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Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People

Good Life Project

05:27 min | Last week

Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People

"So over the history of this show spending eight years more than five hundred guests. Two years filming on location and crew, and now more than six years is a podcast. I have been asked one question over and over and over. So who's your favorite guest so when you do what I do, you learn quickly to dodge the answer to that question for one. You can't win for any name. He dare to offer your simultaneously snubbing hundreds, and if I'm blessed to keep doing this long enough thousands of other people, but more importantly. If you're really paying attention, truthfully, there is no such thing as a favorite guest. Guest I don't do this to be entertained or to fall in love or to make new friends or to have favorites I do because I love doing it, and because it's a bit like my living laboratory, it's it's not about who I liked best, but rather who I have learned from WHO has left changed and on that level would have come to believe as you learn something if you allow yourself to remain open from every single person. As it is on screen. Has It is in front of a Mike in Studio on the? So it is in life. But as I sit here today. Having just learned of the passing of a man who has become as our producer, Lindsay often reminds me. The single most referenced guest by me. In the history of the show Milton Glaser. I can admit to one truth over the same span of time much as I have been profoundly inspired and humbled and awakened, and learn more than any book or school or course of study has taught me. There have been very few guests. Who when they walked out. The door left me thinking to myself. I live their life. Milton glaser was at the top of this very short list born and raised in the Bronx. He discovered what would become his life's work, and never in his eighty five or so years of. Building on that veered from it to make things that move people those are the words he shared with me. As soon as These words were offered in that classic Glazer Rasp. I can feel every cell in my body. Come alive with resonance me, too. I felt me to. My whole body just saying with recognition and resonance. Me To Milton me to. Glazer's list of accomplishments in the world of design and media and education, the stuff of legends launching a design agency push pin studios in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four with a bunch of friends who he graduated, Cooper Union with he would change the face of commercial illustration of art and design that famed Iheart. Logo Did that a tribute to the city. He loved so fiercely at a time when it was on the verge of bankruptcy of crumbling underneath him, Glazer wanted to do his part to help people. Re Imagine it to see the way he knew it to be the way it was in his heart, which probably explains why he was also a founder of York magazine that iconic Bob Dylan Rainbow Hair poster with more than six million copies in print glazer again. Thousands of other works of art posters, brands product packaging restaurants. You name it. Glazer was behind so much of it and Milton's work he it's been seen everywhere from the halls of global industry to local pub to. The Museum of modern. Art in New York City the George Pompidou Centre. In Paris in two thousand four. He received the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum Lifetime Achievement Award. He received the National Medal of Arts Award from President Obama in two, thousand, nine, the first graphic designer ever to be given dishonor. The man had his own typeface Glaser Stencil. That, brilliant mind and the artful hand, and the impact that they would have didn't stop at making, though he also taught for more than five decades, he shared his wisdom his lens on everything from life to art to beauty to work to love with thousands of students, many of whom have now gone out into the world to make their own lasting marks, and it wasn't just this diversion to craft to making meaning to the creation of an noticing of beauty to his commitment to teaching and giving back to the work. It was the choices that he made about who and what matter to him. The deep sustained commitment to living life on his terms, and never allowing himself to be boxed into anyone else's expectations in any domain of life to working and playing and spending time with his wife Shirley who he wed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, seven, and to whom he remained married until the day he died at age ninety one.

Milton Glaser Glazer Rasp Founder Cooper Hewitt National Design Glaser Stencil Museum Of Modern Lifetime Achievement Award New York City Barack Obama Cooper Union Paris National Medal Of Arts Shirley Producer Bob Dylan George Pompidou Centre Lindsay President Trump York Magazine Iheart
Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

"Cell Milton Glaser he was the guy who designed the I love New York logo beautiful in its simplicity literally militarized heart and it N. Y. woman Glazer died yesterday was his ninety first birthday Glazer along with others founded New York magazine in the late sixties he designed posters logos advertisements book covers for ever associated with that generation among them the nineteen sixty six plastic picture Bob Dylan with multi colored hair seem to be blown in the wind fun fact to blazer designed the I love New York logo completely

Milton Glaser Glazer Bob Dylan New York New York Magazine
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 min | Last month

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

07:00 min | 3 months ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

"Written about. And you've talked about sex city and I know that you've said it's a show that you can talk a lot about and that is one television show for better or worse that I find myself talking to people about and I do not get sick of it talking about gay. I don't love everything I love the show. I do enjoy it. I think it's wonderful. I don't love everything about the show but I find myself falling into these conversations with colleagues especially who feel are very intelligent about the show but feel very passionately and I just WanNa talk about it for a happy always. Happy is in this category show and I agree with you. It's like this. It's this beautiful shimmering tax that is the shared thing especially among women that has all sorts of rich and specific things to say about very universal kinds of subjects about power and Saxe and friendships. And all of this kind of stuff and yet it's completely pleasurable and funny and stylized and beginning of a whole bunch of shows that I love me too and one thing I find so interesting about that show is when I watched it when it aired in real time. I don't think I had the intelligence to understand that. The character of Carrie. Bradshaw is by and large designed to be loved and now and I watched them on demand and I really dig into them. I realised that she actually was written as sort of a great person all the time and she brings her friend Bagels and doesn't bring the cream cheese and cheap wines and there's just all these things and I find that so smart that it's refreshing time around though I didn't pick up on. That was like they're telling me that this is this glittery character and I love her and now I watch it. I'm like I love that. She's not a wonderful. That's interesting when you I watched it. You perceived her as a role model and a positive in percent and where you're watching it as a teenager. I was watching it as a eighteen to what around six seasons to twenty whatever six years plus eighteen one thing that I always say about sex city aside from the fact that I I really do admire the show and find a wonderful is that I'm in the Exact Same Age as Carrie Bradshaw. So she went from thirty to thirty eight on the show. I watched it starting when I was thirty two until I was thirty. Eight and Mike Growing Awareness. That women had watched it when they were teenagers or when they were in their early twenties and they saw it through different eyes and perceived the ideas of it in different ways like a lot of teenage girls watched it kind of as a blueprint like this is how women live their lives which seems absolutely baffling to me. That I didn't I grew up in New York City that I that that I never felt like aspirational but I did look at the characters and yeah I thought because they are designed to be liked and I bought it. I liked them. It's so funny because at the time the show was out they've got nothing but criticism in the press like people were constantly and women were frequently saying like I like that show but carries just so self centered and stuff like that. It's interesting that you when you were watching it. You you perceive saying to somebody you're such a carry as like a completely positive thing. I didn't realize that that that that she was self centered. I didn't really realize it until I think the first time I was thirty three and I was watching this show again and I don't I don't remember what it was and I remember. Well I was watching a bunch of them in succession but I was the episode where she brings bagels and doesn't bring the cream cheese. It's the episode. We can talk endlessly about Carrie. Bradshaw she storms out of bungalow. Eight because her friend wasn't paying any attention to her that which The the gay guy that she meets at the club dishes salesman and he literally turned his back for five minutes to talk to another person and she threw a fit and walked out. I cannot get over that bestowed. I'm trying to remember it. Because wasn't it a situation where he had sort of brought her to the club and she was like eight and wanted her to stay home with him? All that glitters is episode. See I actually sympathetic with Kerry. Because she's sort of realized that that guy was but it was once again a yes but in my opinion when I watched that episode she he speaks to somebody else. It wasn't all night. We didn't have their whole entire evening. It was once or twice. He said hello to somebody. And she's like and then she storms out and I'm like poop adult this way. Plenty probably but that is really interesting to me that you had. Perceived Kerry as straightforwardly more positive character again but now I- despite seeing her as incredibly flawed and creating anxiety and a lot of female viewers. Something I wrote about I do. I do love her character. And it's because revolting abilities feel so real including becoming obsessive about the guy. She's dating to the point of being pathetic. Like which upsets I think. A lot of people watching it. But I'm like I don't know I feel like. She opened the door to a lot of amazing female characters on TV. My last question for you as we wrap up. Do you think that my parents were bad parents for letting me watch twin peaks when it came out of course not? They were excellent parents. That's amazing why wouldn't they people all the time? Now when I say that I started watching it at ten and I was scared beyond belief I remember I watched the pilot and I was a little afraid. I had and I was not very sensitive. Kid I remember. I had trouble falling asleep that night because I was spooked and I was so addicted from that sort of spook that I would watch every episode and my parents like sure my sister who's four years ago to watch it with me and now people are like your parents. Let you watch that. No that's that seems weird to me. Although I will say all the movie critics that I know show their kids very adult movies. When they're very young I have not showed my kids stuff but my kids get scared of stuff. That's just specific to them. But everybody finds something I I saw. I mean it's sort of a kid's movie but Charlie and the chocolate factory. I was so freaked out by the scene with the blue gum that I ate a like a gum ball at the supermarket and literally had like a panic attack when it was seventy because I thought I was going to turn into a blueberry so I don't think that it's I don't know it seems like that's a pretty good show. It's not like they were showing you know like I'm trying to think of it wasn't like they were showing you some the theater or something. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. It really fun when I went into production of glamour and iheartradio with new episodes dropping every Monday for more podcast from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows I'm your host Glamour Digital Director. Perry Santon follow me on Instagram. At Perry Salmon Ten P. E. R. E. S. A. M. O. T. I N. Our executive producer is Allie. Perry our producers are glamorous Kim sorrow I heart. Jj Causeway. What I wore when is engineered by Emily Marinov and Derek Clement Special? Thanks to Julie Chen and Diana Bachmann at Conde Nast for more information on today's episode Glamour Dot Com Slash..

Carrie Bradshaw Kerry Saxe Glamour Digital Director New York City Perry Santon Jj Causeway iheartradio Julie Chen salesman apple Kim Conde Nast Emily Marinov Diana Bachmann P. E. R. E. S. A. M. O. T. Allie Charlie executive producer
"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

08:39 min | 3 months ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on What I Wore When

"And sometimes won't read something you know not necessarily by you. But by critic in general tend to it will be something a negative of something that I love and are we going to have a conversation about Mrs Maes? Now Okay no but no. This is not. I'm not getting on the forties. I just feel like a lot of times. I will love something television. Show a play a restaurant. And then I'll read the review by critic that I respect and I understand that they are meant to be smarter than me but it will be a bad review. And then I'll feel really shitty and I'm wondering like how much like is it. Your opinion isn't your review. Just your opinion. Of course. That's what criticism is also my. My criticism is not a statement that I'm smarter than anybody else. It's just my column like it's like a it's it's me it's part of a conversation. I mean I assume other people disagree or like things like that's baked in but what I find interesting about criticism to is that a review is so final. It's never like this show is bad but you might like it. It's always like the show is bad and then I'll read it and I'll be like we eat. Even though I know that I'm smart and I know that my opinion is my own first of all. I'll look if you if you access your Inner Alexis Carrington you will not attract but I just feel like whatever this Percy's season which which I do but then sometimes when I do criticism of a person I respect. I see all the points and I'm like oh so now they're telling me that the show that I like is bad and I missed all these interesting things about it and I'm just wondering do you ever. Do you ever think about that to ever think about you know I'm going to. I'm going to say this show sucks or this show is in great but there's a million people that love it and do you ever think about that response from people you know what I feel. Is I feel multitude of things. One of them is that there's no way in which anything I read the final statement on the show. It's one of the things I particularly like about television. Criticism as opposed to other kinds of criticism is that TV strikes me as a medium that is about a big conversation and debate. I mean it takes place over time. It has this looping affect the audience where people respond to the show as are haters or whatever online. The People Making. The show are often affected by the conversation. I mean this is beyond traditional criticism. It's just there's a big uproar because it's a big mass audience and people debating and taking things apart and liking some things and not liking other things so when I wrote a column. It's part of that conversation. I come from online. A lot of ways. I mean it used to write posts In the discussion boards on television without pity and to me. That's the model of what it is so when I write a column it's both supposed to be a final thing in that it's a statement of my feelings but it's also I assume that some people read it and disagree some people will sway them some people you know like that's that's like any conversation you have like. The goal is not to put somebody else's opinion down but the other thing is I mean I feel like all I can do is be honest about my responses to things like the. I've often said this that I felt uncomfortable rating criticism. I used to write poetry criticism years ago and I felt like the effect on the poet was too intense because poets. One person makes it. They make no money and I was reviewing poetry in the New York Times and it just felt like even writing a mixed review felt very brutal. This isn't about swaying the audiences about the artist and then with but with TV. I felt like people condescend to TV. And they're always actually over praising things just in a sort of Oh look TV did because it used to be considered a junk menial so I was like writing a pan of A. Tv show is a way of praising television. Because it's actually a way of saying I expect it to be able to do great things and so when it falls short that is valuable so yeah. I can't I have to say I feel like I feel like it's not like some of the premise of what you're saying strikes me as as off like. I don't think critics are supposed to be smarter than the people reading the thing. I don't think that the goal of criticism to shame somebody for having a different opinion seen Well that is sort of what you're saying though right like and and so I think that for critic to think too much about like whether the person reading it is going to feel bad because it disagrees with their opinion would be it would not create very good criticism because then it would be sort of tap dancing and caveat and puffery kind of thing. That's said do I think about the reader? Do and part of that is because I try to anticipate disagreement things so that I can incorporate my responses in the thing that's not the same as worrying about wounding a fan of the show. Do you have anything specifically? That comes to mind a response that you've gotten from whether it's on twitter or in your inbox from a reader who so passionately disagreed with you. The honestly the only super negative responses. I've ever gotten our when I wrote a very strong pan of true detective back at the height of the hype and that that piece I wrote was deliberately aggressive. I wrote it because I was trying to puncture what felt like this big ball of gas around that show that was praising it as like this. Oh tourist masterpiece. I really disagreed. I didn't like the show so I wrote it in the summer guns away. But there's a lot of Specifically male fans that show. Yes who wrote me really quite violent responses and also like arguing me out of my opinion and stuff like that. That usually doesn't happen. I will say that when I wrote quite immune piece about Mrs. As L. where I will say I waited until the second season because I did not like the first season but a lot of female viewers were having so much fun celebrating. It said I was kind of like you know I don't like this show but I'm going to. I don't WanNa Piss on people's fun. I'm kind going to wait until the second season. And maybe I'll change my mind and then I can write this relief. Fund Review. Talks about me changing my mind and I watched the second season. I liked it even less so then I wrote a negative review and the the morning that came out my friend Lori wrote me on facebook and she was like are you all right and it was like what do you mean. And she was like. Oh I just assumed you were getting a bunch of flack about this Mrs Maysville Review and it was like to literally think there are hordes of women from the upper west side like storming place in Brooklyn because they're mad about this review. I mean the the show one bunch of Emmy's lots of people like it like I'm just one voice in the concord but So yeah in general I mean I actually got tons of positive letters from people who didn't like Mrs May Zelin felt uncomfortable about saying that I tend to usually agree with your opinion. Well I mean you don't have to do it to me on twitter and they're like Oh. I liked the show that you didn't like I don't like this show that you liked and now this is upsetting me because I'm like we're not like twins like it's good. It's good for people to disagree. Then it becomes more fun discussion. You know. I don't know like I don't I. I like reading things that I disagree with. Because then they challenge my thinking on it. You know like they sort of stress test my ideas but some things are just opinions. I mean I sometimes have emotional responses to things that other people don't like I wouldn't expect everybody to Have you ever wanted to revise an opinion that you put out publicly? Well I once wrote a piece about having changed my mind about this. Tv show the neck. But I have to say. In retrospect although I did change my mind about it the way I changed my mind was so specific. I basically understood the show as being an anti hero show in a cliche that it wasn't but didn't really change my mind about the whole show so I actually think I was trying to do this thing that I thought would be an interesting move to because it's hard. Your opinion about shows often changes. You know they go on for years but I don't really regret any specific thing that I've ridden the only thing I will say is. I once wrote a piece about madman. I absolutely think the column holds up. I think it's a good. I mean and loved madman but it was the thing about the pieces that it was a criticism of the way. The show is being dragged down by. How kind of ponderously symbolic d'andre all the other characters like real people. But he was like symbolizing masculinity in America and capitalism and and like and he had this crazy kind of gothic story and so I wrote this piece of basically saying this show it can be so fleet and and dreamlike.

twitter Mrs Maes Mrs Maysville Review Alexis Carrington New York Times Emmy Mrs May Zelin America facebook Lori Brooklyn concord
Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

What I Wore When

09:34 min | 3 months ago

Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

"For the most part all the women on this podcast were handpicked by me. On behalf of Glamour Women we find fascinating or nostalgic or brilliant or just women. We Wanna get to know a little bit better emily. Nussbaum was at the top of the list. Emily is the television critic for the New Yorker where she's worked since two thousand eleven and in two thousand sixteen. She won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Her voice is authentic and accessible and she's been described as a singular writer in two thousand nineteen. She released her first book. I like to watch arguing my way through the TV revolution. The book examines the changing landscape of television while effectively defending it as a medium with taking seriously it includes essays on everything from buffy. The Vampire slayer a show. That's been pivotal emily's life as well as the Sopranos Vanna Pump. Rules scandal true detective and sex in the city. Emily also tackles the question of whether a viewer can separate art from the actions of problematic creators in a timely me to ask a when I asked if she'd be willing to be a guest on the podcast. She seemed genuinely surprised saying she doesn't really consider herself a stylish person. I explained that the goal isn't to only feature quote fashion. He says that would be so boring. I'm so glad she agreed because our conversation was good so good in fact that we ran out of time and had to wrap it up just as we were digging into one of my favorite topics. Carrie Bradshaw not to worry. Though she still had plenty to say. I also asked emily to give her professional opinion on whether my mother and father were absolutely terrible parents for letting me watch twin peaks at nine years old which he happily did. Here's our conversation so I want to start by asking you. Which is what everybody that comes on this podcast. Which is what are you wearing right now? Oh I hadn't thought about this I I'm wearing black pants That fit well. Which is the difficult thing for me with pants. and I'm wearing some sort of gray tank top in a black sweater and a necklace that I really like that. I bought it a museum shop. That is where I generally buy jewelry And I don't remember where I got these things but they're kind of distinctive simple silver earnings during your earrings a lot. Yeah I like the erase striking. So I'm wearing good jewelry but I'm wearing completely neutral. What you wear to New York office kind of thing which is a black sweater and black pants. Oem Wearing kind of Nice sneakers wearing these these sort of Weird Green Corduroy Sneakers Love Them. And because the name of the PODCAST is what? You're going to talk about what you were when you interviewed for Your Job at New York magazine so I think this was around Two Thousand and three or two thousand four and at the time I was working as a freelance writer and I was writing for places like The New York Times magazine and doing both short pieces and long pieces. But I mainly thought of myself as a writer and Adam Moss who had worked at the Times was the new head of New York magazine and he was hiring new staffers and he called me to see whether come in and I thought they were gonNA call me to be a writer there which frankly and tells a different kind of clothing. 'cause writers are often shrubs But he actually wanted me to come in to interview to be the editor of the culture section. It wasn't something that I was sure I wanted to do. I was very ambivalent about it so I sort of winged it when I went in for my interview in a way that I don't normally for things and I'm convinced I got the job because of the clothes I wore which is true of almost nothing else in my life but I somehow put together an outfit. That was stylish showed my genuine uncaring about whether I got the job which is often the right combination for a situation like this and it was more stylish than I actually am so what I wore is dark blue jeans that fit right in for the period were sort of the right style gene because at the time they were kind of they had that sort of low weight but for for whatever reason I was actually pulling it off. Because I don't really have a body that works that great and that kind of jeans but I had good ones but the main thing is I wore. I had a a blue crushed velvet sort of waistcoat jacket that I had bought vintage that had silver buttons and my mom had given me these actually quite nice low ankle boots that were kind of a brownish yellow alligator skin or something that had stacked heels wouldn't stacked heels those two items actually looked good like they were distinctive. Strange Somewhat Bohemian. Downtown things and wearing pants always gives me a stronger sense of authority in a situation like this. I think I normally would have gone to a job interview honestly wearing an alien skirt a simple top jacket to try to look professional. But I think partially because I genuinely kind of didn't want to get the job or at least was doing it. I know that sounds almost disrespectful. 'cause it was such a good job but I was ambivalent embitterment about becoming an editor instead of a writer. So there's this part of me that was just like whatever like I didn't really rally right so I so I sort of magically managed to hit on this outfit. That kind of looked made me look way more downtown selective idiosyncratic and actively stylish and a young woman way and it went in and I have to say and like The other thing is Adam. My old boss and Hugo Lindgren. Who was also interviewing me They are guys who actually care about fashion in different ways and I walked in and I actually saw that they liked my clothes like this sounds stupid but the dumb way in which I was like. I've hacked this because so many things are stupid first impressions and there was this way in which because I looked kind of free wheeling and like I'm matched the part or something that helped anyway. I did get the job and initially said that I would take it for three months because we were just putting together the prospectus of the magazine and then ended up staying there for many years and Adam is an incredible boss. It all worked out. I never dressed like that again. I was GONNA say if he was hiring me in any way as you know perhaps delusional suspected that I was just sort of acting a role that worked for the job interview after that. I did not wear good clothes to the office. I did try to dress up a little bit. I went on a shopping trip with my I think he was. We were dating. I married my husband who's very stylish and has great taste and we were living in the West village and we went for this walk down. I think Greenwich Avenue had a couple of different shops and so I went out and I sort of went on a shopping trip to try to buy a few items. That seems like an editor at New York magazine would wear these items. When did you buy do any of the things were because I don't know brands but I bought some things that were kind of medium pricey and seemed like statement things I was never able to use them or put them together? But I do remember the first day I went in the office. I mean my entire impression of an office like that was like thirteen going on thirty hundred percent. I so I was trying to. I was trying to raise my game to ROM COM level which remind notion of medium also. Yes exactly the truth is I mean. People dressed in black in New York and a lot of people who are in fashion dress very neutral and the one time I ever wrote about fashion. I was really struck by the fact that I was like wait. This is not made up of butterflies like this is a lot of thirty to fifty year old women wearing black and like simple expensive chunky statement hearings or something. It's not a situation in which people are trying to stand out. Visually so are wearing off the runway necessarily says gallons and no. I think that's what people think of fashion back. I'm trying to remember what else I bought. And then at one point when I early in having that job I also attempted to have power lunch as a sort of a joke with a friend at Michael's and midtown because he's like a fun thing to do and on the way to that. I bought some bought some clip on earrings. That had on the way to the line. Yeah on the way to the lunch. I literally was like I'm GonNa like it but again it was sort of as a joke because my friend and I were like. We're now like media. People are power lunch area. They they were like strange. Chunky rhinestone earrings with red and blue stones in them that were round clip bonds rather than dangling or they were sort of you know punch in the face upper east side ish food jewelry of some kind so I remember. I stopped at the store. So those were my power. Close is basically what I'm saying for New York magazine. Are you somebody? Now that considers yourself AH shopper. No I actually don't like to shop. My husband likes to shop though so I often will go shopping with him and he will pick out things that are good and he's responsible actually for some of the best things that they own because I mean we'll go to a vintage store and he'll pick out something that I personally wouldn't have picked out because I'm just a highly pragmatic shopper. I just I find it boring. I don't like going through the racks. I don't like spending money and I also don't like searching for bargains so I'm like the worst combination of ten no India and I and I don't really enjoy changing and changing rooms and trying various things on and all of that kind of thing but I do like having some nice clothes so I go either with hammer or with my son. It's actually fun. I used to shop with my son when he was a little younger and then he would read things one to ten so that was fun. That's does he do that now? Yeah I mean he's he's we haven't gone shopping in a while I mean and also he's he's about twelve now so I don't think when he was eight he actually he's. He's much more interested individuals than I am so he he had a lot of opinions but he's also very enthusiastic so pretty much. No matter what I tried on. It was from eight to ten. So that's a good person to shop

Writer New York Magazine Emily Adam Moss Editor New York The Times Pulitzer Prize Glamour Women Nussbaum Hugo Lindgren The New York Times Magazine Carrie Bradshaw India Vanna Pump Michael
NYC: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

Start Here

04:25 min | 5 months ago

NYC: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

"I was an Ra in college. A resident assistant and one of the things we'd always deal with was guests from outside the dorm kids complaining that now. The roommate was always bringing over their boyfriend girlfriend. Sometimes there were complaints about creepy or people hanging around. This was New York. City's she'd have to find out whether they'd actually been invited in. So imagine a parent constantly being around the dorm. How bad could that be worse? That's what helicopter parents. But that's kind of for the family work out right. That's what Lawrence Ray did way more than just disturbing it will infuriate you. These accused of preying on his daughters friends at Sarah Lawrence College yesterday in New York a story exploded loaded out of West Chester County home to the prestigious Liberal Arts College Sarah Lawrence as charges were filed against a parent of former student their. ABC's Aaron Katersky covers New York law enforcement. He's been working sources from here in Manchester so Aaron I mean what can you tell us Larry Ray effectively moved in to his daughter's his college dorm when she was a sophomore and ended up certainly overstaying his welcome but more than that according to federal prosecutors. He would subject checked people that his daughter new and others on campus to sexual and psychological manipulation and physical abuse race first victims victims were sophomores at college. Westchester county girls and boys young enough to be his children. Larry Ray had been in prison and he he had just gotten out and he moved in with his daughter and during a period that lasted ten years both while she was in in College at Sarah Lawrence and after in Manhattan and in North Carolina according to the criminal complaint he would mentally and physically torture porcher young people men and women with with physical abuse with psychological abuse and with sexual abuse. Then I mean Erin when you hear these charges these accusations from prosecutors. It doesn't sound like a really manipulative father. Sounds like a much more organized. Scary thing the way they tell it Brad. One of the the alleged victims mentioned in the New York magazine Article That touched off this whole investigation admitted that he was part of what he called a cult under the pretense of counseling. The victims ray inquired about intimate aspects of their lives and mental health managing to convince several of them that they were broken at that only rake. Break fix them. Someone who would learn the intimate details of someone's private life after gaining his victims trust. Ray turned on them. Falsely accused of harming him by attempting to poison him. Morton deliberately damaged his property according to federal prosecutors he would under the pretense of of helping them through their problems subject them to things like sleep deprivation to other kinds of psychological torture. Things that prosecutors said shock the conscience on one occasion as alleged rates high this victim to a chair place the plastic bag over her head and almost suffocated her and he would extort false confessions from these young people and then use those to extort money from this victim constrain hundreds of thousands of dollars from their parents savings accounts at raise direction from young people who open lines of credit who engaged in prostitution according to the indictment all to serve the needs and interests of Larry Ray. It's just shocking stuff. Do we know how the investigation began in the first place. This begin with with an article in New York magazine that was co authored by a student at Sarah Lawrence at the time. The article was entitled the Stolen Kids of Sarah Lawrence and it out lined effectively the same things that federal prosecutors outlined in the Indictment Sarah Lawrence put out a statement saying that after that article was published published. They conducted an internal investigation and found nothing to substantiate what the article alleged happened and yet federal prosecutors and the FBI found it when they began digging into it and they brought the charges against Larry Ray on Tuesday multiple counts of forced labor and sex trafficking appear before judge. Last night he did not enter a plea disturbing story Erica Turkey. Thanks so much for keeping an eye on thank you bread

Lawrence Ray Sarah Lawrence College Sarah Lawrence New York New York Magazine Aaron Katersky Brad Westchester County Psychological Abuse ABC Liberal Arts College Erica Turkey City Manchester FBI Erin Manhattan West Chester County Morton
New York: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:34 min | 5 months ago

New York: Lawrence Ray Accused Of Forcing Daughter’s Friends Into Labor, Prostitution While Extorting $1 Million

"We turn next the allegations involving a college students father. He's accused of preying on his daughters friends. At at Sarah Lawrence College authorities. He moved into her dorm room and tonight among the charges now sex trafficking extortion. Here's ABC's Diane Macedo Tonight. Federal agents call it a crime that shocks the conscience sixty year old. Larry Ray accused of manipulating his daughter's college classmates committing extortion forced labor and even sex trafficking conduct. I'm makes you angry. According to the indictment it started in twenty ten when ray got out of prison and moved into his daughters Dorm Room at Sarah Lawrence College in Westchester New York. Prosecutors say he started convincing his daughter's roommate's they were broken and and in need of fixing it was here that he laid the groundwork for psychological conditioning. That would eventually lead. These young adults become unwitting victims. Prosecutors say he made eight up lies about his victims coerce their false confessions than US those confessions to extort roughly a million dollars from them even forcing at least one victim into prostitution to to Shen and at times resorting to physical violence rates high. This victim to a chair plays the plastic bag over her head and almost suffocated for the FBI says it launched the investigation after New York magazine. Detailed the story in twenty one thousand nine hundred and David Sarah Lawrence says it conducted unintentional investigation. After after that article came out but could not substantiate those claims in a statement they call the charges disturbing ray faces life in prison if convicted

Sarah Lawrence College Larry Ray Extortion David Sarah Lawrence Diane Macedo New York Magazine FBI ABC Prostitution Shen Westchester New York
Harvey Weinstein has been charged in Los Angeles with rape and sexual assault

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

09:59 min | 6 months ago

Harvey Weinstein has been charged in Los Angeles with rape and sexual assault

"Brand Harvey Weinstein now faces formal criminal charges here in LA he's accused of raping one woman and sexually assaulting another in twenty thirteen here's DA Jackie lace today in all eight women came forward to report that they were sexually assaulted by the defendant in Los Angeles county three of those alleged crimes took place outside of the statute of limitations and for that reason we have declined to file charges in those three cases we continue to investigate allegations involving three other women to determine if additional criminal charges will be filed laci's announcement came just adds wine stains criminal trial began in New York in that case mine seen faces charges from two other women former production assistant Mimi hall lay and an unnamed woman who says one sting raped her in a hotel room also in twenty thirteen here to tell us more about what to expect from one scenes trial is Iran car mon senior correspondent for New York magazine and has a new story out in the current issue previewing the trial hi Erin how are you hi Madeleine thank you so much for having me great to have you let's begin with the LA charges announced today can you give us a few more details about them sure well you know when we were putting together this story which included a portfolio of photographs of twenty one of the women we wanted to get a sense of the sheer scope of how many women have come forward so the number that we came up with in terms of the women who have been public is one hundred and then from that you have more maps such as what we just heard from the DA how many of those women are of making allegations that are criminal as opposed to sexual harassment how many of those women are willing to cooperate with prosecutors how many of those women have evidence and and so it's a kind of process of attrition that has gotten us to this point we may not be done yet but in New York today the trial began in the cases of two women I'm also one charge of rape relating to one woman and sexual assaults relating to another today we received news that that there are two already out of LA county and there may be more my understanding is that the investigation of London is also on going we were not even at the jury's out stage yeah but I think it has taken years to get to the point it has taken one hundred women many courageous reporters a lot of docket investigation just to get to the point where Harvey Weinstein hi is being held accountable were being tried in court well right so a hundred plus women that sure is a lot and as you say it's not all about rape some of it is sexual harassment but still only four so far for charges filed so far to New York to LA so it seems like there's a pretty high bar for these prosecutors to file criminal assault charges against Harvey Weinstein there is an issue I mean if you just heard the prosecutor say some that is the structure of the law some of it is that depending on the level of the offense and the jurisdiction there is a statue of limitations that says that the case cannot be tried after a certain point so for example Annabelle issue or a says the Harvey went in raped her sometime in the winter of nineteen ninety three to nineteen ninety four and that is too old under New York law which we tried but what prosecutors are trying to do is to bring in some of these women who cases can be tried on their own to establish a broader case against white so in the New York trial US three women who have not been named yet excuse one thing of a thought and then the bill as you are to have been named are going to testify at two hardy won in we what they say is a pattern of predatory behavior and in particular and embellish your testimony prosecutors wanted to establish that hardly one thing with the serial predator which in New York at the criminal charge that can lead to life in prison and so even though her kids can be tried on its own prosecutors are kind of making a novel argument here that that they successfully got the judge to ask that you bring before the jury that that that that the broader pattern even though it can't be tried separately is something that the jurors should be aware beyond just these two women whose cases are being tried in New York and we don't yet know the full set of facts the cases that are being brought in Los Angeles but it'll be interesting to see just how broad the scope of a party went pattern of behavior will be many of these stories were talking about cases that happen I believe the LA que the allegations took place within a day at each other right it was the next that bad evening actually so in twenty thirteen and so this is similar to what the prosecutors did in the in the Cosby case right that they brought in other women to testify as to a pattern of behavior yes it's interesting read because wide but objective and subjective when it comes to that so the objective thing is the the the statute says you can only bring this kind of charge at this time but along the way there are still many subjective decisions that have to do with how our culture needs you what is the crime who is guilty what is an alibi what is it what is a consent so all of that it's shifting and its objective for example in twenty fifteen with a woman went to the NYPD to report that Harvey Weinstein had sexually assaulted her and she agreed to wear a wire but but you wanted to cheer as they ultimately decided not to bring charges in part because they believe that her past made her a not perfect now if the bill could be case is an example of how just in a few years the kind of culture change that would lead one charges to be brought to the the Bill Cosby kids prosecutor had basically backed off years earlier from from bringing charges against copy and into how the case is wrong and what kind of arguments the jury will accept so in the copy trial in two thousand sixteen I believe and beat the first trial ended in a mistrial he was charged with assaulting one one man and a second woman testified the second trial for the exact same charges a year later took place in the middle of a broader cultural conversation about meet you about just expanding the understanding of what it means to be a victim how would a quote unquote typical victim of I behave and five women testified about their own experiences a copy they were outside the scope of what the court to try and that's hard copy with connected so we'll see whether this cumulative effect will be something that the jury will accept and that's where we really bring in the subjective question the jury is going to have to try harder defense is going to say look at these text messages look at the email they said that the woman who alleges rate that hardy had eight a long term loving consensual relationship with her right now says she said that this was a sexual thought that this is right and so the jury ultimately if they have to make a really subjective analysis in you know what frankly is a very touching the six if IT about whether this was a consensual experience or whether it was right above the law play a clip of tape of of what to me me whole a says happened to her and just a warning to our listeners this is a pretty graphic piece of tape so if you have kids in the in the car maybe turn the volume down but here is what she says happened when I went upstairs to his apartment he wasn't wearing a robe at all but he did start making advances it's such a quiet and not too long and too into me being there and then he back to me and I mean he just wouldn't let it go and is very forced he's very intimidating Elsa very persistent forceful and big physically so he backed me into a dark room out which looked like you know the rest kids drawings on the walls and didn't seem like a master bedroom or anything and he held me down and he forced oral sex on me basically okay so is that what is the formal charge for that what is he faced for her for that if he's convicted sexual assault it's a charge and and maybe help lays case and I think again each one of these is going to have to be assessed on its own but I think ultimately jurors are human and they're going to try to understand each of these charges in the broader context of what they're going to hear again with that that the the defense is going to say that these were individuals who were seeking employment and few they argue where consenting to sexual activity even if it wasn't pretty it's not right that's basically what their argument is going to be in the plan I'm presenting email and text messages for me the whole way and the other woman to make the claim that they that this was consensual and the prosecutors according to there at least expected you bring experts show that that's a really common reaction to sexual assault that there is there is often a normalization attempt on the part of people who have experienced sexual called where they want to just pretend like everything is normal and they want to move on with their lives I want to see themselves as victims and again this is this may be a culturally prefer but that is certainly something that borne out by expert testimony I have to leave it there Iran Carmont senior correspond for New York magazine thank you so much for coming out

Harvey Weinstein LA
Rudy Giuliani: 'I'm more of a Jew' than George Soros, a Holocaust survivor

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Rudy Giuliani: 'I'm more of a Jew' than George Soros, a Holocaust survivor

"Blasio slamming predecessor Rudy guiliani for what he calls a particularly dangerous anti semitic rant politicos is is on is reacting to Giuliani's comments in a New York magazine interview in which he claimed that he is quoting here more of a Jew than George Soros's Soros a Holocaust survivor has long funded major liberal causes in campaigns and has been a conspiracy theory favored for years Lazio tweeted that he knows to be on is determined to set new lows in pathetic spineless behavior but said the comments about Soros a particularly dangerous adding the recent attacks on Jewish communities are fueled by this kind of hate he finished by calling Giuliani an absolute disgrace Giuliani defended his comments in a tweet yesterday once again saying the people who oppose groups that Soros supports our quote here better Jews and better people than

Rudy Guiliani Giuliani George Soros Lazio New York Magazine
How 'Broadway Joe' redefined the NFL

Retropod

05:31 min | 7 months ago

How 'Broadway Joe' redefined the NFL

"Com. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen world with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered fifty years ago a few days before his team took the field as huge underdogs in the super bowl. New York jets quarterback Joe Nemeth known and then and forever as Broadway. Joe arrived at a Miami Hotel in a Turquoise Cadillac Nemeth known to sometimes show Eh Games. Still drunk from the previous evening's activities. was there to accept an award. The quarterback sat on the dais next to his companion for the evening. Mr Johnnie Walker wrote Mark Kriegel in his two thousand five biography when it was his turn to speak Namus said I'd like to personally thank all the single girls in New York for their contribution. This was pure Broadway Joe tipsy free willing amorous and so was the cockiness that emerged from his whiskey. Soft lips later the jets will win in Sunday and said `I garin teeth. I the colts win by a large score. Today I'm GonNa say Baltimore Colts by a score of thirty five to ten. I think New York to win forty one thirty one. Nemo's prediction wasn't just hockey. It was really New York over forty one called the his opponent. The the Baltimore Colts were seventeen point favorites nameless knees were beat up. The colts have the second most potent offense in football in the best defense. Some were predicting a blowout. They said that it couldn't be done. But it has been near. The Third Super Bowl could gets one sixteen to seven was named most valuable player. Performance wasn't all that stellar. He didn't even throw a touchdown. But in critical wrote the moment itself took Namus fame and pro football's popularity to different planet in fame's pecking checking order. Nemeth suddenly outrank Sinatra. The biographer wrote. Actually at that moment he outranked just about everybody who wasn't a beetle doc attendance around the NFL Sword Soda TV or ship particularly with the launch of Monday night football the following season. The League made sure that Nemeth in the jets played in that inaugural game he's going NBA. Joe Name. After George Sauer for the touchdown everyone wanted a piece of Nemeth especially reporters profiles of Nemeth for the nineteen seventies equivalent of Click Bait legendary columnist. Jimmy Breslin wrote a famous story about Nemeth For New York magazine entitled Nemeth All night long in it. He compared the quarterback hanging out at a bar to Babe Ruth hanging out at a bar. I saw ruth once when he came off the golf course and walked into the bar at the Old Bailey side course in queens president wrote in one shot. He swallowed the mixing Xing Glass Ice Chunks. And everything else. He slapped the mixing glass down instead. Give me another one of these things kid. The place went went nuts. It is the same thing when you stand at the bar with Joe Namath. Life went on like this for awhile not surprisingly Nemeth endured his fair share of busted relationships drunk driving charges bad business. The steals fading playing ability in then of course fading fame drinking was the biggest problem. Nemeth was an alcoholic alcoholic. He settled down in Nineteen eighty-four marrying Deborah. mays woman he met at a voice class with her insistence. Nemeth was able to quit drinking a few years later but after they divorced in two thousand Nemeth began heavily drinking again leading to one of the ugliest and most embarrassing moments of his life during a jets game in two thousand three Nemeth wearing his old number and obviously heavily intoxicated intoxicated was interviewed on the sideline by ESPN reporter. Suzy Kolber he answered one of her questions in a truly shocking way. What does it mean to you at now? Team is struggling kiss. I couldn't care less about the teams throttling Nemeth apologized and entered Rehab. Namus is seventy five years old. It's easier for him to look back now on that improbable win and understand and just how much it changed his life and sports forever. I think about it now. He recently told the New York Daily News. But at the time time I

Joe Nemeth Turquoise Cadillac Nemeth New York Jets Namus Colts Baltimore Colts JOE Joe Namath Mike Rosen New York Daily News Football Joe Name Babe Ruth Jimmy Breslin NFL George Sauer Miami Hotel
Ex-'60 Minutes' reporter sues New York magazine over article

America's Morning News

00:24 sec | 7 months ago

Ex-'60 Minutes' reporter sues New York magazine over article

"Number sixty minutes correspondent Lara Logan suing New York magazine over an article about our coverage of the attacks on Benghazi the X. CBS stars is seeking twenty five million in the suit filed last week it claims the magazine article tarnished her career in retelling how her twenty thirteen report on Benghazi was retracted by CBS news because of inaccuracies a rep for the magazines as it stands by the

Lara Logan Benghazi CBS New York Sixty Minutes
Vox Media agrees to acquire New York Magazine

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 10 months ago

Vox Media agrees to acquire New York Magazine

"The new media company vox has acquired New York magazine the publication is known for narratives about politics power influence and fame New York magazine started a half century ago as part of the new journalism movement NPR's David full conflict reports in media everyone's talking about scale are you a big enough to ride out the storm stirred by tech giants vox media is a midsize company that grew out of a network of sports blogs it now includes a news analysis site box the tax like the virgin either in curved New York magazine has its own sites dedicated to politics culture food in the world through the eyes of women vox media CEO Jim Bankoff tells NPR the two media companies shared voice driven sensibility and a tradition ridden reporting but have little actual readership overlap York magazine's current owners the Wasserstein family had been looking to sell it instead they'll take a significant minority ownership in vox and Pamela washer seems to run your bank of says he expects to generate more revenues from subscriptions to new digital products television and movie projects and from building out new York's commerce site for conflict and pure news New

New York Magazine NPR Vox Media Pamela Washer New York David CEO Jim Bankoff
"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Daily the los angeles times struggling to gain new subscribers to paper while kalat explains me a bit more about that and also gives me her overview of the state of new stance in the u._s. We heard directly from the newspapers executive editor a non pure stein that the newspaper is not performing exactly the way that they had hoped they wanted to double digital subscriptions up to three hundred thousand and he revealed at that first half of the year had been rather disappointing that while they added fifty thousand thousand digital subscriptions they had a significant number of cancellations during that same time which meant that increase was only about thirteen thousand so very much in far off the <hes> wanted goal which in some ways is quite a shame you see the success of the washington post the new york times in the east coast. I mean the west coast really needed a strong paper yeah it did and i think like there was so much there was so much hope and here in los angeles times new strategy exactly because of dot like how it would redefine the west coast as a media how were so many of the heavyweights just mentioned the boston globe the washington post wall street journal the new york times. They're all based on the east coast ended in a very specific area of the east coast that could only be beneficial for american the media for the american media landscape to have a counterweight on this side of the country because even if we look at further opt to the bay area the the san francisco chronicle can't read really measure up to the same level as well and clutter of course. You're you're from portugal and you were living here in london. How how did he change your immediate consumption especially for print media in the u._s. Because every time i go there by the way i love l. a. but it's quite hard to find a new stand or somewhere where you can buy the proper newspaper or a magazine right from my own experience. What i had to change mostly was not being able to find the newspaper every every day or a magazine every day. Just as i'd go for a little walk during my lunch hour mainly because there's not much walking involved unless unless you really plan for it and also because you know what we in europe i guess conceive as a traditional news. Kiosk is not really a concept. That's very much explored here now so you can find some newspaper kiosks..

the new york times los angeles kalat washington post executive editor san francisco chronicle portugal wall street journal europe washington boston london
"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

12:15 min | 11 months ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"This week on the stack we speak to the new editor of new york magazine david housego. It tells me all about their exciting new kover plus. We speak to our women in l._a. Lada habil on the latest problems facing the los angeles times and finally our hong kong bureau chief. James chambas explains links how the main hong kong dailies are covering the protests. Stay tuned for this week's edition of the stack from derry housing london. This is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis. I am finland. It was to prochet cool coming up on the show. We'll look at the problems that l. a. daily the los angeles times is is facing with its circulation numbers plus. We review the printed press in hong kong but before that i spoke to the editor of one of my favourite titles new york mark magazine since early april they.

hong kong los angeles times editor new york Lada habil york mark magazine david housego bureau chief derry finland James chambas l._a london thirty minutes
Highlights and analysis of the debate

Left, Right & Center

11:35 min | 1 year ago

Highlights and analysis of the debate

"And center I'm Josh barro of New York magazine on the right is Megan McArdle of The Washington Post on the left is plain old also a columnist at The Washington Post and when it Lopez of business insider is our special guest all right so we talked about trade but obviously there was much much much more than trade whole lane who won these debates I'm I don't think anybody won these debates actual lay I think everybody I went through and read tons of commentary at one point and came to the absolute conclusion that everybody thought the candidate that they like the most won the debate I read impassioned defense you know a passion Biden won the debate Warren when the debate Sanders won the debate I even saw John Delaney won the debate I saw in this way I mean it was across the board and conversely people generally thought whoever they didn't like didn't do particularly well so you saw well you toward in Sanders only did well because they teamed up and you know they were against some lilliputian and you saw well by now only did well because you know he was against terror out send and so on and Harris only did well or you know whatnot because she wasn't fully attacked the way she deserved and so on down the line and I think it just sort of became a sort of wash and I think the pop that was the public's reaction to I mean barely anybody watch I think it had viewership of about eight million at fat and to be honest it's actually already it's Friday it's already kind of hard to remember very much of it so I mostly agree with that with two exceptions one is that I don't really think I saw anybody saying that they thought Kamel Harris had a good night even people who work fans of commerce he didn't work for her campaign you probably weren't saying that she won the debate and and then the flip side of that is I saw a lot of people saying they really thought Cory Booker did a good job in that sort of elevated himself above the the lower tier position that he had managed to hold on to in this debate I Meg and I know you wrote about Kamel Harris this week yes I think that there's no question that she lost the debate in in part because you know she her last debate she was definitely the clear winner rich she went into the debate point seven percent she comes out pulling at fifteen right that is a major move and that is because she she took the fight to Joe Biden sort of questioning him about his history opposing federal school busing efforts and people thought here is the fighter who can really dismantle trump on stage but the problem with that is that she then went into this debate as a front runner and people were gunning for her and it turns out that she's all offense and no defense and so when people started landing punches she was just reeling and really not able to mount an effective response on the other side of that I thought Elizabeth Warren did well enough I mean I think she slightly improved her position she looked very good but mostly she siphoning voters from Bernie who I think did not do well in this debate not because he did badly but merely because he's just holding steady it's not really widening as support Cory Booker I agree absolutely like god himself noticed finally after months and months of waiting for this to happen I think enter Yang also I don't think he's gonna be president but I think that you know he went into this debate with almost no one knowing who he is he made a couple of very well timed jokes sounded very coherent and you know plausible if not to me personally very convincing on things like his signature universal basic income initiative so I think there were a number of people who really committed this to be looking much better but in part that was because of what the for one of the sort of great white hopes came out looking much worse can can we and and I hope this is the last time in my life I ever have to say this phrase can we talk about and Yang for a moment alleluia the Ted talk version of politics yeah I I don't get it at all I don't get the people who are you know talking about you know good night friend Riang I mean I guess you know if you're if you're not really Yang gang if you're judging it like a like a high school debate competition and you know he won some points that might be right but the the problem with Andrew gang is that is central idea that virtually every problem in society is best addressed through universal basic income of a thousand dollars a month is both wrong on the merits and also it doesn't speak to any particular constituency in the Democratic Party and he has this idea that basically the problem is that our jobs are being automated away which is if it's if it's ever gonna happen it's not happening yet if that was what was happening you would see really fast productivity growth in the economic data because the robots would be doing all the things that people used to do and yet right productivity growth is actually pretty slow and then you know what what kind of Democrat is supposed to be into the entry on message if you you know if you just want things to go back to normal and you want a third Obama term he's not your guy if you're very concerned about inequality and the concentration of wealth in the hands of certain of a few powerful people of political and economic power he's not your guys you're very concerned about racial justice he's not your guy he said the sort of bizarre thing about how basically it's too late on climate change and we need to give people money so they can afford to move to higher ground I do not get at all what this suppose it gang constituency is supposed to be I've actually gone to so I went to an injury Yang rally so I can actually talk about this okay so you go to a rally right and it's a bunch of guys it's a thirty five and under many of whom like have to pause for a minute went before the answer a question like who did you vote for two thousand sixteen they often can't remember if they voted in the primary if you ask them if they very who they voted for in the general there's also this pause and then they also Hillary Clinton and I'm not convinced if that means they had to think about it whether they are voted for trump and no they shouldn't say that or if they actually like you to vote I mean I'm not convinced but I'm not convinced of any of those but what I think it does is it appeals to this kind of people who I don't wanna say they're disenfranchised because their tech guys by definition are not disenfranchised but they see themselves as disenfranchised and you know this is kind of you know vaguely lake we could rent okay higher episode on these guys right exactly taken over the internet this is not a large box and enter right now it's not all it and expect it might not even be a voting block is again as I said I'm not sure how many of them vote but you know this is a sort of stuff that looks really great on an internet chat board I mean this is like a plaque right exactly it's a platform for internet chat board it is a platform that appeals to people like engineers who lake systems with very simple rules right that's actually like I've been lot of libertarians in that camp rate is the lake extremely simple operating rules and then it's kind of set it and forget it government and I think it does appeal to those people and I should point out that while it is true that probably most the people coming out for him don't didn't vote in twenty sixteen certainly in a primary truck did pretty well in twenty sixteen by mobilizing those people because in fact even though they're not a big portion of the electorate the primary voters are not a big portion of the electorate and so if you can get people moving you can get a fairly small group to swamp primaries especially in early races that said I do not think enter Yang is gonna be present and at what I want to ask is like is that the point right so yes if you if if you're asking like why would he be doing this if it's not this kind of classic democratic lake little bit from column a little bit from column be little bit from column C. coalition building politics that is how democratic primaries usually work then yes it's it's not a good strategy but is the goal to actually become president or is the goal to get himself noticed to make himself higher profile to get his ideas on the board and I think he did that in that debate when I want to give you an opportunity to talk about anybody other than Andrea ang and Marianne Williamson I haven't you haven't gotten it yet on the on the one question what were your big takeaways went winners and losers my big take away is that the progressives won in the moderates just found it blocked they just sounded like they didn't have any answers and they sounded like they were not willing to make that the sweeping changes that I think a lot of Americans want to see I think that the progressives are right a lot of people are not happy with their health insurance as much as I hate to say bill de Blasio was right and I think that you know when you hear guys like John Delaney and Tim Ryan talk about confronting China on green tech or and the technological space at all they say things like well I'm going to hire a chief manufacturing officer it's like that's not a real plan Mister Ryan that's actually nothing you need to put your money where your mouth is China has spent ians and billions of dollars and has spent eight spent a lot of time planning their technological advancement the United States needs to at least match that effort to be able to go toe to toe with them to see what you want about the A. O. C. new green deal at least it matches the problem in scale even if you don't agree with that the actual mechanics of her plan and the moderates just sounded like they were petty like they didn't have any real solutions and that they were not up to the task of winning the next century or the next generation or whatever the next monumental thing it so here here's what I don't get about this if if the if the democratic primary electorate is is hungry for a bold progressive who wants to you know really radically re imagined what government is for once things like single payer health care that sort of thing white is Joe Biden have such a persistent poll lead I actually I thought it was it was weird how much of the analysis of this debate of the campaign generally has sort of glossed over the existence of Joe Biden there was a an op ed by Bret Stephens in The New York Times this week complaining that quote Democrats are not up to their historic responsibility unquote he's this you know conservative columnist who wants the Democrats to not be such a Liberal Party it is because he doesn't care for Donald Trump he's complaining you know you had John Delaney and Tim Ryan up there making these good points but nobody's voting for them but people are are are intending to vote for Joe Biden and you had Joe Biden up their forcefully pushing an incremental this message and pushing back on some of the ideas from the progressive candidates saying basically that if you take away employer provided health insurance the polls show that's on popular you're gonna get beaten up over that there are a lot of people who wants to insure that everyone has health insurance but who don't want to do that saying that a lot of these plans that involve big tax increases you have to tax the middle class for them and that's impractical and that that incremental is message basically saying you know we can't have maximum change here's what we did in the Obama administration was built on that that does seem to have a lot of appeal among voters in the democratic primary I point out that a lot of Biden's appeal at this point seems to be that people think he can beat trump and name name recognition in general were early yeah yeah we're we're not that early I mean to and Bernie Sanders has has very very high name recognition and had and as the champion of this message and Sanders is nowhere in the polls I kind of think of all these debates completely as prelude to September when we will finally get all of the major competitors on one stage and I think at that point you might finally see some movement among the competitors that is actual real movement and will hold as opposed to for instance after the first debate where Biden fell after fairly weak performance and then slowly crept back up as people kind of forgot about it so make in one of the things that we heard when you're having these conversations between the center candidates in the left candidates as you would talk about one of these ideas like like getting rid of employer provided health insurance and you would speak that someone would say that some popular and then the progressive candidate would say that's a Republican talking points this is not a Republican talking for it this has nothing to do with the Republic Republican talking ports your question is a Republican talking point we cannot keep with the Republican talking points on this you got to stop the thing is in what again the thing that I take from Joe Biden's poll lead is that

Josh Barro Megan Mcardle The Washington Post Lopez New York Thousand Dollars Seven Percent
Joe, Jeffrey Epstein And Cablevision discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Joe, Jeffrey Epstein And Cablevision discussed on Mark Levin

"Hour I came across the name the caught my attention in this rather interesting piece in The Hollywood Reporter about Jeffrey upstate the serial a pen a file Democrat donor billionaire hi I'm not being with Democrats in Palm Beach in New York Hollywood the same community is Harvey Weinstein all these Democrats stronghold you might say try came across the Senshi my recall in two thousand three W. W. D. reported that stinks tried to buy New York magazine with Weinstein Zuckerman billionaire investor Nelson Peltz then Cablevision chief Jim Dolan and Donnie douche a representative for wine Steen declined to comment do Shea marketing entrepreneur and well known media personality who is a contributor MSNBC's morning Joe he also hosts the network's Saturday night politics program said on the show several months ago the dubs sting tried to suck him into that world but he quickly rebuff those efforts I could see there was something very very wrong here he said Deutsche through a spokesman declined further comment why would he declined for the common I can't think of why would you declined further comment seems to me is a lot more explaining to do not that he did anything wrong a man who called the president and his supporters neo **** effectively why should have to explain himself ladies and John in hindsight it might come as no surprise that the New York media never covered the Epstein story aggressively despite the fact that it happened in its own back yard it wasn't until the Miami Herald's Julie brown wrote a three part story late last year that the feds launched a new investigation into abstain which led to his current arrest and incarceration a lawyer involved with the cases notes quote those relationships are a big part of the Jeffrey Epstein story of how he waited justice for all these years meaning his ties to liberal politicians the liberal media types the Hollywood to liberal billionaires in millionaires that's how he if they do justice for all those years I

JOE Jeffrey Epstein Cablevision Weinstein Zuckerman Harvey Weinstein New York Julie Brown Miami Herald John President Trump Deutsche The Hollywood Reporter Msnbc Steen Representative Donnie Jim Dolan Nelson Peltz W. W. D. Hollywood
"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Behave perfectly the whole time and if i have time another lovely learning i enjoyed some of the most longtime editor of new york magazine recently fell off his bike and decided to change his career entirely highly so he left the eminent city based magazine and all the great journalism he did that to pursue other things and he decided to be a little bit less ambitious so we don't tell me all this means to do that exactly but we all telling them to think very carefully 'em i suppose about impact making and i thought that was very poignant and sing while you were there and he's talking about quality of life and life in cities moderating expectations that was a huge demo in madrid over the weekend in protest against demonstration impose restrictions have been imposed on bringing petro calls into the city the new man has reverse that but clearly hasn't gone down with a huge section of the city's population who were out in the streets in a heat wave you will be only struggling with his well i i thought that the guy products they must have been addressed those little so that we still this weekend but yeah we did talk about the the hall the points of living in cities we did a panel on housing and we talked about you know whose responsibility is to make sure that all cities inevitable at the right price but they don't look too much at the they build the right type of houses i think he's mad who's promised to make the city on carbon neutral by twenty thirty five on one of the speakers on that topic i think gave a very convincing a convincing reports herself and how governments need to take a bit a row john lewis pumping josh thank you very much wwe's they called you conference in madrid well not nearly as before we got a recap of some of the day's news stories police in hong kong of contra protested mark the anniversary of its handover from british the chinese road north korean state media said donald trump's visit to the country was an amazing event and edited by as and designers descending on the german capital for bill in fashion week that wraps up this edition of the briefing produced by reese james and daniel baker such but you owning golfer and charlie.

editor new york magazine hong kong donald trump reese james daniel baker madrid petro john lewis wwe
Carol, Assault And Donald Trump discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Carol, Assault And Donald Trump discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Hey, became a fight. And it was it hurt. And it was against my will on Friday. Celebrated advice, columnist edging Caroline public with her accusation that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in the dressing room Bergdorf Goodman, Twenty-three years ago. Carol says she told to people at the time, it happened both of whom then told New York magazine that wasn't true that she'd told them of the assault today, the president used one of his Goto denials when it comes to sexual assault accusations telling telling the hill of Carol, quote, she's not, my type would think that prominent writer accuses president of rape is the very definition of news. Whether or not the allegation is provable. And yet, it was bizarrely missing from the front pages of most major newspapers garnering, this single column placement in the Washington Post and well, Carol did appear on broadcast outlets like NBC, nightly news, MSNBC, and CNN. And as further interviews, scheduled aquisition was weirdly absent from political discussion, on the news and it's fairly remarkable that it was. I mean I can understand newsrooms being wary of a first person account published a memoir that they themselves didn't report out. But it's an on the record accusation violence sexual assault. With two people confirming the Carol told them, the assault contemporaneous -ly. That's a very serious allegation against the most powerful person in the country following we should note. Fifteen other women who have made allegations of sexual misconduct against Donald Trump. The media's treatment of the allegation has not gone unnoticed, indeed today. The New York Times executive editor said, quote, we were overly cautious in how they handled the story. There's a kind of perverse dog bites man quality to the story almost no one is surprised by the accusation seems to me important to resist the soft bigotry of look, speculations, that produces a news environment in which everyone just kind of shrugs their shoulders at the president being accused of

Carol Assault Donald Trump President Trump Caroline Bergdorf Goodman New York Magazine Washington Post NBC The New York Times Executive Editor Msnbc Rape CNN Writer Twenty-Three Years
Writer makes sexual assault claims against Trump and Moonves

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Writer makes sexual assault claims against Trump and Moonves

"In a new book excerpts published in New York magazine writer e Jean Carroll has made sexual assault claims against the president and the former chairman and CEO of CBS correspondent, Ben Tracy aging Carol, never reported, her alleged sexual assault police, but she did tell to friends about it at the time in those friends have confirmed that to New York magazine. Now, Carol is also accused former CBS's moon Vesa social misconduct. He has denied those allegations Moonves was forced out of CBS last summer after reports of sexual misconduct, Mr. Trump denied the alleged incident in a lengthy statement, and claimed he has never met

CBS New York Magazine Assault Jean Carroll Carol Ben Tracy Chairman And Ceo Mr. Trump Writer President Trump Moonves
Eliminate WiFi Dead Spots In Your Home With Eero

Dishin' Digital

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Eliminate WiFi Dead Spots In Your Home With Eero

"Dish and digital sponsored by New York's ultimate camera authority. If you have sluggish WI fi in parts of your home, you may want to replace your current router with something called a mesh network. You get a set of them like three or four and you space them evenly throughout your house, and they cover the entire house in the strong, even blanket of WI fi. David Pogue is a tech columnist for New York magazine's the strategist and he likes the system from Eero. They're very beautiful, very small, white shiny capsule like units, and you can also get them as what they call beacons. They look like night lights and you just plug them into an outlet. And that way, there's no cords at three hundred dollars for the bay station, and beacon, the euro is pricey Pogue is also likes the cheaper WI fi option from Google, which includes three units for two hundred sixty dollars dish in digital. I'm Palmer inane. There's more a WCBS eight eighty dot com slash dish in digital.

WI David Pogue Dish New York Magazine New York Eero Palmer Google Two Hundred Sixty Dollars Three Hundred Dollars
Protect Your Phone With RhinoShield CrashGuard

Dishin' Digital

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Protect Your Phone With RhinoShield CrashGuard

"I'm Paul Dane with dish in digital sponsored by bien, h New York's ultimate camera authority, a low cost way to prevent costly cracked screen repairs. David Pogue columnist for New York magazine's the strategist is a big fan of the Rhino Shield crash card. It's a twenty five dollar bumper. It's just hugs the edges of the phone. It doesn't cover up the front or the back. And yet, you cannot just drop this thing onto concrete. You can throw it onto concrete with all your might. And you will not crack that glass. So how's it work? They've come up with a really great plastic that absorbs impact, but the plastic has the sort of honeycomb structure inside that distribute shock Rhino Shield says the crash guard can withstand a drop of at least eleven feet dish in digital. I'm Palmer dean. There's more a WCBS eight eighty dot com slash dish in digital.

David Pogue New York Magazine Paul Dane New York Palmer Dean Bien Twenty Five Dollar Eleven Feet
Review: Sony's Noise-Cancelling Headphones

Dishin' Digital

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Review: Sony's Noise-Cancelling Headphones

"Dish in digital sponsored by h New York's ultimate camera authority. The Bose quiet comfort noise cancelling headphones of ruled the roost for a decade, but David Pogue columnist for New York magazine's the strategist says he's found something better the Sony W H one thousand x m three these guys are a pre unbelievable on a plane or train or a car. They are so quiet, and he says the Sony's have more features Sony last thirty hours on a charge instead of twenty the right? Your Cup on the Sony is actually a track pad. So with one finger you can swipe up or down for volume or left a rights change tracks. And there's also really cool feature. When someone is trying to talk to you like a flight attendant. You don't have to take them off. You just kind of press your palm against the right year peace and all of a sudden it passes the outside world sound through to you. They sell it for the same price as those from bos- three hundred fifty dollars dish in digital. I'm Paul Dane, there's more a WCBS eight eighty dot com slash dishing digital.

Sony David Pogue New York New York Magazine Paul Dane BOS Three Hundred Fifty Dollars Thirty Hours
"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Yeah. Like, if you re the same thing with the Wall Street Journal, if you read the Wall Street Journal, quote, unquote, premium content, but across a wide variety of rice stuff, and you're not to loyal to any one thing. So the upside for you guys is there's money. Uh-huh. Actually. And then theoretically, you're exposing your stuff to someone who maybe doesn't react stuff all the time. That's all good. The flip side is there's a real disincentive. I think to subscribe to New York magazine. Yeah. Getting texture because it's already in there. And you you know, you guys are getting a very very small slice of and one thing for us because we put everything on the internet. You could get it all in apple news regular, so we're ready giving you all of our content there. Now apple is coming to us and saying can we put it in this premium locked category, and we'll actually be paying you for some of the readers of it. And so that's sort of just so. Get away. We're getting get eight four the other thing that happened this year, the probably most significant second most significant thing after Adam leaving is that we launched a digital subscription business back in December. So now, we are asking our readers to pay five dollars a month a fifty dollars a year. And you know, if you like look at what we're about from a macro business thing. Pam washing or CEO's been here for three years. He made this big decision early on that even if we thought and we do think we can grow our advertising business. The overall business is better if it's diversified. And that there are these two other business models out there that are best for us. One is the affiliate revenue with strategist in one is a digital subscription business. And the cool thing about being an editor's both of those are basically rewarding. Good journalism. Right. It's just I as an editor I need to try to get some percentage of the fifty million people who are reading us. Each month to decide where that good that. They want to pay for it. You know, so. Okay, great. Because you you get five free articles or whatever it is have the quote unquote, dynamic paywall, which means you never really know what the tally is. But at some point, if you're you gotta tap on the shoulder to shoulder, and you get a full wall. And it says you're up for the month. Please subscribe. So I mean how I mean when you go to apple news, then again, which is going to allow me ten paying for now. Yeah. Ten bucks, and I can review the New Yorker and everything else in there, and in theory when I get to your tap on the shoulder and the pay wall goes up online. Oh, I don't I don't get paid you directly. I'm already thinking about this. Yeah. That's a that might happen with enough frequency that the whole thing doesn't work for us. So you know question. We, of course, we don't know. And and we'll we'll see the sense is that there is a different two different. Use cases. Really that. There are people who are going to get to us from apple news. And they're really not, you know, there's a huge number of them first of all and for the most part, they're not the people who are ready..

apple Wall Street Journal editor Adam New York magazine CEO fifty dollars five dollars three years
"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Famous magazine covers and even again fairly recently. If you were a magazine editor, you spend a lot of time thinking about how this would work on a newsstand. What would I mean, the new standard soon? Yeah. You know, it's not that. I'm we're not New York magazine's never really had a newsstand business. So actually that is special to us. We we're gonna make pretty always even more based on subscribers so the so the value of a cover for us isn't so much like you're walking in an airport, and you see it. I mean, that's great. It's marginal part of the business now and always kind of has been, but it's really just like. Oh, yeah. This. Why I subscribe because? Well, that's exciting or weird you're making someone who's already money feel better. And they also expect this is going to travel around the internet sort of brand for you. Yeah. Yeah. So that's you know, that's just one part of the magazine experience. But I've always appreciated kind of curated intentional dramatic walked through of my news. I mean, I find that. When I go to museum, I wanna know whether to turn right or left, and I want somebody to have guided me through what they think is the the right way to see something. So I sort of a bias of mine. But I think it's what's exciting to a lot of people about magazines is that you can really go on a journey in kind of regularized weekly biweekly monthly cadence, and it's kind of this form, right? Where there's the front of the book shorter snappier. But then once you get into that kind of how it all works. That's where I'm like, you don't care. Yeah. We're like, let's shake it up. None of those rules are important really the only thing that that that I would argue for in terms of a print magazine. Is just that it forces you to as editor spent a lot of attention to making a full experience, and it gives the reader a chance to break from the world and having experience. So that's that's the like the argument for prints. The core thing of what New York magazine is translates beyond print because it's about voice attitude and approach to journalism, you know. So it's the same reason. Like when people who still make albums care about track list in the order, even though most the stuff is gonna get this aggregated singles going to go out was going to stream it they still think it's important to like, this trek starts side and wasn't asides anymore. But still we're going to go and order. We're going to tell you a story. And I think you know, like, whatever you think of what apple news. Plus is the fact that they apple a tech company is in magazines matter in the world, I think what they're saying is not just that flip through cadence or the digital equivalent of that. But that there is a a type of content out in the world type of journalism that isn't newspapers, and it isn't nonfiction books, and it is. Documentaries on Netflix. But it's this other thing where you see it is a relationship that you can have with a brand of journalism that is that shares a point of view in an attitude with you, and is your sort of partner in understanding the modern world. So let's talk about apple news. Plus, you guys were prominently featured in it beca trae stir in that yet and that promo reel. She looked great. A lot of the magazine publishers are in it in part because they rented contractually they had this thing called texture sold it to apple and they're there. But you guys have always part of this new extra reported texture to become okay? Owners of text. We weren't. We had already had a relationship with, you know, there there are people not many of them who were reading us on texture already. So you go you you didn't need to be part of apple news. Plus, I'm not sure, okay. But we definitely decided it was it was worth jumping on. So I've talked about this a couple of times, I think it is a pretty cool experience. If you like. Magazines. Don't particularly care about any one magazine. Yeah. And it's kinda what apple is saying sort of like, but not on stage..

apple New York magazine Famous magazine editor Netflix partner
"new york magazine" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Night Call

"I'm Molly Lambert in Los Angeles. And joining me as always is tests Lynch and over in New York, we have Emily Ashida and special guest. I don't know. No. She's so excited. She's ready to go. Rachel handler. My editor and colleague, New York magazine and vulture a very funny and great writer and just all around great co worker. That review and Fred also used to work together. I will double confirm. She is also a great co worker, and friend Android or bring this to my raise meeting. Great performance review. We were gonna start sorry inside jokes about the magazine. You raise your consciousness. Yes. Let's cut all read your aura. They're like your aura seems get. Yeah. Yeah. It's nice blue year for you. Speaking of Auras in crystals. We talked about crystals last week. We got a lot of face news this week. Yeah. Much space. This is both crystal news and space news, which makes it perhaps the most exciting new age. News lucky a-. Which is that I read a story on live science favorite science story aggregate are about how the sun is going to turn into a crystal when it dies how or why? Well, funny, you should ask just the sun is gonna die. Hold on. I'm trying to pull the store. I'll tell you the short version. I remember vaguely there was a new study that was published that said that white dwarfs, which is I think we knew that the sun would turn into a white dwarf white dwarfs turn into solid crystal cores that are made of oxygen and carbon. And then when they're really really old. This is the discovery they're just like a an entire crystal star. Who's not like a diamond though, it's like a or is it like compressed carbon that just turns into. I mean, I think that's sort of what it's like which again is what you're saying last week. Like that to me is what is amazing about crew. Crystals is your. Yeah. The earth the earth squished an egg that like a weird. Business scientifically backed up the earth made and scientists six we call stones and gems or earth x a footnote about how the age that. We think stars are might be wrong because as they turn into white dwarfs they start cooling in that. Like kind of distorts what their age, and as we've learned from all the statistics are fake about everything. Exactly. Right. Well, that is true and science though, it's like old beliefs continually get replaced with like, we know more. Now, there's something smaller than a molecule or whatever and than atom. This also says that the skies are probably already filled with these crystal stars because it means that there's just a lot of stars that like already burned out and are dead and are just floating around being crystals in the skies on Mary very soon. I mean, if to be a dead star, it means it's just burnt out done. It's energy has been depleted. And it's like a plant that dad, but it's like. How long does it exist, and it's dead state forever? I guess just like flutes. It's like it's like a rock, then becomes like a space rock, but I don't know if you've ever really dies just four is a different farm. Also before the sun turns into a crystal. It's gonna turn up into a a giant red giant and swallow the earth will. Yeah. But right. It's just it's fake news..

New York magazine Rachel handler Molly Lambert New York Emily Ashida Los Angeles Lynch Fred editor writer Mary
"new york magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

"Places and kind of shoved under this one banner and again, in a way that feels like it's all of a piece of not, you know, a Frankenstein's monster of magazine content. Totally true. Do you think it's the the quality and the? I mean, you know, there's many. There are many magazines or many websites that are beloved right. There are many, many, there's a million different places that if we heard that they were going up for sale, you know the journalists, the journalism world, you know, would sort of gasp, or you know, Saab or whatever else do. What is it about New York magazine is the institution? The quality. What? What makes this feel like a bigger potential deal than than some other ones? I'm not sure if you're not used were beloved though, because I think it's almost more more like highly highly admired, right? Yeah. Beloved is more like, you know, the kind of primal connection to deadspin if we found out tomorrow that was going out of business, I'm knocking rapidly on would here or Jabil, right things that are more like, oh my gosh, I feel like I know these. People like these are. These are my friends online. Was New York still has a little bit of that magazine distance? I think it's, I think it's more admired in a way and it's all I think it's because it's, I don't know. I think it's I, because I think this is like this is sort of indicative of every mosque publication ever. But I think it's just like there's a high degree of professionalism when publishing that much stuff. You know, there's not like that. They've certainly had their screw ups and stuff like that, but there's not just feels like again, I think one of the I don't miss the magazine euro all that much. I missed like certain like parts of it, but I don't miss the fact that you just ran out of stories to read pretty quickly and but what was cool about it was that you could read something and you could feel like a whole publication was infused with the same sensibility voice since the an old word. Right? Won't be barely use that anymore. Sure. And also there was like a high degree of professionalism. You felt like everything was really edited and looked over right? That just doesn't exist in the web in the same way, even in a even in a high quality publication, like the ringer. But I think with New York's website, it feels like they got as much of that into a onto a website as they could. Absolutely. It's it's con- it's reader confidence, consumer confidence, right? It's it's picking up the magazine knowing that despite the fact that this is it's not a monthly glossy. Right. I mean, this is a this. This is a in some ways. It's a, it's a transactional New York magazine, but in every issue there would be one or two long pieces that you would be very happy. We're going to be very happy when you were reading them. Right? I mean, this is like there's great writing and all of them, and there's useful stuff too, but it's the you're right. It's the, it's the confidence in the professionalism. Should we talk about a decidedly shabby our presence in American media, Chris Berman ESPN's very own. We talked, you said a minute ago, Andrew. Marshall of the New York Post reports that Berman it's gonna come back to ESPN perhaps in some limited basis. He would do like sports center pieces. Maybe some interviews on his old pregame shows on the NFL countdown. They actually wanted him to come back and do more per. Sean, but boomer's life in retirement, fairly pretty books. I don't know if it's golf, it's times it's, he's, he's busy hit. Just dead easy. He actually he didn't. He didn't quite leave ESPN. He was never actually SPN, but he was kind of reduced to funny highlight guy, emeritus Beck in January twenty seventeen after the twenty sixteen seventeen football season. He got this big slickly produced farewells special his old job now on Sunday NFL Canada's occupied by Samantha ponder as Martian points out. The ratings were down twelve percent last year. Do you feel he'd Berman got shoved out the door too soon, and that's what accounts for this move. I mean, it all felt very strange when it happened, right? I mean it felt like Berman you kind of expected there to be more fireworks from one side or the other. It reminded me for whatever reason..

New York magazine Berman ESPN New York NFL Beck New York Post Jabil Canada Samantha ponder Andrew Sean Marshall twelve percent
"new york magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

"David topic. Number two, there was a report by Benjamin Mullen and the Wall Street Journal that the owners of New York magazine, which which owns, of course, New York and several websites which will talk about or exploring a possible sale. Then CNBC's Alex Sherman followed up on this by publishing an internal Email from New York media CEO Pam Wasserstein which said we very much believe in this exceptional institution. We are proud owners and would be happy to continue owning it for years to come. It's not exactly we're going to own it for years to come, and then she talked about some of the things they've done. And it says the point is that I'm trying to make our company the best version of it self as I know all of you are. We don't know yet what's going to happen to New York, but I thought we should talk for a few minutes about what makes New York unique in this media world. We live in what I got my reasons. You want me to go first. Wanna go, I way I just want to take one more beat to talk about that. Pam Wasserstein memo to her staff was I was just trying to just do the mad libs version of this. Everyone listening and try to imagine if your boss sent out this Email. I like I could just I could only imagine. I mean, first of all, I kind of I at first blush, it sort of sounds like our boss Bill trying to explain why he's doing a lot of other podcasts besides it besides his own, you know, it's fairly standard that everyone talks to everyone in media, but I've stepped up dissipation a bit this year. But yeah, I mean, there's nothing about that for a magazine that is more than anything else known from its inception for just the quality of writing. And I know that sounds like reductive or it sounds too obvious because we're talking about a magazine, but Newark magazine has had some of the greatest stables of writers over the years of anywhere. This is either a high point or a low point. I'm not sure which in the in the John row of of PR mumbo jumbo because this is. Ju. It's just magical doublespeak. And when you're anyway when you're in that moment of existential terror as journalist as you and I have been various put in our lives and you are scrutinizing every official utterance and every Keith j Kelly Beatty report in the New York Post Gawker in the old days about like what is happening inside your company?.

New York Pam Wasserstein New York magazine New York Post Benjamin Mullen Wall Street Journal CNBC Newark magazine Alex Sherman David Keith j Kelly Beatty Bill CEO official
"new york magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Title of the show an i don't really want to promote it very much and i thought well while you're sure why wouldn't you had uh senator cures to gyla brand out giving speeches using the f word all over the place an interview with a his new york magazine using the f word yeah campbell while harris is that her name kemulah kamala come on come on ha i echo using the f we s called the f bomb now it's just another democrat senator term i guess uh in speeches you've got uh tom perez the head of the dnc whose i think of the witness protection program is a crook and sleazy any it doesn't come off well and he's got pointy teeth leica ferret and and he's using the s word and speeches public thanks so they're just they're keeping a classy their classy party there there are this is progress there progressive were were progressing down a sort of them barbarian rabbit holes but never mind old but i started thinking about all of the other lies that the democrats have been selling over the course of the past few years the past year in particular net neutrality is very important and if you do away with it the internet will be ruined well how long ago was that no anybody see any difference any anybody said it any difference in the inner the the hysteria the apoplexy over all of this the the trump administration the republicans just signed into law wonderful stuff the repeal of the individual mandate on amount we're all gonna die millions are going to be without healthcare people are gonna be dying in the streets lies all lives as they say drilling in the arctic national wildlife reserve the and work which was part of the uh the last big bill that we pass through ever hear the tax bill that was going to be the end of the world market keystone xl pipeline mando ikea poke honest people out there in teepees and wigwams and your son things protesting in vandalizing equipment belonging to companies because they were working on a pipeline much like any other pipeline one of thousands in the country except more modern and safer and and all of that good stuff but they're against it and now that that's that was cleared long ago.

new york magazine campbell harris kemulah kamala dnc apoplexy senator tom perez trump
"new york magazine" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on WLOB

"Ask you is do think there is something about and i'm not sure why we you know the the a lot of people talk about whiteness here quoted in the new york magazine article is george uh ciccarelli mar a political science professor drexel university um he is calling every suggesting for targeted gun control for domestic violence offenders and as i showed you uh the fbi profiler said that the the percentage of mass shooters who are uh who have previously committed domestic violence is very very small uh but in that proposal he mentions whiteness witeness is never seen as a cause in and of itself of these kinds of massacres of other forms of violence despite the fact that white as is the structure of privilege and is the structure of power and a structure that when it feels threatened you know he says lashes out so again this is part of the philosophy of uh calling plemmons and of this professor that somehow we are under threat so i'm asking you are you do you feel threatened do you feel demo oh women and minorities have taken a place at the table and that their pushing you out i'm wondering because if this is what's driving to mass killings i want to get to the bottom of it and you can see i'm treating it with a little bit of a tongueincheek here but that's the one that's where these these are smart people they spend their time at university right they're not making this stuff up are they what does it just come out of a view of the world that is not necessarily the world that you're a part of i look at these things and i see silliness i look at these things and i see people who are trying to justify their own philosophy maybe i'm the crazy one eight three three eight five two four eight six six i'm looking for actual practical things i can take to the bank here and if you give me whiteness you kinda leave me hanging here you know i'm looking for a better way to make a list of.

professor domestic violence new york magazine fbi
"new york magazine" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"That it hits the reader like a hard slap across the face now the four reveal ling that paragraph new york magazine correspondent christian for rials and he may pronounce it ferry is i don't know reminds us that it is quite extraordinary that a private citizen paul manafort was secretly surveilled twice the faisal warrants faisal warrants our four international terrorrists criminals foreign agents but the new york magazine guy says the is quite extraordinary that a private citizen secretly surveilled isse by faisal warrant it is studying it confirms that trump was i he was fairly close to being right when he claimed that is wires in trump tower were tapped now the writers the new york magazine also lets us know that it would probably be wise for other possible targets of the muller investigation to go get lawyers even if they've got nothing to hide which is also true now here's the paragraph now the reason mentioned this even a new york magazine writer reveals this is really odd to faisal warrants on a private citizen that at surveillance operations going on at the residence building of donald trump that's kind of odd them this is the revelatory paragraph one individual who is familiar with an aspect of the muller inquiry but asked not to be named told new york magazine that unlike other federal probes that he's seen in action where prosecutors build their cases from clear allegations this one feels different.

paul manafort trump tower new york magazine writer donald trump faisal muller
"new york magazine" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Of the muller investigation it formed the basis of the obama effort to get trump investigation firstly there's nothing there and muller hasn't found at what's to be found though there was election rigging it happened in the democrat party their were crimes of hillary clinton committed with her email server and election was rigged and it has been documented and it can be proven and it happen on a democrat side and it heavily debbie blabbermouth schultz and hillary clinton the my point here is that i wouldn't be surprised if the muller investigation is discovering some of this stuff and they're fresh this is not what they wanna find they can't find any trump crimes is what i'm hearing they continue to search in vain for a trump creditors and others new york magazine and this is rural buddies at news busters did new york magazine admit the muller investigations of fishing expedition and yesterday's new york magazine had they know what's the data this was at yesterday's of day before new york magazine had the best summary of the state of the trump russia collusion investigation by muller yet written it was contained in a single paragraph buried deep in an article with no other surprises so you would have to look for this yet despite having to wade through material which basically tells us what we already know about the investigation that one paragraph is so stunning in its revelation amid an otherwise routine summary of what muller is up to that it hits the reader like a hard slap across the face now the four reveal ling that paragraph new york magazine correspondent christian four rials and he may pronounce it ferry is i don't know reminds us that it is quite extraordinary that a private citizen paul manafort was secretly surveilled twice the faisal warrants faisal warrants our fort in turn national terrorrists criminals foreign the agents but the new york magazine guy says the is quite extraordinary that up if it citizen secretly surveilled isse by faisal warrants it is studying it confirms that trump was i mean he was fairly close to being right when he claimed that his wires in trump tower were tapped now the writer the new york magazine all so let us know that it would probably be wise for other possible targets of the muller investigation to go get lawyers even if they've got nothing to hide which is also true now here's.

muller democrat party hillary clinton new york magazine paul manafort trump tower writer obama debbie blabbermouth schultz trump russia faisal
"new york magazine" Discussed on I Have To Ask

I Have To Ask

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on I Have To Ask

"Today's episode is brought to you by open account a podcast gets personal about making losing and living with money created by unquote bank and hosted by sujin pauk download and subscribe to open account wherever you get your podcasts oh welcome slate i have to ask i am isaac johner my guest today is a livia mitzi the washington correspondent for new york magazine nazi initially gave fame after writing about her experiences as an intern on euthanasia wieners do mayoral campaign and then went to work at daily beast since joining new york magazine she's written extensively about the trump white house her profile of joe scarborough emeka brzezinski and they're fraught relationship with president trump is currently the magazine's cover story she's also written about other white house personalities including kellyanne conway steve bannon and rights priebus bolivian nazi he joins me now by phone a special by phone appearance how're are you olympia i'm hey how are you i'm okay we've had some trouble recording this which i should tell our audience because you are currently outside the white house is that correct i am an out the effect of wet way if you hear any noil like egret parrot blocking by inflammatory uh because there's no there is really no fate in the white house for you make any kind of phone calls and they don't fit in the lower practice area which is where the all the reporter you their work with you problematic as you can imagine i can't imagine so let me ask you this because we're recording this thursday afternoon.

intern emeka brzezinski trump white house reporter washington new york new york magazine joe scarborough president steve bannon
"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on Warm Regards

"Whether what's coming is preventable yeah and that's where i think of scientific criticism of earth science scientists criticism of the new york magazine article centered is that he presented views facts as more certain than they were then they i'm ben besides says that and even when talking about worstcase scenario maybe even especially when talking about worst case scenario we have to be transparent about be sort of uncertainty that that underlies the statement so like he could have said new to the best of our knowledge this is one thing that might happen but it was just like this is what might have rogge mrs what will happen it was just near dancing around like is this likely or is this a faroff thing like you know in in like you said jacqueline if the goal of a piece of journalism mike that which he said was his goal was to motivate action um you you have to know what certain and what's not can plan and if people are planning for the kinds of things that we're in that article i feel like people are gonna over planning i mean maybe that's not a bad thing and that's kind of what the whole point was when he was saying it's like well uh you know if we prepare for the worst case scenario than will be ready for anything militant what's unfortunate about that is that there was a tremendous amount of work done around ipcc to quantify the words that we use when we talk about whether something is likely very likely unlikely certain does have actual numbers around them they're they're they're probability's associated with tom asserting percent chance equals likely ends emile there was a lot of work that went into making met language clear and consistent and meaningful and so then did you see that not be adopted and other another realms his has been a bit frustrating i don't know andy may be you know whether or not there's but there have been problems with the that terminology as introduced in the ipcc but um i just i think that think there was an a missed opportunity in that that peace to basically say really interro really upfront wehlig look.

jacqueline tom new york magazine emile andy
"new york magazine" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

The Vulture TV Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"new york magazine" Discussed on The Vulture TV Podcast

"After said was called on its met met world i was here emmy makers a character on the show name mad so it's not that much of a stretch but in you know the character was named mad and the novel sounds like an indepth premier anything but still it's weird little weird i also i feel like that speaks to something about damon lindelof which is he's always struck me as somebody who reads i know a lot of people read criticism and and kinda keep up with that but i feel he reads it in a very close and personal way that feels different to me like i could imagine if if he wasn't doing what he's doing i feel like he would be doing what we do which is writing television criticism year i wouldn't be surprised if there were the case may be a mural like him we'll just like on the leftovers maybe there's an alternate universe where he did that he recap the week after this next clipped is from the interview we did at the new york magazine office with the khasif search party and it kind of was this year became inevitably tied to politics and gizella post to allah shaukat about the election and it's funny in practice was this was right after the office of a lot of our interviews around that time kind of we couldn't help but go there because everyone was like like having a fog what else series i remember when like a liquid happened is always very disturbing moment and for our colleague whoah going to go talk about show i'm so proud of the show uh but i was like how my gonna just like pontificate about like the funniest thing happened near debt like it's just it's all of a sudden on your hit with the reality of your own life of your priorities start to go into question which is only that's healthy for everybody is to realize what our real priorities are and how we connect things um for me which are kinda talked about a little than was that.

damon lindelof new york magazine