35 Burst results for "New Technology"

Europe's coronavirus resurgence: Are countries ready to prevent a 'second wave'?

Ben Shapiro

04:19 min | 10 hrs ago

Europe's coronavirus resurgence: Are countries ready to prevent a 'second wave'?

"According to the UK Daily Mail. Second wave is striking EUROPE, Spain reintroduces lock down Greece's He's worrying rising cases. The virus is more active in Germany amid warnings friends could quote lose control at any moment. According to the UK Daily Mail. A second wave of covert 19 appears to be striking Europe, forcing Spain to reimpose lockdowns in case is speaking to a three month high in Greece. Head of Germany's doctors union has declared the country is already in the midst of the second wave because people have flouted social distancing rules. Well, this is perfectly predictable. You can't people keep people locked down forever. For literally years in time. It's not a thing that you could dio instead, you're going to have to at some point allow people who are young and healthy to go out there, and if they get it, they get it. That is fact what Sweden is doing in Sweden, which remember until five minutes ago was the bad guy. Sweden has basically flattened her. It looks like Sweden may have reached her immunity is what it actually looks like. Meanwhile, in other countries, they got a problem. In fact it it seems pretty obvious what's happening here. Italy has not seen a second object. Why hasn't Italy Tina? Second uptick because they got nailed. Basically, here's the rule If it burned three population maybe you're done. It is not burned through your population. You probably are not done. Spain's 8500 cases over the weekend and all inclusive resort in Majorca was shut down. Two towns north of Madrid has been put under strict lock down as well. Finland today announced plans to reintroduce recommendations to work from home whenever possible. By August 1st, Finland's cases had risen by more than 300% in two weeks. That run understands us that governor of Florida can't believe. Also governor of Finland Donald Trump, obviously blowing it over in Finland is blowing it over in France as well. Authorities in France grappling with a sharp increase in fresh cases, which has seen more than 7002 infections within the last week. As well as a rise in the number of people being treated for covert 19 in the I C U Around 1200 cases are being reported for day. Two weeks ago, he rolling average with 719. Meanwhile, in Germany, they're seeing an uptick as well. Some 730 cases have been reported each day on average this week against the 460 being recorded her day about two weeks ago. So the second wave is, in fact hitting Europe. It really is kind of the first wife. It really is more the 1st 1 because the first wave Basically just got a little bit squished. And delayed Basically, everything just got delayed. Meanwhile, Sweden seems to be coming out the other end of this. According to Newsweek. As of Sunday, the latest death rate in Sweden for 100,000 people was reported to be 56.4 figure is lower than that reported in the U. K 69.6, Spain 16.8 and Italy, according to the latest report Sunday by Johns Hopkins University. The UK currently has the world's 4th 4th highest death toll Spain in Italy, where the former to European countries hit worse by the outbreak. Sweden's latest case fatality ratio proportion of deaths compared total cases was reported to be about 7.1% and figure is more than half the percentage reported in the UK, half that of Italy in Belgium and nearly half that of France. The reason being that a lot of young people are getting it in Sweden, and he's burned through some of the young population and now they're basically done. Sweden's 70 rolling average daily new cases has been mostly declining since as far back as April 16th when the average was in 99. The average dropped it to two average daily new deaths on August 2nd, according to world Ometer. New infections for 100,000 people in Sweden reported in the past 14 days has dropped from 46% compared to that reported in the 14 days prior. Meanwhile, Spain, France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, each spiking between 58 206% in new cases. New cases in Denmark, Norway and Finland. All the other places that supposedly handled it better than Sweden have also seen. Their percentage is increasing at around three times the percent drop in new cases scene in Sweden in the past two weeks. So what That sort of says is, it looks like Sweden. Maybe this thing it may look like it's over in Sweden. Under technologies epidemiologist, Sweden's Public health agency. What we've cut down on movement in society quite a lot, if compared how much we travel in Scandinavian countries. The decrease in travel is the same in Sweden, as in the neighboring countries. In many ways, the voluntary measures we've put in place in Sweden have been just as effective as complete lock down in other countries. In other words, when you tell people don't travel, all that much people take it pretty seriously. The point here is that for all the talk about how we know how to handle this, and we just have to shut everything down, Lock down this lock down there. Sweden and locked down and may be the smartest of all sweet may be the smartest of all.

Sweden Spain Germany Finland UK Italy Europe France Donald Trump Florida Madrid Greece Belgium Johns Hopkins University Tina Ometer Denmark
Advocates For Deaf And Blind Laud Netflix's New Playback Features

All Things Considered

04:32 min | 13 hrs ago

Advocates For Deaf And Blind Laud Netflix's New Playback Features

"Netflix recently announced it's rolling out a new feature that allows some viewers to stream their favorite shows or films, slower, half speed, say or faster. The feature, which is currently on Ly, available to Android users, adjust voice pitch to make the faster slowed down speed. Sound natural. The idea to criticism from directors like Judd Apatow, who said last fall that platform should leave content as it wass quote intended to be seen. Advocates for the deaf and blind are lauding the new feature, saying It's a win for people who rely on playback options so they can also enjoy the cinematic experience. One of those advocates as ever it bacon. He's a board member of with the National Federation of the Blind, and he joins us from Salt Lake City, Utah. Hello. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. So for those who who dont know for someone who is blind, How do you watch films or TV shows? So we watch films just like anybody else on Ly. We have what's called audio description. Our audio description narration that's going on while the programming is being viewed. And so basically when there is no dialogue between the actors, a narrator comes on and describes what's happening in the scene and what's happening in the the show. So we have an understanding so like they might describe The set What's happening around us? They might give us some gender information or race information about characters, just overall things that help us. Understand and comprehend what the creators were trying Tio portray to the general public. And so how does this new playback feature assist with the viewing experience? Well, blind individuals. Many of us use a screen reading technology on our computers and our phones. And we have learned and adapted over time to speed that up on a regular basis. We've also been listening to audio books for years as a member of the National Federation of the Blind. I've been listening to audio books from the library for the blind for many years, and we've always been able to speed up that process because we're listening all the time and in our our ears that kind of trained over time to listen at a quicker speed and so allowing us to do the same thing on on on a show. Like a documentary or some type of other content. It really helps the whole lot. When when you're trying Tio consume such great content in mass quantity. And why is it so important? You mentioned that you've been doing this in other platforms. Why's it so important on a streaming platform like Netflix? Well, I think it's very important because I'm going to watched a lot of content just like anybody else. And honestly, I've been listening to so many things all of my life that when I listen at regular speed, sometimes it can sound a little slower than it that it should. And And so I might. My years kind of wanted a little bit more faster as a blind individual. Because that's what I've been used to listening to my computer, listening to my phone listening to audio books, so it's only a natural process that I would want the speed to be a bit faster on the streaming content that I'm viewing on Netflix or other platforms. You know, as I mentioned earlier, there are directors actors who have pushed back saying This playback option distorts their art and the way it was intended to be consumed. How would you respond to them? Well, I would say to to someone like Director Judd Apatow, who is a person who I love the the programs that he's put together, and I've watched several of his films, There is so much information that they have put out in their content. That audio description allows me as a blind individual to comprehend and observe on DH two Having that speed feature. It just allows me to do better understand and better comprehend what they were trying to portray in their creation. I love a lot of Judd Apatow's work and I think if he understood me is a blind individual and how I consume content, he would be applaud this new feature by Netflix

Judd Apatow Netflix National Federation Of The Bli LY TIO Salt Lake City Director Utah
Facebook launches its new TikTok clone: Instagram Reels

The Trading Group Show

00:55 sec | 20 hrs ago

Facebook launches its new TikTok clone: Instagram Reels

"Facebook launches a new short form video APP that should sound familiar rials is a new section of instagram, where users can post short videos accompanied by music. And if you think that sounds similar to Tic Tac Newyorktimes technology reporter Taylor Larenz explains, you're not alone. Facebook, which owns incident is notorious for copying other APS. If there is a popular up out there, Facebook is likely going to clone it. There are differences between the two APS reels on Ly allows for 15 Second videos, while TIC Tacs can be up to a minute. Tic Tac also breaks as a standalone app while rials is a subsection of instagram, Lauren says the launch comes at an opportune time. Everyone on quick talk is kind of figuring out what their next moves are real concern successfully launched something similar enough to take that it would be really easy for them to have over last month, Tic Tac addressed it's growing list of competitors, noting in a statement. To those who wish to launch competitive products we say Bring it on

Facebook Tic Tac Newyorktimes Tic Tacs Rials Taylor Larenz Reporter Lauren
NCGOP alleges corruption on Charlotte City Council, files ethics complaints

Financial Symphony

02:59 min | 22 hrs ago

NCGOP alleges corruption on Charlotte City Council, files ethics complaints

"Has filed ethics complaints against two City Council members. Dimple as Mira and James Smudgy Mitchell. And before we get everybody's reaction to this, Fox, 46 Charlotte's Rochelle are Metzger set it up pretty nicely, but I wanted to clear the Air. Charlotte City Councilman James Mitchell says he wants to clear the air about an ethics complaint filed by State Republicans, accusing the Democrat of using taxpayer money to visit Detroit sports facilities in November 2018 is the first time ever That that has been a test of my name and is truly follows. Mitchell says It was strictly an economic development trip to talk about a potential dome stadium for the Carolina Panthers and future facilities for Charlotte FC. But the complaint says Mitchell's former company stood to benefit from the trip. Bart Moloch was the stadium expert. I spent time with elected, efficient and instead of Detroit, Thomas Entertainment District. That was that true was about it, And so there was no way he benefited from politically no benefit from financially. That was me doing my work this chair of economic development commit. In a separate complaint, the state GOP accuses Democratic Councilwoman dimple as Meera of receiving campaign donations in exchange for a yes vote when re zoning issues came before the council in a statement. As Meera says, in part, these are active and traditional donors. Too many candidates. Most importantly, My vote can't be bought, and I have never received the endorsement of the prominent developer organizations. This is purely a racist, sexist and political attack, as Meera says the complaint is an attempt by Republicans to deflect attention away from concerns surrounding Republican Councilman Tark Bakari, whose company was given $1.5 million of city money for an advanced technology jobs program. That money has since been taken away to which dark Macari took to Twitter last night. And in a Siri's of tweets defended himself, he said, Among other things, if Councilwoman Dimple s marriage does not publicly retract this libelous statement and refrain from repeating this action in the future. I will be forced to take swift legal action. The Democrats took a cheap shot at the ethics of Tart Muk are very cheap shot the attorneys for the city Have basically cleared him of any wrongdoing. In fact, documents and videos of a previous meeting from weeks before showed that the Democratic Council members knew everything from committee meetings and even Complemented tart macari on his work. You wonder what the political rationale was when they all of a sudden voted. I think 9 to 1 to cancel a contract with dark, which he abstained from voting, by the way, which is by what the rules are now the GOP, I think, fired back and said, if you're going to take shots against AH, Republican, one of only two Republicans in the county. You might be living in a glass house. Well, Bret

James Smudgy Mitchell Meera Bart Moloch GOP Detroit Charlotte City Council Tart Muk Dimple S Democratic Council Mira Charlotte Fc FOX Twitter Carolina Panthers Tark Bakari Rochelle Bret Developer
How Did Plesiosaurs Swim So Efficiently?

BrainStuff

03:01 min | 1 d ago

How Did Plesiosaurs Swim So Efficiently?

"From two hundred and twenty to sixty, six, million years ago. A strange order of marine reptiles called please sores roamed earth's oceans though they were a diverse bunch in many respects. Every known species did share one major trait they all had four broad paddle like flippers and in most cases, the hind pair almost looked like a duplicate of the front set both in size and shape that makes it easy sores, which were not dinosaurs but lived at the. Same, time unique among ocean going vertebrates. That's because no other marine reptile or mammal extinct or extent sports fore flippers of similar size. So how did this unique body plan work researchers might have just found the answer on August thirtieth in twenty seventeen an international team of scientists published a new study on please IUS Sore locomotion headed by Paleontologists Luke. Muscat. The group used measurements from a pair of British species to construct to replica flippers one four limb and one hind limb with three, d.. Printing technology these were affixed to a custom built robot, which moved the replicas around in a tank of water to see exactly how the paddles would turn things up musket and company released colorful dyes into the tank as well and tracked their motion through water. Afterward, the scientists put the robotic legs through numerous simulations designed to test out different swimming styles. They found the most energy efficient stroke called for both flippers to work in concert when the front limb flapped in this test it created. To vortices in the water as the current push these backward, the Hind flipper weaved in between them by capitalizing on the wake generated by its frontal counterpart. The rear limb made its own flapping motion sixty percent more powerful, and this finding actually contradicts a twenty thirteen study, which argued that please the source swam like sea turtles using their four limbs to push themselves forward while their rear paddles acted as rudders using the robot muskets team also tested this existing hypothesis, they found the rear paddle. Drag if kept in a stationary position but by using all four paddles to actively generate thrust it please or could move more efficiently. However, the Co authors acknowledged that like most aquatic animals please probably adjusted their swimming style as the situation called for it. Furthermore, the study is complicated by the fact that several please easiest source species had four limbs that were noticeably longer than their rear ones or vice versa looks like follow up research will have to take species specific data into account.

Swimming
Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

the NewsWorthy

05:59 min | 1 d ago

Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

"Hank Shaw. He's the senior manager on the security solutions team for the cybersecurity company lookout I asked him whether he thinks Tiktok is actually threat and how it compares to other Social Media Apps when it comes to your privacy, is it really that much different from what's being collected from other social media? In reality no these APPs we give them access to lot and we accept that right. There is this kind of level of access that we all except when it comes to our lives on on the Internet. The difference he says is tick talks parent company by dance, any access, the Chinese, Communist Party, which you'll hear them referred to as C. C. P. May get your data. The core of the concern is who owns it? It's it's the fact. That it's a Chinese own company in that the CDC has demonstrated certain data usage tactics that don't fly in the United States, and that's why the center this whole debate tic TAC itself at least says, the data is secure and doesn't go to China, but Hank isn't so sure by dances under contract with the CCP to promote propaganda in the Chinese equivalent APP, which is called Julian getting getting that pronunciation right? They do that in the Jinjiang Province where The government is to put likely controlling the weaker Muslim population. So when I look at it from a moral perspective, I just personally when want my data potentially accessible by people who are doing something like that and in comparison to a US based company someone like facebook or twitter obviously instagram's owned by facebook they at least have to answer to the US government. As we've seen, know can take a series financial hit they have the US government. In Regulatory standards to answer to, and they've they've got a federal by to answer to which in my opinion bite dance doesn't totally considering they have that agreement with C.. P.. That's why Hank feels the possible Microsoft takeover of Tiktok in the US would be a step in the right direction and would help set some new standards for the APP but I also spoke with Patrick Jackson. The chief. Technology. Officer at the privacy firm disconnect who's also worked. For the NSA test. APPS. For a living I look at the network communication I also reverse engineer, the binoculars areas to see what secrets they hold in them. He says not so fast I would say that anytime you let your data leave your device Goto even if it's a US company or a foreign company that data can wind up in the wrong hands and it's because data is sold, it could be shared or could be stolen he points. To, facebook scandal a few years back facebook a US company allow data to be used by Cambridge. ANALYTICA to possibly interfere with the US election that data was was misused by companies that were US based, and so it to think that just because this APP is owned by a US company that data will only stay in the US and users don't have to worry is is false because you know money talks and these companies will do deals that will. Bring in dollars in May mean exchanging data for those dollars and also data can be stolen if we're giving up all of this data about ourselves location things that we like you know how long we look at certain videos. If we're giving up all this data to a US company and that data is stolen, then we're still back at square one. In fact, he says facebook who owns instagram and is now rolling out the tiktok copycat. Reels may have. More information about us than any other company almost every single APP that I do testing on has an integration with facebook, and so if you think about how much data that facebook is getting not only from the APPS that you use directly owned by Facebook Messenger. What's APP instagram and then eventually reels they're also embedded in so many apps that they don't own including Tiktok and so it's it's you know for a lot of attention to be on TIKTOK. Justified. That's okay. It's it's people's right to be suspicious, but that same suspicion should carry over to even. US. Companies like facebook they know when you're opening your workout apps and they know how much time you spend in them, our phones go everywhere with us. Our phones probably knows better than our loved ones still patrick has found some abnormal things about Tiktok specifically even beyond. Who owns it the amount of data that they collect within the first I counted the first nine seconds I counted two hundred, ten network requests from my device back to tick tock servers. It's clear that they've architect did this in the way to suck up as much data as possible. So knowing what these experts no I had to ask, would they ever download Tiktok? Henshaw says not right now personally for the privacy concerns until it's all hashed out I just is just something that I don't want to be the potential of Patrick Jackson on the other hand has downloaded it, but he gave it very limited access are revoked all the permissions that it's asked of me in the APP is still usable I can't postings because I don't give it microphone and camera permission. But if you just WANNA browse what's popular, you can do that and he says that's a good rule of thumb for any APP give the least permissions prop possible. See that APPs still works without permission that they were asking you for, and if it does then great if it doesn't and let's say you need, it's a calendar APP and you needed to actually access your calendar thing just give it that single permission ultimately, both experts agree it's up to us to understand where our data might be going for. As much as we use mobile phones in for as much as as comfortable as we are with them, people generally don't really know what to do to keep themselves safe. So we have to get really savvy about being able spot that abnormal behavior and then decide for ourselves. What do we feel comfortable with as they know that this is that this is happening then they could make better decisions. But if you don't know that you know High Fructose Corn Syrup is in your children's you know Pancake Syrup. Then you'll continue to buy it, but once you realize then you might say you know what I'll pick this other natural one over here. That just has a sugar

United States Facebook Tiktok Hank Shaw Patrick Jackson Communist Party Instagram Jinjiang Province Senior Manager CCP NSA Officer Engineer CDC Cambridge Microsoft
Lorenzo Soria, president of Golden Globes group, dies at 68

All Things Considered

00:22 sec | 1 d ago

Lorenzo Soria, president of Golden Globes group, dies at 68

"And not to. Ah bum your mood at all. But the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced today that it's president Lorenzo Soria has died. The group that awards the Gold Globe says he died peacefully at his home in L. A. Today He was 68. He was born in Argentina and as a journalist in L. A. He covered politics and technology as well as Hollywood. Cause of death was not Immediately

Lorenzo Soria Hollywood Foreign Press Associ Hollywood Argentina President Trump
General Motors unveiled the Cadillac Lyriq crossover

CNBC's Fast Money

03:44 min | 1 d ago

General Motors unveiled the Cadillac Lyriq crossover

"Trying to capitalize on the red hide electric vehicle market with an all new ev crossover. Let's get to fill Abo-. He's got all the details hey phil. Hey Melissa. This has been in the works for some time and General Motors has made it clear. Cadillac will be the brand that will lead all of its major technology push into electric vehicles over the next several years. So with that in mind last night, they gave us a first look and here it is the new Cadillac Lyric, which is a mid size crossover utility vehicle. This is pretty close to what it's GonNa look like when it ultimately comes out in a few years when you look at the lyric keep in mind that they're saying that. The range will be at least three, hundred miles and the inside has just phenomenal appearance in terms of what it will do with the heads up, display the panel in the front in front of what they call the cockpit behind the instrument, the instrument panel behind the steering wheel it looks fantastic but keep in mind. This is a vehicle that we will not see until twenty, twenty two. That's because they have to build out charging infrastructure around the country. They're not even saying, Hey, we don't know exactly how much of a charge you're going to get with. A quick charge let's over twenty or thirty minutes but the goal here is to become much more competitive and ultimately beat Tesla. Yes. General Motors believes that it can be Tesla if they're gonNA do that they better win in California that is the number one ev market in this country take a look at sales last year we're just showing brand sales here between Tesla and Cadillac, and when you compare the two no comparison at all that is Tesla's biggest market and they're doing quite well there you go. Seventy, two, thousand last year were sales of tests in. California Cadillac little over eleven thousand, they've got their work cut out for them and certainly have their work cut out in terms of catching up to them when it comes to market cap tesla's market cap more than seven times bigger than General Motors in one other piece of Ev Related News. We've been talking about spanks Melissa. You've got fisker, which is what about three weeks ago there was a SPEC that was announced that fisker will ultimately go public through. Well, today they announced that this car, the ocean ev will be built by Magnus tear at Magnus tears. Facility over in Europe we should be clear here. They did not announce that our sources tell us that we reached out to the company. They say they have no comment at this time, but the bottom line is this Melissa everybody wants to get into this space, but we're not going to see a big flutter flurry of these vehicles for at least a couple of years. Thanks, Philibeaux. Bond when I'm not quite sure what the strategy is for releasing the specs of a cool looking car that won't be on the market at all until two, thousand, twenty, two I don't know if people are going to hold off and say, I'm GonNa wait for that Cadillac lyric and not by my tests because the lyrics going to come out and twenty, twenty two. I. Don't know what do you think? Yeah. Patience is a virtue but not not when you have somewhere to be so listen conceptually I do think it makes sense for for Cadillac they've been trying to shift their demographic for years. Now I think they've had a storied past of being a large boxy car I mean you think of an older generation and they've they've gradually typically captain gradually shifted that demographic but that's just it's a concept we're talking about latter half twenty, twenty, two, I mean, what does the consumer demand look like what is the infrastructure look like and then what other technological developments have been made by Tesla and other competitors by the time they're actually able to bring this thing to market. I also thought it was interesting that they had already pegged price in the seventy thousand dollar range. We don't know if that's really going to be an ethical applicable price point two years out. So again, think it's a great headline tension grab her nights in.

Cadillac Melissa Tesla General Motors California Fisker Europe Magnus Phil
Cadillac says new electric SUV has features to take on Tesla

Sean Hannity

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

Cadillac says new electric SUV has features to take on Tesla

"Motors Cadillac brand is the latest to roll out an electric vehicle with the promise of taking sales from market leader Tesla up. GM officials say the lyric midsize SUV will have a range of over 300 miles per charge, as well as technology and features to pull buyers from Tesla. The car will be available in China first and expected to be in American showrooms in two years.

Tesla GM China
Trump signs order to bar transactions with TikTok's parent company

The Gee and Ursula Show

01:17 min | 1 d ago

Trump signs order to bar transactions with TikTok's parent company

"Because President Trump has signed an executive order now that would ban Tic Tac from doing business with US firms or the company that owns it. Ah, And the question is Is TIC tac, really a national security issue. Yeah, because the idea that it's owned by the Chinese company and that Chinese companies because of China being a totalitarian regime are one and the same with the repressive government there And, you know, I've never been a big fan of China, especially since the Tiananmen Square crackdown back in what, 89 I was around the same age is a lot of those college students. That just always stuck with me How they just, you know, wiped out so many of their up and coming generation in an effort to hang onto power. And so as technology has progressed, all these abs that most of us led on our phones were giving way. All this information about where we are who we are about what we like and what we do. I mean, the fact the idea of thinking about information going to AA Communist regime or the Chinese regime. I'm not sure exactly what they could do to me other than make me serve up more ads for me to look at for stuff I don't need to buy. But I can't. There's a part of me that's uneasy. Uneasy about the Chinese ownership of TIC tac and understand where Trump is coming from, which is probably just a bid to kind of reach up to the base in an

Tic Tac President Trump China United States Executive
Trump effectively bans TikTok, WeChat with executive orders

Daily Tech Headlines

00:26 sec | 1 d ago

Trump effectively bans TikTok, WeChat with executive orders

"President trump had a pair of executive orders that would ban all US transactions with tiktok owner bite dance, as well as the popular messaging APP. We chat beginning September twentieth both orders site, the International Emergency Economic, Powers Act, and the National Emergencies Act as the authority for the ban claiming a band would address the national emergency with respect to the information and communication technology supply chain response from TIKTOK says, it will seek to challenge the order in court.

International Emergency Econom Donald Trump United States President Trump Tiktok Executive
Apple and Google partner on COVID-19 contact tracing technology

The Vergecast

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

Apple and Google partner on COVID-19 contact tracing technology

"Apple and Google this week you know they're covid nineteen contact tracing tool. Has Been, implemented in both IOS and android. Virginia is the first state to release an APP that uses those Api's Alabama has an APP in Beta. So we're seeing the fruits of that Labor come to America it's coming out in other countries in the world. Eventually, both companies are going to make that functionality exposed in the primary user experience. They're going to build it into the operating system, but right now eating at from your state that's important because your state has validate that you've got a positive test in the notify everybody else apple move don't have themselves testing abilities. So the first steps towards phone based contact racing are. Coming out in America in Virginia again, Beta Test

Apple Virginia America Google Alabama
Nasa wants to grow ‘living’ astronaut homes on Moon and Mars out of mushrooms

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 2 d ago

Nasa wants to grow ‘living’ astronaut homes on Moon and Mars out of mushrooms

"NASA is exploring technologies that could grow structures made from fungi to become our future homes in the stars. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A team at NASA's Ames Research Center is working to prove that planetary habitats can be fabricated from fungi. Fungi are familiar organisms from mushrooms to mold, but the part of a fungus you may not know are the unseen underground, my Celia, these tiny branching threads network to build complex larger structures with extreme precision. The NASA team envisions a future where a compact habitat built of. Dormant fungi could be taken on long journeys to places like Mars upon arrival explores would unfold the structure and add nutrient enriched water enabling the fungi to grow into a fully functional human habitat with funding from NASA innovative advanced concepts or nyack program. Early stage research is underway to prove that MICO architecture may not be as farfetched as it sounds, and in the distant future fungi could be a sustainable solution for housing on distant worlds or on Earth

Nasa Ames Research Center
Evan Kuo: AMPL - the Controversial Digital Currency With an Elastic Supply

Epicenter

04:41 min | 4 d ago

Evan Kuo: AMPL - the Controversial Digital Currency With an Elastic Supply

"I began our journey there. But just to set the context like to introduce to your audience. Audience. What ampoules are? So the foundation is called ampleforth foundation and we have a protocol called ampleforth protocol, but the ample amp pl is actually a token. It is a non collateralized cryptocurrency like bitcoin with an important twist, its supply elastic, and what this means is on a daily basis. The token in protocol will automatically increase or decrease the quantity of tokens held in user wallets based on twenty four hour weighted volume price. Let's the mission of influence. So what was the thing that drove you to start this? What needs? Did you see it flipping? So the mission of ampleforth this to become an essential building block of an alternative financial ecosystem, and really I think what's interesting is how we came to this realization that we've been needed a building block or how we even decided that that would be an interesting thing to produce and just kind of going back to the beginning of the journey with me and brandon like I said were thinking very deeply about why bitcoin was designed the way it was because it was so obviously difficult to scale and. Two things, kind of emerged from that thought process number one, it was designed to counteract a sovereign monopoly and that was very different than our minds from say a free market monopoly. So say, for example, you're not happy with how Google or facebook function you, and I are free to go and create a search engine to our liking or a social network to our liking and compete on the open market. Now, they have a lot of advantages being incumbent, but nobody would tell us You cannot compete with Google, you cannot innovate upon facebook we're free to try. But. In the case of money, it's not the case, right? So historically, people have tried to create their own currencies like even liberty dollar meeting their own coins started used them in circulation in been stopped by the government, and that's the difference between a sovereign monopoly, and if market monopoly and one thing that struck us is that the bitcoin protocol great lengths to counteract the sovereign monopoly in being censorship persistent. Made huge concessions along the way. For this reason we think that if if the service that you're producing doesn't really require that level of censorship resistance, you might be handicapping yourself a great deal in attempting to say create a better search engine on a smart contract programming platform because of scale and usability limitations, and so on and so forth. How would you say the bitcoin protocol has restricted itself and basically you said earlier that you think it's not scalable. What's behind? That can go a little bit into technical detail. What exact you thing is not scalable. I think as a layer one blockchain. It has a limited in TPS right and as the ledger gets bigger and bigger, you run into all sorts of congestion issues and you let's say comparing to something like visa, it can't hear handle nearly as many transactions per second, and again, this is thinking back to our interpretation of the original paper title, appeared appeared digital cash, and of course, our naive understanding of money at the time was that caches that which I use. Use to purchase coffee. There's something different about how bitcoin is designed rate, but I also want to just move forward to the next point of realization that we came to, which is really important and the bitcoin protocol succeeded in articulating scarcity in a purely digital context, right. So unlike golden natural commodities, which naturally scarce by the physical limitations of the world, the bitcoin protocol was able to define scarcely using just an algorithm and that's very unique in the digital world like. Many things are scarce, digital world somebody takes a photo, it gets replicated. You can't really undo that you can't say that this is the only instance of that digital photo. So that was a really big idea and the takeaway for me. Brandon was that the the most salient opportunity to apply this sort of technology is money, and then what happened was we began to wonder about what was wrong with money rates. We saw that bitcoin has succeeded in creating a censorship resistant fix apply acid that's analogous to a digital gold. But what was even wrong with gold? Is there anything wrong? Wrong with gold and you know we really recruited a very helpful and we're super grateful for this team of investors. In advisors. You pentire capital true ventures, founder collective, even Brian Armstrong and folks from the Hoover Institute at Stamford, which is,

Ampleforth Foundation Brandon Google Facebook Hoover Institute At Stamford Founder Brian Armstrong
HereAfter with James Vlahos

Alexa in Canada

03:39 min | 5 d ago

HereAfter with James Vlahos

"Hereafter is uses conversational ai to help people save and share their life stories interactive way if this is something we've been doing in older technologies for. Since time began practically I by oral history than recording in books than photos, videos, audio this anyway, we can sort of capture the essence of people and passed along to the next generation. As the idea of hereafter is, will we have haven't new canvas have a new medium we have boys computing. That's a way to. Get People's voice and then share their stories memories, dreams, songs, jokes, wisdom all of that in a back-and-forth manner. So it's non new longer just you a nerd experience of reading somebody's biography or memoir. It's even talked to Avatar of somebody a legacy Avatar. Hear their voice talking back. So. That's the the essence of the company as the inspiration was very personal. It was back a few years ago. My father had been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. And we knew right away that he had a matter of months to live, and the first thing that happened was I did a district conventional oral history project with him, recording him talking all about his life and. Had these hours and hours recordings got them. All professionally transcribed had a binder full printed out as his words at great resource for this inert resource and that was right at the time that I was getting more involved with conversational AI and researching the book and realizing, Hey, you know there's a new way to. Share this information, and for me, there's a new way to sort of you know I was I was desperate like had Michael Hold on I'm losing my dad do I hold onto him in this? Admittedly, a very incomplete way compared to having the real person, but but some way to capture some part of his essence and keep it around. So I did that I created this conversational agent that you could access on Facebook Messenger. Messages with it, and you could get little videos and audio clips as well and I called Bath The dad bought, and that's really the. Basis that for everything discounts sense. and. So while I mean. Obviously. It's a very personal story. I'm just I'm just trying to think all the questions that come to my mind about this. What did you think about this? When you when you shared this idea with or did you share this with them? I did. It was very important for me to get his permission for some foremost but also the permission of other people in the family because I knew right away like I think this is a cool idea. I can see that it's a little bit of a weird idea. So I wanted to talk to everybody about it. and his own feeling about it like this was a man who was staring down data in some ways didn't care either way. Because you had bigger concerns. But he and he didn't get it either I was like a chat wechat by I don't get it But when he finally kind of came around to it, and when I finally demonstrated an early version to him. He really got it and he said I while like. Sounds like me those are things that actually would say or have said. And I like this idea that it could be shared with kids and grandkids in the future.

Michael Hold AI Facebook
Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

Mac Power Users

05:02 min | 6 d ago

Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

"L. Everyone. This is David sparks joined by my pal and yours Mr Stephen Hackett how's it going Stephen? It's good David it is. It is good. I have to say. That, our guest today really has on my toes. which will get reasons of like it's kind of like when you show up at work like the boss's boss's they're like and you feel like you can't goof off her do anything I'm going to be on my best behavior is what I'm saying that. Well, you know, well, why don't we just welcome to the show Jim Medicine Dorf Jim Nice to have you on the Mac power users summer of fun. The. Show it was so great hanging out with you guys last month that DUB DUB and San Jose. Wrong universe. Hey, guys, thanks for having me I. appreciate it. So for those who who may not know I, need to give a little back story to. With Jim a lot of you probably know Jim he's part of the sort of apple audio community online but when I came on the show now what a year and a half ago I over the editing that was kind of one of the one of my. Sticking points today was like I'll do it but I when I went the edit and I edited it for quite a long time and over time needed to hand it off to somebody else and. Jim is that somebody else will get into this but Jim at, it's a lot of podcast including a lot on relay FM and I'll tell you honestly we didn't get a single comment the week you took over because you are you're better editor than I am first of all, but it was so seamless and you're so good to work with and. That's all great. But you're also like this big MAC nurse we're GONNA get into that today. So that's when I say. I'm on my toes. So I take notes during the show via maybe places where we talk over each other we need to fix something and now gyms just here he here's all that anyways because he edits the show but now he's going to hear them in real time just how bad we are at the sometimes. Yeah. Jim. Is The all hearing ear of the relay network and I was joking with him earlier because when we record the show and I make a mistake, I can't help myself I say sorry Jim every time and we write it down. So there's probably a super cut of MEESANE. Sorry Jam like fifteen minutes long if you put it all together but the other thing that's where it is Jim here's all our shows before they released. So sometimes Jemele text me about something that happened on focus and say how's that going Wait anyway. But Jim is a pro audio engineer and Mac Nerd we talk about audio workflows and video workflows. Today Jim also has some of the things that he does a lot He's got a small business and we're GONNA, talk about that and he's a musician and we Jim and I got on the phone yesterday and we kind of worked out all of our jazz talk. So we knew ca Stephen is going to. Go crazy if I spend the whole episode talking about it but but Jim uses APPs and technology for some of his music too. So we got a lot to cover today. Jim, are you ready strapped in for this? I'm ready. Let's do it. All right. Well, give us a little background Jim, how did you get all this knowledge and get to where you right now? Oh my gosh. Well, I. The first thing to say is I'm. A person of a certain age I'm forty five to be exact. So wait wait wait. person of age. Forty five. Yeah. I used to catch myself doing that I'm not that old why? Why are we doing this to ourselves Jim? You're good. It works for some of us. Just remember what Indiana Jones says though it's not the years it's the mileage. Yeah exactly. So you know I say I'm forty five because I have been using the MAC for an awful long time. Now, at this point I got my first machine in Nineteen ninety-four. Was a quadra eight, forty, eight V. I'll try to go through the the life history of Jim as quickly as I can. So we can get to the stuff that's of use to will listeners hopefully, but I was exposed to audio and video and photography from birth more or less My Dad was a professional photographer. And he was also the recording engineer for a regional symphony where I grew up. Here in Ohio. and. So really at a at a young age, I would go with him to concerts. And by the time I was ten or twelve years old I was helping him. Rap Microphone Cables and. kind of learning. Some of the very, very basics of audio. Through through Osmosis of. Spending time with him while he was doing his thing.

JIM Jim Medicine Dorf Mr Stephen Hackett Engineer David Sparks San Jose MAC Ohio. Indiana Jones Editor Apple
What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

Healthcare Triage Podcast

00:43 sec | Last week

What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

"This episode, we're going to be talking to Tatyana for rude and Brooke pates about the Bio Bank. What is it? What does it do? How can we use it for research including COVID Research Brooke. Tatyana. Welcome, Brooke, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and what do you do? My name is Brooke pay I manage the operations of the. INDIANA. By obey can have been doing that for about seven years now. So all of our intake of samples are recruitment of subjects. That is all falls under what I do. Well, how did you get to this? What training via have? What did you go to school for degree to get what? What do you do to get this job? I have an undergraduate degree. Degree from Butler University in Biology, but always liked the ethical issues related to the technology of the science. So that landed me in the Masters Program at Iu, I have a masters in bioethics after I graduated. I. Took a position with a bio. Bay That was a nonprofit startup by obey associated with are you and then several years into that role the company. Became more associated with you and I began working for Tatyana Tatiana. You've been on the program before, but for those who might have missed that episode and they should definitely go back injured anyway, you tell us a little bit about yourself, your training of what you do, of course. So many Tatyana, food, I am the chair of the Department of medical and molecular genetics and. And I'm also now the director of the Indian Bio Bank. So I got here through have an undergraduate degree in biology and math I did that in Connecticut at a small liberal arts. College called Fairfield. University. And then I got a master's degree in something called bio mathematics put those two things together. I did that at Ucla and then I got my PhD. In Indiana University and loved it loved what I did and just stayed and never left. So I've been on the faculty now for over twenty five years. So let's strong with just the basics. What what is a bio bank? So I can start with that. So if you take the word apart bio meaning anything biological and Bank we all think of a bank is a place. You put your money. This is a case where this is a place where you put specimens or biological material. So if it was just Just Bank of biological material I. Mean it has some value, but it's really valuable when you link it to information about the individual from whom you got that biological sample. Typically, we do this for all kinds of diseases, but we're going to talk today about in particular people who were Kovic positive and it lets us ask questions about, for example, why did some people die? Why did some people improve after being in the hospital? Why did some people never end up in the hospital? Why do some people have long term complications? Complications and others not and this marrying of biological samples and clinical information lest you ask those questions. So it's a a bio bank I have so many questions about the logistics about it. So what what kind of samples first of do you take an house? One of the things that's really easy to be able to obtain relatively easy is a blood sample. So if you think about a people go to a doctor's office, you get kind of blood drawn for lots of different reasons. So it's a relatively relatively easy thing to. To, be able to collect, but there's lots of different things you can obtain an study from a blood sample. So one of the things that you can obtain from a blood sample is DNA. So that's our cinetic material allows us to ask all kinds of things about genetic people use the word genetic predisposition. Why do some people develop disease and you ask about changes DNA that might contribute to that? If you take that blood sample now and also do some other things to it. So for example, if you're able to. Literally spin a sample you to spin it in a machine that spins it really fast. You can actually get the blood to separate and it comes into these different parts of the blood. One of the things we study is something called plasma. So plasma and and kind of a partner to it, which is serum are really valuable because you can measure things called proteins in and proteins are things that our body has. A lot of people have been talking about like. Like, antibodies and things like that. You can measure antibodies, which lots of US have been hearing about in plasma and serum. So we collect that from individuals that are in the Bio Bay something else that we collect is something called Arnie. Now aren a simply tells us how much of a protein we make. So week study thing called expression, how much do we express it and so some of the things that can be important is if we make a lot. Lot of something or less of it, and could that be controlled by something, for example, in our DNA, those are things that some of the things that we study in our blood. The other thing that we've been studying particularly around cove it is we can take that blood sample and we can actually sort the different kinds of cells that we have in our blood. It's kind of amazing and we can collect one particular one called a Mon- and lots of people. People want to study the different components of our blood because we can also ask do we have more or less of them? Is that affected? For example, by having certain diseases, what it is that those products are able to make. So we've been studying that and the other thing that we've been collecting is not anything related to blood. So we've also been trying to collect urine from individuals who have had covert to try to understand what we can measure. Measure in the urine that might help us understand why some people are having kidney complications and some people are not.

Bio Bank Tatyana Tatiana Brooke Pates Indian Bio Bank Bio Bay Indiana Indiana University Butler University In Biology Ucla Fairfield Kovic Director Department Of Medical Connecticut Partner
The Encryption Debate Rages On

Cyber Security Sauna

04:07 min | Last week

The Encryption Debate Rages On

"So etiquette you've talked about encryption before. Got Fascinated. Encryption in the nineties already, I've been most interested in societal aspects of cryptography lately since I've seen quite concerted attacks against the freedom of businesses and individuals on using encryption, you're doing a horrible job tooting your own horn. You're not mentioning the UK parliament or anything like that at all. I was. Invited by the British parliament actually, they had a giant comet A. When they were deliberating the investigatory powers bill, I can today's so they invited me to to give evidence on encryption and I was happy to. Explain how what they were. Planning to do was horrible. Davor. Nicely listening to are they paid no attention to why opinions? I was also participating in the European Union Commission Panel on. On dual-use aspects of encryption. And similarly to European Commission. noted. That the guy from Finland appeared on, they pay no attention to what I was telling. So I have good track record of. Being listened to, but look necessarily followed or that's all we can. Anyone of, US, can ask for. But. You sound like the right person to briefly summarize what the Christian debate is all about. Technology. And from the mathematics point of view, we have gotten to a point where good quality encryption. is now available and good enough quality would in this context me in that if I choose to protect. Some piece of information and communication with quality. cryptography means. It. Is Too costly for the adversary to try to break. That encryption in. reasonable. Amount of time. So everybody on this planet currently has access to technology and know-how on good quality encryption at this is unprecedented in our times, and of course, this medics. Punch off authorities unhappy because quite many of those intelligence gathering mechanisms and. The law enforcement investigatory methods have being built around the notion that the authorities would be given access to people's. Communication. Day. Regardless of how it was protected. In case, there is a legitimate need to obtain that access If there's a good quality could Covic protections, there's nobody but the actual personal interest that they all started these are now. Tracking, or trying to interrogate. So nobody else would be positioned to decrypt the material sold that makes of course, the authorities have begun happy, and that discussion has been going on for centuries. and. Only now, a small people to sit. And individuals are in a position to utilize encryption without having to ask for permission. Yeah. So like before when when regular citizens tried to encrypt their information so that it wasn't available for law enforcement lawyer I was just like all you sweet summer child and just cracked it anyway but they can't do that anymore implementation. They were either week because the computing power was not that abundant in the past. All they were artificially weak. So they were basically I. The back door, all day were deliberately written. To be faulty so that the authorities would be in a position to crack the conversation open.

European Commission. United States British Parliament European Union Commission UK Finland
"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

06:04 min | 3 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

"The last thing I talked to you about is in a sense what we can do. I mean as you said you. You know you're a believer in the power of open. Technological innovation and that there are a lot of solutions that are positive that come out of these things you know that takes us the question like how do we steer society towards those positive outcomes and do the best we can to prevent the the negative ones one of the things? I I found fascinating. Is there a couple of programs like this? I think but Stanford in the last couple years started teaching kind of technology ethics class in as part of the kind of computer science program because Stanford Computer Science programs just total feeder for Silicon Valley and and all these people if they actually graduated wrestling would just drop out there startups. But you know. They spent through the traditional way. Is like you teach people how to do computer science and engineering. And you don't think about those secondary or tertiary effects of the thing that you're inventing Or the tool. You're building the software APP that you're creating and one of the things they're trying to deal with this and say. Hey you actually are responsible for the way that people end up using the tool you bring into the world and you need to think about that and that in many ways is you know. I think that's part of the problem with facebook had is at Soccer Berg. Just kind of he went into it with a sense of like what could be go wrong. If you make people more connected and didn't run this kind of scenarios about how it could go wrong so that that's encouraging to me but is there is a more we can do to build on that. Well that's a very important initiative and I think it needs to be nationwide. There's an enormous push toward getting more people into stem and that's crucial. That's a good thing but if you don't have every computer scientists robotics engineer every person who's building a new technology also have a course in ethics and I would also argue history. I don't think you're going to have smart technologies that are safe for humanity. And eventually we're going to be driven toward that so I think it's inevitable and I'm trying in my own university to push more and have more teaching about ethics for the computer scientists. So that's that's definitely where academe needs to go but there are bigger things that have to happen because you know technologies that have a societal impact. You really can't get around having a societal response. It's not like there's a shortcut silver bullet you have to build policy so with respect to policies that would be useful for us today therefore different levels that they have to happen at one. Is The consumers. Individual people need to demand safer products and also the ability to choose whether or not say a product is connected to the internet or not and to make sure that that you know your refrigerator still works well when it's not connected as a refrigerator that is so consumers need to get into the game they need to have a better understanding of what the risks are and then secondly at the national level. We need to build more standards and regulation. There's a ways to go in educating Congress about new technologies but they've always been behind the major technological innovations. That's nothing new and I don't think it's a balance between privacy and security when it comes to privacy protection because at least in Cyberspace. Privacy may be security and then technology companies. You know there has never been an industry. An innovated industry that has fully self regulated itself. No major industry ever house and in fact Alfred Nobel after the British regulated dynamite. He was thrilled because they were clear. Standards laid out for him to follow. He made much more money in the UK as a result and finally international cooperation. We we have to push forward international discussions on cooperating and things like artificial intelligence and cybersecurity for example I think we should treat human generated medical data and the human genome as part of a shared human heritage You know surely the pandemic demonstrates how important that is Audrey Kurth Cronin. Thank you so much for joining us. We love the combination of kind of historical perspective but actual practical applications and solutions for the present day. And and the coming future. I know our listeners will check out your book. Power to the people. Thanks for being on the show sped. Pleasure Stephen Thank you. Audrey Kurth Cronin is the director of the Center for Security Innovation and new technology at American University in Washington. Dc. She also wrote the book power to the people how open technological innovation is arming. Tomorrow's terrorists from wondering. This is American innovations. If you like our series please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe where available on Apple podcasts spotify. Npr One and every major listening APP as well as at wonder DOT com. If you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art of this podcast you'll find the episode notes including some details. You might have missed American. Innovations is hosted by me Steven Johnson for more information on my books about science history and innovation including my new one coming out may twelfth enemy of all mankind. You can visit my website at Steven. Berlin Johnson Dot Com our producer for this episode. Is Audrey Note? American innovations produced by Natalie Shisha executive produced by Jenny Lower Beckmann Marshall Dewey and Lopez. You're about to hear a preview of into America. It's a show about politics policy and how Americans are dealing with the unprecedented health crisis presented by the corona virus. This week we're hearing how music is bringing people together from a youth choir Seattle. That's uniting their voices online singing or listening to music is a really great way to still feel connected even in this time when we're super disconnected always music is important. It always makes you feel good tour. Turn concert livestream for folk singer in Nashville.

Audrey Kurth Cronin Stanford Computer Science Audrey Note smart technologies Stanford facebook Berlin Johnson Dot Com Silicon Valley Alfred Nobel Seattle UK robotics engineer Soccer Berg Center for Security Innovation Jenny Lower Beckmann Marshall Stephen America
"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

"No go..

"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

09:07 min | 3 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on American Innovations

"Apartment kitchen has converted carriage house and finally on an abandoned Bartsch but his ambitions whereas large and grand as his labs for small and humble Nobel envisioned dynamite transforming cityscapes and blasting railways buildings and tunnels into existence. And when he finally got dynamite right it did just that power the industrial age and made the modern day metropolis possible but it also led to new forms of terrorism. Anarchists used dynamite to assassinate political leaders including the Russians are Alexander. The second that fearful blast in eighteen eighty. One was in fact the very first suicide bombing on this episode. I talked to security expert. Audrey Kurth Cronin to argue Nobel story is also the story of our current times once again backyard inventors spearheading new technology. But that technology is being used in lethal ways that we've never seen before. Cronin is the director of the Center for Security Innovation and new technology at American University in Washington. Dc. She also wrote the book power to the people of open. Technological innovation is arming tomorrow's terrorists. She believes that new technologies like Cyber Weapons Three D. printing artificial intelligence are this century's version of dynamite. So how do we encourage people to keep innovative while making sure those groundbreaking inventions? Don't open the door to new forms of violence. Audrey Kurth Cronin. Thank you so much for joining us on American innovations. Thanks for having me so I WANNA start talking a little bit about your book which is power to the people how open technological. Innovation is arming. Tomorrow's terrorists how did you get into this project in the first place? Well I was looking at the relationship between the late nineteenth century and the current day and seeing a lot of parallels between the incredibly fast innovations that were occurring with technology. Then and also today so I wanted to write about a breakthrough technology. I wanted to write about game. Changers that surprise people especially technologies with great potential for good that can also be lethal and then there were two specific. Things that happened. I was reading a book that quoted Nobel Alfred Nobel arguing that is explosives would make war so terrible that it could never occur and then of course we went straight into world war one and the irony of that the horror of that really struck me and then on the same day. I just happened to be watching a youtube video of Mark Zuckerberg defending facebook. You know wish along with Youtube and twitter and other things like what's up has been used by terrorist groups like Isis in ways that are horrifying and just like Alfred Nobel Zuckerberg was struggling with the unintended consequences. So I saw kind of a direct line between the nineteenth century. Innovators and today's technology giants both of them created brilliant world inventions but they also sometimes fell short in thinking about how their creations could be misused. That's why I think you're just a perfect guest for us not only because we've just had this whole sequence about Nobel's life which we're going to get to but you know it's a big theme of this show that connecting past stories to the present day. That's a lot of what we do with these kind of interview segments. I think that's a really important property of your work. I mean how much given the technology does change so much. I mean it's almost the definition of technologies. It's constantly changing. How much can we draw on the lessons of the past to make sense of the present or near future innovations? That are coming. Well I would say a lot. More than we do not to say that there are exact parallels between the two eras in the eighteen hundreds and in the present but there are a lot of things that echo or that are common between them and we have a tendency to believe that everything we're experiencing today is completely unprecedented and that's not true so finding the balance between understanding the history and seeing how people dealt with new technologies in the past and then the things that we're facing today that's very important to me and frankly stephen that's one of the things. I love about your show because it does put things in context. Thank you very much. That's very nice. You say but there is so much news in the technology space and by definition is you know innovation is just constantly driving us to new places But you know there's a lot from the past where we have gone through similar patterns in a way right where we see for instance. In this case we see technologies designed for one purpose at ended up getting utilized in all these kinda surprising ways. Some of them not particularly positive ways That that's an endless pattern. The history of technology that people invent something for one reason and then other people use her for entirely different reasons so trying to be able to project forward in thinking about how these tools will get exploited. I think is a really important skill to have. And that's why your work. I think so valuable as well. So let's let's start. Let's talk a little bit about Nobel right so our listeners have just heard three episodes telling the story of Nobel's life and he's such a such a fascinating configure in this in this period on so many levels. I think what drew you to him. Oh you talked briefly about that. Famous quote of his which is kind of mutually assured destruction before the atomic age. In a way it was there anything else about his career that you found particularly fascinating. Oh Alfred Nobel is just a fabulous study inhumanity. His life was full of stark contradictions. He came from very humble origins where they were scraping to have enough to eat. But then at the same time. He became one of the most successful entrepreneurs and business people and inventors ever but he had a business that grew faster than any had any business had before but it also led to the first wave of modern terrorism which was horrifying and he was a really strange person and obsessive workaholic. Who's really private? But he was also multi-lingual he was a writer. He loved poetry and literature. I just wanted to figure out whether Nobel had regrets and remorse on the one hand but I also like everyone else admire the great legacy of the Nobel Prize that he left behind this. This was an unusual set of episodes for us because I actually wrote them. Normally we have other wonderful writers who come in and I just play the parts but but I but I wrote this because I was so fast it with novell to and it Kinda relates to another project that I'm working on as well and you know one of the things that we wrestled with a lot in the story was to what extent Nobel did take responsibility for both the initial kind of body count from his invention just from accidents. You know the first wave of NITROGLYCERIN. All these people were just accidentally blowing themselves up and then post the invention of dynamite. Once it got adopted by the terrorists how much Nobel kind of recognized that he was partly responsible for that and whether that weighed on him. Do you have a read on that? That's one of the hardest questions because I think he was very complicated in how he felt. I don't think it was clear. Remorse versus clear pride in his invention. I think it was ambivalence one of the things that people who have written biographies of him in the past argued is that the Nobel prizes came strictly out of his remorse and it's definitely true that he regretted the innocent people who died because of dynamite and other explosives but he also made a lot of money for more and he sold explosives other than dynamite. There were extremely useful to the military and extremely important particularly with the artillery of the first World War and killing hundreds of thousands of people. So you know. His remorse was only to a point. He believed he actually had developed something. That was a stabilizing factor. And he you know. He thought that his explosives were so horrible that they would make war impossible so there's both sides to his story and I I don't think anyone's ever going to completely resolve that the thing we really focused on in in our telling was the relationship with Bert of funds. Sutton are like that that she she seems to have really had the the the major influence in steering them towards the Nobel Prize and of course she ends up winning the fifth. One or something like that that. That's such a fascinating relationship to the two of them. Yes he was in love with her earlier in his life when she was hired to be secretary but she ran off and married the son of a noble Viennese family which is why her name was von Suttner but Nobel kept in touch with her over the years but even when he endowed the prizes he had a sceptical view of humanity a one version of his will stipulated that the Nobel prizes should end in thirty years because after that if the international system wasn't reformed that humanity would fall back into barbarism. And Wow for US looking back at the two world. Wars that followed. That's a chilling thing to say but anyway it's probably von sudden who suggested the piece price too.

Nobel Alfred Nobel Nobel Prize Audrey Kurth Cronin Alfred Nobel Zuckerberg Bartsch Youtube Washington Center for Security Innovation American University Mark Zuckerberg stephen facebook director novell Bert Sutton
"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

Of Consuming Interest

01:34 min | 6 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

"Website. Can <Speech_Female> people go <SpeakerChange> and get information <Speech_Female> about what you're doing <Speech_Female> project Gold <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Project Gold Dot <Speech_Female> Org Project <Speech_Female> Goal <Speech_Female> Gio? Al Dot <Speech_Female> Org. Yes <Speech_Female> okay wonderful. <Speech_Female> Oh I hope. People <Speech_Female> will take advantage <Speech_Female> of it to <Speech_Female> check and see what's <Speech_Female> going on <Speech_Female> the project <Speech_Female> dot org the <Speech_Female> project the <Speech_Female> project <Speech_Female> goal <Speech_Female> dot org. <Speech_Female> Gotcha okay <Speech_Female> that will do it. <Speech_Female> Well thank you so <Speech_Female> much for being here. It's very <Speech_Female> interesting. I always <Speech_Female> find it kind of fascinating. <Speech_Female> I did <Speech_Female> some research and <Speech_Female> reading on what had gone <Speech_Female> on at the show. I've <Speech_Female> never been to it <Speech_Female> but I've heard it's incredible <Speech_Female> so it <Speech_Female> just covers <Speech_Female> acres A. <Speech_Female> I don't <Speech_Female> know how you get around to see <Speech_Female> it all but you do a good <Speech_Female> job. Thank you so <Speech_Female> much Shirley. You've <Speech_Female> been listening to <Speech_Female> call for actions <Speech_Female> of consuming interest. <Speech_Female> My guest <Speech_Female> has been Deborah Berlin <Speech_Female> Executive Director <Speech_Female> of project <Speech_Female> goal. We've <Speech_Female> been talking about <Speech_Female> the future and technology. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Thank <Speech_Music_Female> you for joining us. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music>

"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

Of Consuming Interest

07:35 min | 6 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

"Oh that was one. Use of HAPTIC technology Bud another use of this haptic technology would be to potentially be able to virtually Put on virtual reality glasses And See something and then actually feel it so you could voice. You're right there exactly. Let's come back on that happy note. You're listening to of consuming interest. I'm surely rooker. My guest is Deborah Berlin. She is the Executive Director of project goal. In one of the things that they do is to Encourage and make seniors help seniors to become more comfortable using technology and I think that's such a worthwhile Pardon the PUN. But the goal that you have your. I think it stands for get older. A darkens adults online online. Yes I like that. All right so What you were talking about. Is this the sensing and feeling in some of the uses of this technologies? I'm sorry I had interrupt you right right. So we were talking about how it could be used for someone who didn't have site and be able to feel and just hover their hand over something and be able to Just manipulate their hand without seeing but actually have a sensation of touch and It's it's an amazing technology. You know how you could maybe use that. Haptic technology in different ways and I saw a Japanese company at at C. E. S. that was using haptic technology along with Augmented reality to combine the two for gaming purposes. But you know how we might combined these technologies and maybe figure out a way to enhance someone who's aging to enhance the sense of touch with augmented. This is the problem in the senior population particularly among our veterans. No matter what war they've been in they seem to have hearing issues. Absolute site diminishes. Yes even the sense of touch and smell yes. are diminished. And if any of those things could enhance that re- that Experience it would be useful. So yes and you know the number one issue for many in Who are in the aging come in community is isolation. Yes so the fact that you are isolated. You're away from family or in a in a in a sense you are in a social situation which diminishes your health in many ways and the depression that can capsule come about because of it absolutely so if there is technology that can help reduce that isolation if you can have technology that can bring you in a place where you are with family where you are with a social community that makes you feel better. That would be fabulous so right now. We do have video chat. We do have an opportunity to see family to see friends but if we could do it in a way where we had that sensation of actually being there. When you do something like skype. You're you're kind of you're not connected in a way you see you see when you hear them right exactly if you could actually put on virtual reality glasses makes you think you're there and be in the room with them and then perhaps have this haptic sensation of being able to touch and feel that would be a whole new experience to really help that sense of isolation very exciting. I mean every time you come back from the show the show. You always come back with some interesting. It's an idea it's really. This is an idea now. Now we don't have it on the floor of C. S. yet. But this is an idea that you know. I'm just thinking out of the bogs you can do it. What could be what would be so might have right well and and you know what all the great things come from. Somebody's idea debbie and there are holograms as well where we could. Maybe have one of our relatives appear in our home. So you know it's there's all sorts of different things at technology it is. It is an interesting world that we live in now. And it's amazing to me the things that have been developed but I do think the going back to our original what we were talking about in terms of the privacy. I do think people need to understand and have some control over what happens to this information. Absolutely whether or not you really want somebody to have it. And what do you do if they have it? And what are their responsibilities? So that's a big challenge though. That's a big big. It's a big challenge. We need you know we need the right policies Shirley we need to get that national privacy law so you know having having some the right policy in place would be a big help. Are The tech company's GonNa push back on this now. I think everybody is pushing forward. And once once this Nash. A national law. So I you know I think they know where they are and what kind of environment I think. I think we're we just needed to go homered. Well there are a lot of people would disagree with you saying we're working just fine as it is right now so I you know I don't know it's a it's an issue that Certainly deserves a lot of discussion. I don't know how I feel about it because I think I do. Pretty good job of controlling. What my privacy. But I'm not sure everybody does or I'm not sure everybody's aware of oh I would agree with that. I think they'll oh I think a lot of I think a lot of consumers need you know need more probably more information in regard. Yeah Yeah I think they're absolutely right. Well anything that you see other than that. We've just got a couple of minutes here on the horizon On the horizon. Well let's there's a lot a lot of traffic health stuff where that doctors can see him without seeing you in the office. Yes and I and I think is as far as that goes One thing that is very helpful is the the network that we have that all this runs on. We Another policy issue. But it's it's the five G. Network. That will soon all be running on as that. We need the the faster connections away though. I think it is coming. And it's starting to come and we need that faster network for all of this. Toronto which is critically as otherwise. It won't be able to do it. We really important for all the Health can the medical services the health connections etcetera to to make that all work really well for consumers particularly those in rural communities etc but there is some new technology on horizon that will help to deliver Internet access to underserved areas absolutely. Yeah yes but you know. It's all very exciting. We're living guarding. It's here it's it's coming in and so W what is your.

Executive Director of project Deborah Berlin depression skype Toronto debbie Shirley Nash G. Network
"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

Of Consuming Interest

15:26 min | 6 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

"Shirley Rooker well. Technology is moving forward. And there's no better place to see what's new in the tech world. Then go to the consumer electronics show which takes place every year in Las Vegas because first off. It's a huge crowd and so huge number of things there. Well one of the things we always enjoy doing is catching up with Debra Berlin. She has been going to this show for a number of years and she's back here to tell us what's going on. We're also going to share some of the concerns that come up because of technology. Deborah is the executive of project goal. And I'm going to let her debbie tell our listeners. What project goal really is. Oh thank you Shirley and it's great to be back to talk about this again. It's always enjoyable to have this opportunity to catch up on. What's new technology? So project goal focuses on aging and technology and what I work on is promoting the benefits of technology for the older community and there are a lot of benefits from what I gather. And we've talked about this in the past not only watches that you wear to keep track of what you're doing and doing your heartbeat and all kinds of stuff. So what? What do juicy. Now you said that one of the things we were talking before we started the program. You were saying that one of the largest sections one of the largest sections. There was devices devoted to health. Some of them are probably ready to go to market and some of them away out in the future but what were some of the things that caught your attention. One of the growing areas one of the growing marketplace's is the health area. The health devices the fitness devices and the wearables related to that which I think is of great interest to the older community. What we're seeing is the opportunity for us to monitor our wellbeing to connect to our doctors to connect to our fitness centers. Do Check on our well being on a regular basis and I think that's of great interest to everyone but particularly those who are aging and interested in staying fit now. I know that you've been focusing on helping to educate older citizens about technology for a number of years. Have you seen changes? Have you seen the The senior citizens adapting more technology and using it more is this changed in your opinion absolutely in fact there was John. We're going to give you all the credit. Thank you because there's a great can winstons here. That project will start about ten years ago and we've seen a tremendous growth in adoption in technology in the past decade but Aarp just did a survey that they released in early January and It showed that there has been great adoption by the older community with all the various different tech devices. And so there's survey they did a great breakdown in age groups so they didn't just say in the fifty five plus community. We've had great adoption. They broke down by different age categories and not surprisingly it shows that As the gap widens with age that we see a little bit of a drop and a drop the drop goes down greatly as seniors age. So you know. Your highest adoptions sixty to seventy and then it drops from seventy to eighty and eighty age eighty. An older of course is low. The least rate of adoption. But we're talking about all the tech devices the smartphones the tablets Home tech pro products like Security Systems thermostats smart appliances As well as home assistance and I think we'll talk some more about those data. We call the commonly called personal assistance. I your voices system Which are very popular with everyone right now but also very popular and very useful for the aging community. What we want to. I want to hone in on something. I think I'm going to just mention this very quickly. Okay One of the challenges of tech adoption for that This survey touched on when they did. It is that there's a concern with technology. And that is online privacy the privacy with using these various different devices so I think I wanna put a bookmark there and get back to that later. Yes I plan on talking about that. Because that's one of the things I hear about all these wonderful things and you're gonNa have this vice in your home. Cooked hooked up to the Internet and another devices soaked up to the Internet and a devices listening to everything you say. And they're they all hear you. I mean it's to me. It's getting a little bit crazy and I wondered consumers. Really realize what they're giving out about themselves that information's going. I'm not sure we all have answers to that. But actually why don't we talk about the privacy concerns right now and then we can move on to some of the other nifty? Little things on stuff because Let me tell you a story. I may have. I told you this. Before but A friend of mine had a listening as personal assistant device. Alexa in her house and she one day opened the door. There was delivery person there. It was a big box and it was twenty some bottles of hand lotion and she thought my goodness what is this. So she called Amazon is that I didn't order it and they said well you ordered it by Alexa. Why hate to tell you folks shouldn't have Alexina House anymore because obviously something she said triggered it and we've heard all kinds of stories about this happening. Is there any way that the technology can filter? I mean I I would not have a device in my house. It hurt me talking all the time because goodness knows what I'm going to say about people right. I'm being facetious. But truthfully it's a concern. Yes I surely. Your concern is one that is shared by all consumers and obviously the AARP survey backs that up significant concern. Who Do we do? We find this kind of concern in the younger generation who've really basically grown up with these devices absolutely I think there's absolute concern about what happens to our data. What happens to our information online? Everyone is concerned about it. And it's a concern across all of the platforms and so this is something that we need to resolve consumers need this protection and we need to Were we need a national privacy law? That's what we need. We Need National Privacy Law that offers consumers protection no matter what website they visit no matter what platform they're going to it needs to be across the entire ecosystem. So that's what we need and we need Congress to take that action. So that's that's that's a big thing. I know that some states are initiating privacy laws themselves but a patchwork of privacy laws is so difficult for businesses especially. Nah A national business. When you're online you don't know where you're doing business so I don't even know how you would adapt your business your online presence to deal with a consumer in a state that has a very stringent privacy law and you may be in a state. That doesn't have any where you're doing business so it's that is a major problem as far as I'm concerned and I'm always concerned about the health of our small businesses and I don't WanNa see it impacted on them. I think this would have to be something. That was carefully crafted so that it doesn't put our businesses at risk. Let's just take a brief pause here to let our listeners know that they're listening to have consuming interest. I'm Shirley Rooker my guest is Deborah Berlin. She's the executive director of project goal. She's also the founder and president of concern of the Consumer Policy Solutions. Which is the umbrella group under which you do project goal mine and that's okay. But at any rate we're focusing more on technology and seniors and we've just digressed a little bit into the area of privacy because I it's it is definitely a concern among the senior population. Absolutely absolutely. Well I I mean I don't know do you I don't know what's going to happen in terms of privacy but as I said my concern is that it not hamper the businesses ability to do business but to protect privacy all right. I'm more concerned not about what I buy online. But about the devices in my house that are collecting information about me. My family my conversations. I don't know who's collecting what you don't know when they're collecting it and certainly with these assistant devices. That are voice They use voice commands to to talk to them right. I'm considered recording it. I mean we do one of the things that I would see. Was THAT CONSUMERS. Have the ability to not have any information shared with anybody. If that's what they chose right so I'm concerned about two things. I'm concerned with one. Given consumers the strong protections they need to manage their own information data and too I'm concerned have those protections for consumers to have that confidence so that they don't abandon the aging community so that they don't abandon these wonderful technologies. That's really my concern as well because this is a an opportunity for them to find a a great advantage these technologies and if those as as that survey found if those online concerns stop them from using opioid from finding a smart appliance in their home and adopting that. I think that's a real loss as well So we have to define it depends on what you're using it for and how intrusive it really is and a lot of those devices are very intrusive but the bigger question to me is when data is collected. Do you have the right to go remove it. Do you have the right to know what's collected about you and that's putting a big burden on the business this doing the collecting so. I'm not adverse to that because if you can quite my information I want to know what it is. I'm not sure how we're ever going to get our hands around it. Debbie I tell you it just makes my mind spend spend when I think about it. I'm sure you can feel the same way. Yeah and and this is. These are the issues that the The congress is working on grappling with right now and I think they're doing a good job of of working on those issues and trying to resolve them and you know we know that it's a. It's a difficult time right now how to get to the end game. I think they can. I think that they'd be very interesting to hear from listeners. About they think about privacy You can always reach me at Shirley call for Action Dot Org so let me know. I'm very interested in hearing what what people think because to me. It's it's I feel like I'm being intruded on knowing that. Somebody's out there listening so I don't really have a lot of smart gadgets. I have a lot of device that I can turn on and off and I mean really turn them off. That's a big difference to me than some of them that are always on and the other issue too of course if your children have are using these devices that are connected to the Internet. But that's another story I've talked about. Let's go back and talk about some of the things that are making life easier for all of us and particularly some of the people in the older community Absolutely so Some of the things that I saw a obviously robotics are are huge at CIS that has grown from a very small space to a huge space in. Uc robotics everywhere. I think that we will See that kind of a slow warmth to that in the United States. They're much more popular in other areas of the world but The the use of robotics here in the US is is slowly growing in adopting that They're they're I saw a few. That were humorous. Can I say There there was a A display of robotics for the bathroom and one that I thought was very humorous but maybe one of the more useful ones was the toilet paper robot that could bring you a roll of toilet paper while you were were sitting on the John and I thought that was extremely useful but I. I don't know who would pay for something like that but it was. Well I've I've experienced the toilets where you walk into the facility and the toilet lid raises and it flushes for you and closes and sterilizes eaten. It does the whole thing I mean. It's like whoa right right. Yeah I think paying for something like that might be questionable but Here but on a more serious side what I think is going to be. Interesting in terms of technology is how we combine some of the new innovations that we have for example. The opportunity to combine virtual reality with a technology called ticks. Haptic what I've never heard of that. W just floored me. Okay so HAP- dicks on. I can't tell you exactly how it works. But if I'm sitting here and and I connect a device and a k with a connected haptic device that in a hold my hand over something that you on the other end I can actually feel what something that you are moving or you know I can feel something I can actually feel it in the air. So it's as if you're touching it but you aren't touching it. It's it's a feeling a sensation. What would this be used for? Would this be used for doctors to examine patients so One one example of how I have seen this used is for someone who can't see to use a remote control without.

Shirley Rooker Deborah Berlin Alexa United States Las Vegas Debra Berlin AARP executive founder and president Alexina House Aarp personal assistant Security Systems John Congress Amazon executive director
"new technology" Discussed on The Disruptors

The Disruptors

06:19 min | 6 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on The Disruptors

"Even excavating. Somebody's you know somebody's GonNa be digging holes from Waste Management So. Yeah people always need to be entertained. People always need to be educated. You can master any one of these disciplines. That doesn't require require you to chase. Every brand new little magpie shiny thing that comes up this year and I think that you'll have a competitive advantage for doing so because it feels feels like everybody else is doing the magpie thing and chasing every brand new shiny thing that comes along and your competitive advantage than to not is to not play their game. I I don't know if there's going to be a better way to start to end the interview. That's a great. That's a great spot to start to wrap things up I got. Do you want to ask me about the most most valuable advice I ever. Let's go for the most valuable advice. Either you give it or you can tell it well because I I'm glad the email that question because because it got me thinking about it and I ended up thinking about it for an hour or two because I don't know actually let me ask you one quick question before we do go for. You've asked that question to a lot of if your guests right Do they usually narrow it down to one thing. Some of them do some of them. Don't usually it's one two or a theme a lot often do though but people also like to answer so it's hard isn't if you had to narrow it down to one thing or two wouldn't it be so general as to be almost useless it would be unless you were speaking to a general audience. Okay because I thought about it for a while and I realized that there's not advice almost needs at target right. It's so Weirdo. Ask ME THE STUPIDEST NEW AGE question I've ever heard which he looked at me very seriously seriously. Instead I want to ask you a very serious question I said okay. And he hit record on his recorder and he said how do you love and I said well what is love what what a stupid question like it needs a target. How do I love nature? How do I love my kid? How do I love Miles Davis? What the fuck are you asking? Skin like. The verb that requires an object to its verminous. So I was thinking about this question about the most valuable advice ever received achieved as I will advice about what I mean. We can't just assume everybody just wants to make money or get famous so I wrote down a few for you ready. Let's do it. The the most valuable advice I ever received about investing is to set it and forget it can just rebalance five minutes year. When fidelity when analyzed all their client portfolios to see who's were performing the best and what they had in common at the end they found out the best performing fidelity customers were the people who forgot they had accounts there and so they hadn't even logged in in twenty years? Those were the best performing accounts outperformed the active managers by far most valuable. Sex Sex advice ever received was when the person you're with tells you exactly what feels good specifically and why best parenting advice have received received. Is that kids communicate by playing. You can't ask them a question and get a direct answer. Play is how they communicate. Best Marketing Advice I ever received. Is it marketing. Just means being considerate. Marketing doesn't mean blasting or spamming or advertising. Marketing is a business being considered. That's market them them. It's pretty similar to. It's very Sethi but but not just him. Actually Harry Beckwith Harry. Beckwith is the underrated predecessor. Mr Dissect go and if you can find Harry beckwith books like selling the invisible and he has about four or five of them fucking brilliant but almost nobody knows him best. Love advice have received. This is my first degree relationship. taught me how to be honest and not play games. Best programming advice was to learn the language not the framework to write code by hand hand. And don't repeat yourself best writing advice to right like you talk more succinctly best life choice advice is it changes good unless you're on the path of mastery if you're on the mastery path stick with it but any other time on thank you but otherwise changes good Whatever scares you go do it? Most valuable advice on taking compliments. A famous musician told me that people always come up to him after the show giving him a compliment and the best lesson lesson learned. Is You just say thank you. You never deny compliment because that's insulting. It's scary when somebody gets up to give you a compliment. It's vulnerable so if somebody gives you a compliment you just just say thank you and then you turn the subject back to them. Best advice ever received on romance is to be Meta considerate to let someone pursue sue. You aspire you and desire you. Don't put them on a pedestal. Because if you put somebody up on a pedestal. You're making them look down on you. Which is Meta inconsiderate? Best advice vice on hiring is to let your existing staff recommend their friends because people like working with people they like more than anything anyway. I wrote down a bunch of those red. Yeah we just got rid of. We don't need any TIM ferriss books anymore. That's pretty much all the best advice for everything asked me that question. That was really fun too. I Like I had a fun hour sitting there thinking about the different best advice I've ever received because the best advice you've ever received about sex is different than the investing advice. Hopefully I think that'd be a blog post on your site is it looks. Sounds like you've already done most of the grunt work for that one. Thanks for coming on today. Derek that this has been an interesting fund. One that's gone everywhere everywhere and I think going everywhere while also coming back to that having somewhere the specific minimal somewhere of mastery is very important for people especially for me to hear right now. So they're working people find you learn more about you and what you do. Well the reason I do these interviews is because I like the people that I meet when I do them so I always say like if you made it all the way to the end of this go to my website go to sievers dot org and I put my email address in a big font there and I actually replied to every email so introduce yourself else ask me anything. Send me an email through sievers dot org and just make sure it's not a question because it's always everything's a no. You got to remember what we talked about guys. Thanks for coming on today Derek. This has been done. Thank you and guys. Thanks for tuning in if you've enjoyed this disruptors.

Derek Harry Beckwith Harry Harry beckwith Beckwith Miles Davis TIM ferriss Sethi
"new technology" Discussed on The Disruptors

The Disruptors

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on The Disruptors

"Chitchat for a while and I was just like okay get to the point. What do you want and so finally after like forty five minutes I said okay? Look we've been trying to make the ultimate recommendation commendation engine and you know we've checked out the competition and whatever software. You're using their at CD. Baby just blows US away. My God your recommendations are the best in the industry you know. How were you doing this doing what they said? How are you recommending the customers? You get this music if they like that music and it's a bull I just listen listen to it. What do you mean I listened to everything that comes in? I keep some private notes and I with my memory and my notes. I say if you like this you'll like that. And they looked confused and they will. How will that scale? What have you start getting one hundred albums a day and a simple Donald? Hire another person to help me do this. What's the problem? They look so confused by answered. Sure enough. I did start getting one hundred albums day and pretty soon. It was to people's fulltime job to listen to everything that came in. Make private notes and recommend this music if you like this and that was it I never did spend millions programming some software. I spent thirty seconds paying. Some people still have the world's most powerful neural net ray in our heads and we just don't know how it works right. It is crazy and so many people on on this podcast. Don't think about that. Brought it up and then I see that with a lot of you know the. They've mentioned the customer service aspect. I because I do meet a lot of programmer nerds. I mean. I'm a programmer. Myself I love talking to my fellow programmers. But what's funny is when they started company they think that technology is the solution to everything and they're selling or even even be to be service matters so so much people choose one company over another based on a single thing like getting a human in reply instantly or somebody picking up the phone. These are the things that make people choose one company over another not the fact that you've gone server listener using in parallel functional programming on the back end. Nobody cares about that. You care but your customers don't so yeah I have a facebook. My accounts not working. I can't access it and there's no no absolutely no way. You can't even submit a customer service support if you can't log in because you're not logged in. Yeah it's that's a whole nother. Can Hannah worms. What What technology are trying to you most excited about? Why most excited about not? I just moved here from New Zealand. Held are your kids one kid okay when I was born. He's eight next month when he was born. I moved to New Zealand to be a full-time Dad for five years which I did because John Lennon did remember reading that story. That John Lennon's musician. Well apparently John Lennon had his first kid Julian at the height of Beatlemania and completely ignored him and he regretted it so when his second kid sean was born he said I'm going to take five years off. And he just told his agent. You know not everything. I'm I'm off the grid for five years and from seventy five to eighty. He was a fulltime dad and remember just seeing that in the eighties teenager thinking like if I ever have a kid. That's what I'm GonNa you do like if my wants my kids. Born like specially those first five years are really crucial. I'm just GonNa be fulltime Dad. So that's what I did. I he was born and we moved to New Zealand and it was mostly a fulltime dad for six years and we spent most of our time just outside in nature just playing in forests and beaches and climbing on the rocks and feet in the river hands in the mud. You know and it's funny that that was most of my life for the last. Six years was being out in nature which is timeless. This I'd be playing with my kid in the middle of nowhere with nothing and nobody around and the waves crashing on the rocks and the birds chirping in the trees and at the end of the day I would like turn on the computer again and I'd always I wouldn't bring my phone or anything. It's just me and him in nature just just being focused and at the end of the day he'd go to sleep. I'd turn on the computer and it would be like trump's this blockchain I just go now. This none of this is real like the to me. The real world is the physical cycle world and my kid and my life so I just turn it off again and things come and go. I'm not a geologist.

John Lennon New Zealand programmer sean facebook Donald trump geologist Julian
"new technology" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:33 min | 11 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Vu dot Edu if you can do that he can master their Masters Program. Okay back to Cindy guest you see how easy that is you too can become a data scientist a brilliant designer and blend them together to really make magic happen and no wizard hat require. I love it okay so molly but before we took a break here for Paul. I asked if you would be able to share with US US how you X. Research and Design Techniques have been leveraged and maybe share some specific situations with us would be great if you don't mind sure I'll paint the picture of one typical scenario and then how we've used you ex design research design and research methods to accomplish. It's the challenge presented to us so if you think about any type of lab situation a staff member may come in and learn about their work order for the day from one computer system they may move on to work with test tubes or a microscope or some some other physical device they may have to enter test results in to a computer and maybe reporting system that because it's been Kuwait and validated to meet regulations is rather immutable in in terms of changing the design and may not have any API application programming interfaces that allow us to connect electronically to get data so there's a challenge and if you're a designer but in to add another software component to the mix the last thing you WanNa do is make the system more complex here our research and again this is where data you get from research the humanist to actually look and communicate with the user and and then design all come together so if you think about it you want to look at the user and not only speak with them but observed them in their work environment. What are what are their distractions distractions? What are their habits have? Their habits been formed for great reasons meaning. They're so skilled inefficient that they've created taboo on the way they do something or is there has it created for not such a great reason because they had to do a workaround for an imperfect interface user task analysis that include who'd detailed identification of data flows is really important step to take and this type of analysis may extend beyond how the user interacts tracks with computer applications to take one step back. I want to emphasize that the one thing I've learned interested you like everything you weren't through through doing the work. That's really how you craft a lot of your design techniques and what I've learned is that it's great to incorporate takes Meeks from other design methodologies so obviously implementing suffered these human computer interaction but there's ergonomics of it does the user have to traverse from one end of the lab to the other to enter data. There's a cognitive psychology aspect of it think about it if a user has to move from one application into the other do they have to carry information between the applications in their mind and have we asked them to exceed the normal amount of information Asian they can keep in their head and that raises a potential not only mistakes but for people to be unhappy when they come to work doing the research and and then really documenting the detailed data flows is important set of steps to take to make a change on an interim basis that it's not only doesn't act complexity but how to reduce complexity in redundancy and then the one opportunity you designer house at this point in time is if you really documented the data flows in user scenarios. You've set the environment up to be ready to quickly feed into the requirements Kliment when the new like perfect system. I guess nothing's ever perfect but better system. can be put in place so one of the takeaways I'm hearing from from this when I look at it as a marketer Lauda. This is very interesting behind the scenes that I don't ever see as a marketer we look at obstacles. Stu Cole's to the communication obstacles to the yes and to the where we want to take a conversation and a narrative of and we talk about friction should marketing what gets in the way of the consumer the customer experience. How do we psycologically remove resistance so that the the customer the visitor the prospect experience is not stopped right so friction is is kind of a conversion Asian killer and marketing it creates a level of doubt and can stop us from achieving the action that we are looking to do would you you see user experience design as entering in from a marketer standpoint? How do I remove friction from the marketing communication communication from a website from an engagement? Is there an application there in marketing absolutely you know when you hand off from marketing into development is that role for the designer in between and what really great is over the years my class we as a foundational concept if we talked about personas and it used to be kind of strict division between marketing segment definition and you X. Personas but now they really overlapped and that really makes sense because you're focused on providing the best most competitive experience for the user. It's just different roles to play okay to do that but the exchange of data between those roles is key and the timing of the exchange of that data so for example on when he had a marketer may we know that in order to compete with another business the speed of turnaround for whatever the service the businesses providing key so they're already a stakeholder colder in the operational aspect of the business but then in the marketer can help prioritize which aspects of the system are addressed first so they know what the competitive landscape in there knowing which segments are their target that the ones that bring in the most revenue and what their priorities are so the challenges is to not only facilitate that communication in a way that can cross organizational teams but the timing of it. Ah If there's an ongoing conversation or the conversation with marketing what data and metrics they need out of the system on the back end before before the system is modified develop. That's really important because one of the biggest challenges I think everyone knows even consumers at home when you're working with applications is on your laptop trying to translate from one system to the other at the data element level frequently one of the greatest hurdles to making major improvements in the system just going from my phone my computer I get a text that I see it on my phone and I want to go to my laptop and it can be very a very challenging. We're going to be winding up here in just a few minutes and I have I think I have time for one more question and molly went. I'd like to do is toss us it over to you and say you know I've been asking all the questions. Is there something I didn't ask or address and would you like to share with our listening audience. As we wind up our short time together sure I mean the one thing I wanted to emphasize is that I think you exercise are always striving for the best experience and often that is newer technology but sometimes new technology is on the horizon and what we don't want to do and sometimes you see it often. We don't want to ask ask the user to wait a year or two with a really unbearable solution so what I'm advocating for is designing for the interim and take that opportunity you to put the extra effort into China and pave the way for the ultimate solution the other thing. I WanNa say that some of the more recent technologies that are not omnipresent yet ah really showing up is artificial intelligence and virtual reality. The latter is more expensive other than entertainment but for the workplaces really kind of expensive expensive to develop so it's not as common but I think those technologies are going to appear more and more and the thing is maybe the smart tool that helps bridge technologies without asking the use of do anything but if history is a predictor of the future in any way the introduction that technology analogy is going to be incremental and whenever you have incremental adoption of technology you have a hybrid solution and so again when you have a hybrid solution vision designed for the use of for the here now and hopefully you're going to be doing it systematically and methodically so that the future come sooner than you think it's very good advice we can't boil the ocean so start with a short term think for the long term and know that it's all going to evolve and technology's changing and were changing changing with it so thank you molly for your time today for joining us on our Wvu cast. I hope that I'll see you on campus Mr Online soon thank you so much have.

X. Research and Design Techniq Cindy Stu Cole scientist Paul molly Wvu Meeks Kuwait China
"new technology" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:11 min | 11 months ago

"new technology" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Time again for another episode of Wvu Marketing Communications today coming to you live for the campus of West Virginia University the University it's a syndicated show that's squarely at the intersection of data driven decision making and modern marketing practices with the Modern Gurus that somehow somehow make this magic seem easy. It's Cindy Greenglass or you. Have your wizard hat on today here. I noticed that the guru guys are you know you really for years and years marketing was what I grew up in the creative side of the equation here now it seems to be have swung the other way with the scientific analytical side of the the equation it's all measurement but it really is still blended the two isn't it well when I took the IMC program at West Virginia University and I'm you know I'm a data Geek and right and I had to take creative best practices and I said Gosh I'm not creative. I'M GONNA be terrible at this and I remember my instructor saying to me. remember member would Einstein said creativity is intelligence having fun. ooh I like that company. Is that what yeah so we're all creative just just in our own unique ways. I'm thrilled that today we have a really interesting speaker joining us to talk about creativity and you ax user experience platforms which again you might say as technology not necessarily creativity. This is going to be terrific. Our guest is going to be molly a Gilmore. She is a fellow colleague and Professor at West Virginia University. She teaches user experience platforms which which is something I know nothing about and is owner of blue jeans as your genes the genes wear media which is pretty cool a consulting business in New York City that focuses on user experience design and product development and I really need to take her class because I think this is pretty cool stuff. inter-business Molly Alec Combines her background in Science and engineering with her love of design so Paul like you said creativity now is a blend of sciences assists art and science. It's left brain right brain. It's a lot of different things and we're really fortunate. That molly is joining us in addition to her consulting her background background includes twenty years in software and product design companies like Microsoft intuit big big names. She's also had endeavors recently data mining applications visual design at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine we got a real smart person here with us and Molly does consulting on Three D. Modeling and animation and I'm just blown away by her credentials got a master's in bio and four matic a master's Susan Engineering and she has a BA in French so we got the Renaissance Woman Molly welcome to our show today. Hello Oh Cindy. Thank you so much for the introduction. I'm so happy you invited onto your program today. It's a pleasure to have you with us and we're going to spend over the next half half hour talking about you. Ex Design is the link between old and new technologies kind of at a start and before we go any further. Would you define you X. for us in your terms. What does it mean to you? And what should our listeners know about that term so that's a good place to start because you hear it everywhere and it's interpreted differently based upon the context the theme team that's consistent across domains has to do with focusing on the quality of the way a user user interacts with any product service interface and whether or not you're meeting the user needs and if you've considered more than just the usability the users emotional perspective safety of the user and on top of that for most designers you also considering the overall business goals so for a lot of people. It's fascinating because there's multiple things you need to consider multiple techniques so it's challenging but it's warning because if you can come up with a solution that not only addresses the user needs but ultimately facilitates the business the schools. You feel like you've done something positive. Wow that's a that is just fascinating that we're now bringing motion and so it's not just I I tracking anymore right the old fashioned you know heat mapping when you did websites and he did some you know I tracking and you thought you figured it out right yeah well. That's it but I think what I tracking doesn't give you at least yet. maybe with the introduction of a it'll start being able to derive more information from data elements that you gather measurements that you gather but it doesn't tell you why and if you think of the diversity of humans and their experiences I think it still comes back to understanding the human aspect of how a person responds to their environment whether it's software they're using at home or software. You're using in their workplace what they need to complete their goal typically doesn't include their opinions and their emotional needs so. Let's talk a little a bit about how you X. Now is being focused on designing for new products. You hear a lot of this with new product development that makes sense because we're entering into the new phase and you WanNa know how all of this holistically would be considered but how can you use you ex design and related to older technologies how you bringing the old and the new together okay. That's a great question so as a designer I'm frequently presented with challenges divvy lead to working with imperfect system and often one of the issues of these imperfect systems is a component of technology. That's older outdated dated or not connected and these situations typically occur when we're designing software for people that work within complex systems these people or users as as a designer terms them nature interact with a mix of technology both software and hardware as well as complete manual procedures as part of their overall workflow so if you think about healthcare life sciences manufacturing to me this is where this scenario typically occurs. Why do you think that this is really an an important topic for us to understand and discussed the blending of this new technology an old technology and linking user experience and design? Why should we care about this? I kind of think when you said for sure medicine engineering highly complex or tack nickel fields do we need to concern sooners with this in some of the non technical environments role sure so again in my current business I tend to work in these these other domains where there is complexity but as an individual think about it the complexity of the interface of the controls in your car the complexity of shopping for food when you have a phone in your hand someone's calling from work and you have a baby and the the basket I mean there's all types of ways where ear because of tight timeframe and budget we focus on a senior task but we don't look at the whole context and one of the themes throughout this discussion Shen is that you X. Designers I mean my background is suffered but frequently in coming up with solutions that are able to create a reasonable the bull environment for the user to do what they need to do. You're working both within software and with things that are not suffering related. I can give you more examples. Look as you mentioned some of the most identifiable solutions to occur with healthcare. I mean we've all heard statistics about the sometimes tragic impact of mistakes made in healthcare settings and the same thing holds true for other areas even manufacturing and one thing I wanted to point out is as we move to improve these situations or these systems through technology. We sometimes forget that we've asked the user to be the one that stitches together individual pieces of technology that are not yet compatible so how do businesses bring that technology up to date a how do they wrestle with legacy systems systems. They still need to maintain but bring up the technology. Maybe they don't even have the wherewithal to we know how to tackle it. I can understand you don't want the consumer or the audience to have to figure that out. Where do you start as a business us well so there's reasons why a business may not be able to upgrade their entire system? I mean there's the cost of the technology allergy and the cost to change operational procedures and then there's other times a responding to outside forces so for example I worked demanded facturing situations where there's Osha regulations put in place and the timeframes are immutable and very restrictive and so the business doesn't have time to upgrade the whole system so I think the theme of this conversation is this is a place where you X. Designers can play a role now traditionally another other disciplines you hear things like system engineering systems engineers may work to design the most intuitive and fast exit from on an airplane things like that but I think as we usually technology become omnipresent some of those techniques have evolved to be more applicable to all types types of environments again the businesses when they're going through any type of system upgrade the wall of a US designer can in help create positive and beneficial interim solutions as they work towards the more perfect. You know full system comprehensive a system implementation. That's in the future so we're going to take a break in a couple of minutes and I'd like you to think about this question molly so that when we come back back you might be able to address this for us. Share with us in our listeners some of the research and design techniques that you and your clients have been able to leverage in specific situations so maybe you can give us a a challenge that they were trying to overcome tom or or even if it was a new product that they're implementing that's kind of cool about the exiting getting on and off an airplane. I'm always fascinated by that. Southwest Airlines has the ABC. Every airline seems to have a slightly different way of doing it whether they do window I the I'll last I would assume that all of that like you said is part of engineering process and some level of of of scientific discovery. Let's take a look at in in in your world how you use that research plus design techniques and how it's been leveraged in a real world situation while you think about that we're gonNA pause for a minute and Paul's going to tell us a little bit more about Wvu right Paul you got it for those of you who are fascinated Ashdod by these conversations and WanNa hear more. There is a way that you can become a part of this whole program. It's West Virginia University's Online Data Marketing Communications nations program. I graduate program of its kind in the country they focus on strategic thinking critical problem solving and informed decision making in the kind of fascinating fascinating cutting edge subjects like we're talking about today..

Molly Alec West Virginia University Paul product development Wvu Marketing Communications Cindy Greenglass West Virginia University the U instructor Einstein New York City IMC Albert Einstein College of Med Microsoft Southwest Airlines Wvu Professor US Ashdod Online Data Marketing Communic
"new technology" Discussed on Beers with Talos

Beers with Talos

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"new technology" Discussed on Beers with Talos

"Fridge Ryan that drives me up the wall dot com thing I'm like I'm not I don't need a fresh because you know what else is going to break mental above the compressor the water dispenser you're right because those lines heine extremely small diameters and they will clock in a heartbeat a notch hard water. Yes absolutely drives while you gotta by the way gotta by the forty five dollar filter but house filtering system then you don't have to worry about it anywhere correct yeah next episode of New Technology while we're arguing about refrigerators. I've you know the Water Water Dispenser that you have on the outside of the door so you don't have to open your door. Yeah Makes Sense Right my water dispenser. My refrigerator is inside the door. So you have to open the door. What's dumb? You have to open to get the glass of well. Why would you not just a pitcher of water in the fridge? That drives me drives me. That's it's really poor. The let's I WANNA I WANNA move on from here. Real quick and I want to do that so with the with the J._p._l.. Attack when talking about being an A._T._p.. Right right yeah well. It's an anti P P. Yeah you know me weeding pilot yes. It's an automatic tweeting refrigerator frigerator the J._p._l.. The report described the attack as an A._p.. Class is advanced persistent threat. The attack went on undetected for nearly a year the NASA oh I G said and the investigation the instance ongoing so if they were on this pie and we're able to pivot onto other parts of the network for over a year there's going to be some stuff on the devices that they touched that are going to be useful from a threat hunting thing perspective well. It depends right. Here's the thing is it really nippy just because you didn't detect it for year doesn't make B._T.. Does it right and if you call it an A._B._C.. That kind of gets you off the hook a little direct as what I'm thinking here Brian you own something that doesn't mean that they that they were actively. You know their advanced persistent threat. This comes four months after abt ten was charged for <unk> hacking NASA the U._S. Navy and a bunch of cloud fighters. I think assumptions. They want you to draw the line there yeah that's the exam. That's exactly what Craig just said. I think every company gets compromised would love to try and find a way to connect it to an actor yeah because let's be honest. There's a funded group of adversaries targeting your network. They're probably going to get in Oh yeah. I think everyone acknowledges that like you have enough people working on the problem. Find someone who left the door unlocked right but the reality is that's usually not the case. I mean you know let's give NASA the benefit of the doubt it is NASA right. They literally do make rockets and cool stuff but for the majority of users I think the term is overloaded and overused much like the term zero day to the point where every anytime you see you've really got a question yep absolutely and you shouldn't need to write it but again you know people over us. These things are really what we said before used the term without knowing what it means Ryan on what the implications are. I don't think this is another one the whole thing and tell you very clear about what I said. Earlier like there is no indication in the report. That specifically says this was A._p.. Ten or any other specific threat actor right. I want to be very clear about that. You're saying it was a cover Europe..

NASA New Technology Europe Ryan Navy Brian Craig forty five dollar four months zero day
"new technology" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"new technology" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Stories of the future in which shoppers go in pick their products and exit all without interacting with a single human now other supermarkets are taking a page from amazon's book to find out more i'm joined by pardon me olsen in london so pardon me tell me a little bit about you're article and what you found out when you were looking at british supermarkets yeah so we found out a few a couple of months ago that tesco was trialing very similar to technology to amazon has been doing in the united states with their so called amazon go stores on end the way amazon has done it is they've got cameras in the store and sensors all around the shelves of the store it's a small store and people can walk in take something off the shelves and basically walk out and all the technology in the store tracks the products at sees when they've been taken off the shelf and you're paying through the app just because you're leaving the premises 'em and now there have been several retailers in europe who are basically picking up that same technique 'em fine tuning it a little bit tesco a in the uk which is one of the world's biggest supermarket and the biggest one here in britain on they claim that their technology is one tenth the cost of amazon's because i said amazon using sensors tesco only uses cameras how did that work if they're only using cameras surely it's easy to find a black hole where you can snag i don't know a free packet of how lutely absolutely end the the the people behind those who are kind of engineering this technology on its that's kind of their job is is really to make these image recognition systems is they're called a witch power these cameras able to detect even these very small movements movements which is if you pick up one candy bar versus two candy bars they're kind of the same shape inside if you have just to press together it might look like one on you could you could trick the system into thinking you're only taking one but the system is actually able able to detect if it is to were not so they're they're see there's the camera's hooked onto the ceiling of the story about a hundred and fifty cameras in there in tesco's trials store on the cameras don't look like normal surveillance cameras his ex he looked like a futuristic showerheads all those they're kind of these black discs with kind of a little lens in the middle and they're looking down at all the products andrew 'em you couldn't have two or three cameras looking at one product at the same time so it's kind of like triangulating the picture and that's how they're able to look in such detail exactly what people are picking up off the shelf wow so it's quite well photograph candy bar than what you're talking about absolutely and we were looking at one on a there was a company in france called care for and they're working with a start up on which also does image recognition i should've said earlier tesco is doing this with the technology and israeli technology startups up on in france 'em care for is working with a start up who's a image recognition software can reid labels so even from high up on the ceiling lincoln reid exactly what's on the label of a bottle of whiskey or 'em you know a bottle of diet pepsi see her whatever it is so not only can they detect what the product as they can reid what it says on the label to how long before this technology comes to the usda's what happens in britain something that's miles away years away yeah that's a great question and so actually retailers in the united states have been looking into this from what we've heard a kroger looked into it a walmart has also looked into it on walmart has this really big test store in new york where it tries out and you kind of technology that it might eventually rollout and all its other stores on ended is actually a working with cameras but it also installs up on on the ceiling of that store that can track products but it's only using that technology for inventory management and potentially for shoppers also just to know what's in stock and what's not in stock they're not using it to allow people to just walk out and pay 'em so there's a couple of different reasons for that upper why a retailers in america aren't doing the same thing art chasing amazon go in the way retailers in europe are on one is it stores in america are just so much bigger 'em end product recognition cameras is it recognized products on the software behind not it just takes enormous computing power you need these rocks of servers and you need them installed in the store on and that's very expensive to run on so there's that cost a benefit and then also 'em when i spoke to and analyst about this here a the market for groceries a grocery firms in america just isn't as competitive as it is here in the uk or in europe there's bigger regional players who tend to dominate whereas here in europe you tend to have it's a little bit more of a rigorous competitive market and so there's a bit more incentive to try new things to stay ahead my last question have you tried it out i haven't tried it out i'd be really interested to try to try this technology the demonstration that the tesco gave was pretty compelling when they showed it to investors it was literally a guy going down this while wiz candy bars hours and chip packets and he just took a couple of candy bars off the shelf put him in his back pocket and then just walked out and it's kind of interesting when you think about surveillance cameras and what they're there to do they're they're kind of stop people from.

amazon london olsen
"new technology" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"new technology" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"On right now from holograms and reflective displays two photon ick quantum computing. You'll also learn about the surprisingly wide range of technology. We need to develop to make driverless cars, as safe and reliable as we want them to be recorded this conversation live on the showroom floor CAS twenty nineteen the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and our guest is Owen laws. Mun the head of performance materials venture fund 'em ventures. His unit looks for forward thinking companies that make sense to partner with an invest in as they innovate and develop new technology, basically. Owens job is to figure out. What's the next big thing? And then help everyone worked together to actually make that thing happen. Pretty cool stuff, also cool is that Owen has a strong background is a chemist. If it sounds like there's a lot of science going on at his station. That's because there is so having a background in field like chemistry is pretty handy for this type of work as you're about to hear. We asked Owen about what kind of technology is they've invested in recently. And here's what he told us. Let's set aside some curiosity. I mean we've invested in companies from like holographic direct.

Owen Las Vegas Mun partner two photon
"new technology" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"new technology" Discussed on After The Fact

"From the pew charitable trusts. I'm Dan, Luke. And this is after the fact here's a question for you. What's made your life better? As you think about that. Let's make you think a little harder. What's the biggest improvement to life in America over the past fifty years? The Pew Research Center asked that open ended question and forty two percent of people answered technology technology, even outranked piece as in the end of wars. In fact, the next closest category of answers was health and medical advances. And only fourteen percent of people mentioned that clearly Americans like technology that forty two percent is our data point for this episode. So to wrap up this year, we're going to look to the future and talk about the promise and the peril of technology. or is he knows a lot about the brave new world of technology from artificial intelligence to advances in neuro technology. She's the former director of the defense advanced research projects agency, you've probably heard that by its acronym. Darpa it develops technology to enhance national security. She's a board member of the P research center, and after her government service. She's back working in Silicon Valley and joins us from Palo Alto. California are the thanks for being with us. It's great to be here. So we began by noting that foreign ten Americans are crediting technology with improving life most in the last fifty years. How do you see the change is going on in the world today in this broad range of digital information? The information revolution how it's led to. All sorts of changes and big data, and and and artificial intelligence, where are we as a society these days with all of these changes coming at us. Those are some of the big visible changes that are happening around us today. And I think they're so pervasive. They affect so many different parts of our lives. Our work lives the way, we interact even among ourselves as families and societies are personalized entertainment. So I think it's very easy to see lots of changes happening simultaneously. But I would add today when we say technology, we often just think information technology, but of course, technology continues to advance and many other domains as well and often it's because we can leverage information technology to make advances for example in areas like biology that are now I think moving in some extremely interesting new directions as well. I think we're in a period because. Ause technology change builds on everything that's come before. I think we all have a sense of acceleration. And that the world around us is changing in many dimensions. But at a pace that we haven't really seen before some of the things that we see in headlines today like driverless cars were fanciful even only a decade ago. And it seems like people seem to think that robots are going to just sort of take over the world, and people are worried about jobs and a lot of other concerns what is actually happening with that technology now, and how should we view sort of robotic technology its impact in the workplace, and where things are going. We're living in a time in which a set of technologies and artificial intelligence are advancing at a pace. That's startling. You know to me, this is just the current wave of something we've seen over and over and over again with technology, which is new capabilities emerge from research, and they. Daf'al with their possibilities. But they also bring with them some really thorny challenges. And and you know, that's really ultimately the most interesting question to me is how are we going to navigate through these questions that we face? So that we get the benefits of technology without suffering too much of the pain that comes with it. And so today, if you think about artificial intelligence, we all sorta got used to the old version of artificial intelligence, which was really just about capturing a bunch of rules. So that computers could follow these rules. You know, if you use turbo tax file your taxes. That's essentially what you've got. Then we don't even call that artificial intelligence anymore because this new generation is about machines being able to learn patterns in all kinds of interesting data. So every day were we see another example of machine that's better than humans at classifying images or doing other tasks that you know, until very recently, we thought only humans could do those things and and. I think when that happens I there are huge possibilities and new opportunities that open to do tasks that aren't that interesting. But to do them now using machines and to make people much more productive and to give us access to information and understanding that we haven't had before something all of that is fantastic. As history shows that also means sometimes that it's going to change the nature of work in ways that might ultimately be very good and very much more productive. But it's very challenging for the people for who you know, who's immediate jobs are being threatened. And so I think those issues are very much on everyone's mind today as they should be. And then Finally, I think the other thing that happens when you're in a time of huge technological progresses. I think we just naturally have a tendency to just extrapolate any magin that if machines are going to get this much better this quickly in areas like machine learning that Shirley, they're just gonna keep getting better and better and just have phenomenal. Sort of superpowers. And I think we need to be really careful about over extrapolating because these are technologies that have power, but also limitations and they're not magic pixie dust. And so I think we also just need to rein in a little bit on extrapolating out beyond where the technology actually is. We're talking so much about all the technological advances. And it happened so fast that there's probably stuff going on people's lives as in when even think about the advancement anymore. Right. It's just become commonplace to them that actually happens to me all the time. I remember the first time I was searching for something that I thought was really obscure and Google auto completed it, and I mean, it was really Erie. It was creepy. Right. And then the second or third time. I was like, oh that's interesting about the fourth time. I found I was expecting it to auto complete and I was sort of disappointed when it did not complete. I that's how quickly these these new technologies seep into our day-to-day lives. And I think a lot of people have a tendency to think about machines. Ticky over tasks, certainly we've seen it production lines. And that of course threatens jobs, but actually isn't technology a lot of the most important advances in technology happening at at a much higher level like in the sciences, like radiology and places where that may not be first of mind when we're thinking about the change that could becoming I think a lot of the conversation tends to be about human versus machine. And where I think the biggest possibilities usually are lie with humans using machines in in in ways that allow us to do things that we couldn't do by ourselves. But the machines can't do by themselves either. And I think that's where a lot of really creative. New frontiers are going to be I think we're at a chunk show right now in our progress in science and technology in which we are starting to be able to apply the scientific method to systems that are so complex that until recently. We just didn't think we could make much progress on them and the. The reason for that is because of our ability to analyze data that's been around for a while our ability to generate new kinds of data that haven't been around before our ability to build with our computers, very complex models to form new hypotheses to do kind of experiments, and that's a very general new capability, and so what kind of complex systems are we talking about? Well, one of the areas is about the complexity of biology, if you think about what's happening inside the human brain with over eighty billion neurons, or if you think about what's happening inside of everyone of our cells all the metabolic pathways in the signaling pathways and the chemistry. That's going on at any moment in time. Those are very very complex systems, and this is one area where we're starting to see significant advances. Whether it's understanding how the brain works in deeper ways than we've had before. And starting now to have not just neuroscience understanding, but. Technology that allows us to repair brain function. When it's as simple as losing the ability to control an arm, for example, because of an injury in recent years we've seen research in which individuals have had small implants placed on their brains on their motor cortex on their sensory cortex. And amazingly now we can pick up those tiny electrical signals, and in that moment translate what the brain is signaling and translate that into the instructions to drive a mechanical arm. And so what that means is that some of these early examples individuals are able to think and simply with their thoughts move a mechanical arm, and we know how to do it backwards to. So when that mechanical hand touches something we can figure out what signals to fire from that sensor in the fingertips. So that the brain receives information Lou away. We do with our natural fingers, and these are sort of amazing early examples of something that I think is not tomorrow. But down the road, we can start to see that the understanding we have of the brain's functioning and our ability to interact with the brain and new ways it opens a huge number of new possibilities. And with us will come again in a whole new set of challenges. Let's put some data to that. Because we do that a lot in this podcast. The Pew Research Center asked people about their worry and enthusiasm about things like human enhancements that includes gene editing to give babies reduced risk of disease or maybe a brain ship that actually allows you to have improved cognitive abilities. And each one of those instances the public is like two thirds were worried that something could go wrong that they'd had some concerns about those enhancements. What's the role of the scientists in in all of this to make sure that the technology is an advances are used properly during my time as director of? Darpa we wrestled with these kinds of questions all the time. Because in that agency. Of course, our mission was to pursue breakthrough. Technologies for national security biology was an area that often presented us with these kinds of confounding questions about the same technologies that would help a wounded warrior be able to to use a prosthetic limb with near natural control by just thinking about that is the same technology that can open the door to things that are not just the restoration of function, but enhancing function and quite routinely. We were asking ourselves will what is the best direction for the next research program? Of course, we wanted to try to see where the most powerful technologies were. But we felt that it was also an integral part of our job to engage with people who were thinking about broader ethical and societal questions to try to learn from how people have implemented previous, medical and biological technologies. And. Think there's often a lot to be learned from history and take all of those notions into account as we charted our course again, we were just doing the research. But we knew that even there there were choices that were important for us to think through we've also talked about the sort of just pure exponential speed at which the technological advances have come at us and the ability to absorb vast amounts of data so fast. Are you Optimus tick that these sort of value driven questions the ethical questions? We've just been discussing can move at that exponential speed or catch up to where the technology is that I think that is the challenge, and of course, technological capability moves at the pace of research and the pace of markets and those can move pretty fast. Making decisions about how we're going to use these technologies. Whether it's a formal decision through a law or regulation or the emergence of norms. There many ways that we do that. But, you know, inherently those are consensus processes that are a reaction to the capability of technology. And while I firmly believe we can do better and be be more adaptable, for example, in the way that we establish our regulations and be more -ticipant, Tori of where technology's going. I think we have room for improvement. But I think it's just important to recognize that inherently these societal choices about how we're going to use the technology. They're not gonna just move. They're not really as simple and straightforward as what comes out of research or building businesses. So sort of the same human questions, we've been wrestling with for millennia are still with us, even as we've made all of these other mazing strides that is. The interesting Kloner, isn't it? Thanks so much for spending time with us today. We look forward to talking to you again. Thanks so much for the chance to talk about these issues. You can read the Pew Research Center survey on what Americans believe is the biggest improvement in their lives on our website pewtrust dot org slash after. The fact you can also go there to watch a talk by our Z provoker at the espionage ideas festival about emerging technologies. Happy new year everybody we hope you'll join us a lot in the new year. For the future trusts, undone loop, and this is after the fact.

Pew Research Center director America California P research center Google Palo Alto Silicon Valley motor cortex Shirley Lou Erie forty two percent fifty years fourteen percent
"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"Consistently than absorption refrigerators regardless of the outside ambient temperature because of that more powerful compressor motor that they have. So most compression refrigerators also have freezers because of that motor, they work very well in uneven terrain, and for those of us who like to boondock, we often find that most compressor refrigerators will operate just as well, regardless of being flat or on an incline, and they're built with a twelve volt power system in mind, which means. They run very efficiently and battery power compared to the absorption refrigerators. So so that's our advice if I don't know how old of unit you are going to be buying. But if if it's if it's relatively new, it's probably a compression refrigerator, and you don't have to worry about those warnings that you heard about having to be perfectly level. But the refrigerator is very important, very important. Yep. We're gonna go Packers. Packing as we co-ord- this. Yeah, we're, we're doing this episode of course from the RV hall of fame in Elkhart Indiana, but we packed it before we. We got here and we gotta make sure we've eaten some of our meals from it. We all make sure that we have repacked. It was some more stuff. That's a nice thing about travelling than RV's having that refrigerator, right? Stop by grocery store or a farmer's, you know, front yard produce. Damn, Yep. And you get your own. Alright, hey, those are questions. And you know what we really like is we like to have your voicemail. We'll inlands or Email like this every every month or so. We try to get into the Email, but it's your voice. We'd like to participate. Have you participate by asking the questions and by doing our Lee voicemail segment, here's how it works. Part of the podcast. Ask a question Lee.

Lee Elkhart Indiana twelve volt
"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"Ask you, I read someplace, didn't we Jennifer, that employment unemployment here is basically in Elkhart is basically zero and that they're looking for almost ten thousand people that come to work here is that is that an accurate where I think the actual is about two point, one percent that's I guess, in the region. But yeah, but you know, I think there's five percent of the people that don't wanna work anyway. So once you get under five percent, I think you're pretty much at full capacity. But yeah, there there are a number of tech centers in town that are also training right now like welders and and people like that to work in the factories and and in conjunction with the manufacturers. They're going back to the high schools. Like when I was in school, I haven't told you my age when I was in high school, we used to have machine shop and auto shop. Things, things like that would would shop and they've kind of got away from that. Now they're going back to it to teach because college is not for everybody. So they're trying to teach these young people coming out at high school, the skills that they need to work in in the factories. Well, it is a BoomTown. It is BoomTown, and because of the RV industry there'll Sarah, thank you for making us feel welcome here at the RV hall of fame and we can't wait to start taking video and okay show could add one more thing about the museum though. Yeah, plead, I didn't mention we. We have a number of famous units in there, not just old units, but going back into the thirties when Mae west used to work in vaudeville and paramount studios wanted her to get into to the movies. They made a motorhome dressing room for her so she could go on the site and and kind of have her own little space there. So that's in our museum. And we have. See who's the guy that flew the spirit of St. Louis. Charles Lindbergh's personal unit is in here as well, and and so it's it's not just old RV's it in the road that you wonder through. Kind of takes you up from nineteen thirteen up to the nineteen eighty five's. And then we have a section that's gorving they have five thousand square feet. It's new RV so you can see the old and the new in the same place. We can't wait to cut and save. This is finished recording this podcast. We're out there. There'll thank you so much for being our guest. Okay. You're welcome to spend my pleasure. All right. We have much much more for you including a look at some really neat new technology that was introduced at the show by road track. We'll have interview and a report on that and much more. But I, let's check out the news of the week. Mike, Scott news RV views the information at trans that shape the lifestyle. Usually the RV use of the week and other sad story of someone dying at a national landmark while taking a selfie made the news last week, this time, the location was Michigan's pictured rocks, national lakeshore, the victim, a California woman who was solo, hiking the north country trail and pause to take a selfie on a two hundred foot cliff. Overlooking lake superior. The woman apparently slipped fell into the lake and died to kayakers witness the accident and brought her to shore, but she was dead at the scene. So sad or we, we've been there north country shore rate at that spot and it's a long, long way down. And we've seen it other places people to take. Cking terrible chances all for a selfie. Yeah, scary stuff. Yeah. Because when you're taking a selfie, you're not thinking about your feet. No. Then you're trying to get that background just right. Oh, I it very sad. Very sad. Hey, we've been reporting for some time about the maintenance backlog in our national parks because of shortages in the federal budget. But a story I saw last week was the first I have read of towns near popular tourist destinations, taking local tax dollars that would normally fund roads, police or fire, and instead giving it to the federal government to pay for federal land expenses. Well, the story focused on Vail Colorado, which is setting aside one hundred twenty thousand dollars to pay US forest service employees to monitor federal trails and campgrounds and discussed several other cities throughout the country who are also taking the local. Payer money and want to pay for federal Landcare. So kind of everybody chipping in helping out with that. That's good deal..

Mae west BoomTown federal government Vail Colorado RV hall Charles Lindbergh Jennifer lake superior Elkhart paramount studios Michigan St. Louis Sarah Mike California Scott five percent one hundred twenty thousand do two hundred foot one percent
"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"new technology" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"The products that. Will be on their showrooms in spring and summer. I would estimate that in the in the four days that the show's going on here that there will be close to four billion dollars written four billion. Wow, that's between all the manufacturers and so forth. It gives us a sense of what mine if manufacturers are here in the Elkhart area. I wait. You have. I know you can't aim all of them, but they say it's eighty percent. Eighty percent of the Tony production is built within about seventy five miles away. You're sitting right now and and but the manufacturers would be winnebago that bought grand-design. So they're even though their main factory for motorhomes is in is in four city Iowa. They have grand design, here's Nate here cart. And then you have. Of course, you have all Thors different brand names, which I won't go through and then forced river among some those Jayco Jayco. Yes, some right. Yep. Airstream was one of their initial purchases and then Jayco was one of the last purchase now road track and Heimer and yeah, that's all right. They're all here. And so there's an lots of smaller upstarts now and I guess that's what made Elkhart the Rb capital of the world. It started here. And then as a grew from back in the really back in the fifties. People would branch off from one manufacturer and start up, and there was plenty of labor, plenty of raw materials with you yet Detroit to the northeast, and you had Chicago to the west and Indianapolis to the south. And so they're the materials were here to build automobiles and other other things. So that's kind of how the RV industry started here. And a lot of Amish workers here. Amish workers, they had farms with with Barnes and chicken coops and places in a lot of them started. They're just like Jayco the we now have a book in the library of the fifty year history of Jayco and it's amazing when you look at the the first picture of the Jayco factory as a barn and chicken coop and the old farmhouse. Yeah. Yeah, it's amazing it. It is. Let's I with the RV what who was for started who started here? Actually the very first would have been shocked and Wilbur Shulte ended up the back in nineteen thirty five. Built the first travel trailer, but they didn't call it a travel trailer. They called it a mobile home and show never built for peace. They, they ended up going into the manufactured housing or mobile home industry back then it was called and so they were I and and and then from there, it was probably skyline would have been one of the one of the very first is well, we looking at some of the pictures on the walls here. Now we mentioned that the the open house is not open to the public, but this is a place that the public should come and they should come for this place that we happen to be sitting in right now, the RV hall of fame tell us about this place how it came to be and what people can see when they're here. Well, this actually started back in nineteen seventy two as a as a hall of fame in a couple of dealers garage. He's really and. And they started inducting people and honoring the founders at that time of the industry. And and then in eighty five, they built a building downtown Elkhart and they were in that building from an an and that expanded to a library and a small museum with just a few RV's in it. And then from from there, they did a campaign to raise the money to build this place which opened in two thousand seven. So that would have been what about twenty years, but twenty years later than where started in downtown Elkhart this big building and how many exhibits do you have? Well, we have roughly sixty ABS exhibits. It starts out in nineteen thirteen with a nineteen thirteen model t. convertible and it's authentic and original pulling. In a nineteen thirteen URL travel trailer thought to be the first travel trailer built in a production factory in California. In fact, I believe it's in the world. Guinness Book records..

Jayco winnebago Elkhart Airstream Nate Iowa Wilbur Shulte Thors Indianapolis Heimer Chicago Barnes Detroit California twenty years four billion dollars Eighty percent eighty percent