting deeper and hotter all the time after the publication of along investigative piece by rebecca traced her a new york magazine today. Basically a long form review of the work culture in cuomo's office and his administration and reporting on a litany of women who have worked for him who say he has behaved inappropriately toward them in the workplace tonight both. Us senators from new york. Democratic senate leader chuck schumer and democratic. Senator kirsten gillibrand kirsten gillibrand. Both have called for governor cuomo to resign from the governorship senator schumer gillibrand join a majority of the overall congressional delegation from new york in now calling for cuomo to step down. This is the front page huffington post tonight quote. It's over schumer and jill brand coal for cuomo's head now the photo. There is one of an odd series of reuters photographs. Taken today at the governor's mansion apparently from quite a distance in these photos. The governor is seen walking around talking on a cell phone while wearing a blanket. Also his it should be noted. He's in the company of a really quite amazing looking. Good dog but why. The governor's wearing a blanket. Nobody knows the news of senator. Schumer and senator gillibrand joining the pile on now demanding. Cuomo's resignation is front page news all over the country tonight so far cuomo himself is showing no signs of heating these demands for his resignation if he refuses to resign ultimately the only way he can be removed from office against his will before the next election of course is by impeachment as we reported here last night. Democrats in the state legislature in new york have announced the opening of an impeachment inquiry targeting cuomo acid yesterday. If they do impeach him in the assembly he will then go on trial in the new york senate where a majority of new york senators have already called on him to resign thus making it seem more than just likely that he would be convicted in the senate and removed from office if the assembly goes ahead and impeach him but again that process has just starting and again. Lots of calls tonight. That this news. About senator. Schumer and senator gillibrand means. It is over for governor. Cuomo seems disagree. We will let you know if the story develops further over the course of the night. It's a fair bet that it will. We will let you know

Cuomo Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Kir Governor Cuomo Senator Schumer Gillibrand Jill Brand New York Andrew Cuomo Senator Gillibrand New York Magazine Chuck Schumer Senate Rebecca Schumer Huffington Post York Reuters United States Assembly
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | 5 months ago

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
Trumps Legacy in the Media

On The Media

05:02 min | 5 months ago

Trumps Legacy in the Media

"A status report on the condition of forty fifth. President left journalism in turns out being called enemy of the people and scum of the earth for five years was sometimes scary but it wasn't all bad. It offered some of us especially those from elite mainstream outlets covering the white house some lucrative career opportunities the fact that donald trump was trying to turn reporters into villains made them heroes to half the country. I say this as somebody who benefited however inadvertently from it mckay coppins is a staff writer at the atlantic. How did he benefit. Well when i would write a story. That was skeptical of donald trump. I would get invited to go on the daily show. I would get offered speaking engagements. My stories would be re tweeted and travel all over the world. You basically had this huge global cheering section. You had this great line in your piece that once obscure correspondence where recast in the popular imagination as resistance heroes. Yeah i mean that was i think. The strangest part of it right honestly journalists tend to do their best work when they're not seen as you roic figures when they're actually kind of obnoxious little too nosy and a little bit on the fringe of whatever world. They're covering and they're not glam up instead. They're kind of just these rumpled observers of american life. i think that's kind of the sweet spot for journalism and so it was kind of uncomfortable went in the imagination of one half of the country. It's almost like we had cape on right that i don't think is actually where the best journalism is produced and i think the best reporters and journalists of this era did all they could to resist that you quote new york magazine's olivia newton these saying that she could write in a piece quote. Donald trump is the biggest a whole to ever live and he is a terrible human being and a bleep president and like he's ugly mad at me except the same people who are mad at me anyway for existing right. That's the other thing that was happening here. Which is that. In the trump era a lot of the conservatives who had spent time in the past criticizing the mainstream media for being biased. And who had a certain amount of poll among frankly editors at washington publications a lot of leaders of newsrooms really cared about conservatives complaining of bias that changed in the trump era in part because a lot of those conservative critics went so fully off the deep end frankly where it was no longer debate about whether something was biased. Restoring should have been framed a different way instead of became just dismissing every inconvenient story as fake news inventing facts wholesale. What happened. Was that a lot of reporters. And editors got desensitized to these criticisms and kind of stopped paying attention. You know what. I think of libya was describing there. Is that when you have conservatives who are going to be mad at you no matter what you write every day you end up kind of tuning out. What they're saying and you pay more attention to the rest of the country which exists somewhere from the center to the left. There is a kind of direct language where you're actually not just trying to convey clearly what's happening you're trying to preach to the choir but it's only your audience. It's not the whole country. And i think that making our audiences uncomfortable is often our job right. We have to reflect how they're feeling and what they're thinking but also present them with information and stories that will challenge how they think that's something that we have not always done well and i hope we can figure out how to do it. What lessons will stay with you now. That trump's gone. I'm going to be better about not letting the political figures i write about set the terms of my coverage right one of the things about the past five years is that donald trump wanted a culture war with the media and too many of us in the media gave him one we kind of centered ourselves in this story in a way that a lot of readers and people out there in the public found insufferable and i think rightly so look. It's hard because all the audience incentives again in all the book deals and the cable news contracts and the twitter followers flow to reporters who are at the center of political drama. But we've hopefully realized. I know i have that. Placing myself at the center of every story is not actually usually a service to the reader and. I hope that we'll all be a little bit more self

Donald Trump Mckay Coppins Olivia Newton White House New York Magazine Atlantic Libya Washington Center Of Political Drama Twitter
interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 6 months ago

interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
How Pundits Are Inflating Trump's Odds of Facing Criminal Charges

On The Media

07:16 min | 6 months ago

How Pundits Are Inflating Trump's Odds of Facing Criminal Charges

"This week saw americans of all political humor's bewitched by wishful thinking some seeing donald trump after many stumbles finally on the path to victory in states and join texas and support of supreme court lawsuit which seeks to stop george michigan wisconsin and pennsylvania from finalizing their election. Results president trump on twitter. Call this case quote the big one and others foreseeing delectable prospect of rule breaking tax dodging constitution shredding precedent on trial there are credible allegations of donald trump has in tach fourth bankruptcy for four instances of possible obstruction of justice that robert mueller outlined his report on russian interference in the election. Meanwhile the president and his family actually have a whole lot more to deal with. New york's attorney general is investigating the trump organization misled investors by inflating assets as court filings and news reports hinted investigations well underway certain. Team ounce within the talk of sphere. We should probably expect that. There will be charges against him that he will be indicted on in this case. We're probably going to trial. I think is an excellent chance that he will be found guilty. Pius found guilty. There's an excellent chance he'll wind up in prison last month. In the new york review writer lawyer and former federal prosecutor amish kadoorie reviewed the various arguments including his own for the likely prosecution of donald trump but kadoorie also conceded that in fact. Such speculation is quote insane among his critiques of the media. Commentariat that there are too many former prosecutors himself included represented and that there are too few defense attorneys who know better than anyone had a scrambler prosecution and that no one is willing to say we just can't know. I guess it's not a great way to get twitter. Followers or cable news hits. But it's just fundamentally true. There are lots of things we don't know and facts could change. And you know. It's very rare that i see anyone saying that which brings us back to august. Virus vans sadness subpoena last year to dorsey bank as part of its investigation into president. Trump's business dealings times says the bank complied with that subpoena. When that news broke a lot of people were strongly suggesting there might be a bank fraud. Case what the manhattan. Da is looking at here is overstating the value of your assets to get loans understating the value of your assets when it comes tax time that kind of thing is straightforward textbook fraud. It's much easier for prosecutors to prove those kind of charges love. Compare the two and then you know. He's in huge trouble. If they're not the same a bunch of people were saying. This is not just a bunch of people but a bunch of prominent former prosecutors with significant followings on twitter and cable news contributor gigs. I was really taken aback because i found fundamentally very misleading. You basically said the speculation was insane. That you've done this at doj and it simply not how fraud investigations are conducted. Yeah no that is the word i used in the wall street journal insane in particular about the suggestion that had been made by former acting solicitor. General under obama. And you'll cut yo. I think it's totally possible for all of this to come out before the twenty twenty election terms of new york's prosecutors getting this information on in acting on it in so that was really surprising to be coming from someone who is at least supposed to know better. According to convicted trump lawyer michael cohen trump inflated his assets when it was opportunity to do so deflated them when that was profitable. And if cohen is right doesn't that mean that a prosecutor could just compare one accounting book with another find the mismatch numbers. And you know it's over no So it's a very reasonable supposition but when you're investigating financial fraud case the fact that some documents some numbers may differ from one set to another is often just the start of case you have to figure out why they differ does matter why they differ. Who prepared them if their lawyers. Accountants and auditors involved. What did they have to say about. The relevant figures trump did not have a huge business. Right this is something that i think david farrell hold. The post has been very good at illustrating for the public. And it's fairly small organization but that organization still had lawyers had an accountant that is going to substantially complicate any investigation. If the lawyers overstepped and they can't prove that this was a conspiracy with which trump was involved. Then he's not liable that's correct. We don't even really know what trump's involvement was in the preparation of any of these figures that would be the crucial question. You'd want emails if they exist and of course he notoriously does not use email. You'd want to know whether he had spoken to people and provided them potentially with oral instructions now in the case of cohen. That is what he says right. That trump instructed people to falsify these figures it's not a great witness is not a great witness at all and so you would want people to corroborate that you'd want much more than michael cohen. Ideally if you're just playing the odds the odds usually disfavor an indictment right. People do things that look problematic. You look a little closer. There are some times innocuous explanations or maybe you just can't build the case to prove what you think really happened so charges are not brought. There may not be a criminal case against the president. Even if the justice department looks aggressively at what we know so far and digs up additional things and that's itself a big. If you say that there's a bunch of suctions built into this genre of reporting the reporting on the president's future prosecutions that baffles skew. Your i mean. One of the assumptions is that there is a criminal case. It's just you know which one where do you find it. Another option is that sivan's will definitely be charging the president. Are you talking about the new york magazine. Piece that said considering the number of crimes he has committed the time span over which he has committed them and the range of jurisdictions in which his crimes have taken place. His potential legal exposure is breathtaking though certainly one of them. I think the la times columnists that you mentioned that assumption is also built into his piece. There was a piece of politico on december third about trump's pardon power that said well. He's got all this criminal exposure in the states and you know criminal exposures kind of a term of art just means like the risk of potential criminal charges. It is not really that informative because a lot of people have come criminal exposure. A lot of times and never get charged. And you know vance's office in particular. I say i find it really strange that this assumption has sort of taken hold at all because his office history presuming complex white collar. Cases is quite checkered including

Donald Trump New York Review Amish Kadoorie Kadoorie Dorsey Bank Twitter Robert Mueller Michael Cohen Trump Pius David Farrell New York Supreme Court Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan Cohen Texas DOJ
Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 7 months ago

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

"All right. Let's get to today's episode. Twenty twenty as we all know sucked extremely hard already but we may now be entering into even more difficult months ahead as winter sets in and the case loads appear to be rising so we asked professor. Laurie santos to come on the show. She is overflowing with science based strategies for navigating this difficult time this is the second episode and our two part series that we are semi facetiously calling. Winter is coming. If you missed last week's episode zindel segal a pioneer in mindful treatment for depression and anxiety. Go back and check that. One out laurie. Meanwhile as a tenured professor at yale where she teaches a blockbuster course unhappiness. she's also now. The host of a really popular podcast. A really great podcast called the happiness lab and in this conversation we talk about how to handle the holidays in a pandemic how to have hard conversations with your family combating pandemic fatigue in your own mind. The need to double down on self care these days. Why the things we think will make us happy. Probably won't and the cultivation of jomo the opposite of fomo and time effluence. Here we go. Laurie santos laurie santos. Thanks for coming on. thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So let me just start with your course which there been a bunch of articles about your course in the new york times in new york magazine and so i've been following your work for a long time. But can you just describe how you became interested in teaching this students. And why you think it took off in such an incredible way. Yeah so it. All started when i took on a new role so i've been teaching for over a decade. Now which makes me feel very old but in just the last couple of years. I took on this new position. I became a head of college on campus. And so y'all's one of these weird places like hogwarts where they're like colleges within a college like connect griffin doris leather in sort of thing And so i'm head of silliman college no relation to slither and even though people get that confused but what that means that. I live with students on campus. Like my house is literally in the middle of their quad. I e with them in the dining hall. I kind of hang out with them in the courtyard as i was seeing student. Life up. Close and personal and honestly. I didn't like what i was seeing. I was kinda shocked at the level of mental health. Dysfunction that my students were dealing with it was something. I was kind of blind to while i was like up at the front of the classroom. Which sort of embarrassing. Now in retrospect. But i kind of just didn't see it but you know so many students reporting. They're depressed and anxious and this caused me to like look. Is there something weird about yale or something. We're doing wrong but conceptually to something. We're seeing nationally like right now. The national statistics are really scary over forty percent of college students today. Report being too depressed to function. I shouldn't say today. this is more two thousand. Nineteen sorta of pre kovic time right so in two thousand nineteen over forty percent of college. Students were too depressed to function over sixty percent report. They felt overwhelmingly anxious most days and more than one in ten said. They'd seriously considered suicide in the last year. And so these are national statistics but this bore out what. I was seeing on campus. It just felt like you know honestly. We weren't meeting our educational mission at yale right. We're bringing these students here but you know for students in my lecture and forty percent of the kids out there. Too depressed function most days like they're not learning computer science or chaucer trying to teach them at yale right there just kinda missing it and so i thought it was sort of part of my educational mission to sort of fix this and as a psychologist i thought you know. There's lots of work on the kinds of practices. You can engage with to improve your mental health. It doesn't have to be this way. And so i thought i know i'll develop this whole new class about living a good life and all these evidence based practices students could use. I no idea. I thought it was going to be thirty or so students. Because that's what's typical for a new class. And i remember yale. Students don't register ahead of time so it's like once the classes offered you kind of watch. This little graph of how many students are interested in your course and the i noticed something weird was happening. Was that the graph in most classes went from zero to one hundred students but mine had an order of magnitude difference. It went from zero to one thousand students and then it went over. That and i was like this is strange and that was because over. A quarter of the students at yale wanted to take the class the first time it was offered over a thousand students and so that created lots of logistical hurdles. Like finding a concert hall. That was big enough to fit everyone. You know joked about putting it in the football stadium but that would be a little cold. And yeah i mean when it showed me. Was that students you know. They don't like this culture of feeling stressed anxious. They're really like searching for solutions. And i was sort of proud of them because they were really looking for evidence based solutions. Like they didn't want platitudes or just kind of self help but they wanted to know what did the science say about how you could live healthier.

Laurie Santos Yale Zindel Segal Griffin Doris Silliman College Laurie Anxiety Depression New York Times New York Football
New York City to Close Public Schools Again as Virus Cases Rise

Brian Lehrer

03:39 min | 7 months ago

New York City to Close Public Schools Again as Virus Cases Rise

"I was in New York City. Public schools shut their doors today because of the 3% positivity rate. As we've been discussing the Nassau and Suffolk County executives are both strongly disagreeing with Mayor De Blasio is decision to do that and to use that threshold. Positivity rate in National County is 3.5% even higher and Suffolk, But Nassau County executive Laura Current is leaving school closures up to the 56 local school district's in the county and says she would only order a Countywide closure if they hit 9%. That's the state standard three times the threshold the city is using. Talk about that and more now with Nassau County executive Laura current. She also has an article in New York magazine called Held Long Island County fought Covert. 19, a county executive looks back at the first wave. Executive Current. Always good to have you on Welcome back to W N. Y C. Good morning, Brian. And thank you very much for having me back. So, your statement says, Quote I strongly disagree with Mayor De Blasio is decision to close down schools in New York City. I want to make clear to our residents that I will do everything I can to keep our schools open, unquote. Why criticize the mayor by name there rather than just make your own decision for Nassau County. Well, I felt it was important, since this is really dominating the news cycle and, of course, New York City News really dominates the news in the suburbs. I just wanted to make it very clear to our residents. That the safest place for kids right now is in school. The schools, you know, it's a little bit different in Nassau County. So in the city, the mayor is in charge of the schools. Out here in Nassau County. We have 56 independent school district with their own elected boards. They make their own policy and make their own decisions, of course, with guidance from the state. Um, but my goal is to make sure that our health department, our county Health department Is working with them, helping interpret the guidance, helping them with contact tracing etcetera, and we've made very good relationships. So my goal is to get the word out there that it's very important for kids to stay in school right now. As I said, it's the safest place for kids are 56 school districts have really and I have kids in public school myself. They've done a fantastic job at this social distancing and ensuring math compliance and having kids on alternate days and all of that. They've really recalibrated quickly, and we're not seeing transmission within the school buildings. So you know, you did mention where a 3.5 yesterday. Our latest number was 3.3% that is concerning because we had been down it around 1% positivity rate, but the uptick isn't happening in the schools. It's not happening in the businesses and the gyms and the bowling alleys. It's really happening at these social gatherings, and I know that a lot of people have Covad fatigue. But people are still having these sweet sixteens and going off to other states to have big weddings and then coming back. That's where we're seeing the uptick. So I'm saying to everyone in the You can hear my voice. If you know you're not worried about yourself. You're not worried about your family. Think about the kids who need to be in school. Think about the businesses that need to operate. Keep people working. And, um, you know, as I said, school is safe right now, and I'm closing schools should be a last resort. That's what the CDC Protocol say in anything like a flu like pandemic Closing schools is the last resort. In March. It made sense. We got to that point We had 50% You know, we're getting into 50% positivity rate. At that point. It makes sense. At this point. It just doesn't make

Nassau County Mayor De Blasio National County Laura Current New York City Long Island County Suffolk County Nassau Suffolk Brian New York Bowling CDC
New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

Chicks On the Right

04:00 min | 7 months ago

New Yorker fires Jeffrey Toobin for exposing himself on Zoom

"Jeffrey Toobin. Was the guy who was on a zoom call right? He's works at CNN. He's a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine. And he's on a zoom call. And well, he's on to zoom calls raison. Assume call with CNN talking about the last election, but he's on another zoom call with I'm not a not 100% sure. But, uh, hey, kind of forgets where he is. It kind of gets out cameras work on a computer and he ends up tilting one of the cameras down. And it turns out that that Jeffrey Toobin Was Hmm. Not wearing Pants. And Jeffrey Toobin, You know he's on the zoom call. He was on another zoom call. But the first zoom called talking about the election was aware of what was going on on the second team calling to the camera got panned down, And then they saw the Jeffrey Toobin was Um He was. How does one say zooming himself? Hey, crazy. What else would I say? The best I could do under the circumstances. Tony Katz, Tony Cats today. So good to be with you. Yes, he was zooming himself. And New York magazine. New Yorker magazine has come out to say that we finished our investigation and he's fired. And he put out a tweet saying I got fired after 27 years. Love the magazine. I love the people maybe a little too much and And that's not have a nice day. I'm out. But he still has a job at CNN. My question, of course, is How How does he still have a job? I mean it if I did that. I can't imagine I would have a job now. Here's what's really weird, Ari. Let's say you did that. Okay, So here's where I'm Here is my oddness, I guess. That someone is that Foolhardy. Is the fireable offenses that somebody was doing? That isn't so. So Here's Here's the difference When this all happened, he said was I thought I had logged off Zoom. I didn't realize you were still on. Well, that's the firing a fence because you don't think that you're being recorded every second your computer's open. I am the guy who has tape. On my cameras. If you look at my I have two laptops. I have three screens, two laptops, and then I've got extra cameras, right? I'm doing Newsmax. I've got the camera for Fox. I've got a whole set up here. It's kind of made and by the way that we're adding another TV on there's another whole computer system coming right? We are. We are like command center. Here we are. We're the NORAD of the Midwest. We're ready. We're ready to launch the missiles do the whole thing. Of course, I tape over the cameras on my computers on my laptops. I don't trust them. Don't trust anything or anyone anywhere. What are you crazy? Not in the slightest And that you thought that, um you did it, And that's enough. You had that much faith in the in the usability of technology. You thought that was okay? That's the firing a

Jeffrey Toobin CNN The New Yorker Tony Katz Tony Cats New York Magazine Newsmax FOX Midwest
The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

The Cut

04:50 min | 8 months ago

The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

"Idea for a future radio story. Today, is January twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. Donald Trump was just inaugurated. That was me four years ago I wanted to capture my fears and concerns about trump's presidency. So I hopped in the recording studio my old job recorded a little audio time capsule. I've kept this file on my computer for four years. Didn't listen to it until recently. So many people in this country are so excited about trump. Is can't believe I could disagree with this many people. Innocent innocent extremely privileged belief. But I guess that's why I wanted to ask you avery of the future. You who have lived through one term of. The trump presidency. So weird just a few questions. So I recorded fifteen minutes of questions about the state of the country for my future self, which is to say me. Currently. To answer did he build a wall around Mexico or did he try Oh man I mean yeah. He's still trying like actively according to customs and Border Protection, there's been three hundred, seventy, one miles of new wall completed but there's still a lot more to go. So we'll see is marijuana legal. Depends on the state you live in, but it's fully legal in eleven of them. So yeah. Yes or no Legal. Well, no. It could be. There were a bunch of other questions that I won't bore you with because I. Realize I can't actually answer most of the questions from my past self. Like they're all kind of complicated and still in process and it turns out a lot of the rights I was worrying about four years ago are still very much under threat now. Including the issue that I was most frightened about. On Donald Trump's inauguration day. The very first question I asked to my future self. Was this one. Are Abortions illegal. Did HE DE-FUND PLANNED PARENTHOOD? Of course I, know abortions are still legal for now the law of the land upholds Roe v Wade. Although I'm not sure I really understood how complicated the answer to this question actually was. And is especially now that trump has appointed three supreme court justices. So I want to start asking you that big question. Are Abortions illegal. Well, yeah. They are legal right now for some people, they have been inaccessible to millions more preceding trump's inauguration. Rebecca Tracer is a writer at large for New York magazine and the cut. So where we are right now is that we're closer to abortions being illegal than we've been in my life time nominated by President Reagan and serving thirty years on the court. He was often the crucial swing vote you know Anthony Kennedy's retirement breath Kavanagh's confirmation, and here today not because I want to be. Terrified riding completely over the testimony of Christine Lousy Ford I. Do not believe that these charges can barely per bed judge cabin from serving on the court Susan Collins vote for breakfast all these things on a court. level. were sort of big publicly covered wakeup calls and there has been women in the streets. Right there have been women and men in the streets there have been people in the streets. Four years into Donald, trump being president the like. The reality of that is hitting a lot of people hard. But one of the ways that we got to this point is that the inaccessibility and the project of making abortion illegal. Didn't hit anybody hard enough. Inaccessibility isn't just recent. It's now it happens now around the country for millions of women for whom enough barriers have been put in place that that role might as well not exist because it actually doesn't serve as a barrier. It doesn't serve as a protection of their right to get the care that they need. So there are states. In the country where the the laws are so prohibitive where there have already been people jailed for abortion.

Donald Trump President Reagan Marijuana Susan Collins ROE Rebecca Tracer Mexico Christine New York President Trump Writer Anthony Kennedy Kavanagh
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 8 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 8 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 9 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Rich People Problems

The Cut

04:57 min | 9 months ago

Rich People Problems

"I realized I've been using the words envy and Jealousy interchangeably when there's actually a fine but stark difference between them. Jealousy. is about fear. Jealousy is anxiety about losing what you have that nervous feeling that someone is out for your spot. Envy on the other hand is about desire. Envy is wanting what you don't yet have its daydreaming and striving and keeping up with the Joneses. But. The primary difference I would say is that these are two radically different feelings. Jealousy. Is Corrosive and painful, and it drives you absolutely up the wall. Envy on the other hand is almost. Fun. I mean I feel like what my therapist would tell you that my obsession with comparison is like not good for my life. But I also feel like it's a strong part of unfortunately my personality for writer Evie Ebert envy is a byproduct of ambition I had kind of built my life around this idea that This version of me and the president is not the real me. The real me is this like Hologram of myself that I'm pursuing where things work out the way that I want them to and I'm better and I'm smarter and I'm more successful and I'm getting there. and. Then it was sort of like the pandemic HIV extremely harsh pause button on everyone's life and it was like, no the what you have right now is all that there is there's no forward movement we had to remind ourselves to be happy to be alive and lucky if we're in good health. Grateful for what we have right where we are. Blake. That's hard to sustain. Aspiration without opportunity ferments envy. Of course, I could be much worse off but I was like green with envy about people whose homes are larger were living in better climates maybe who had outdoor pools and I had a real inclination to kind of judge myself for becoming obsessed with. Who has a better basically and so I was like, no, this is part of my self care practice is allowing myself to be annoyed by people. But then every realized that other people were probably allowing themselves to be annoyed at her. He's essay in the cut is titled Do. You hate me for my lawn. She has a law and it feels extremely luxurious like being able to open the front door and signed my four year old out I feel like marie-antoinette basically for a while felt like everything and anything was a luxury showing off your sour dough bread meant you had groceries Zoom conferences meant you had a job complaining about your kids had human contact you can't win at this. I mean, some people are having A. Hard. Time but nobody's having fun and then in the midst of pointing our fingers at each other and tossing are envy around our immediate circle. We picked our ears up. We heard sound. Horrible sound. No has been the siren song of extremely wealthy celebrities. Huge We rose up and grabbed R N D, r proverbial pitchforks, and we marched to the photographs of Drake's weirdly empty hotel lobby of mansion. We swarmed to pick apart the celebrity bookshelves on zoom. We roundly mocked the rich and famous as insistence that all in this together it was so overtly tone-deaf. Are. Envy. was almost. Delicious I'm having this resentment and you're having to and it's it's something that we're kind of sharing. I feel like it's part of the shared pandemic experienced. It was suddenly like we were truly all in this together. Freud talks about this in civilization and its discontents that cohesive society unites around a common enemy an out group. There are lots of scary an unfortunate examples of the groups America has ostracized, but the rich and famous are not among them. Because, it's so much more complicated than pure animosity if they're so awful and they're so ridiculous in there. So repugnant why? Why does Kim Kardashian have like a Zillion instagram followers molly young is the literary critic for New York magazine and she was wondering why we want to keep looking at rich people for envy or fantasy or whatever we turn to them for I mean what's interesting about the quarantine is you started seeing a lot of people turn against celebrities right like Ellen complaining that quarantining in her gigantic house made her feel like she was imprisoned or whatever, and finally people are starting. To kind of examine the purpose that these celebrities are serving in our lives need to examine why we're interested in them in the first place

Joneses Blake Kim Kardashian Ellen Freud Evie Ebert America New York Magazine A. Hard Instagram Writer Drake President Trump Molly Young Envy.
"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

"Written about. And you've talked about sex city and I know that you've said it's a show that you can talk a lot about and that is one television show for better or worse that I find myself talking to people about and I do not get sick of it talking about gay. I don't love everything I love the show. I do enjoy it. I think it's wonderful. I don't love everything about the show but I find myself falling into these conversations with colleagues especially who feel are very intelligent about the show but feel very passionately and I just WanNa talk about it for a happy always. Happy is in this category show and I agree with you. It's like this. It's this beautiful shimmering tax that is the shared thing especially among women that has all sorts of rich and specific things to say about very universal kinds of subjects about power and Saxe and friendships. And all of this kind of stuff and yet it's completely pleasurable and funny and stylized and beginning of a whole bunch of shows that I love me too and one thing I find so interesting about that show is when I watched it when it aired in real time. I don't think I had the intelligence to understand that. The character of Carrie. Bradshaw is by and large designed to be loved and now and I watched them on demand and I really dig into them. I realised that she actually was written as sort of a great person all the time and she brings her friend Bagels and doesn't bring the cream cheese and cheap wines and there's just all these things and I find that so smart that it's refreshing time around though I didn't pick up on. That was like they're telling me that this is this glittery character and I love her and now I watch it. I'm like I love that. She's not a wonderful. That's interesting when you I watched it. You perceived her as a role model and a positive in percent and where you're watching it as a teenager. I was watching it as a eighteen to what around six seasons to twenty whatever six years plus eighteen one thing that I always say about sex city aside from the fact that I I really do admire the show and find a wonderful is that I'm in the Exact Same Age as Carrie Bradshaw. So she went from thirty to thirty eight on the show. I watched it starting when I was thirty two until I was thirty. Eight and Mike Growing Awareness. That women had watched it when they were teenagers or when they were in their early twenties and they saw it through different eyes and perceived the ideas of it in different ways like a lot of teenage girls watched it kind of as a blueprint like this is how women live their lives which seems absolutely baffling to me. That I didn't I grew up in New York City that I that that I never felt like aspirational but I did look at the characters and yeah I thought because they are designed to be liked and I bought it. I liked them. It's so funny because at the time the show was out they've got nothing but criticism in the press like people were constantly and women were frequently saying like I like that show but carries just so self centered and stuff like that. It's interesting that you when you were watching it. You you perceive saying to somebody you're such a carry as like a completely positive thing. I didn't realize that that that that she was self centered. I didn't really realize it until I think the first time I was thirty three and I was watching this show again and I don't I don't remember what it was and I remember. Well I was watching a bunch of them in succession but I was the episode where she brings bagels and doesn't bring the cream cheese. It's the episode. We can talk endlessly about Carrie. Bradshaw she storms out of bungalow. Eight because her friend wasn't paying any attention to her that which The the gay guy that she meets at the club dishes salesman and he literally turned his back for five minutes to talk to another person and she threw a fit and walked out. I cannot get over that bestowed. I'm trying to remember it. Because wasn't it a situation where he had sort of brought her to the club and she was like eight and wanted her to stay home with him? All that glitters is episode. See I actually sympathetic with Kerry. Because she's sort of realized that that guy was but it was once again a yes but in my opinion when I watched that episode she he speaks to somebody else. It wasn't all night. We didn't have their whole entire evening. It was once or twice. He said hello to somebody. And she's like and then she storms out and I'm like poop adult this way. Plenty probably but that is really interesting to me that you had. Perceived Kerry as straightforwardly more positive character again but now I- despite seeing her as incredibly flawed and creating anxiety and a lot of female viewers. Something I wrote about I do. I do love her character. And it's because revolting abilities feel so real including becoming obsessive about the guy. She's dating to the point of being pathetic. Like which upsets I think. A lot of people watching it. But I'm like I don't know I feel like. She opened the door to a lot of amazing female characters on TV. My last question for you as we wrap up. Do you think that my parents were bad parents for letting me watch twin peaks when it came out of course not? They were excellent parents. That's amazing why wouldn't they people all the time? Now when I say that I started watching it at ten and I was scared beyond belief I remember I watched the pilot and I was a little afraid. I had and I was not very sensitive. Kid I remember. I had trouble falling asleep that night because I was spooked and I was so addicted from that sort of spook that I would watch every episode and my parents like sure my sister who's four years ago to watch it with me and now people are like your parents. Let you watch that. No that's that seems weird to me. Although I will say all the movie critics that I know show their kids very adult movies. When they're very young I have not showed my kids stuff but my kids get scared of stuff. That's just specific to them. But everybody finds something I I saw. I mean it's sort of a kid's movie but Charlie and the chocolate factory. I was so freaked out by the scene with the blue gum that I ate a like a gum ball at the supermarket and literally had like a panic attack when it was seventy because I thought I was going to turn into a blueberry so I don't think that it's I don't know it seems like that's a pretty good show. It's not like they were showing you know like I'm trying to think of it wasn't like they were showing you some the theater or something. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. It really fun when I went into production of glamour and iheartradio with new episodes dropping every Monday for more podcast from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows I'm your host Glamour Digital Director. Perry Santon follow me on Instagram. At Perry Salmon Ten P. E. R. E. S. A. M. O. T. I N. Our executive producer is Allie. Perry our producers are glamorous Kim sorrow I heart. Jj Causeway. What I wore when is engineered by Emily Marinov and Derek Clement Special? Thanks to Julie Chen and Diana Bachmann at Conde Nast for more information on today's episode Glamour Dot Com Slash..

Carrie Bradshaw Kerry Saxe Glamour Digital Director New York City Perry Santon Jj Causeway iheartradio Julie Chen salesman apple Kim Conde Nast Emily Marinov Diana Bachmann P. E. R. E. S. A. M. O. T. Allie Charlie executive producer
"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

"And sometimes won't read something you know not necessarily by you. But by critic in general tend to it will be something a negative of something that I love and are we going to have a conversation about Mrs Maes? Now Okay no but no. This is not. I'm not getting on the forties. I just feel like a lot of times. I will love something television. Show a play a restaurant. And then I'll read the review by critic that I respect and I understand that they are meant to be smarter than me but it will be a bad review. And then I'll feel really shitty and I'm wondering like how much like is it. Your opinion isn't your review. Just your opinion. Of course. That's what criticism is also my. My criticism is not a statement that I'm smarter than anybody else. It's just my column like it's like a it's it's me it's part of a conversation. I mean I assume other people disagree or like things like that's baked in but what I find interesting about criticism to is that a review is so final. It's never like this show is bad but you might like it. It's always like the show is bad and then I'll read it and I'll be like we eat. Even though I know that I'm smart and I know that my opinion is my own first of all. I'll look if you if you access your Inner Alexis Carrington you will not attract but I just feel like whatever this Percy's season which which I do but then sometimes when I do criticism of a person I respect. I see all the points and I'm like oh so now they're telling me that the show that I like is bad and I missed all these interesting things about it and I'm just wondering do you ever. Do you ever think about that to ever think about you know I'm going to. I'm going to say this show sucks or this show is in great but there's a million people that love it and do you ever think about that response from people you know what I feel. Is I feel multitude of things. One of them is that there's no way in which anything I read the final statement on the show. It's one of the things I particularly like about television. Criticism as opposed to other kinds of criticism is that TV strikes me as a medium that is about a big conversation and debate. I mean it takes place over time. It has this looping affect the audience where people respond to the show as are haters or whatever online. The People Making. The show are often affected by the conversation. I mean this is beyond traditional criticism. It's just there's a big uproar because it's a big mass audience and people debating and taking things apart and liking some things and not liking other things so when I wrote a column. It's part of that conversation. I come from online. A lot of ways. I mean it used to write posts In the discussion boards on television without pity and to me. That's the model of what it is so when I write a column it's both supposed to be a final thing in that it's a statement of my feelings but it's also I assume that some people read it and disagree some people will sway them some people you know like that's that's like any conversation you have like. The goal is not to put somebody else's opinion down but the other thing is I mean I feel like all I can do is be honest about my responses to things like the. I've often said this that I felt uncomfortable rating criticism. I used to write poetry criticism years ago and I felt like the effect on the poet was too intense because poets. One person makes it. They make no money and I was reviewing poetry in the New York Times and it just felt like even writing a mixed review felt very brutal. This isn't about swaying the audiences about the artist and then with but with TV. I felt like people condescend to TV. And they're always actually over praising things just in a sort of Oh look TV did because it used to be considered a junk menial so I was like writing a pan of A. Tv show is a way of praising television. Because it's actually a way of saying I expect it to be able to do great things and so when it falls short that is valuable so yeah. I can't I have to say I feel like I feel like it's not like some of the premise of what you're saying strikes me as as off like. I don't think critics are supposed to be smarter than the people reading the thing. I don't think that the goal of criticism to shame somebody for having a different opinion seen Well that is sort of what you're saying though right like and and so I think that for critic to think too much about like whether the person reading it is going to feel bad because it disagrees with their opinion would be it would not create very good criticism because then it would be sort of tap dancing and caveat and puffery kind of thing. That's said do I think about the reader? Do and part of that is because I try to anticipate disagreement things so that I can incorporate my responses in the thing that's not the same as worrying about wounding a fan of the show. Do you have anything specifically? That comes to mind a response that you've gotten from whether it's on twitter or in your inbox from a reader who so passionately disagreed with you. The honestly the only super negative responses. I've ever gotten our when I wrote a very strong pan of true detective back at the height of the hype and that that piece I wrote was deliberately aggressive. I wrote it because I was trying to puncture what felt like this big ball of gas around that show that was praising it as like this. Oh tourist masterpiece. I really disagreed. I didn't like the show so I wrote it in the summer guns away. But there's a lot of Specifically male fans that show. Yes who wrote me really quite violent responses and also like arguing me out of my opinion and stuff like that. That usually doesn't happen. I will say that when I wrote quite immune piece about Mrs. As L. where I will say I waited until the second season because I did not like the first season but a lot of female viewers were having so much fun celebrating. It said I was kind of like you know I don't like this show but I'm going to. I don't WanNa Piss on people's fun. I'm kind going to wait until the second season. And maybe I'll change my mind and then I can write this relief. Fund Review. Talks about me changing my mind and I watched the second season. I liked it even less so then I wrote a negative review and the the morning that came out my friend Lori wrote me on facebook and she was like are you all right and it was like what do you mean. And she was like. Oh I just assumed you were getting a bunch of flack about this Mrs Maysville Review and it was like to literally think there are hordes of women from the upper west side like storming place in Brooklyn because they're mad about this review. I mean the the show one bunch of Emmy's lots of people like it like I'm just one voice in the concord but So yeah in general I mean I actually got tons of positive letters from people who didn't like Mrs May Zelin felt uncomfortable about saying that I tend to usually agree with your opinion. Well I mean you don't have to do it to me on twitter and they're like Oh. I liked the show that you didn't like I don't like this show that you liked and now this is upsetting me because I'm like we're not like twins like it's good. It's good for people to disagree. Then it becomes more fun discussion. You know. I don't know like I don't I. I like reading things that I disagree with. Because then they challenge my thinking on it. You know like they sort of stress test my ideas but some things are just opinions. I mean I sometimes have emotional responses to things that other people don't like I wouldn't expect everybody to Have you ever wanted to revise an opinion that you put out publicly? Well I once wrote a piece about having changed my mind about this. Tv show the neck. But I have to say. In retrospect although I did change my mind about it the way I changed my mind was so specific. I basically understood the show as being an anti hero show in a cliche that it wasn't but didn't really change my mind about the whole show so I actually think I was trying to do this thing that I thought would be an interesting move to because it's hard. Your opinion about shows often changes. You know they go on for years but I don't really regret any specific thing that I've ridden the only thing I will say is. I once wrote a piece about madman. I absolutely think the column holds up. I think it's a good. I mean and loved madman but it was the thing about the pieces that it was a criticism of the way. The show is being dragged down by. How kind of ponderously symbolic d'andre all the other characters like real people. But he was like symbolizing masculinity in America and capitalism and and like and he had this crazy kind of gothic story and so I wrote this piece of basically saying this show it can be so fleet and and dreamlike.

twitter Mrs Maes Mrs Maysville Review Alexis Carrington New York Times Emmy Mrs May Zelin America facebook Lori Brooklyn concord
"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"This week on the stack we speak to the new editor of new york magazine david housego. It tells me all about their exciting new kover plus. We speak to our women in l._a. Lada habil on the latest problems facing the los angeles times and finally our hong kong bureau chief. James chambas explains links how the main hong kong dailies are covering the protests. Stay tuned for this week's edition of the stack from derry housing london. This is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis. I am finland. It was to prochet cool coming up on the show. We'll look at the problems that l. a. daily the los angeles times is is facing with its circulation numbers plus. We review the printed press in hong kong but before that i spoke to the editor of one of my favourite titles new york mark magazine since early april they.

hong kong los angeles times editor new york Lada habil york mark magazine david housego bureau chief derry finland James chambas l._a london thirty minutes
"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Behave perfectly the whole time and if i have time another lovely learning i enjoyed some of the most longtime editor of new york magazine recently fell off his bike and decided to change his career entirely highly so he left the eminent city based magazine and all the great journalism he did that to pursue other things and he decided to be a little bit less ambitious so we don't tell me all this means to do that exactly but we all telling them to think very carefully 'em i suppose about impact making and i thought that was very poignant and sing while you were there and he's talking about quality of life and life in cities moderating expectations that was a huge demo in madrid over the weekend in protest against demonstration impose restrictions have been imposed on bringing petro calls into the city the new man has reverse that but clearly hasn't gone down with a huge section of the city's population who were out in the streets in a heat wave you will be only struggling with his well i i thought that the guy products they must have been addressed those little so that we still this weekend but yeah we did talk about the the hall the points of living in cities we did a panel on housing and we talked about you know whose responsibility is to make sure that all cities inevitable at the right price but they don't look too much at the they build the right type of houses i think he's mad who's promised to make the city on carbon neutral by twenty thirty five on one of the speakers on that topic i think gave a very convincing a convincing reports herself and how governments need to take a bit a row john lewis pumping josh thank you very much wwe's they called you conference in madrid well not nearly as before we got a recap of some of the day's news stories police in hong kong of contra protested mark the anniversary of its handover from british the chinese road north korean state media said donald trump's visit to the country was an amazing event and edited by as and designers descending on the german capital for bill in fashion week that wraps up this edition of the briefing produced by reese james and daniel baker such but you owning golfer and charlie.

editor new york magazine hong kong donald trump reese james daniel baker madrid petro john lewis wwe
"new york magazine" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"That matters how we're socialized. That matters. You know, just a Pius all of the, you know, historical inning in discourages contracts that that that influence how we live and how we interact with each other. But. This. I don't know. I just feel like we shouldn't take so long. Oh. I don't know. I think the fact that so many people come to you and say can we bottle this chapter shows? I know I can only really be for myself. But that at this point, I just want people to have the revelation. I mean, the fact that it's taking so long is also is a problem, but we need to change things. So that people grow up differently. But, you know, Joe, Biden, seventy whatever. He's he does not get this part. Right. Does not at all get. And maybe he never will. And I. Joe? We don't have to Joe Biden. But we he example, we give people so many chances. Yes. Because they're white because her male. And he even had chance like he could have few very easily after you know, the I forgot her name wrote the piece for New York magazine about his. Yeah. I could have just very easily to say, you know, what I I'm sorry. These things. And not joked about it. Yeah. Yeah. Like like, the the blueprint is not hard. Oh, you have to just take it seriously. Like, that's that's that's like the bare minimum. This take it seriously. He can even not mean it, honestly. Just just at least perform and actually, you know what? We're running out of time. And I want to talk a little bit about performance because you said that his team in the book. So the theme that I saw developed in the book, and it actually does kinda wrap around to to talking about masculinity. And even Joe Biden. Is the difference between self consciousness and self awareness. And I don't know if I'm using the official term. So allow me to explain what I think I mean like, you write a lot about being self conscious. And that's that's the part that I think is really easy tied entity. With like, I totally also, you know, have had alien in my own skin kind of sensations. Also felt like I have to figure out like how to behave in this particular situation. You know, because I didn't get the rule book that everyone else got the rule book. And that's the source flower humor in the book too. But the chapter about the internet hating you. I think shows a transformation between being self conscious and thinking about yourself all the time..

Joe Biden I. Joe New York magazine official
"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Yeah. Like, if you re the same thing with the Wall Street Journal, if you read the Wall Street Journal, quote, unquote, premium content, but across a wide variety of rice stuff, and you're not to loyal to any one thing. So the upside for you guys is there's money. Uh-huh. Actually. And then theoretically, you're exposing your stuff to someone who maybe doesn't react stuff all the time. That's all good. The flip side is there's a real disincentive. I think to subscribe to New York magazine. Yeah. Getting texture because it's already in there. And you you know, you guys are getting a very very small slice of and one thing for us because we put everything on the internet. You could get it all in apple news regular, so we're ready giving you all of our content there. Now apple is coming to us and saying can we put it in this premium locked category, and we'll actually be paying you for some of the readers of it. And so that's sort of just so. Get away. We're getting get eight four the other thing that happened this year, the probably most significant second most significant thing after Adam leaving is that we launched a digital subscription business back in December. So now, we are asking our readers to pay five dollars a month a fifty dollars a year. And you know, if you like look at what we're about from a macro business thing. Pam washing or CEO's been here for three years. He made this big decision early on that even if we thought and we do think we can grow our advertising business. The overall business is better if it's diversified. And that there are these two other business models out there that are best for us. One is the affiliate revenue with strategist in one is a digital subscription business. And the cool thing about being an editor's both of those are basically rewarding. Good journalism. Right. It's just I as an editor I need to try to get some percentage of the fifty million people who are reading us. Each month to decide where that good that. They want to pay for it. You know, so. Okay, great. Because you you get five free articles or whatever it is have the quote unquote, dynamic paywall, which means you never really know what the tally is. But at some point, if you're you gotta tap on the shoulder to shoulder, and you get a full wall. And it says you're up for the month. Please subscribe. So I mean how I mean when you go to apple news, then again, which is going to allow me ten paying for now. Yeah. Ten bucks, and I can review the New Yorker and everything else in there, and in theory when I get to your tap on the shoulder and the pay wall goes up online. Oh, I don't I don't get paid you directly. I'm already thinking about this. Yeah. That's a that might happen with enough frequency that the whole thing doesn't work for us. So you know question. We, of course, we don't know. And and we'll we'll see the sense is that there is a different two different. Use cases. Really that. There are people who are going to get to us from apple news. And they're really not, you know, there's a huge number of them first of all and for the most part, they're not the people who are ready..

apple Wall Street Journal editor Adam New York magazine CEO fifty dollars five dollars three years
"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Famous magazine covers and even again fairly recently. If you were a magazine editor, you spend a lot of time thinking about how this would work on a newsstand. What would I mean, the new standard soon? Yeah. You know, it's not that. I'm we're not New York magazine's never really had a newsstand business. So actually that is special to us. We we're gonna make pretty always even more based on subscribers so the so the value of a cover for us isn't so much like you're walking in an airport, and you see it. I mean, that's great. It's marginal part of the business now and always kind of has been, but it's really just like. Oh, yeah. This. Why I subscribe because? Well, that's exciting or weird you're making someone who's already money feel better. And they also expect this is going to travel around the internet sort of brand for you. Yeah. Yeah. So that's you know, that's just one part of the magazine experience. But I've always appreciated kind of curated intentional dramatic walked through of my news. I mean, I find that. When I go to museum, I wanna know whether to turn right or left, and I want somebody to have guided me through what they think is the the right way to see something. So I sort of a bias of mine. But I think it's what's exciting to a lot of people about magazines is that you can really go on a journey in kind of regularized weekly biweekly monthly cadence, and it's kind of this form, right? Where there's the front of the book shorter snappier. But then once you get into that kind of how it all works. That's where I'm like, you don't care. Yeah. We're like, let's shake it up. None of those rules are important really the only thing that that that I would argue for in terms of a print magazine. Is just that it forces you to as editor spent a lot of attention to making a full experience, and it gives the reader a chance to break from the world and having experience. So that's that's the like the argument for prints. The core thing of what New York magazine is translates beyond print because it's about voice attitude and approach to journalism, you know. So it's the same reason. Like when people who still make albums care about track list in the order, even though most the stuff is gonna get this aggregated singles going to go out was going to stream it they still think it's important to like, this trek starts side and wasn't asides anymore. But still we're going to go and order. We're going to tell you a story. And I think you know, like, whatever you think of what apple news. Plus is the fact that they apple a tech company is in magazines matter in the world, I think what they're saying is not just that flip through cadence or the digital equivalent of that. But that there is a a type of content out in the world type of journalism that isn't newspapers, and it isn't nonfiction books, and it is. Documentaries on Netflix. But it's this other thing where you see it is a relationship that you can have with a brand of journalism that is that shares a point of view in an attitude with you, and is your sort of partner in understanding the modern world. So let's talk about apple news. Plus, you guys were prominently featured in it beca trae stir in that yet and that promo reel. She looked great. A lot of the magazine publishers are in it in part because they rented contractually they had this thing called texture sold it to apple and they're there. But you guys have always part of this new extra reported texture to become okay? Owners of text. We weren't. We had already had a relationship with, you know, there there are people not many of them who were reading us on texture already. So you go you you didn't need to be part of apple news. Plus, I'm not sure, okay. But we definitely decided it was it was worth jumping on. So I've talked about this a couple of times, I think it is a pretty cool experience. If you like. Magazines. Don't particularly care about any one magazine. Yeah. And it's kinda what apple is saying sort of like, but not on stage..

apple New York magazine Famous magazine editor Netflix partner
"new york magazine" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Night Call

"I'm Molly Lambert in Los Angeles. And joining me as always is tests Lynch and over in New York, we have Emily Ashida and special guest. I don't know. No. She's so excited. She's ready to go. Rachel handler. My editor and colleague, New York magazine and vulture a very funny and great writer and just all around great co worker. That review and Fred also used to work together. I will double confirm. She is also a great co worker, and friend Android or bring this to my raise meeting. Great performance review. We were gonna start sorry inside jokes about the magazine. You raise your consciousness. Yes. Let's cut all read your aura. They're like your aura seems get. Yeah. Yeah. It's nice blue year for you. Speaking of Auras in crystals. We talked about crystals last week. We got a lot of face news this week. Yeah. Much space. This is both crystal news and space news, which makes it perhaps the most exciting new age. News lucky a-. Which is that I read a story on live science favorite science story aggregate are about how the sun is going to turn into a crystal when it dies how or why? Well, funny, you should ask just the sun is gonna die. Hold on. I'm trying to pull the store. I'll tell you the short version. I remember vaguely there was a new study that was published that said that white dwarfs, which is I think we knew that the sun would turn into a white dwarf white dwarfs turn into solid crystal cores that are made of oxygen and carbon. And then when they're really really old. This is the discovery they're just like a an entire crystal star. Who's not like a diamond though, it's like a or is it like compressed carbon that just turns into. I mean, I think that's sort of what it's like which again is what you're saying last week. Like that to me is what is amazing about crew. Crystals is your. Yeah. The earth the earth squished an egg that like a weird. Business scientifically backed up the earth made and scientists six we call stones and gems or earth x a footnote about how the age that. We think stars are might be wrong because as they turn into white dwarfs they start cooling in that. Like kind of distorts what their age, and as we've learned from all the statistics are fake about everything. Exactly. Right. Well, that is true and science though, it's like old beliefs continually get replaced with like, we know more. Now, there's something smaller than a molecule or whatever and than atom. This also says that the skies are probably already filled with these crystal stars because it means that there's just a lot of stars that like already burned out and are dead and are just floating around being crystals in the skies on Mary very soon. I mean, if to be a dead star, it means it's just burnt out done. It's energy has been depleted. And it's like a plant that dad, but it's like. How long does it exist, and it's dead state forever? I guess just like flutes. It's like it's like a rock, then becomes like a space rock, but I don't know if you've ever really dies just four is a different farm. Also before the sun turns into a crystal. It's gonna turn up into a a giant red giant and swallow the earth will. Yeah. But right. It's just it's fake news..

New York magazine Rachel handler Molly Lambert New York Emily Ashida Los Angeles Lynch Fred editor writer Mary
"new york magazine" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Kley magazine new york magazine not real big deal new york magazine and i forgotten the exact words but in essence what it was you want to be a writer if you wanna be a writer this is what you really want to do this is why gleaned from people who wanted to be writers you wanna put in a few years here and there at a newspaper for example or a magazine and then you wanna light up the sky with a novel and what was interesting was tom wolfe hadn't done that that's not didn't appear to be that's what tom wolfe wanted to do and fairly lateness career and tom wolfe had already had all these magazine pieces and tom wolfe has had already had what has to be that has to be considered in the twentieth century of the united states merica one of the five best pieces books of nonfiction the right stuff i mean that is a killer like you open as great as the movie is you open that book you do not stop you don't stop it's that good he he got inside the mind of at the bravest people of there the astronauts did not just didn't go on commercial flights they're going up into space nobody's been you don't know how it works and he talks about in the beginning of it in the beginning of it is all about the ones that don't come back and the people who have to go see their wives and their children am sorry billy's not coming back because billy pushed the envelope a little bit too far it is a can't be wrong on this it's one of the great works of nonfiction in american journalism and i mean we could argue who wrote the best play ever in america maybe it's eugene o'neill maybe it's arthur miller you can argue how great is saul bellow how great is phillip roth greater all these people how does temping way i got this guy i got this guy because then he writes bonfire of the vanities and bonfire of the vanities identifies class in culture wars before any less knew what they were and while he's doing this in order to be noticed because he wanted to be noticed he would wear white suit everywhere he went in.

new york magazine writer tom wolfe united states billy eugene o'neill arthur miller saul phillip roth Kley magazine america
"new york magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Title of the show an i don't really want to promote it very much and i thought well while you're sure why wouldn't you had uh senator cures to gyla brand out giving speeches using the f word all over the place an interview with a his new york magazine using the f word yeah campbell while harris is that her name kemulah kamala come on come on ha i echo using the f we s called the f bomb now it's just another democrat senator term i guess uh in speeches you've got uh tom perez the head of the dnc whose i think of the witness protection program is a crook and sleazy any it doesn't come off well and he's got pointy teeth leica ferret and and he's using the s word and speeches public thanks so they're just they're keeping a classy their classy party there there are this is progress there progressive were were progressing down a sort of them barbarian rabbit holes but never mind old but i started thinking about all of the other lies that the democrats have been selling over the course of the past few years the past year in particular net neutrality is very important and if you do away with it the internet will be ruined well how long ago was that no anybody see any difference any anybody said it any difference in the inner the the hysteria the apoplexy over all of this the the trump administration the republicans just signed into law wonderful stuff the repeal of the individual mandate on amount we're all gonna die millions are going to be without healthcare people are gonna be dying in the streets lies all lives as they say drilling in the arctic national wildlife reserve the and work which was part of the uh the last big bill that we pass through ever hear the tax bill that was going to be the end of the world market keystone xl pipeline mando ikea poke honest people out there in teepees and wigwams and your son things protesting in vandalizing equipment belonging to companies because they were working on a pipeline much like any other pipeline one of thousands in the country except more modern and safer and and all of that good stuff but they're against it and now that that's that was cleared long ago.

new york magazine campbell harris kemulah kamala dnc apoplexy senator tom perez trump
"new york magazine" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on WLOB

"Ask you is do think there is something about and i'm not sure why we you know the the a lot of people talk about whiteness here quoted in the new york magazine article is george uh ciccarelli mar a political science professor drexel university um he is calling every suggesting for targeted gun control for domestic violence offenders and as i showed you uh the fbi profiler said that the the percentage of mass shooters who are uh who have previously committed domestic violence is very very small uh but in that proposal he mentions whiteness witeness is never seen as a cause in and of itself of these kinds of massacres of other forms of violence despite the fact that white as is the structure of privilege and is the structure of power and a structure that when it feels threatened you know he says lashes out so again this is part of the philosophy of uh calling plemmons and of this professor that somehow we are under threat so i'm asking you are you do you feel threatened do you feel demo oh women and minorities have taken a place at the table and that their pushing you out i'm wondering because if this is what's driving to mass killings i want to get to the bottom of it and you can see i'm treating it with a little bit of a tongueincheek here but that's the one that's where these these are smart people they spend their time at university right they're not making this stuff up are they what does it just come out of a view of the world that is not necessarily the world that you're a part of i look at these things and i see silliness i look at these things and i see people who are trying to justify their own philosophy maybe i'm the crazy one eight three three eight five two four eight six six i'm looking for actual practical things i can take to the bank here and if you give me whiteness you kinda leave me hanging here you know i'm looking for a better way to make a list of.

professor domestic violence new york magazine fbi
"new york magazine" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"That it hits the reader like a hard slap across the face now the four reveal ling that paragraph new york magazine correspondent christian for rials and he may pronounce it ferry is i don't know reminds us that it is quite extraordinary that a private citizen paul manafort was secretly surveilled twice the faisal warrants faisal warrants our four international terrorrists criminals foreign agents but the new york magazine guy says the is quite extraordinary that a private citizen secretly surveilled isse by faisal warrant it is studying it confirms that trump was i he was fairly close to being right when he claimed that is wires in trump tower were tapped now the writers the new york magazine also lets us know that it would probably be wise for other possible targets of the muller investigation to go get lawyers even if they've got nothing to hide which is also true now here's the paragraph now the reason mentioned this even a new york magazine writer reveals this is really odd to faisal warrants on a private citizen that at surveillance operations going on at the residence building of donald trump that's kind of odd them this is the revelatory paragraph one individual who is familiar with an aspect of the muller inquiry but asked not to be named told new york magazine that unlike other federal probes that he's seen in action where prosecutors build their cases from clear allegations this one feels different.

paul manafort trump tower new york magazine writer donald trump faisal muller
"new york magazine" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

03:04 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Of the muller investigation it formed the basis of the obama effort to get trump investigation firstly there's nothing there and muller hasn't found at what's to be found though there was election rigging it happened in the democrat party their were crimes of hillary clinton committed with her email server and election was rigged and it has been documented and it can be proven and it happen on a democrat side and it heavily debbie blabbermouth schultz and hillary clinton the my point here is that i wouldn't be surprised if the muller investigation is discovering some of this stuff and they're fresh this is not what they wanna find they can't find any trump crimes is what i'm hearing they continue to search in vain for a trump creditors and others new york magazine and this is rural buddies at news busters did new york magazine admit the muller investigations of fishing expedition and yesterday's new york magazine had they know what's the data this was at yesterday's of day before new york magazine had the best summary of the state of the trump russia collusion investigation by muller yet written it was contained in a single paragraph buried deep in an article with no other surprises so you would have to look for this yet despite having to wade through material which basically tells us what we already know about the investigation that one paragraph is so stunning in its revelation amid an otherwise routine summary of what muller is up to that it hits the reader like a hard slap across the face now the four reveal ling that paragraph new york magazine correspondent christian four rials and he may pronounce it ferry is i don't know reminds us that it is quite extraordinary that a private citizen paul manafort was secretly surveilled twice the faisal warrants faisal warrants our fort in turn national terrorrists criminals foreign the agents but the new york magazine guy says the is quite extraordinary that up if it citizen secretly surveilled isse by faisal warrants it is studying it confirms that trump was i mean he was fairly close to being right when he claimed that his wires in trump tower were tapped now the writer the new york magazine all so let us know that it would probably be wise for other possible targets of the muller investigation to go get lawyers even if they've got nothing to hide which is also true now here's.

muller democrat party hillary clinton new york magazine paul manafort trump tower writer obama debbie blabbermouth schultz trump russia faisal
"new york magazine" Discussed on I Have To Ask

I Have To Ask

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on I Have To Ask

"Today's episode is brought to you by open account a podcast gets personal about making losing and living with money created by unquote bank and hosted by sujin pauk download and subscribe to open account wherever you get your podcasts oh welcome slate i have to ask i am isaac johner my guest today is a livia mitzi the washington correspondent for new york magazine nazi initially gave fame after writing about her experiences as an intern on euthanasia wieners do mayoral campaign and then went to work at daily beast since joining new york magazine she's written extensively about the trump white house her profile of joe scarborough emeka brzezinski and they're fraught relationship with president trump is currently the magazine's cover story she's also written about other white house personalities including kellyanne conway steve bannon and rights priebus bolivian nazi he joins me now by phone a special by phone appearance how're are you olympia i'm hey how are you i'm okay we've had some trouble recording this which i should tell our audience because you are currently outside the white house is that correct i am an out the effect of wet way if you hear any noil like egret parrot blocking by inflammatory uh because there's no there is really no fate in the white house for you make any kind of phone calls and they don't fit in the lower practice area which is where the all the reporter you their work with you problematic as you can imagine i can't imagine so let me ask you this because we're recording this thursday afternoon.

intern emeka brzezinski trump white house reporter washington new york new york magazine joe scarborough president steve bannon
"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

"Whether what's coming is preventable yeah and that's where i think of scientific criticism of earth science scientists criticism of the new york magazine article centered is that he presented views facts as more certain than they were then they i'm ben besides says that and even when talking about worstcase scenario maybe even especially when talking about worst case scenario we have to be transparent about be sort of uncertainty that that underlies the statement so like he could have said new to the best of our knowledge this is one thing that might happen but it was just like this is what might have rogge mrs what will happen it was just near dancing around like is this likely or is this a faroff thing like you know in in like you said jacqueline if the goal of a piece of journalism mike that which he said was his goal was to motivate action um you you have to know what certain and what's not can plan and if people are planning for the kinds of things that we're in that article i feel like people are gonna over planning i mean maybe that's not a bad thing and that's kind of what the whole point was when he was saying it's like well uh you know if we prepare for the worst case scenario than will be ready for anything militant what's unfortunate about that is that there was a tremendous amount of work done around ipcc to quantify the words that we use when we talk about whether something is likely very likely unlikely certain does have actual numbers around them they're they're they're probability's associated with tom asserting percent chance equals likely ends emile there was a lot of work that went into making met language clear and consistent and meaningful and so then did you see that not be adopted and other another realms his has been a bit frustrating i don't know andy may be you know whether or not there's but there have been problems with the that terminology as introduced in the ipcc but um i just i think that think there was an a missed opportunity in that that peace to basically say really interro really upfront wehlig look.

jacqueline tom new york magazine emile andy
"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

"I went i wouldn't do that you stay on the podcast and suddenly suddenly warmer cards takes a very dark turn speaking of dark turns actually that's a perfect segue to your point number three the new york magazine article of last week which is like singlehandedly or terrified open should people um and started a conversation again about how do we communicate climate in this um in this current era where we've gone you know several decades now into uh at an experiment that is really uh by all you know scientific consensus irreversible on timescales that are meaningful for the next several decades or even centuries if you wanna go out that wall but um i dunno disembodied wanna to somebody when it intro witter alcohol so it's david wallace wells the for the new york magazine wrote an article called the uninhabitable earth famine economic collapse a son that cooked sauce what climate change could rakes is a wrecker rick rick ranking what climate change could be sooner than you think yeah oh pretty sunny cheerful article allround what what are some of the the headlines uh the section headlines there's nine sections in i am jacqueline on so before i get into the sections it's always really interesting to look at the your eleven article because it can give you a hint as to the titles history which sometimes evolves right they might change it because if it's not getting enough attention they might change to another title so the your for this one he knows near york my dot com slash daily slash intelligence or says the law and its climate change earth too hot for humans which is my memory of the original title something like could the earth or when will the earth become to offer humans and that's leads i think what's interesting point um and then of course section was doomsday so we start you know we start a pretty mild right off the right of the starting gate and that and that goes along quite quite long actually is almost like a full you know i guess articles length of doomsday then there's heat death.

david wallace wells new york magazine climate change rick rick jacqueline york
"new york magazine" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

The Vulture TV Podcast

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

"After said was called on its met met world i was here emmy makers a character on the show name mad so it's not that much of a stretch but in you know the character was named mad and the novel sounds like an indepth premier anything but still it's weird little weird i also i feel like that speaks to something about damon lindelof which is he's always struck me as somebody who reads i know a lot of people read criticism and and kinda keep up with that but i feel he reads it in a very close and personal way that feels different to me like i could imagine if if he wasn't doing what he's doing i feel like he would be doing what we do which is writing television criticism year i wouldn't be surprised if there were the case may be a mural like him we'll just like on the leftovers maybe there's an alternate universe where he did that he recap the week after this next clipped is from the interview we did at the new york magazine office with the khasif search party and it kind of was this year became inevitably tied to politics and gizella post to allah shaukat about the election and it's funny in practice was this was right after the office of a lot of our interviews around that time kind of we couldn't help but go there because everyone was like like having a fog what else series i remember when like a liquid happened is always very disturbing moment and for our colleague whoah going to go talk about show i'm so proud of the show uh but i was like how my gonna just like pontificate about like the funniest thing happened near debt like it's just it's all of a sudden on your hit with the reality of your own life of your priorities start to go into question which is only that's healthy for everybody is to realize what our real priorities are and how we connect things um for me which are kinda talked about a little than was that.

damon lindelof new york magazine