35 Burst results for "New York Los Angeles"

 Judge: Uber doesn't have to offer wheelchair accessibility

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Judge: Uber doesn't have to offer wheelchair accessibility

"A federal judge has ruled that Uber does not have to offer wheelchair accessibility I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest A California federal judge has rejected a legal push to require Uber to provide wheelchair accessible vehicles finding that such a mandate would be to onerous on the right helling company The judge rejected a lawsuit that would have required Uber to offer wheelchair accessible vehicles and New Orleans and Jackson Mississippi the judge said the plaintiffs failed to present a reasonable modification of Uber services and did not provide adequate evidence that Uber had violated the Americans with disabilities act attorneys for the plaintiffs argued that Uber has a deep rooted accessibility problem and treats accessibility as an afterthought Uber offers services to accommodate wheelchair users in several other cities including New York Los Angeles and Boston

Lisa Dwyer California New Orleans Mississippi Jackson Uber New York Los Angeles Boston
Study: Millennials didn't stray far from where they grew up

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Study: Millennials didn't stray far from where they grew up

"A new study finds millennials are sticking closer to home Young adulthood is when Americans are most likely to move away from their hometown But by age 26 more than two thirds of millennials still lived in the same area where they grew up according to a study by Harvard University and the U.S. Census Bureau 80% were less than 100 miles away among those who do leave their parents commuting zone New York Los Angeles Washington and Denver continued to be popular Atlanta was a choice of destination for many young black adults while young Hispanics were also drawn to San Antonio and Phoenix The study echoes other data showing an overall decline in mobility in the 1950s 20% of U.S. residents moved each year That figure is down to 8.4% Jennifer King Washington

U.S. Census Bureau New York Los Angeles Harvard University Denver Atlanta Washington San Antonio Phoenix U.S. Jennifer King Washington
New York Los Angeles, Census Bureau And Chicago discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

New York Los Angeles, Census Bureau And Chicago discussed on AP News Radio

"Many Americans left the nation's biggest cities during the first year of the pandemic 8 of the ten largest cities in this country lost population during the first year of the pandemic At the top of the list New York Los Angeles and Chicago New York lost more than 305,000 people between July of 2020 and July of 2021 according to the Census Bureau Among the ten largest cities only San Antonio and Phoenix gained new residents and not many so where did everybody go Many went to smaller big cities primarily in the sunbelt Austin Texas and Fort Worth Jacksonville Florida Charlotte North Carolina The reasons vary housing costs jobs births and deaths I'm Rita foley

New York Los Angeles Census Bureau Chicago New York San Antonio Phoenix Fort Worth Austin Jacksonville Texas Charlotte Florida North Carolina Rita Foley
Goodbye NYC: Estimates show big city losses, Sunbelt gains

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Goodbye NYC: Estimates show big city losses, Sunbelt gains

"Many Americans left the nation's biggest cities during the first year of the pandemic 8 of the ten largest cities in this country lost population during the first year of the pandemic At the top of the list New York Los Angeles and Chicago New York lost more than 305,000 people between July of 2020 and July of 2021 according to the Census Bureau Among the ten largest cities only San Antonio and Phoenix gained new residents and not many so where did everybody go Many went to smaller big cities primarily in the sunbelt Austin Texas and Fort Worth Jacksonville Florida Charlotte North Carolina The reasons vary housing costs jobs births and deaths I'm Rita foley

New York Los Angeles Census Bureau Chicago New York San Antonio Phoenix Fort Worth Austin Jacksonville Texas Charlotte Florida North Carolina Rita Foley
"new york los angeles" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:11 min | 5 months ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"That we will never go And when I say we I mean anywhere including places like New York Los Angeles we will not go back into lockdown again Is that is there a consensus even if it's a quiet one on lockdowns were disastrous with little to no benefit Unfortunately I don't think there's a consensus I mean look at the study out of Hopkins on lockdowns It was very elegant very sophisticated My colleagues did it And it was basically blown off by a part of the country that didn't want to hear it Here we had the largest public health intervention in human history that is the lockdowns And people are not even interested in studying the impact of it There's probably no better comparison than comparing Sweden and Michigan identical and population identical in their age and age distribution yet Sweden had doubled the death of Michigan We've got to learn our lessons and unfortunately I think some parts of the country are not interested in the data Doctor mccary what would you tell us we should know for everybody out there who is following the storylines What's next I mean we're right now today is the anniversary of 15 days to slow the spread It's now been 730 days two full years since 15 days to slow the spread What's next How does this continue Well I think the thing that we've never accepted as a country that we still need to accept is that there is a 1000 to 10,000 fold difference in the risk to people who are vulnerable and older versus people who are younger and healthier We've never talked about obesity as a risk factor We've got to get people active healthy We've got to talk about food as medicine And we've got to start recognizing that risk can not be eliminated We've got to learn to live with it because it's going to be here forever which means every viral season we're going to see a bump up You've got to use common sense precautions If you're 6 stay home if you've been exposed say your distance and if you're around someone vulnerable be careful That's true of all respiratory pathogens at this point influenza is as or more dangerous than COVID according to the new Financial Times.

New York Los Angeles mccary Sweden Michigan obesity COVID influenza new Financial Times
Brazen Looting Takes Place at NYC Clothing Store -- Are Progressive Policies to Blame?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:11 min | 7 months ago

Brazen Looting Takes Place at NYC Clothing Store -- Are Progressive Policies to Blame?

"Stop. Let me share a personal story about coming to New York City a week or so ago. After I've got rid of COVID and finish through that and a couple of days after Christmas came to New York, a friend of mine was telling me a New York story. He was up by Union Square and witnessed 7 guys running out of a clothing store called Roth's rothman's men's clothing. On Union Square. Big men's clothing store here in New York City. And 7 guys, he counted them, running out of the store, bursting out of the store with their arms loaded with jeans and shirts and coats. They just ransacked the place, broad daylight, middle of the day, probably thousands and thousands of dollars worth of merchandise. And people just look at them. And they ran down the street and got away, presumably. Larry elder. My friend and colleague was talking to Pete hegseth. This past Thursday on Fox News. Because these crimes were seen all over America. Are directly and deliberately a result of progressive policies in cities like New York. Los Angeles, Chicago. Listen to the way Larry laid this out with Pete hegseth on Fox News. And you have laws out here in California like proposition 57 that have reclassified all sorts of groups of crimes as nonviolent and they include but are not limited to serial arson, nonviolent crime, assault on the police officer, nonviolent crime, aggravated assault, nonviolent crime, domestic felony battery, nonviolent crime, rape of an intoxicated victim, nonviolent crime, as a result, people are not being held for the time. They ought to be held and they're out in the streets when they are not be out in the streets. And as usual, the sage is right. He's absolutely right. But that's why people are ransacking stores and committing crimes and not being held accountable.

Pete Hegseth Union Square New York City New York Rothman Fox News Larry Elder Roth Larry Los Angeles Chicago America California
Here's What Matters in the Kyle Rittenhouse Case

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 9 months ago

Here's What Matters in the Kyle Rittenhouse Case

"The median American ladies and gentlemen is both racist and anti semitic hates the country Even though the luxuriate in the benefits of a Republican government and a capitalist system They live in their own bubble Washington D.C. New York Los Angeles They say whatever they want to say because the corporatists that own these these media outlets they're buying protection and some of them actually agree with them And they're having difficulty coming to grips with the fact that Kyle rittenhouse should never been charged with murder That in fact the evidence all the evidence Including testimony including video including his testimony Demonstrates that he was protecting himself with a weapon Now let me tell you something It doesn't matter why he was there it doesn't matter if he crossed state lines It doesn't matter if he's familiar with the town which is where his father lives and he's been there many many times Doesn't matter if he had a gun He was the year too young to purchase So his friend purchased it doesn't matter what kind of shirt he was wearing Doesn't matter what he said four months after or four hours before The issue is when he pulled the trigger to his rifle When he pulled the trigger to his rifle was it reasonable under the law did he have a reasonable expectation that he could be fatally harmed The answer in all three instances is yes

Republican Government Washington D.C. New York Los Angeles Kyle Rittenhouse
"new york los angeles" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

Mueller, She Wrote

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

"Pillows to listeners of my podcast at helixsleep dot com slash bureau. Now let's return to our guest. Let's talk about the field. And the evidence response teams in the field How many evidence teams are there. What does selection and training look. It must have a feel for that across the bureau so one of the beautiful things about the evidence. Response team is the standardization of training. And that's the main goal of the program is to have this this force of people from all across the country every office all fifty. Six field offices has an evidence response team and the size of the evidence. Response team is dictated by the office and the kind of work it does so new york los angeles they have some of the largest teams that we have in the bureau of about forty individuals on each team In in those teams you have smaller eight-man sets and so We everybody on those little eight man. Teams has a role that they're trained and they're they're also trained do differ role so our thought process is. You should know how to do every role on that eight maintain whether it be photographer. Scatter evidence collection team later because sometimes people are going to change the scenes going to change. Who's available that goes going to change So the teams are all consistently trained in how to do everybody else's job and then they all get the same training at quantico at our training facility and then we can mix and match those teams as needed for the scene. So if you have a large scale event say Boston bombing or an airplane crash that we might be supporting the ntsb. We can take a forty man team and we can make him a two or three hundred man team just by bringing in additional surrounding evidence response teams from local field offices. Those teams from the responding offices will be made up of agents professional support from all types of disciplines inside their office. And i think that's what makes the teams stronger because the diversity of the individuals for inside the office so you've got people from violent crime white collar crime. You might have professional support that the does certain things that would lend themselves whether it be electron or Computer specialties. That might lend themselves well to being on evidence. Response team and the makeup of the teams is approximately about fifty percent. Fbi agents and fifty percent professional support. So it's a good blend that we find Across the bureau and right now we have about thirteen hundred people trained to do evidence response team work in and out of and deploy across the country. So that's a good number for us to have an and when you think about it. The thirteen hundred actually gives us a workforce that no police department really can help support. Because when you have something like the dallas police shooting they have large scale scene. It's gonna take anywhere from nine to eleven days on average for a mass shooting. It's hard for police. Department to cease daily operations and go do crime. Scene work for nine to eleven days and for us to be able to dump to three hundred people out to assist state and federal partners is part of the work that we do as far as bringing something to the table for state and local entities. So that's the thing that you'll first responders will be the local field office and then we can. Within an hour's we can bring in more additional support. We can have lab. James fly out the typically. We get flying support to travel to these scenes through our critical incident response group. They made tain all the airplanes. And so that's who takes us to all these locations and relatively quick fashion so when we have like a pulse nightclub shooting we can deploy very quickly the title. Fbi agent comes with reward preceded by immense responsibility agents vital in large scale investigations like the pulse nightclub. Shooting in two thousand fifteen forty nine people were murdered inside the orlando nightclub. It became a massive multi agency investigation including agents from jacksonville. I think most people on my team would say it was one of the worst we've ever encountered just because of the number of people who were killed. I think one of the things. Our listeners might be surprised to learn because of the steady diet of hollywood tv and motion picture drama that two picks crime scene investigators as these kind of full-time.

new york los angeles ntsb Fbi Boston dallas James orlando jacksonville hollywood
Cities With The Most Common Crime Threats

The Dan Bongino Show

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Cities With The Most Common Crime Threats

"Violent crime. I want to read these cities and There's a common threat, you'll get it when I'm done. New York. Los Angeles, Chicago Houston, Philadelphia, Memphis, Detroit, Dallas, Phoenix Baltimore. Ladies and gentlemen, What's the common theme to those cities there? Yes, they are run by mostly far left radical Democrats. So it's kind of on

Memphis Los Angeles Houston Philadelphia Chicago Detroit New York Dallas Phoenix Baltimore
"new york los angeles" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on KTOK

"The more they do that the more Democrats do that kind of thing, the more distaste they're American public. I'm not talking about their own district of San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburg, Boston Detroit. All those sewers of filth where a lot of these people live and depend upon government for everything. Everything from the grocery store down the block to whether or not they're going to get into work that day. The same places I might add that have been most shut down. By the pandemic. I didn't mean that This is a totally impromptu rant. I did not plan this it all but I'm going on What happened today and I only have a few minutes left. But they are yours. Newsradio 1000, Katie. Okay. Hi. You're on the air. Hey, lady, How are you? Hey! Above guns for everybody. Well, I love you to death. Listen all time nor normally But I gotta tell you, I think you are dead wrong. Okay? We will never win again. The moral to this story here is Democrat can cheat and there is never Ever a consequence and we will never win another major election national again, they will not change their voting in those states. Because they don't have to wait for her negative behavior. You have a You have a point there. I may be wrong on that one. I still think that there will be a bloodletting in the midterm elections, though. If Kamala Harris takes over.

Kamala Harris Newsradio San Francisco Pittsburg Katie Los Angeles Detroit Boston New York
Retailers are turning to virtual storefronts this holiday season

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Retailers are turning to virtual storefronts this holiday season

"Shopping is big part of the holiday season. We go downtown or to a packed mall browse the store windows smell. The chestnuts roasting in the street. The pandemic has obviously changed all this but some retailers like gap ted baker and ralph. Lauren are trying to deliver that experience to our computers. I just clicked her. A virtual tour of ralph lauren's beverly hills store at the entrance. There's an archway decorated with christmas garlands and a marble fountain with mannequins posed in front of it. I think that that this dude is supposed to be riding a horse or something and there is a saddle next to him. Yeah a saddle. Part of the ranting. I guess. I don't think that it's for sale. And i tried to click on it. But now i ended up in another somewhere else. I don't know where i am. Now let me go back. Oh god okay. I talked about the virtual storefront experience with joe toro a professor at the university of pennsylvania and author of the book. The aisles have is the thing that's weird about it. One is that there's no one else in the store and two. There's no sales people so it's essentially a store after the rest of the world has been destroyed. And when you click on a particular marker next to the goods you see the price of the goods you can actually purchase it. We've seen the companies that make these virtual stores sell themselves during the pandemic as a way to get people in store despite the lockdown Do you think brands are hoping this will drive sales or is it. Just more of a pr move well everything. They're hoping we'll drive sales. I think what it is is an attempt to use the architecture that they have. The stores are brands. The physical architecture says something about store the idea that when you walk into a ralph lauren. Store it's not macy's that's the kind of idea they want to depict find interesting. Is that retailers. Were launching these virtual storefronts even before the pandemic which to me indicates that they think people will want to use them during normal times. Why do you think. Shoppers would go to a virtual store if they could go to one in person because it's easier sometimes because people have gotten used to the idea. The habit of shopping online and because those stores wanna differentiate themselves from amazon. If you can actually walk into ralph lauren. In a way that makes you feel good about what you're doing instead of going on to amazon and just going through a regular kind of standard catalog. Maybe would find more interesting. I mean occurs to me that stores are not always accessible or comfortable for everyone. And don't forget that. If you live in new york los angeles there are stores for just about every brand and so what they're doing is reporting the expensive architecture and branding that they created for these flagship stores in big cities and allowing people all over the country and even the world to go into them. So you've written about. How retailers are remarkably good at tracking us in store figuring out our preferences what we might wanna by using cameras and smartphone apps and gps's how might the data collection process look different in virtual storefront. Well the great thing about that. From the standpoint of the retailer is they can actually follow. Your is particularly if using goggles right. They know what you're looking at. They know where you've gone it has the counterpart of walking through the store. So they can actually see. Have you passed the shoe aisle while maybe if we give you a virtual coupon you'll go back to the shoe while they're that level of lineal activity that they can follow and they can see what you're interested in which is partly possible to do of course on a regular website but in terms of the movement across the store and maybe the the trying on of things and putting them back and all that eventually you'll be able to see in this kind of world That's gonna be useful for Stores to know also where you start when you go to a website you pretty well have search for a particular good and then you put it down or you purchase it when you walk into a store. You may wonder you know. If it's a virtual store the same thing and companies will be really interested in how people wander. That's one of the major issues of creating stores organizing stores figuring out how to get people to buy things. Where do you place your goods based upon how people wonder do you think there's any additional data a retailer might be able to get if you're shopping in its virtual store rather than its in-person store will say say what you look for is one thing if the voice becomes part of it for example if they include a virtual sales people who talk to you the way customers talked to the virtual sales people could become another important piece of data what companies infer from the way you speak and even the literal voice tones that you speak with can tell them things about you. Joe torre wrote the book. The aisles have is

Beverly Hills Store Joe Toro Ralph Lauren Ted Baker University Of Pennsylvania Lauren Ralph Amazon Macy Los Angeles New York Joe Torre
Trump says he didn't lie about the coronavirus

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:49 min | 2 years ago

Trump says he didn't lie about the coronavirus

"Last night the president of the United States watched five straight nonstop hours of Fox lunacy, and then he started his day today by watching three more hours of the same stuff and he admitted that today in a press conference where he was trying to recover from the things that he admitted on tape to Bob Woodward and Bob. Woodward's new book rage. Donald trump is always the most damning witness against Donald Trump as he was today when he told us what he was doing last night for five hours instead. Of Reading the Harvard School of Public Health New Report on the impact of Corona virus on households in major US cities. The Harvard reports starting to America's four largest cities and says, half or more households in New York Los Angeles Chicago in Houston report facing serious financial problems during the corona virus outbreak with issues ranging from depleting their savings to serious problems paying rent Donald Trump doesn't know that because he spent five hours last night watching Fox and three hours this morning as he does every night and every morning when Donald Trump went to the White House briefing room today to try to rescue. Campaign. From being swamped by the Bob Woodward Book He finally faced a first question. That should have been the first question to Donald Trump. Every time he has submitted to report is questions since he became a presidential candidate and then president of the United, states we had to wait. Until the end of the fourth year of the trump presidency for the first question to Donald Trump to finally be. Why did you lie to the American people? Why did you lie to the American people? Why should we trust? Would you have to say how terrible question and the phraseology I didn't lie what I said is we have to become we can't be panicked so. This is worse. Than the most strenuous flu. And you would. flew. What I went out and said, it was very simple. What I went out of Said is very simple. I WANNA show a level of confidence and I want to show. Strength as a leader. For Donald Trump showing confidence and strength always means moving his hands very strangely and lying because he has no confidence and he has no strengthening never has had either of those things. Donald Trump. Now stands accused in the court of public opinion of being personally responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of people who would not have died of Donald. Trump had told America what he told Bob Woodward on February seventh.

Donald Trump Bob Woodward Harvard School Of Public Healt United States President Trump BOB FOX America Harvard White House New York Los Angeles United Houston Chicago
Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

"A new survey measures the financial pain as the pandemic goes on. Almost half of American households have suffered serious financial losses were told in a new poll, by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard t H. Chan School of Public Health in the country's four largest cities. The situation is even worse especially for Latinos and black-americans fifty to eighty percent of those. Households report serious financial problems. They can't pay their rent or their mortgage or their credit cards, and they've depleted what savings they have had. NPR's Yuki. Noguchi reports on the findings. The pandemic is creating serious financial problems, job loss depleted savings or possible eviction. That's despite hundreds of billions in government stimulus and other support. The survey shows economic stress running higher in the. country's four largest cities, New York, Los Angeles Chicago and Houston. Latino and black families were substantially more likely to face serious economic distress compared to white counterparts. Robert Blend in is a professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard and Co author of the survey. He says the results show the personal financial challenges run deeper and broader than previously understood. I would've. Expected that all the aid that was coming from various sources would have narrowed not eliminated the differences by race ethnicity the survey conducted. This summer also found distress among households making less than a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's a just a lack of funds creating knock on effects trouble paying for food or medical care, which in turn lead to serious health consequences. The surveys implications could mean everything from a bigger drag on the economy to the nation's mental health outlook and blending says, the prognosis is grim at the time of the survey. The federal government was offering six hundred dollars a week in additional benefits for the unemployed. That was not renewed after July it's going to get worse because there is nothing for the people we serve eight who earn thousand. Dollars a year already communities are not working fulltime to fall back

Robert Blend NPR Harvard T H. Chan School Of Pu Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Federal Government Professor Of Health Policy Noguchi New York Harvard Houston Los Angeles Chicago
Field Trip's App Wants to Guide Your Next Psychedelic Journey

Techmeme Ride Home

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Field Trip's App Wants to Guide Your Next Psychedelic Journey

"Filled trip is an APP. That sort of looks like your run of the mill guided meditation APP when you open it up. But. Field trip wants to guide you on a deeper sort of mental journey. A psychedelic journey because Phil, trip pairs with supervised in clinic drug experiences quoting wired. It's a capital T. trip because the APP alongs to field trip health trial based venture focusing on psychedelic assisted psychotherapy, the trip, which begins a soft launch. This week is digital companion to field trips clinics in. New. York Los Angeles and Toronto where patient settled under rooms filled with. Zero gravity leather recliners, and waited blankets and take an ego quieting psychedelic substance under the supervision of a field trip trained therapists. Field trip belongs to a new and growing class of for profit companies using psychedelic drugs, namely, MDA Ketamine, and Cilla. Sivan, the alkaloid makes magic mushrooms magical to treat depression anxiety and other obstinate mental illnesses unlike most players in that for profit cohort field trip is. Is Open for business field trip isn't dosing patients with MD or Silla. Sabin. Because both are still listed by the government schedule on substances, but it's also not waiting for legalization to find its customers instead in New York and Toronto field trip is treating select patients with ketamine a associated drug that has FDA approval for off label use right now. The Los Angeles Clinic opens later this month. But for those sheltering in place in the safety of their homes field trips, new APP handily distills its consciousness expanding protocols, making a guide or at least a facsimile of one accessible whether you can visit a clinic or not, and quote.

Ketamine Los Angeles Clinic Toronto New York Phil FDA Depression Los Angeles MD York
"new york los angeles" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Cities including New York Los Angeles and Minneapolis where George Floyd lost his life consider slashing police budgets president trump saying most law enforcement officers or what he called a great people it will be defunding there will be a dismantling of our police and they're not gonna be any just spending of our police our police have been letting us live in peace so we want to make sure we don't have any bad actors in there the president the comments at a law enforcement roundtable earlier this afternoon president press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said the president is considering reforms for police the presumptive democratic nominee said the time is now for police reform spokesman for former vice president Joe Biden says the presumptive democratic nominee does not believe police should be de funded but supports the urgent need for reform including mental health and substance abuse treatment that is separate from police funding Biden also says funding should help diversify police department so they better represent the communities they serve in additional funding is needed for body worn cameras changes the Biden campaigns as the trump administration has made more difficult to obtain top Republicans including president trump have attempted to link Biden to city and state democratic leaders who are calling for police funding cuts Jared Halpern fox news this is congressional Democrats outlining legislation to overhaul policing Merican who took to the streets to demand a change with this legislation Democrats are heeding their call Senate democratic leader Chuck Schumer the measure would require additional body camera dash cams for police and prohibit choke hold their child in the former Minneapolis officer charged with second degree murder in George Floyd's death is being held on one.

New York Los Angeles Minneapolis George Floyd president Kayleigh McEnany vice president Joe Biden Chuck Schumer officer second degree murder press secretary Jared Halpern Senate
"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

12:09 min | 2 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Rocks not going the way that the violence for the most part is behind us now of course going to go through this weekend which is my big concern right correct yes and especially if there's there's always potential anymore for something to pop up and then there's the gaskets thrown right back on the fire but god willing at least here things will continue to settle down and you know through all of this I've been reading and I know you have as well about you know all this it supposedly and I'm not talking about president trump's order I'm talking about insurrection from ma various groups whether on the far right far left the white supremacist or trying to set up antifa antifa is trying to set up those guys these guys are trying to set up those guys and I'm wondering how in the world it works by me with social media obviously it's kind of easy to do it either isn't there seemingly three oh groups out there right there is the sincere peaceful people that are out there at everybody recognizes that then there's the you know the folks that are a little bit more in the violent side of that and then there's kind of the anarchist opportunists that are looting the stuff out there but right there's different ebbs and flows in every police officer I talked to's there's you know a lot of this is coordinated right with some of these groups on who they're going to your attack and what business are gonna destroy in all that so it's complicated I know you and I wanted to hopefully help explain who these different groups are and how they communicate with one another and all that well we went to a former FBI agent Brad Garrett from ABC news Brad welcome to the program today to celebrate we figured you know we want to figure stuff like this album would go to the FBI so did you understand why don't you understand though what we're talking about here however these give them people go about communicating this stuff in deflecting blame I mean with the I think what Twitter it's easy that's set up you know bogus handle and operate under that is that what we're doing well maybe only to a certain extent if they're actually going to talk about committing criminal acts whether it's limiting or whatever it might be they're either going to do it in person over there gonna do it through encrypted apps which are much more difficult for law enforcement to intercept thank you know obviously they have to know about them to begin with because of the so many of them going on at the same time but you know when you look at these groups in in you know not to say that some of them don't have a version of a hierarchy you know in in Hey it's it's really hard to picture though that there's any release super organized fashion the any of this now could there be in DC could there be a Cincinnati in inside sales of the group the answer is probably yes to a certain extent but you know to add another category you mentioned three it's just out not criminals I mean who just are you seeing sort of the the the product of demonstrations to go live stores because they note the police are not going to be able to deal with it because they're all dealing with protests I mean we had a number of stores there's a there's a CVS two hundred feet from my front door and I walked out two days ago there were like three hundred scripts all over the ground you know they looted at CVS hi I use as an example of you know you think those people care one way or the other about politics or police reports of course not they're just they they're there to steal like the people who are breaking into high end stores and in New York Los Angeles angels eccentricity it it's it's even though the number of I suppose versions of groups is pretty endless here and that obviously is the frustration to law enforcement Brad explained everyone who or what antifa is because it it's I think it's very confusing because they they claim to be opponents of the bad guys right anti fascists who who isn't against fascism right so it's kind of complicated although again cops I talk to say there's there a lot of the problem in this is because they're about kind of making trouble and and start up a lot of stuff and very very coordination explain who that group is okay so he had to actually give you a definition it just like you mentioned is is sort somewhat difficult but they believe that anything that sort of adds to government control excessive use of the government all of those things are sort of fair game and I think that's why you'll see them get in certain environments aggressive with law enforcement because they I think surely someone picture alon fortunate as the enemy that quote unquote it fall into the for the fascist definition and so you will see that you know throw bottles get into all sorts of skirmishes you would want for someone they will argue that there's you know there's a good reason to do that it's hard to picture that there is a good reason but that's I'm just telling you from their perspective there is there is there is that going on but I will tell you you know is there any like national affiliation it's really hard to say there's no you know there's no like the one person in charge right is it isn't more regional is it more in my in my view local I mean did do they said people from other states to come let's say to where I am in DC I think the answer is yes into you you do have that but you know naturally driven partly by word of mouth either chewing crypto that or some other way they they're able to communicate that's not so blatant like Twitter or Facebook where you know there's a lot of people will be on law enforcement if those two companies that do a lot of monitoring and are looking for red flags and fake accounts because the you know the other components of this is how much the Russians are trying to in the flames to get all of these groups you stop we go at each other because you know they want to destabilize us and you know what a perfect sort of venue to do that in but during protests and riots smell is there an organized situated out in TV as you said is not there it's not really an organization that's just kind of a name for people like that now on the other side is it the KKK the white supremacists who who on the other side is doing that type of thing well I mean you you certainly could have white supremacists who also there's a whole faction of them who A. to police and would like to go after the police because the police are going after them obviously there's a whole group of people called sovereign citizens who believe basically anything but the local government is all illegitimate and so you know and they've committed a number of of murders over recent years of law enforcement and other people so you can see how this sort of takes on it's like in a barrel with like eighteen pieces of paper hitting you of different groups that could have some hand in in what's going on from as you mentioned the everyday citizen right to protest goes down please of the curfew timing goes home to all of these other potential layers of people who have their own agendas from just out and out criminals who have their own sort of philosophical agendas rather anti fascist whether they were sovereign citizens whether they're white supremacists just sort of goes on and on in it got to go back to the antifa folks in as you said that the reason crypto apps in there which makes them harder to track Ameen and get in on the FBI and is is a very powerful organization what I mean it it's just crazy to believe that we can't I mean why can't we hacked the apps why can't we get around use the power of the government to to break through some of that you know firewall that stop in and find out how these folks are communicating what makes it so tough well II I mean it's it's not totally impossible I mean there are ways to get a court order some judges but you you know you then have to get judicial authority to go to what's a what's app that's one of them to to help help decrypt the problem is even the way some of those are set up it's difficult to to decrypt it in a quick fashion what people are saying I mean it's it's really a tough road and I will tell you the more traditional terrorists whether they're domestic or international have gone to these encrypted apps because they no longer force that are going to have much a much bigger problem in intercepting their communications I'm very one thing I've been an advocate for is look everything is on tape two days these days right whether it's a police body cameras a surveillance camera outside of a multitude of buildings everyone has cellphones and I'm saying look let's find the folks that are that are you know shooting at cops the folks are beaten down people folks are you know throwing bricks through stores and stealing stuff in identify them and you know fill the letter Lolol item it mean what kind of things are is is that realistic or does it make it hard because people have mass song what's the level of of the facial recognition software that's out there what is that an option for the FBI well it it certainly is an option a you know a lot of things environmentally of fact that whiting position of the camera extra you know quick example in my P. G. is apparently tracking down a number of bad guys that looted some stores the end is primarily based on witnesses who saw it from their apartments high above down the street and the cameras actually captured the license plates of the people that were dropped off to go live and and you know and I think they're always staying in other states so my sense is based on who I've talked to is that they're actually running down those people as we speak so there yes there are ways to do that but think about it should be like New York Los Angeles even here in Washington DC the police are so overwhelmed in dealing with the sort of the everyday all hands on deck to deal with protests slash riots and then you know working with the military and working with other police department six after that seems a lot like looting and stealing it would become somewhat secondary just because there are people that work on NYPD maybe a little bit different because they got almost forty thousand cops but but it's it's it's really a tough thing and as I mentioned earlier it seems though that and they know that they can take probably as long as they want I mean outside the CVS when I walk down there Monday morning I mean all the scripts that they had taken out of the pharmacy were ripped open and the pill bottles are open numbers they took their time outside this door because he raps well that's a pretty big comfort level in my view he cannot so I wouldn't be on my list of things to do if I were a thief which is a wait and look at what you're stealing but I use that as an example of you know they they they probably at least in the short run are going to get by with what they're doing all right with that Brad Garrett will let you go man thanks so much always a pleasure okay guys take care.

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Blood it was one reason particular it was my helmet hair I was born with him and here I'm trying to cut it a bunch of times even buzz in it but it immediately just goes back down there geico motorcycle fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more apple is tracking its eye phones that were stolen during lootings a post on social media shows a message that says this phone has been disabled and should be returned to the store looters amid the George Floyd protests broke into the company's stores in New York Los Angeles and Washington DC gun sales are on the rise amid those protests and violence research firm small arms analytics and forecasting estimates more than one point seven million guns were sold in may an eighty percent jump over the same time last year stock prices for a number of gun manufacturers were also up the new jail in BC news radio feature on iPhones short cuts app lets people covertly record police when being pulled over the new add on is called police and it lets you tell scenery when you're being pulled over the creator Robert Peterson says the idea is to keep everyone safe and honest and also notifies emergency contact and when the recording is stopped that contact gets a copy of the video you on mosque is picking up another win the C. E. O. of SpaceX and Tesla got one point six eight million stock options of Tesla this week ending a seven hundred and seventy million dollar payday this after the electric car maker had some operational goals and achieve the market value of more than one hundred billion dollars over the course of six months musk already owns more than thirty eight million shares of Tesla stock representing more than twenty percent of the company the Midwest regional economic numbers look a little better in may Creighton University economics Ernie gross said the nine state mid America business index increased to forty three point five from thirty five in April a score of fifty is considered growth neutral gross says the survey shows the corona virus outbreak had less of an effect on manufacturing limited other parts of the economy directly tied to consumers that was a quick look at your money James Flippen NBC news with those protesting the death of George.

Ernie gross NBC James Flippen America Creighton University BC Washington apple geico musk Tesla E. O. Robert Peterson New York Los Angeles George Floyd
"new york los angeles" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on KCRW

"Is weekend edition from NPR news under the Garcia Navarro Minneapolis Detroit New York Los Angeles Washington DC and so many other cities we'll be bringing you more from the places seeing protests and violence but first a story about the other crisis in this country the pandemic and how it's impacting children the first sign that something was wrong came with stomach pains it was April thirtieth and nine year old kai remote pride wasn't feeling well and thought it was something that he ate but then it went away that's Tammy Hurst and his mom she can carry live in the DC area she's a management and program analyst and she says later that Thursday he had a slight fever and I gave him Tylenol a didn't think no more of it after the fact because the fever Hey bro but it came back we spent the next day asleep at his dad's house running a fever of a hundred and two read about the coronavirus Houston took him to the hospital it was a quick in and out of the emergency room when they told her to take him home and monitor him the fever didn't break and then a telemedicine call with hi res doctor a few days later they said to just hang tight then the stomach pains came back stronger this time he didn't want you to touch a stomach ache they weren't system because it's hurting everybody back did he started throwing up she took him to the doctor in person Gautama corona virus test but the result wasn't going to come back for days at home with chi re again she noticed something strange so by Wednesday night he started developing a raid at in I looked at it as it was lack of real slight nous of rain is like most people body when the pick that when I was I just know that his absence supposed to be I don't understand why they were getting radio he shouldn't and now my son has allergies but he's never experienced that at that point a friend colder about the new condition she'd seen in the news it's called multi inflammatory syndrome in children or M. I. S. C. sides immediately got out because I got scared I was like let me immediately taken city emerged from something is not right with him finally Tyree was admitted to children's national hospital in Washington DC when they admitted him at every car at a broke down in the hospital because for seven days I was strong I was you know doing what I'm supposed to do as a mother but then when my son told me Brookdale he didn't like it and so I had to build myself back up hi res bloodwork showed he had some kind of infection but all this coronavirus tasks the ones at the doctor's office and two at the hospital come back negative an antibody test though show the chi re had been infected at some point with the coronavirus that causes covert nineteen the antibody test came back positive that he has been in contact with Kobe at some point we just don't know when no one's been around as he didn't show anything he had been sick prior to then Dave that maybe write a fever we just didn't know in advance so the doctor I was like well it could have been before everything shut down it could have been school it I mean we at that time we was going a lot of different places the doctors told me they thought he had M. I. S. C. this past week we spent a day at children's national talking with doctors diagnosing and treating M. I. S. C. the hospital has seen somewhere between thirty and fifty cases of the syndrome that's only a range because as the disease is so new the guidelines from the CDC about what constitutes it R. brought the chi re symptoms fit with what they have been seeing doctor reported to BSEE is the chief of pediatric infectious diseases at children's national she says I've been using a variety of medication to treat the symptoms of the condition which can mimic another relatively rare inflammatory condition called Kawasaki disease what we're really trying to prevent is injury to the coronary artery which are medium sized blood vessels that feed the heart with blood ending callous sake disease unrelated to Kovan we know that about twenty five percent of children if we don't give them a medication called IV IG or intravenous immune globulin we know that about twenty five percent of them will have damage and injury to the coronary arteries which can lead to major problems my cardio scheme in heart attacks down the road and because M. I. S. C. is believed to be a reaction to a past coronavirus infection and appears to take hold once the child has antibodies there's something else that worries Dr Michael bell he's chief of critical care at children's national and we interviewed him inside the pediatric ICU there may be concerns of relaxing eight kids are gonna get a vaccine is going to cause antibodies looking out for this complex syndrome in the backstage children is probably important thing to look out for so we're trying our best to study diploma for reaction the kids are having I think it does implications not just for the kids who are we're seeing now with the disease but also for consuming the whole world I want to have seen some points and that's a bunch of kids who all get sick with the syndrome would be a problem so we are in anyway certain that's going to happen with taxes but we're obviously that's a concern for scrapping with antibodies that's obviously something affordable which is why it's important for any vaccine to be studied extensively I asked my re what all this has been like for him those are scary no yes you know he was get all the needles he was get all the needles he's not very talkative and he still tired after his check up this past week the doctors gave him a heart monitor because his heart is now a rhythmic the doctors at children's national hospital emphasized that multi inflammatory syndrome in children is rare and there's only been three deaths from the syndrome in the United States so far but Tammy Hurston story always like filling his head and make a show he don't have any more fevers and asking him at you know every hour an hour are you okay are you filling okay let me fill you hang it and I have to tell him every day like if it please tell mommy if something is really bother you because I don't want him to feel that you know because it was a scary moment for him and he don't want to go back in the hospital that he wouldn't tell me so I try to keep our him her advice to other parents be watchful and if in doubt take your child to the hospital elsewhere in the program come with us to the main children's hospital here in DC which is seeing a wave of M. I. S. C. cases it's the first time children's national hospital has allowed the media to witness them caring for kids with M. I. S. C. they say the corona virus doesn't discriminate but as we've seen in the U. S. some communities of color have been hit very hard and the same seems to be the case in the United Kingdom where people of Pakistani descent have been nearly three times more likely to die of covert nineteen than white buttons blacks of African descent nearly four times based on government data and pure as London correspondent Frank Langfitt reports about foreign every five people in the U. K. are white but when she's disease local government councillor in Oxford looks at who's dying from covert nineteen she struck at how many look more like her particularly in the National Health Service the NHS doctor Austin way and he hit hardest it's impossible to not to recognize that they all people of color this is a Pakistani descent she says she has friends who've lost three or four family members that's not true in all communities there's no fear for loved ones and does a lot of questions everyone else is too so we want to know why this diseases disproportionately impacting communities of color Ross Warrick has some ideas he's a research economist with the institute for fiscal studies a London think tank which is working on a review of inequality in Britain old age brackets a number of ethnic minorities do you have a high prevalence of health conditions that we would tend to think would put them at risk from coronavirus including diabetes including cardiovascular and spiritual problems while the work thinks there other contributing factors some ethnic minorities tend to be poor are also more likely to live in crowded living conditions where the virus spreads more easily especially in the Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic groups the prevalence of legal precedent households is much much lower than the white British majority ethnic minorities are also more likely to be key workers such as doctors nurses and bus drivers were more exposed to the virus Dr chan nag Paul chairs the bridge met association he says two thirds of the more than two hundred health workers who've died of covert nineteen are minorities and surveys show some doctors from what's known here as BAME or black and minority ethnic backgrounds they've been putting even riskier situations about fifty percent of doctors during the pandemic and advised us that they felt they were pressured to see patients without full protection and D. A. any doctors reported that about two to three times as often as white dots is not polymers that surveys show minority physicians suffer more bullying and harassment at work we also know from the NHS that doctors from eight back in Essex County background unless like you challenge and raise concerns about safety in the workplace Britain isn't the only country in Europe where minorities have been disproportionately affected in Norway Somalis have been especially hard hit Linda nor managing director of Minnetonka minority think tank said one reason is because the government didn't provide enough Somali language information on the virus where Somalis could easily find the bark that that some of the community did was really amazing so they open are voluntarily hotline for people to call and get the information is Molly they've made a lot of details in the moment of Jalisco I've got fun though so thanks actually got better quite fast back in Britain choice disease says she believes minorities have suffered more from covert nineteen because of what she says are racialized inequalities in housing jobs in the workplace which she thinks the pandemic will make impossible to ignore Frank Langfitt NPR news depending on who you ask you'll hear that the unrest over George Floyd's death is being fueled by an undercover cops white nationalist anti fascist even drug cartels the trump administration citing no evidence says far left extremists are to blame here's Attorney General William Barr unfortunately with the rioting that is occurring in many of our city a case around the country the voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by violent radical elements president trump reiterated that message in a tweet he blamed quote antifa and the radical left and here's Hannah lamb covers extremism and she is with us today hi Hannah hi there so we have the president and the Attorney General Barr blaming the unrest on the radical left we've heard some activists and state politicians saying the situation is being inflamed by the far right what's going on I mean let's start with our statement I've heard protests and unrest in several U. S. cities after the death of Freddie gray in Baltimore and many others and there's almost always this tension between the core protesters in the more militant block that wants to break stuff throw stuff and take the fight to the cops and yes I have seen some armed leftist groups and anarchist among them a previous protest but we have to be really careful here bar offers no evidence for this claim he doesn't say what he means by antifa tactics a reference to the anti fascist movement which is by no means a single group or monolith any of your other concerns from activists like number one is this a way for the government to smear them so that they can then go in with more heavy handed tactics to break up the unrest and two they wonder where was this alarm from the.

New York Los Angeles Washingto NPR Garcia Navarro Minneapolis Detroit
Can Christopher Nolan's 'Tenet' Reopen Theaters?

The Big Picture

10:10 min | 2 years ago

Can Christopher Nolan's 'Tenet' Reopen Theaters?

"I'm talking about tenant. The sci-fi Crime Saga directed by Christopher Nolan and starring Robert Pattinson. That is expected to arrive as of this recording in theaters across the country on July seventeenth or is it ten. It has been touted as the movie that will reopen Hollywood that can salvage what has been tremendously difficult period for theatrical Exhibitors Theater. Workers Actors Filmmakers Craftspeople People Studio Employees Journalists essentially every single person who works in or is connected to the film industry television streaming into perpetuity. But movies still need theaters and so there is an extraordinary burden on. This is one of the signature communal events in American life. Gathering in the dark to be excited terrified thrilled. Everything that Chris owns movies do at their very best and yet Amanda. It seems completely impossible. That movie theaters will open two months from today. I've spoken to people in and around the industry over the past week to get a feel for this moment and everyone seems very confused. How are you feeling about the burden that is placed on tenant right now? I do not think that anyone movie can save the movie industry or that. It is fair to expect anyone movie to save industry or ruin the movie industry or reopen theaters. Or give us all our jobs back or that is put on tenant that said. I definitely don't think it's opening a too I. Just what are we doing? What are we doing? I completely agree. This just seems like one of the most obvious and difficult conversations in this into throughout much of cove nineteen and obviously this is very low on the list of important concerns regarding all the ramifications but for the purposes of this podcast. It's a huge deal because everything has really grind ground to a halt with the exception of trolls world tour and a handful of netflix releases. And Scoop He. The the movie industry is just not moving forward. There's no production happening right now. And with the exception of a handful of drive in movie theaters seem to be doing pretty nice business right now movies are at a standstill and you know. We got a report over the weekend from deadline about the stakes involved here with potentially making at the re entry film and the report stated that Warner Brothers needs eighty percent of the world's theaters to be opening to make tenants successful. I suppose that could also be true for just eighty percent of the theaters in the United States. Open to to make the film successful. This is a film with the two hundred million dollar budget and a lot of expectation even before there was a global pandemic and it certainly just doesn't feel like were close to being able to have experiences like going to movie theaters. I agree with that to me. It feels a little bit like a game of you know. I don't want to say chicken because I do think everybody's taking their responsibilities as seriously as they can. There's obviously like a lot of information that no one has but it really seems like on the one. Hand Warner Brothers is waiting for the local and state and regulations to be like okay. No you're movie. Theaters will not be open. That it won't be possible and I think the movie theaters that those local state regulation bodies etc. Like frankly have better things to do on or not worried about when movie theaters are going to be off and it's not the priority so it does just seem like a game of waiting for someone to blink. Finally because we're getting closer and closer to July seventeenth and it just doesn't seem like this systems are in place for this to be possible especially at the scale. That Warner Brothers has indicated that it needs in order to make ten successful. I thought a really interesting thing in that deadline piece that you mentioned was that it said that eighty percent of cedars need to be open including New York Los Angeles and San Francisco which are three of them major movie markets in the United States and three very large cities that have taken different approaches to how to manage this but are not immediately throwing open the doors to every single business establishment. So just from a practical sense. It seems like we're running out of time. I agree I as residents of California. I think it's safe to say that you know I'm grateful for how the the the leadership and the state has handled the pandemic but also they have been operating with an overwhelming sense of caution in all these issues and that has been met with some frustration by business owners by people who just want to go to the beach. But you know it. We're talking about two months. It's not a long period of time and the cases are still obviously piling up in this country. And so you're right that just from a very practical perspective. It seems unlikely at best that the theaters are going to open. And we'll get into this as we get deeper into. This conversation about the expectations are on this film and the expectations around the industry in general but the domino effect on this is is just extraordinary for what we talk about on this show every week and you and I can probably come up with top ten list until the cows come home and have a lot of fun talking about old movies and I cooked up to more ideas for stuff. I talked about last night and I think that'll be great to do. But the lifeblood of a contemporary film podcast Is Contemporary. Films is new films and the conversation that stokes new films and antennas is one of those movies. That if you if you if you dig this show on dig what we're doing and care about movies the way that we do it is. It is one of the key movies. It's one of the five key movies. It was going to come out this year. It is the kind of movie even though I personally am not always the biggest Christopher Nolan Fan. They're fun to talk about. You know they're they`re. They're really a gift and ten is an original film and it's trying to do something that even the movies that we have to drag with us through every conversation or the star wars movies or animated kids films as far as big tent pole stories. Go this is really the biggest and most unique in its way and so there's really there are no good answers. I mean you mentioned New York Los Angeles and San Francisco through the various reporting. We've seen that. There is there are already some guidelines for what a theater could do to open. Texas several weeks ago had the opportunity to reopen. Its movie theaters in some theaters that open. But that didn't mean that. Any of the notable studios. We're going to release their films into those studios. So that's the first thing the studios have to agree to start putting movies out. We saw last week that the forever purge the fifth purge film from Blunt House was taken from off the date of July tenth and is now indefinitely coming out. And that's just GONNA keep happening. You know the movies that are around attendant are also starting to move or starting to see August films move or starting this even September movies. Move into twenty twenty one and so because of that and because of these these guidelines that we're GonNa talk about. I seems unlikely. But I mean you. You cited some checkered seating here in the way that we would live in a movie theater if this were to happen what what has to happen here for this to work. We don't know what has to happen and this is what's interesting. Is that what? I'm in. A site? Checkered seating is a like a phrase that has come up in a lot of the industry reporting as as the trades are speaking with theater owners and trying to put together a Some guidelines but everyone is still figuring this out. Nothing has been officially announced the general understanding of what checkered seating is. And I'm quoting the Hollywood reporter here. Is that cedars could end up leaving every other row empty as well as keeping empty seats between patriots in alternating rows and and I think there would be a reserve seating element there. There is a reserve seating element to a lot of theaters already but enforcing where people can buy tickets and where people can sit and this seems to kind of be the consensus at this moment. In terms of what checkered seating is then there would be like increased sanitary measures throughout the theaters. Though you know. I think that'll be senior by Cedar Standard as to what they're doing and how they're enforcing it because there aren't a major guidelines coming up from above at this point so that to me is such a big question is like if even if the theaters are allowed to open. This is like an extreme amount of legwork. You know this is just a completely new involved. Expensive system that they have to put into place in order to allow a lot fewer theater people into their theaters and that takes time and resources Before you even get into questions of like quote consumer confidence or other issues. It's the same issue that is facing many restaurants around the country. It's the same issue that's facing. Many stores many businesses in terms of when they open. How will they manage the intake? And how will they manage the personal interaction that is necessary when operating a business? I think there's there's anxiety about running your credit card to recruit a card reader right now and concern about being able to sanitize your hands and wash your hands and Where mask and you know. I think there's also obviously an additional layer of liability concern given that if these movie theaters do open in July tenant does play and people go and there's an awareness of the film if someone if one person walks out of a movie theater and contracts the virus from another person who has gone to a movie theater. What does that mean for the movie theater? What does that mean for the filmmakers? What does that mean for the studio? What what level of responsibility and financial and legal liability to they have. I don't know. This is uncharted territory There is a this is a free country to some extent and given that. I think it's probably arguable about whether or not Businesses should should accept blame and responsibility for someone becoming sick in an environment like

Warner Brothers Christopher Nolan United States Hollywood New York Los Angeles San Francisco Hand Warner Brothers Netflix Robert Pattinson Chris Amanda California Blunt House Stokes Texas Reporter
Delta will suspend service to 10 U.S. airports starting May 13

Lenz on Business

00:09 sec | 2 years ago

Delta will suspend service to 10 U.S. airports starting May 13

"Delta airlines is cutting flights at ten airports starting on Wednesday this includes New York Los Angeles Chicago and Boston but the airlines is the locations are

Delta Airlines Chicago Boston New York Los Angeles
Official Portraits Of Obamas To Begin 5-City US Tour, Including Stop In Atlanta

WBZ Afternoon News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Official Portraits Of Obamas To Begin 5-City US Tour, Including Stop In Atlanta

"He left the company earlier this month the Obamas portraits are going mobile next year Americans who can't make it to the nation's capital we'll get a chance to see the unique official portraits of former president Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama the portraits will come off the walls of the national portrait gallery and go on a five city tour in twenty twenty one the first stop a Chicago followed by New York Los Angeles Atlanta and Houston Pam Coulter CBS news

President Trump Chicago Atlanta Houston CBS Official Barack Obama Michelle Obama New York Los Angeles Pam Coulter
Obama portraits coming to Los Angeles during 2021 national tour

Tony and Dwight

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Obama portraits coming to Los Angeles during 2021 national tour

"The Obamas portraits will go on tour Americans who can't make it to the nation's capital we'll get a chance to see the unique official portraits of former president Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama the portraits will come off the walls of the national portrait gallery and go on a five city tour in twenty twenty one the first stop is Chicago followed by New York Los Angeles Atlanta and

President Trump Chicago Atlanta Obamas Official Barack Obama Michelle Obama New York Los Angeles
"new york los angeles" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"A very a talent hockey club and there is a lot of depth on his hockey and I think they showed last year when we come back a friend Bernie thought about a former teammate being made the're a frustrating that trying to get a loan for Your Business and the decision is made in New York Los Angeles not with dry Edmund you could find out more at tried.

hockey Bernie New York Los Angeles Edmund
"new york los angeles" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"The board and helped the original owner Start Marie Davila back in nineteen sixty Marie Davila dot com we suggest you go online and schedule a tour Triad Bank the neighborhood the friendly bank located in Franek on Clayton road they're just west of Lindbergh real easy access off highway sixty four get the Lindberg and you are there founded in two thousand five wide range of commercial and personal banking services and how about this actually have people behind the counter people there ready to greet you ready to help you is this owner is looking to expand talk to the bank based in Saint Louis decisions are being made fear a frustrating that trying to get a loan for Your Business and the decisions made in New York Los Angeles Not Withdraw Ed you could find out more at tried banking dot com home equity lines of credit five star rated bank three hundred sixty million in assets check them out try banking dot com less than an hour from Saint Louis it's Greenville University founded in eighteen ninety two this liberal arts institution offers premed offers online student involvement. Yeah that's right they'll get involved in local businesses immersed in the community a great little town of Greeneville while hill annoy less than an hour from Saint Louis if you look into get away for college but they don't WanNa go too far it's right up the road from Saint Louis Great professors early a great experience kids involved in the athletics but again everybody is really immersed in what they're doing on the campus at all times Greenville Dot Edu for more information in about this great institution.

Saint Louis Marie Davila Saint Louis Great Triad Bank Greenville University Lindbergh Lindberg New York Los Angeles premed Greeneville Franek
"new york los angeles" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"New York Los Angeles Chicago Houston have gone dark and the TV by they pulled these out over dispute of cost more town hold your business want to get ahead of your competition call Salem's around for full service digital marketing Salem surround digital solutions results call Greg Cooper two one two eight five seven nine six three five two one two eight five seven nine six three five. your life is an important one I am nine seventy the answer we want to hear how this station is making a direct and positive impact on your life each day our programs and host enter your busy world of responsibilities and challenges and every day it's our wish that what you hear on the station positively affects you and your family we may be your main source of much needed information or we may provide you with a perspective about the world that is truthful and timely maybe it's giving you unique insights at just the right time these interactions happen regularly and we'd love for you to tell us about it here's what we want you to do visit a am nine seventy the answer dot com and type in the keyword story for all the details then record a video message on a camera or a mobile device and share your story with us here's the best part you for sharing your impact story with us you'll automatically be eligible to win a grand prize of a one thousand dollar gift card so share your story today visit A. M. nine seventy the answer dot com and use the key word story for all the details contest rules and to submit your video that's a M. nine seventy the answer dot com key word story. more of a a nine seventy the answer and our hosts then interact with this follow us on Twitter for breaking news what's coming up on the radio thought tomorrow hosts deals from our advertisers and more are handled is. nine seven the answer come on to.

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Why 'The Irishman' May Not Be Coming to a Theater Near You

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Why 'The Irishman' May Not Be Coming to a Theater Near You

"I'm kim masters and this is the hollywood breakdown joining me as melanie of the hollywood reporter and matt net flicks is going for the gold you know they. They got very very close to a best picture. They certainly got the nomination. They didn't get the win last year with roma now. They have a crazy number of movies that they are pushing into the award season. <hes> i think probably the highest profile is martin scorsese's. The irishman an a an outlandishly expensive film about one hundred and sixty million paramount wouldn't do it. <hes> but netflix would now what you're seeing. Is this this drama. Of what kind of release will this movie get and it's almost like the film world is saying hey. This is martin scorsese movie. It has to be in theaters. I accept that's not really an option well. It isn't a small sense. I mean this is becoming an annual debate with netflix where everyone takes note of these high high profile projects that they pick up and then the question becomes well. Wait a second. This is the kind of movie that a lot of people wanna see in theater and the filmmakers certainly wants to see it in a theater later. So what are you gonna do about it and netflix is in this really really tough position. They would love to show these movies for a small amount of time in theaters nationwide worldwide worldwide but they go out and do the road show they try to convince these big theater chains to play the movie and again this year that theater chain said oh. It's going to be out on netflix in a couple of weeks. No we're not gonna play this movie so what you have here is. This is going to release about ten films this fall in theaters but they're forced. I only show them in small independent theater chains new york los angeles some other big cities and for about three four weeks in some cases before they go on the service. We know that steven spielberg for example had some feelings that he sort of expressed last year with roma saying if it's not on screens it's it's a t._v. It's a it's a t._v. Movie it's not a movie movie and then there was a lot of blowback about that and people thought it was exclusionary of young talent. That doesn't necessarily have the power command that kind of release. There was a lot of debate but i imagine if i were steven spielberg i'd be sort of smiling and nodding to myself because i think unless netflix can breakthrough and snag an actual best picture award or some serious batch of major awards at the oscars. I dunno if i'm in a list director to who thinks that i have the power you know to demand a wide release. I'm going to be looking at my options and i'm gonna wanna go to someone who has the ability to say yes. We'll let this play really wide in theaters and because that is the you know it's the holy grail for filmmakers. One thing is clear here and that's that netflix is not going away. I mean they they are coming back. This season even stronger than last season where roma while a great film was a niche play. It was a tough sit as they say you had to really. They get into the the art films of all black and white. It was a period piece. It was different language all of those things yes made it a huge challenge and that's very different from a martin scorsese says he film which has gangsters violence and stylish scenes and everything like that you know they've also got this noah baumbach film with scarlett johansson and adam driver ever to stars of marvel and star wars franchises that are going to be in a film that i think a lot of people are going to want to see and eric story is the name of the film just to fill that in and it's supposed to be getting way out of venice which has just started exactly and i think that the more every season netflix learns a little bit about how to release these films and even if they can't get at that big wide scale theatrical release. They're doing everything else possible to court these filmmakers. They have a sixty person award staff. The people working at netflix dedicated to winning awards. They have no expense spared campaigns. They were they host events. They run <unk> advertising. They pull out all the stops and these are the kinds of things that filmmakers take notice because they say what are you doing for my movie. Well and the other advantage that netflix has of courses at the studios are getting out of this kind of business so we'll see what happens. That's matt bellamy editorial director of the hollywood

Netflix Martin Scorsese Steven Spielberg Hollywood Roma Kim Masters Matt Bellamy Matt Net Reporter Los Angeles Director Editorial Director Noah Baumbach Scarlett Johansson Venice Adam Three Four Weeks
"new york los angeles" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on AP News

"T. and T. in New York Los Angeles Chicago and at least eleven other large cities across the US both the TV network in eighteen T. accuse each other for failure to agree on what CBS is paid for programming CBS said that while it didn't want to it's customers caught in the middle it's determined to fight for fair value the network warns that the loss of CBS programming could last a long time AT and T. countered in a statement provided to variety that CBS is quote a repeat blackout offender American consumers are shelling out for sea scallops says this year's harvest is increasing to near record levels sea scallops harvested mostly by boats from the cold Atlantic Ocean are the target of one of the most valuable fisheries in America new data from no us says the harvest topped fifty eight point two million pounds last year the highest total since twenty eleven and the fifth highest in history the availability of scallops for consumers hasn't changed much and prices to consumers have also held about steady the value of the fishery itself though is rising American scallops were worth five hundred thirty two point nine million dollars at the docks last year that's the third highest figure on record and more than one hundred million dollars higher than the twenty fourteen total fans at San Diego comic con who attended a form build only as a panel for terminator dark fate got an unexpected fly by the end is inevitable member the guide is headed for extinction.

T. Chicago US CBS Atlantic Ocean America New York Los Angeles San Diego one hundred million dollars nine million dollars two million pounds
"new york los angeles" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"New York Los Angeles Miami Dallas Houston well all have in common your democratic areas so you're going to see a lot of democratic representatives in those areas so when somebody says all taxes about with representatives yeah they might lose like one or two but these are gonna be again strongly democratic district exactly and that's what what what the point Dan is making is that democratic voting with in state legislatures as well is going to be stronger because it's not just the federal government for congressional apportionment that uses the census we're in a huge battle here in Wisconsin that just got resolved at the Supreme Court over this issue of gerrymandering how these districts are drawn well if you get more population in heavily democratic areas you're able to concentrate more seats because we have this issue we have this this theory of one one person one vote okay so all districts need to be drawn essentially equally every district has to have roughly the same amount of population this means if you've got this big sprawling area like say Milwaukee for Madison the two biggest voting areas to population centers of Wisconsin if those numbers are padded by huge numbers of illegal immigrants who shouldn't hello in terms of congressional apportionment shouldn't count in terms of who is getting the most voting power here you get more seats in the Madison area you get more seats in the Milwaukee area that's taking seats away from more rural and more Republican areas Dan that's an excellent point we will elaborate.

Houston Dan federal government Wisconsin Supreme Court Milwaukee Madison New York Los Angeles
"new york los angeles" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:45 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But to enforce the law, he said that to NPR's John Burnett, who sat down with Morgan today, and who is sitting here in the studio with me hit John Lewis. What do we know about this operation? That is about to launch across the country starting Sunday. We know the Justice department has fast track the asylum cases of thousands of recently arrived immigrants, mostly from Central America, and they're in ten major US cities. They include New York, Los Angeles, Houston Chicago, and San Francisco. And we believe that these are the areas were ice agents will be targeting families in the coming days. I spoke with. Acting ice director, Mark Morgan, this afternoon at a conference stable in his office at a ice headquarters got a commanding view, the Washington Monument, the Potomac, and he was saying he wishes agents didn't have to go out and knock on doors to arrest immigrants because it's labor intensive and it's dangerous for the agents but he doesn't expect them to turn themselves in the history has shown they do not. So what, what are options they've had due process? They they've had access to turns that had access to interpreters majority of them don't even show up. We have no choice. It's about the rule of law. If those who have gone through the process and received final orders if we don't enforce that, then that whole process is meaningless, John for those of us who have not covered ice rates for many years as you have what is different about how these appear to be taken for them. It's dramatic. Louise up to now ice ages. Prioritize unauthorized immigrants single adults who have criminal charges, whether they're serious, or minor. Now they're gonna. Roundup recent arrivals, and today, the great majority of them are mothers and fathers with their children who've committed no crime of illegal entry, but I can't help but think of the blistering criticism that the administration came under last year when it was targeting families, and separating parents children at the border. Are they taking steps to avoid the appearance, that they're mistreating parents and children? Again, that's really the question at some people administration are asking now I mean rounding families can be messy what if show up at the apartment and only the mom, is there, her daughter is at the data or church camp or off with her cousins. And so these these beefy armed agents come back and arrest the daughter separately. Here's Morgan again. My duty is not to look at the political optics or the will the American people, that's for the politicians with the American people should want us to do as law enforcement officials is to enforce the rule of law and maintain the integrity of that system. If you here in violation. Federal immigration law. If you've had due process and you have a final order. What are we supposed to do? I have another question. When time hoping you put to mortgage John, which is if this round of families goes ahead where will they all stay where will they be detained because I thought one of the problems was there. They were out of detention beds. I asked the director that Mary Louise, and he basically said, this is our job, and we'll find places for them. The truth is, they're not likely to get more congressional money for detention beds. These families are likely to be deported quickly in terms of long-term detention. I asked him about ice being in hot water with the inspector general of homeland security, a recent report chided ice for systemic problems at its contract immigrant detention centers. It described grievous violations such as overly restrictive segregation inadequate medical care, food, safety issues dilapidated in moldy housing units. Morgan insists ISIS addressing those deficiencies and doing better. I pressed him on it. I just dismissed that outright. That doesn't care. That's absolutely false within abuses continue year after year year. So I take exception with your use of the word abuse. It's not abuse. No system is perfect. But I think what you do you encourage oversight. And then you do your best to continue. Get better. Mark Morgan, the acting director of ice talking there with our John Burnett. John Burnett nice to see you and thank you. It's great to be here. Police departments reminding officers of their social media policies after the publication of thousands of -fensive posts by cops on website earlier this month, as NPR's Martin Kosti reports the scandal is testing the boundaries between free speech and police credibility. The posts were collected by something called the plain view project. They look for officers public Facebook accounts, then collected the posts and comments that they believed merited public scrutiny some of the posts endorse violence against criminal suspects. Others are plainly racist in one comment and officer caused LeBron James and Ranga tan. The beat that arrogant to believe that to say so callous. It's unbelievable Reuben Jones works for a gun violence reduction program in Philadelphia. One of the city's who's cops were found making these posts people up in arms, people angry and rightfully so people do not trust the police Jones wants to see cops fired over this, and some will be says Philadelphia police Commissioner Richard Ross. But I the department is having a law firm review the posts on the group's website because they're not all fireable offenses. You know what I'm not trying to minimize any folks that were in this. There are some that or catcher that we quite don't understand why they own their, you know that some of them were. I don't want to call it innocent, but I just want to say that we we're trying to figure out why some of their own there and this is where things get complicated for police departments. Laura scary as attorney that specializes in civil rights cases involving the police police officers don't give up their first amendment right by the mere fact that they're police officers. She says officers have the right to comment on matters of public concern, like politics or societal questions. But at the same time their bosses can tell them not to discredit the department. So it's all very case by case you can have two police officers that voice their frustration over a comment that was made by the black lives matter movement. And depending on the bourbon, depending on the content, and depending on the context equipped be protected. But then it may not be protected. There's some practical considerations here. Cops who said racist things in the past may not have credibility on the stand earlier this week. Prosecutor in Saint Louis said she'd, no longer bring cases or seek warrants based on the police work of seven officers whose posts appear in the plain view database on a website for law enforcement called police one retired police chief Joel Scholtz wrote a column headlined. Is it time to scrub Facebook? It super frustrating time to be law enforcement and a great time to be retired. Many of the posts in the plain view, website, date back to the time right after Ferguson. And they're angry reactions to anti police sentiment in hostile crowds. Schultz says work stress does not excuse being a jerk as he puts it. But he hopes these posts will be seen in context. You know, you say maybe it's a bad apple. We'll know. Maybe it was a good apple on a bad day. Philip Tiba gov of the center for police equity thinks the problem runs deeper. Yes, he says some of the posts in the database are gallows humor. Cops blowing off steam but others cross align posts are so racist there, so bigoted. That is difficult to imagine how a person who would think it was okay to say even with their friends should be having a badge in a gun. To take away like liberty in the name of the state. He says, even if only a few of the cops department, are talking like this. It undermines public trust in the police Martin. Kosti NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A woman who has spent her life being mocked and teased for an unusual name has now used that experience to earn a PHD marijuana Pepsi Van Dyke has become Dr marijuana Pepsi Van Dyke, the title of her dissertation black names in white classrooms, teacher behaviors and student perceptions. Dr Van Dyke sees her name as something to be proud of and not just an obstacle to overcome marijuana. Pepsi Van Dyke, welcome to all things considered. Thank you for having me, now, you have two sisters named Kimberly and Robyn. So how did you end up with this more usual? That is a great question one. I've asked several times. My mom just shared that she felt a kinship with me. And she felt like this name would take me around the world. Have you always been proud of your name, or was that a journey for you journey when I was very young up till about nine years of age? Marijuana was just a beautiful name. I received accolades holiday, your name is so pretty. But then I moved to a new city and all of a sudden I was made very aware that marijuana Pepsi was actually very unusual. And so I just had to accept it and go forth with it. I understand teachers insisted on calling you Mary, even though that wasn't the nickname you preferred, I wouldn't say that they insisted I have had some amazing teachers educators over the years. And I think they wanted to make me feel more comfortable. They could see what was happening and see what the other children were doing. And they were trying to smooth the way and make things easier for me. Do you think it shaped your character dealing with that kind of pushback? Oh, most definitely growing up with a name like that. I'm an introvert, and I don't like a great deal of attention. I was lonely isolated. I just wanted to be anywhere, but somewhere meeting someone new and hearing all the questions when you were a student did both black and white teachers react strongly to your name, or was, it was, it only white teachers at the time it was only white teachers and I believe it's because in the black community, we're used to having names that are more cultural put it this way. One of my research. Participants said it why people like things standardize and that includes names, we are all human. We all here, things that make us look twice. But it's what you do after you wreck. Recognizable that you have this feeling about it. And it's what you act on from that point on. That's the most important part. So what's your advice, to a teacher, who might be listening for when they have a kid in their class, who has an unusual name, and that teacher might have an implicit negative reaction? Well, my advice is simply acceptance, I don't want to come off a saying that teachers are doing something wrong. I understand the name marijuana is unusual. It's not everyday you give it and then you have a student in class called marijuana Pepsi or maybe drew Sheikha. And if you're curious about it feel free to ask perhaps, not in front of the other twenty five students don't ask who name them in a condescending manner, and say, I never would have named my child that what kind of parents, do you have. It's those types of things. Dr Van Dyke, thank you for speaking with us today, and congratulations. On your PHD. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. Dr marijuana Pepsi Van Dyke who just earned her PHD in leadership for the advancement of learning and.

marijuana Mark Morgan Pepsi Van Dyke Mary Louise John Burnett officer Pepsi director Facebook NPR Washington Monument US John Lewis John Justice department Reuben Jones New York cops department
"new york los angeles" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:42 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on KCRW

"Historically, ice has not made it a priority to go after entire families. Mark Morgan is the acting director of ice. He says the agency has no choice but to enforce the law, he said that to NPR's John Burnett, who sat down with Morgan today, and who is sitting here in the studio with John Lewis. What do we know about this operation that ISIS about to launch across the country starting Sunday? We know the Justice department has fast track the asylum cases of thousands of recently arrived immigrants, mostly from Central America, and they're in ten major US cities. They include New York, Los Angeles, Houston Chicago, and San Francisco. And we believe that these are the areas were ice agents will be targeting families in the coming days. I spoke with acting iced. actor mark morgan this afternoon at a conference table in his office at a ice headquarters got a commanding view of the washington monument the potomac and he was saying he wishes agents didn't have to go out and knock on doors to arrest immigrants because it's labor intensive in it's dangerous the agents but he doesn't expect them to turn themselves in the history has shown they do not so what what are options they've had due process they they've had access to turns that had access to interpreters majority of them don't even show up we have no choice it's about the rule of law if those who have gone through the process and received final orders if we don't enforce that then that whole process is meaningless john for those of us who have not covered ice rates for many years as you have what is different about how these appear to be taken for its dramatic mary louise up to now ice agents of prioritize unauthorized immigrants single adults who have criminal charges whether they're serious or minor now they're going to round up recent arrivals and today the great majority of them are mothers and fathers with their children who've committed no crime of illegal entry but i can't help but think of the blistering criticism that the administration came under last year when it was targeting families and separating parents children at the border are they taking steps to avoid the appearance that they're mistreating parents and children again that's really the question that some people administration are asking now i mean rounding of families can be messy what show up at the apartment and only the mom is there her daughter is at the bodega or a church camp or off with her cousins and so these these beefy armed agents come back and arrest the daughter separately here's morgan again my duty is not to look at the political optics or the will the american people that's for the politicians this is i with the american people should want us to do as law enforcement officials is to enforce the rule of law in maintain the integrity of that system if you're here in violation of federal immigr- If you've had to process and you have a final order. What are we supposed to do? I have another question. Which I'm hoping you put to Morgan, John, which is if this round up families goes ahead where will they all stay where will they be detained because I thought one of the problems was there. They were out of detention beds. I asked the director that Mary Louise. And he basically said, this is our job, and we'll find places for them. The truth is, they're not likely to get more congressional money for detention beds. These families are likely to be deported quickly in terms of long-term detention. I asked him about ice being in hot water with the inspector general of homeland security, a recent report, chided ice for systemic problems at its contract immigrant detention centers it described agrees violations such as overly restrictive. Segregation inadequate medical care food, safety issues dilapidated in moldy housing units. Morgan insists ISIS addressing those deficiencies and doing better. I pressed him on it. I just dismiss that outright is doesn't care. That's absolutely false abuses continue year after year year. So I take exception with your use of the word abuse. It's not abuse. No system is perfect. But I think what you do you encourage oversight. And then you do your best to continue. Get better. Mark Morgan, the acting director of ice talking there with our John Burnett. John Burnett nice to see you and thank you. It's great to be here. Police departments are reminding officers of their social media policies after the publication of thousands of -fensive posts by cops on website earlier this month, as NPR's Martin Kosti reports the scandal is testing the boundaries between free speech and police credibility. The post were collected by something called the plain view project. They look for officers public Facebook accounts, then collected the posts and comments that they believed merited public scrutiny some of the posts endorse violence against criminal suspects. Others are plainly racist in one comment and officer caused LeBron James and a rang a tan debt. Arrogant to believe that you could say something so callous. It's unbelievable to Ruben Jones works for gun violence reduction program in Philadelphia, one of the city's whose cops profound, making these posts people up in arms, people angry and rightfully so that people do not trust the police Jones wants to see cops fired over this, and some will be says Philadelphia police Commissioner Richard Ross. But I the department is having a law firm review the posts on the group's website because they're not all fireable offenses. You know what I'm not trying to minimize any that were in this there, some that were catcher that we quite don't understand why they on their home. You know that some of them were. I don't want to call it innocent, but I just want to say that we we're trying to figure out why some of their own near and this is where things get complicated for police departments. Laura scary, as Chicago Turney that specializes in civil rights cases involving the police police officers don't give up their first amendment, right? By the mere fact that they're police officers. She says officers have the right to comment on matters of public concern, like politics or societal questions. But at the same time their bosses can tell them not to discredit the department. So it's all very case by case you can have two police officers that voice their frustration over comment that was made by the black lives matter movement. And depending on the bourbon, depending on the content, and depending on the context equipped be protected, but then it may not be protected. There's some practical considerations here. Cops who said racist things in the past may not have credibility on the stand earlier this week. Prosecutor in Saint Louis said she'd, no longer bring cases or seek warrants based on the police work of seven officers whose posts appear in the plain view database on a website for law enforcement called police one retired police chief Joel Scholtz wrote a column headlined. Is it time to scrub Facebook? Super frustrating time to be a law enforcement and a great time to be retired. Many of the posts in the plain view, website, date back to the time right after Ferguson. And they're angry reactions to anti police sentiment in hostile crowds. Shulte says work stress does not excuse being a jerk as he puts it. But he hopes these posts will be seen in context say maybe it's a bad apple. We'll know. Maybe it was a good apple on a bad day. Philip Tiba off of the center for police equity thinks the problem runs deeper. Yes, he says some of the posts in the database are gallows humor. Cops blowing off steam but others cross align are so racist there, so bigoted. That is difficult to imagine how a person who would think it was okay to say that even with their friends should be half having a badge and a gun. To take away life liberty in the name of the state. He says, even if only a few of the cops department, are talking like this. It undermines public trust in the police Martin. Kosti NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Annual bonfire ritual that started in the nineteen eighties has steadily built a following that currently draws thousands of people to a middle of the nowhere desert location in Nevada. Every year burning man, calls itself, a temporary metropolis dedicated to community art, self expression and self reliance. It also means a lot of people with a lot of nuts, a legal drugs in a single space and now new federal regulations could put a wrench in the tradition. The bureau of land. Management says attendance can't go above eighty thousand people this year as the events seeks to expand and the fed says attendees could face drug screenings before entering the festival on that news burning men released a statement saying the event is still on this year and say they hope Awad of the new regulations won't apply until twenty twenty or maybe ever. Brian Doherty is the senior editor at reason magazine and author of the book called this is burning man. Hey, brian. How are you? Thanks for coming on a so a run us through, if you could what these new regulations look like and how they could affect the festival. Yeah. You mentioned the event has a reputation or wild partying doesn't seem like it's actually a problem that should demand what the government wants to essentially mass searches of American citizens without a warrant, and without probable cause problem. All right. So if this does happen, how could this affect the festival if it's allowed if if this does happen? People will have a great time the art, but the setting the people, you know, the, the events going to be great. But what America think can't tolerate is the government sort of declaring that just because gathering has a reputation that we find questionable. We're just going to put the fourth amendment into all right? So these regulations that are being talked about, which is capping attendance, and the searching for drugs, and so on, and so forth when will we know for sure if that's going to happen this year or in any year in the future. The capping attendance. They've been capping attendance for very long time that that's sort of issue again this year. The notion that maybe you'll radar. And let's figure out how that would work and the be Olympic. No. Where we're not gonna be raising on this thing. Got them communication about this writing about this, and the best I can say is they do not want to say absolutely we're not going to be doing it this year, but not saying they will be doing this year and they, they seem to be trying to indicate that they probably won't without stating. They won't. You're just talking about this. Now, obviously one of the big arguments against these drug screenings is that they could count as unreasonable search and seizure organizers of the event of claimed that it would raise fourth amendment concerns. Why is that? I mean, this is on government land, right? That you should not be able to search an American today without a warrant or probable cause on its face. It absolutely unconstitutional. You can't. People unfortunately in practice. They've created a lot of little fourth amendment free spaces like the TSA, right? Getting on an airplane security reasons. Dan, I am a hundred percent confident. To do this. Does you will be considered by a court. Let me ask you this. I mean are people a little bit unnecessarily up in arms about this? I mean look, if you go to a concert, as you've mentioned before, right? You know, there's bag checks before you enter stadiums or venues and things like that. When it comes onto how reasonable burden is it? It's one thing you as a human being with your pockets and maybe your backpack or going into a stadium or something that you drove twenty minutes to do. Right. We're not talking about a truck trailer filled with everything you need to live for week necessarily going to you're gonna have tons of bags. Absolutely qualitatively different padding, a human being thirty minutes to walk into a football game and someone who was packed up their entire life for a week spent five hundred dollars driven for twenty four hours, is absolutely more significant and it should have legal significance than someone who's fanny pack cocaine walking into a football game. We'll have to see how plays out, Brian Doherty is the senior editor at reason magazine online publication, and author of the book called this is burning man. Brian, thanks so much for coming on pre sheet. It has been a lot of fun. Thank you for having me. Trinidad inviting you to stay tuned for another Friday night, funk odyssey..

Mark Morgan Brian Doherty John Burnett officer NPR Facebook acting director reason magazine senior editor John Lewis US Justice department washington New York cops department ISIS apple
"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"About fifteen minutes. Respond to the mayor of Cincinnati and Newport. Oh, everything's fine. We we we had the symphony coming. We got the symphony. I never heard of these X. Have you heard of these acts, which I'm not sure what they are is. You mean to go down to listen to Brahms lullaby number nine. I don't know. Give me one. What what rid the store I never heard of any of these people. They think you to Mike come over to them. Rob zombie. They're not coming here. How about how about live in dead? You ever hear of them a group called live and dead? Now never heard of them by they're coming. Can you afford live in dead? I'd rather be the first rather than second. But they say the big acts are coming here from New York, Los Angeles, Paris and Newport, that's what it says. How about this at Los Angeles-based AG develops big time big city arenas in Los Angeles, New York, Paris, and Newport, I'm thinking what state it doesn't have that combination of Los Angeles, New York, Paris is Paris, France and Newport, well, promo west does bring in the big concerts as they say. Now, I also asked to marabout strippers in Newport. He says his knowledge, according to Jack crumley this is trip. Joining cross the street from mayor police owes business he said he had no knowledge now. That's he didn't say no Barrett. Heck can't know everything he keeps his eyes shut keeps his head down. When he walks on the sidewalk. Cps is there's no strippers let the Newport. Do you believe that? If there is we might have to investigate that claim getting meet find him, Sean Kelly. They'll get Thomas, Tom good undercover. Undercover at some Asian.

Newport Los Angeles Paris Rob zombie Heck New York Cincinnati Brahms Jack crumley Mike Cps Barrett Sean Kelly Thomas marabout France Tom fifteen minutes
Ahead of Uber IPO, drivers plan strike over wages, job losses

News, Traffic and Weather

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Ahead of Uber IPO, drivers plan strike over wages, job losses

"Later. This week rideshare drivers in several major cities are planning to strike drivers in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and DC plan to pick it on Wednesday. No word yet. If she drivers. Will join the strike comes one day before. Uber plans to go public, and what promises to be the biggest tech IPO since Facebook in LA. The union says Uber cut their pay from eighty cents to sixty cents a mile last month lift drivers say their company got rid of incentives that helped them make

Los Angeles Facebook DC New York Chicago One Day
How Do Mail Carriers Get Their Routes?

BrainStuff

06:18 min | 3 years ago

How Do Mail Carriers Get Their Routes?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain, Steph, Lauryn balk here. Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night keeps your loyal mailman for making their daily rounds in their powder. Blue shirt, grey shorts and occasionally awesome safari hat. But how exactly did your trustee mail carrier get signed the specific route, and how long are they stuck with it? The US postal service was established by the constitution. And the first postmaster general was named by George Washington in seventeen eighty nine. The new country was served by seventy five post offices, delivering to four million people. According to sue Brennan at the United States postal service your mail carriers. Current route is one of more than seventy four thousand world postal routes and nearly one hundred forty five thousand city routes across the nation, the longest single root in America is magnum Oklahoma where a well traveled world carrier drives a hundred and eighty three miles. That's two hundred ninety four kilometers every day to serve two hundred and forty eight customers the shortest route is an Athens, Georgia where a city. Carrier walks nine hundred fifty feet that's two hundred eighty nine meters to make two hundred and Eighty-one deliveries. We spoke with Brian Renfro. He's a second-generation letter carrier from Hattiesburg Mississippi currently serving as the executive vice president of the national association of letter carriers, a labor union, representing America's two hundred thousand city postal workers Renfro explained to us the process by which an individual postal route is designed and assigned for starters, Redford says rural carriers and city carriers have different systems for determining the size of a route a rural carriers route is much more consistent, and they are paid for the amount of time. It takes them to complete the root for city carriers. The guiding principle of design is for carrier to complete the route in his close to eight hours as possible. As you can imagine. And it our route looks a lot different depending on your location in a dense urban center full of highrise apartments. It might take a postal worker. Eight hours to service a couple of blocks out in the suburbs. Another postal worker might walk and Dr miles delivering to single family homes. The size and dimensions of each route are calculated using a combination of computer based mapping software and old fashioned on the ground experience. Renfer said the postal service has a computer program that maps the exact location of every delivery point not just this houses here, but we're the mailbox is in this program uses a number of algorithms to try to generate the most efficient way to travel the route based on the time value that's assigned to each street the computers timing of the root is just a starting point though. After that, it's the postal manager's job to account for reality. Which includes all the variables that can impact the time. It takes to complete a route. There are seasonal fluctuations and mail volume. There's inclement weather there's road construction and new home construction and the very human differences between one carrier and the next Renfrewshire said some letter carriers are tall some are short. Some are young some are older. Some are fasters are slower. There are all sorts of variables that play into it. There's no set time to deliver mail at a particular house the post. Oh carrier has to spend a few hours sorting the mail into trays before heading out on their route the trays correspond to the order of the root. If the house is head of you on the route happened to be heavier on male than usual on any given day. The letters may get to your box later then on another day. Even if the weather is good, and there's no road construction or other delays keeping the roots as close to eight hours as possible requires regular adjustments postal managers will conduct six day route inspections to accurately time each part of the letter carriers day from the daily morning sorting to the on the street delivery to hanging up their bag at night. If carriers day is stretching closer to eight and a half hours. The postal manager will slice off a portion of that route and divvied up among nearby carriers with lighter loads that explains why you might see a new face on your route every couple of years. Otherwise, these ending roots at any given post office is done by seniority when route is vacated the carrier quits or retires. Or a new one is created all the carriers office. Get to bid on the roots the carrier with the most seniority wins. If you've had the same letter carrier for a long time that probably means you're part of a desirable route or those cookies, you gave them on national postal worker day, July first are really paying off. In addition to the long-term route adjustments that are made every few months or years. The postal service also makes short-term route fixes when letter carriers show up to work every morning. They look at the day's mail volume and make an estimate of how long it will take complete their assigned route. Maybe it's a snow day or a day after a government holiday. So the delivery volume is doubled. If they know it's going to take more than eight hours. They can either volunteer for overtime overtime sign ups are every three months or the supervisor can assign a portion of the route to other carriers for the day Renfro notes that though this may sound simple in practice. It can get complicated. Fast individual post offices in big cities, like New York, Los Angeles. Boston might have two hundred three hundred letter carriers to manage each with hundreds of changing customers to deliver to. Episode was written by Dave ruse and produced by Tyler clay, brain stuff is a production of iheart media's how stuff works the more on this. Lots of other topics that delivered. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. And for more podcasts for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water.

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"new york los angeles" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Dependent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Benson show. We have national voting, and that means get rid of the electoral college. Yeah. Get rid of the electoral college, and I'll tell you why. Because they're buying their way into these people are buying now in into the electoral college because their parents are famous, and it's not a college. It's not what exactly is I'm a CHAD'S plan. You guys some of what this is and the kind of movement that's going on for a lot of people who just want to get rid of the electoral college, right? Trump won the votes, the electoral college votes, the votes that matter. You need to get to seventy there's five hundred thirty eight of these electors five hundred thirty eight to seventy get your presidency to seventy two hundred seventy gets you that right there. Two hundred seventy right. That's pretty cool. Right. So twenty-third amendment constitution. Dictionary. Columbia's allocated three so they got three and the rest of it's all had, you know, taken from each state. So states worth something a little bit different people said what are we supposed to positive? But why don't we talk about? Why the reality is? You're not actually even voting for president in a weird way, which you're voting for the person who's gonna vote for president. And a lot of the states have the inside of their constitution say, hey, the person who's a part of the elector here. They have to vote this way based on the will of the people of the state. In getting rid of this. What you're gonna do. And this is where rural America and urban metro America will clash back in the day you at Hamilton Jackson, and they fought it out. Right. Hamilton modern dude, right. The godfather of capitalism says hey, we we we're going to be about big cities. This is what we're going to be about big cities. We hear about all of this. Awesome stuff. We're going to we're going to outperform everybody. We're going to be bigger bolder. Just it's gonna be. It's gotta be amazing. Jackson says look I'm a little bit for that. But we gotta have representation everywhere because we just can't have everybody here deciding the way everybody else lives, right? And you're gonna lessen the states. And so we can't do that. So they fought they fought a lot about it. And they found out with a compromise. And it's it's it's worked out pretty well. If we were to get rid of it. New York, Los Angeles. Chicago. Dallas maybe Houston Miami Seattle. Pretty much. That's what you're going to get everybody else. Nobody cares. They're gonna stop going anywhere else. But big places, that's it. And you've already know where a few of those places are going to go, right? If you're a Republican, you have no chance in California or New York. Whatsoever. Probably not up in Seattle and Washington either. Right. San Francisco, there's no reason for you to be there you've no chance, so you take all your money, and the reason to stop at any of these places and go elsewhere. And the fear is the coastal communities. We'll control. So you'll have two or three big cities that for all intents and purposes will control all of politics across the board. And that's not always a good thing. I think right. I'm all for modern technology. I'm all for living in big cities. I got prompt. But I'm also fine living in a rural area. I got no problem with that. But there's a push to eliminate it. Now, some people say the push to eliminate it is because you know, you gore won the popular lost the electoral college, Trump lost the popular, but won the electoral college. There you go. So if we just get around this, boom. There you go you feel like you've one. Here's the other thing though. And people need to understand this is when you're changing the electorate across the board. It's so much easier to get people in mass the haves and the have nots. And the people that you go out there and say, I'm gonna give everybody free ice cream. No work free money. Everything just vote for me in mass comparatively everywhere else, you could literally change everything and have a one party country. It's.

Hamilton Jackson Trump Seattle New York president Benson Columbia CHAD Hamilton America Chicago California San Francisco Dallas Los Angeles gore Washington Miami
"new york los angeles" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

08:34 min | 3 years ago

"new york los angeles" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Back in the seventies. For the end of the week. Palm beach. Independent in thoughts and punk rock in life. It's the Benson show. We have national voting, and that means get rid of the electoral college. Yeah. Get rid of the electoral college, and I'll tell you why. Because they're buying their way into these rich people are buying into the electoral college because their parents are famous, and it's not a college. It's not what exactly is I'm a chats plan. You guys some of what this is and the kind of movement that's going on for a lot of people who just want to get rid of the electoral college, right? Trump won the votes, the electoral college votes, the votes that matter. You need to get to seventy five hundred thirty eight of these electors five hundred thirty eight to seventy get your presidency to seventy two hundred seventy gets you that right there. Two hundred seventy right. That's pretty cool. Right. So twenty-third amendment constitution Dixie Columbia's allocated three so they got three and the rest of it's all out of, you know, taken from each state. So he states worth something a little bit different. People. Well, we the positive about why don't we more popular? But the reality is you're not actually voting for president in a weird way, which you're voting for is the person who's gonna vote for president. And a lot of the states have the inside of their constitutions to. Hey, the person who's a part of the elector here. They have to vote this way based on the will of the people of the state. In getting rid of this. What you're gonna do. And this is where rural America and urban metro America will clash back in the day you at Hamilton and Jackson, and they fought it out. Right. Hamilton. Modern dude, right. The godfather of capitalism says hey, we we we're going to be about big cities. This is what we're going to be about that big cities. We about all of this. Awesome stuff. We're gonna we're going to outperform everybody. We're going to be bigger bolder. Just it's gonna be awesome. It's going to be amazing. Jackson says look I'm a little bit for that. But we gotta have representation everywhere. Because we just can't have everybody here deciding the way everybody else lives, right? And you're going to lessen the states. And so we can't do that. So they thought they didn't really they fought a lot about it. And they found up with a compromise. And it's it's it's worked out pretty well. If we were to get rid of it. New York, Los Angeles. Chicago. Dallas maybe Houston Miami Seattle. Pretty much. That's what you're going to get everybody else. Nobody cares. They're gonna stop going anywhere else. But big places, that's it. And. You've already know where a few of those places are going to go, right? If you're a Republican, you have no chance in California or New York. Whatsoever. Probably not up in Seattle in Washington either. Right. San Francisco, don't you see there's no reason for you to be there. Right. You've no chance. So you take all your money, and the reason stop at any of these places and go elsewhere. And the fear is the coastal communities. Will control. So you'll have two or three big cities that for all intensive purposes will control all of politics across the board. And that's not always a good thing. I think right. I'm all for modern technology for living in big cities. I got prompt. But I'm also fine living in a rural area. I got no problem with that. But there's a push to eliminate it. Now, some people say the push to eliminate it is because you know, you gore won the popular lost the electoral college, Trump lost the popular, but won the electoral college. There you go. So if we just get around this, boom. There you go you feel like you've one. Here's the other thing though. And people need to understand this is when you're changing the electorate across the board. It's so much easier to get people in mass the haves and the have nots. And the people that you go out there and say, I'm gonna give everybody free ice cream. No work free money. Everything just vote for me in mass comparatively everywhere else, you could literally change everything and have a one party country. It's not hard. It's not. And that's the fear. Of what you don't want something like that little bit of Bob rule. Do I think it's going to happen? I don't think it's going to happen. As soon as people think not in two thousand twenty but by two thousand twenty four what you're finding now is several states are getting together. And they're putting together a centrally a compact where they're gonna go out there. And constitutionally they have every right to do it. So the states are gonna come together. And they're going to say, look, we're r we're gonna take our votes and give it to the popular. Candidate whoever got the most votes. They get it right now. I think they have a one hundred and Eighty-one, right? It can't go into effect until you have two hundred seventy. But here's the question. I asked let's just say for the sake of argument, you get the this compact in Colorado just joined yesterday. Most of the states have been all democrat leaning, the sake for the sake of argument, though, that they get to two seventy and they want to put this compact in which means through over the popular voter Jeter is the rest of the country. They will get their votes the electoral votes, California. This is saying two thousand twenty so next year. Let's say Trump has the popular vote. Do you think California's not going to be pressured to get out of that not give him that? Of course. It's a tough thing. What fair representation the vote for the person in a rural areas you count as much as the person in. L A New York, Chicago, Miami, Dallas. And I my fear is if you think that they only come to the states when it's election time, which is true. Or if there's a natural disaster, which is true. They'll never come to these states probably ever because they literally won't care. They won't you got a place like L A. Right with eighteen thousand eighteen million people in the metro alone. Why would you go anywhere else? That's what matters the most. And that's the issue that you have with something like this. As for me. I like the way it is. If we if there's a happy medium, and we find it and constitutionally it stands the sniff test. Then there it is. But my fear like a lot of people's fear is it's a complete grab of let's get this. And it's easy to have this populism and will continue to bring more and more voters into that are going to be disadvantaged. Love our message, and we'll get to the point where we can have a one all election every single year knowing exactly what it's going to be over and over again, and we'll have one party rule, and that's not what our founding fathers wanted three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three. At Chad Benson show is your Twitter. You could tweet at us love hearing from every single one of you. This is. I even know what to say, Ted Koppel. Who is an interesting character to say, I think the least Ted Koppel here. And he was yesterday giving a talk and he's talking about journalism, and he really hammered down. And he was talking with a journalist who by the way was not happy in the video to see the way that Ted kind of talked about the fact that hey, you know, what New York Times Washington Post, you guys have issues I'm terribly concerned. The when you talk. Where.

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